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The herald. (New Orleans, La.) 1905-1953, September 22, 1921, Image 1

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14 PAcES THE HERALD.
Devoted to the UpbIlldbg of the W est Side of the River. "A very die and creditable weekly newspaper." -MANUFACITURERS' RECORD.
Vol. XXIX ALGIERS, LOUISIANA, THURSDAY, September 22, 1921. No. 20
,~~~~~~~~· ··fm -I __. . . . '- .. . . . .
WIjj NEW ORLEANS SACRIFICE BUSINESS
THAT WILL NET MORE THAN $10,000 A
MONTH AT A COST OF ABOUT $130,000
FERRY COMPANY TAKES IN MORE THAN $650 A DAY, OR
$240,000 A YEAR-ALGIERS PEOPLE
PAY THIS TAX.
Herald's Contention of Free Ferriage Possible, According to City
Engineer Klorer.
The Algier, ferry committee held an important meecting Friday
morning with the New Orleans Commission Council to take up again
.the important matter of municipal ownership of our ferries. All of
tb councilmen \were present except Commissioner Black. The fol
41 members of the Algiers committee were present: Messrs
jr S. Lawton, J. R. Norman. August Schabel. Charles Donner and
C. V. Iaft. All of the members of the Algiers Committee made
talks before the Commission Council giving the main reasons why
city should take over the operation of the ferries. It was shown
i6gures presented through Mr. Maloney's census of the monthly
,t ues of the ferries that they were taking in more than $650 per
It was also pointed out that with the interest charge on the
neoy invested for the fifteen years and the monthly revenue, that
the ferries would produce a revenue for the city of more than $Io,ooo
a month. These figures astounded the many spectators at the meet
'"ig and it is very evident that something will be done to give the
maded relief to the Algiers people who are being enormously taxed
on freight and passengers to cross this natural highway.
COULD CARRY PASSENGERS FREE.
Mr. John Klorer, the City Engineer, made the statement which
;corroborated fully the opinion of the Herald for the past seven or
eight years, that passengers could be transported free of charge with
 present revenue now maintaining at the Canal St. ferries. It had
been stated that the Herald was absurd in its continued hobby
, slogan of free ferriage for the Algiers people, but City Engineer
'lorer s statement corroborated our slogan that free ferriage for
passengers is possible, under the present rates.
Commissioner Murphy was of the opinion that bonds for the
jLry franchise could not be sold because it did not carry a tax, but
nose present were of the opinion that banks would be glad to carry I
dle city for $15o,ooo, the amount necessary to purchase this industry,
.which brings in a net profit of more than $Io,ooo per month.
Mr. Moloney, Commissioner of Public Utilities, under whose
irectiaon a census of the ferry's company's receipts were taken for
month, shows as follows:
FROM JUNE 8TH TO JULY 6TH, 1921.
513 Foot passengers @ 3c average ............................$ 9,795.39
,2to3 Animals @ Ioc __ 210.30
4.og6 Single wagons @ i6c average ................ 655.66
S,154 Double wagons @ 4oc - ...................... - ............. - 461.6o
2. Floats @ 8oc_ ... --. -..-... 18.40
s,6a Two passenger autos @ 2C ...... ............... ........... -..... 412.40
9,680 Five passenger autos @ 30c ..-................ ....-... ......... 2,904.00
4,649 Seven passenger autos @ 5oc .-.........-.................... . 2,324.50
41,97 Trucks @ 6oc ............................. -... -.... ......................... . - 2,518.20
Total for month .....-....- ......-.. ....................... $193oo.45
TWO MILLION DOLLARS CUT FROM FARES.
.IMr. Peter S. Lawton who has made a very exhaustive study of
and conditions of the ferry company and especially of
operating at Canal St., made a statement the other day that
po positive that two million dollars could be cut off the fares in
years and the ferry company still enjoy a sufficient profit to
agood interest on the investment.
WHAT IS THE PROPERTY WORTH.
Southern Improvement and Ferry Company paid for the boats,
.ferry houses, in fact all of the physical property which they
lave, $o09,ooo. This was fifteen years ago, and during this time
¢ ferry houses, the values of which were in the neighborhood of
tato0 Were destroyed and there have been fifteen years of deprecia
tion on this property. According to expert accountants and auditors
I peiissable to charge off a certain amount each year for deprecia
ih So it is readily seen that even with the great advance in prices in
erial the present physical property of the ferry company is worth
hael $t3o,ooo. This amount allows them Sas,ooo more than they paid
Ipreperty fifteen years ago with the loss of two ferry houses and
m years depreciation.
th city in taking over this property woqld not, in our opinion
hIe to pay more than $130gpoo as a fair value and this small invest
a* r would net the city at the present rate of ferriage $o,ooo a month.
Amy bank or monied institution would be glad to offer all their monies
an securities of this kind.
SThe Algiers people should take a great interest in this matter which
~ _r drawing to a close. A modern ferry service at reasonable prices
I-iig. rsuccaess for us from a commercial standpoint. The present
is a barrier which has kept industries away from this section.
SThe passengers on the ferries should no more be taxed for crossing
"Misissippi River than the people in the city should be taxed to cross
SSt. John, the Old Basin, other water ways and bridges which the
maintains and operates for the benefit of the public. Our ferries
be a free bridge for the people crossing this nat6ral water way.
If you have any fight in you for Algiers, tialk municipal ownership
bd as   wlan every dqy until such times as we get the relief we are
Woumded Veteramn Leamrn Farnming
;2~·A x
SL.s'*~+'
'IIILO-~Y~lj~ i ·ra ih~-~r i~1~ ormhmtn .
WHATS THE DIFFERENCE - WE'RE GONNA GET STUCK EITHER WAY
I SAY THIS.ONE I5 YiE
BESI' ONE K'US
try'I'
easy oSs ]
S9
Knights of Columbus 0
Elects Officers
At the regular semi-monthly meet
ing of Santa Maria Council No. 1724, "
Knights of Columbus, Peter E. Muntz P'
was re-elected grand knight for the hi
third successive term.
Other officers elected were: \\'al- to
ter T. Ryan, deputy grand knight; it
Aubrey Galennie, chancellor; Jos- ti
eph P. Skelly, financial secretary; li1
John A. Bardett, Jr., recorder; G. A.
Lyncker, treasurer; F. O. Lyncker, it
warden; James L. Hogan, advocate: rF
A. B. Ryan. Inner guard; John M. hi
Nolan, outer guard; R. E. J. Quinn. pl
B. Zerangue and Owen Lindquist. ai
trustees for three, two and one year b,
terms, respectively, Benjamin Borne N
and John A. Barrett. Jr., were elected U
as alternates to the next annual con
vention of the state council, the dele- tl
gates being the grand knight and a 0
passed grand knight. P
As you glance through the above k
list you will no doubt come to the I
conclusion that the members pres
ent at the election showed their wis- P
dom by picking the present set of S
officers to handle council affairs for ti
the coming year. We know the rec- tl
ord they made and the wonderful s
work they have done during the year
just drawing to a close, all real Santa t4
Mariane full of pep and setting a
mark for all other councils to fol- o
low. .
A demonstration of hand clapping
and cheering lasting about five min- ti
utes was given Grand Knight Peter h
E. Muntz, when his name was men- a
tioned to succeed himself, showing
the popularity of our Grand Knight.
under whose leadership we have come
to be one of the livest and most pro
gressive councils in our order. Pete
responded with a nice little talk and
promised to do even bigger things u
in the months to come. Go to it d
Pete. we are all with you. A like S
demonstration was given to all the c'
other officers on down the line, ac
cordingly as their names were pro- S
posed 'tfor their respective offices, a
showing the high esteem in which s1
they were held. Let's go now boys. a
and make this the biggest year Santa u
Maria ever had.
SURPRISE PARTY S
A surprise party was tendered Mr. g
Joseph Poise on Thursday night at t
the home of Mr. and Mrs. E. PoIse in
Elmira avenue. Dainty refreshments
were served in abundance and danc
ing indulged in. Those participating
were: the Misses Annie Elston, Inez
and Stella Bourgeois, Laura Mendoza,
Pearl and Jennie Lottenger, Emily
Choate, Rose Babin, Adeline Bloom. n
Irene Trahan, Loretta Becnel. Oneida d
Bruney, Odessa Babin; Messrs. Berk-. a
man Church, Sherald Martin, Alvin r
and Jas. Robichaux, H. McCall, Clevin
Mandoza, Lawrence Menge, Mr. and f
Mrs. C. Chauvin, Mr. and Mrs. W. c
Mendoza. Mrs. H. Barrilleaux, Mr. and I
Mrs. E. Daupean, Mr. and Mts. E. (
Polse and many others. d
JELLY BEAN SOCIAL CLUB.
The Jelly Bean Social Club met
at the home of Misses Lilitan and
Ethel Hilderbrand, Thursday night.
Dancing was indulged in and refresh
ments were served in abundanie.
Those participating were the Misses
Ethel and Lillian Helderbrand, Una
Johnson, %Cleo Wheatley. Estella
Thates, Lillian Hunn, Alice Kramme.
Messrs. Chas. Puckett, George Mat
ulich, Chas. Hildebrand, O. Brien
Clark, John Hunn, Charles Christen
son, Edward MoMahon, Misses Car
rle and Rita and Mildred Hilderbrand.
91 ,and Mrs, C. Hlderbrand and
many others.
OPERATING CAR WITHOUT
IUCEREB.
Henry Bernard, chaffeur, charged
with operating an automobile with
am improper license plate was ar
rested at the corner of Verret and
Homer streets, by Motorcycle Patrol
man Joseph Vitari. Bernard was
parolJes br Captala James Crippe to
appear before the traffie court.
PLAMaGDWWID Nm .
Mie mIa Gos sccompanited a
larpge cmre ed AlMs ehldren to
Audabom Park, Saturday evening.
Those wlinning the races were Miss
ft. ,es Mis Maur awlew
at m Ipme a the 100-pE. se
DO YOU KNOW h
MR. AND MRS.
What wonderful thought. come up
when these itwo abbre-'iations are ta
printed in a news item-what intens'I th
human interest these portray. !d
In the home weekly. paper, they Ai
take the one big place in all news se
items, from the simple visit to rela- di
tives, to the larger matters of human
life. tb
¶Mr. and tMrs."--the pgreat news in
item of the universe, the bringer of K
recollections to the ýnan far from T]
home. who takes his old home town b]
paper, and reads the items of MIr. tr
and Mrs. and lets his mind wander fi
back to the days when he knew the
lMr. and Mrs. In knee pants and shall C
1 we say short skirts. K
It's the home town paper where tl
the real Mr. and Mrs. news items it
occur-and to receive the home town ,
paper week in and week out is to S,
kndw the great happenings of the D
I world, the doings of "Mr. and fMrs." J,
"Subscribe for Your Home Town g
Paper Week." is the second week in eI
f November. 7th to 12th. If you don't C
r take the horne town paper, subscribe R
then. If you do take it. renew your J,
l subscription then.
r News your friends forgot to write a
1to you; news about the folks you are!
Jtgerpbted %n; th current 4tstory
of your native town: it is all in Your -
Home Town Paper. Subscribe today.
If you think there's nothing in pa
triotism. just try to knock a man's
r home town. It's a fine way to start
a fight. The folks at home are big
folks to you. Read about them in
Your Home Town Paper.
ATTEMPTED HOLD-UP.
An armed highwayman made an y
, unsuccessful attempt to hold-up p
t Oscar McIntyre, first mate of the S. tl
a S. Minnesota Saturday night at the
Scorner of Wagner St., and the river.
McIntyre was on his way to his
. ship, moored at the head of Behrman h
avenue, when an armed hiwhwayman S
stopped him and, pointing a revolver n
at his stomach ordered him to throw
s up his hands. h
The seaman seized the revolves
and struggled with the highwayman. V
Seeing that he could not wrest the tl
gun from his assailant, McIntyre
t took to his heels, calling for help. tl
The highwayman fled into the South
Sern Pacific yards.
IAOCAL GIRLS SU('ClESSFUL AT h
S NWIMMING MEIET.
y In the women's events. at the swim
r, ming meet at Audubon Park Satur
a day. Miss Gerard was the star, win- a
Sning the 50 and 100 yard events e
a rather easy. Mary Gordon, of the e
a Algiers Playgrounds, lived up to
d form, winning the 25 and being sec- a
r. ond in the 50 yards. Mary Crow- n
ley, another Algiers girl, gave Miss d
Gerrard a hot time of it in the hun- n
dred and was beaten by two lengths. b
TOWN PESTS
i. MisAUS, ip a ISOIf 1W Low
t- OL A O@UaS 5 'St M/ a
CLOC4K A ' tS afst 1n
d t
I. s MoWer I tC 8 ud
i5 a bd .'
r-a
I. I
Dm to Twestyfive, sad takes the
r the Witsr sad borrows
W days * psser ad 857 other
th a $ Nevr CBrints Them P.nk
-ay 4r~a sd8
JAMES E. CRIPPS f
GETS GOLD BADGE
James E. Cripps, the youngest cap
tain in the police department, was
the guest of honor at a reception ten
dered by his friends, at the Avenue
Academy. Captain Cripps was pre- a
sented a gold badge studded with a
diamond.
Leonard Santos was chairman of
the arrangement committee, compris
ing Fred Moss, Guy Sadler, Jesse n
Knecht and ,Recorder John J. Duffy.
The presentation address was made
by Thomas V. Craven, assistant dis
trict attorney, who praised the ef
ficiency of the guest of honor.
Addresses were also made by
Charles Witte, Huble O'Brien, John
Kessler and others. More than
three hundred persons were present,
including Superintendent of Police
Molony, Commissioner of Public S
Safety Stanley Ray, Judge Armand '
Desangles, Judge Emile Leonard,
John Minor, Frederick Cripps, Ser
geant Joseph Hadley, Corporal Fred
erick Smith, Paul Surcouf, Captain
Charles Traub. Captain Edward
Roach, Tony Farrantella and Alex 1
r Johnson.
The Crescent City quartette sang
and there was a brass band.
MIKEROONEY "
SDIES SUDDENLY
IFU'NEAL THIS AFTERNOON
AT8 P. M.
The sudden death of Mike Rooney c
yesterday morning was a great sur- (
'prise to the hundreds of people on a
this side of the river who knew him. s
Mr. Rooney was born in 1874, and
was educated here in Algiers. His t
trade was that of a machinist, and a
he worked for several years at the
Southern Pacific. He served thirty- N
nine months as a madhinist in the 8
navy. and before he was discharged d
he was head machinist. He was also
connected in that capacity with the
United States Mint and remained t
there two years. He also served as a
clerk at the Treasury Department at c
the City Hall. For many years he a
w-,as chief clerk to Mayor Behrman. c
During the Spanish American war,
he was a member of the United I
States Navy and was in several en-It
gagements with forts and land bat- I
ties in Cuba. 1
The funeral will take place this 1
- afternoon from the Catholic Church.
s Interment will be in Greenwood Cem
a etery.
D Deceased, who was 47 years of
age, is survived by his widow, for
merly Miss Genevieve Owens, his
a daughter. Miss May Rooney, his
- mother. Mrs. M. J. Rooney, Sr., three
:" brothers, Daniel. Thomas and Joseph
- Rooney, and four sisters, Mrs. Peter
E. Munts. Mrs. Canibel and theI
Misses Margaret and Mamle Rooney.
Member of Mamy Clubs.
Mr. Rooney was associated with
many fraternal and local organiza
tions, among them New Orleans
Lodge No. 30, B. P. O. Elks. Alham
bra Club, Choctaw Club, Loyal Order
of Moose, Benevolent Knights of
America, Woodmen of the World and
Junior Order United American Me
chanicss. His daughter is now
attending school at Franklin. La.
Mr. Rooney was connected with
one of the oldest and most prom
nent families in our district.
For twelve years Mr. Rooney was
chief clerk to former Mayor Martin
Behrman. As such, permits for all
entertainments, balls, boxing con
tests and numerous other events,
were issued by him. He was thus
in a position to come in contact with
a large number of persons and make
many friends. For many years Mr.
Kooney was a big political isetor sad
was always allied with the Regular
organisation forces.
LIBERTY SOCIAL CLCB.
The Liberty Social Club will give
a dance at the Avesoe Academy, St
arday .Sept. 24.
C A rma p**4 Ms bead has been
easile and the ommuites me es
'eeo a that atteads a goe4 time.
HISTORY OF THE V
FERRY FRANCHISE
.FVI IY FitAN.'HliE ('AIIRIEDI TAX \
ITO AIAERINES FOit STltREET
RIEPAlR'I.
1. II. Norman Tel, C'ount il.
The following address was made i
I before a special session of the co- i
Ivil on Friday. Se.pt. 16th:
Some fifteen years ago the ('Canal . l
Street-A.\liers Fierry Sy-,t llm Frl-r; at
chise was sold at Public .\uction andl n
bid in for $22 .-00. In addition
thereto, among other matters the
lessees were to pay to their predeces
sorT the value of the sidewalk fromnt -
the Ferry landing to the L & N.
Station. and were also to maintain
Canal Street from the Ferry Landing
to the L. & N. crossing. In other st
words. the people of Algiers were not
only taxed to yield a revenue of it
$225.0010.00 to the City. but were t
also taxed for the construction on t
this side of the river, of a sidewalk t
from the ferry landing to the L. &
N. Depot. as also to maintain Canal
Street from the landing to the L. &
N. crossing, besides immense profit p
earned by the lessees. in
We may be, and no doubt are. o01
somewhat ahead of the times in our a,
views, as to the rights of the citi- al
zens of New Orleans to have free
access and egress to one side of the 11
river from the other: nevertheless we E
are not ahead of the times in insist- Ii
ing upon and exacting the privilege c"
of being free of tax for overcoming of
natural conditions beyond the actual
cost of overcoming the conditions. pt
The city of New Orleans is not legally P
or morally entitled to exact a quarter m
of a million of dollars from our peo- tl
ple to cross the river, besides, a h
princely million and a half of dollars
of profits to the lessees are wrong- ft
fully wrung from us. b
Progress is an essential and neces
sary part of modern civilization, and
our people are continually, conscious
ly or unconsciously, placing in opera- b
tion progressive ideas that become
part of our daily lives. b
3 There was a time when it may
i have seemed proper to exact and col
lect a toll to cross the New Basin e
and Carondelet Canals, as it was the
custom to collect toll to travel on i
the shell road to the Cemeteries or I
West End. This is no longer the a
case, these crossings are all free to '
our citizens, as is the right of free
travel to West End on the Shell a
Road. .
We are not here, however, to ask
you to grant us free transportation
across the river, the times are not
yet ripe for this, but we are here to
register our solemn protest against
a system of lease of our Ferry fran
chises that may yield a half million b
l of dollars or any part of it, to the
-City, an immoral tax upon us, be
1 sides additional taxes to pay for the
sidewalk, to maintain Canal Street
to the L. & N. Crossing, and the un
* heard of tax of more than one and
one-half million dollars of profits to
e the lessees, resulting not only the b
keeping away of industries from our
a side of the River. but In the actual
I driving away of the established in
dustries from our midst.
a Is it right, is it fair, is it honest a
I that these onerous and burdensome
s additional taxes should have been v
t or should be levied upon us, only r
e a fractional part of the Citizenship t
of New Orleans.
My statement is based on figures s
i furnished me by a statistician some- o
-I time back and may be challenged by I
I interested parties, however, as the d
Honorable Commissioner of Public
SUtilities has checked the income oft
the Ferry for a given period, the fig
ures are before you, and any Intelli- c
gent person, with some knowledge ,
of the subject, can fairly accuratelyt
calculate the cost of operation and a
+the difference between that and the
Champion Broad Jumper in Action
t adctie photogradh of Ned Ooerdtn, Harvard's great neiro ithlet
ceasted by many the greatest track4eld athlete of the day, who secentl
a semubed the weeMd's beat Juip record, maklmg the aracaloes leap ot i -
t eat ane i a l.as d so tae eart, d stadlem duriag o aetet betwee thi Tlad,,
Ierard sad O 0m ..oe .s.
..
Emrvenj1 mini ~ 9"~]~ embtlus·
Weddings of New
Orleans Folks
15I'r sTlI)F (O l'LE, IWHO EN
Ti:ltl:Il) THilE STATE OF MAT
ItIMONY Il'IlNG WEEK.
I ISHER I -TIIA I'TH.
'1 i., Stela F"isher atndl Elbert C. I
i'.lthI. l ith w.all k;:own young pe)to
pl, ot Grtlna. w'r,e married quietly
:Tat lhur,:tay tt::ht by .Judge Goeorge
I' I Lit 'f .\l.:.'r. Miss Izs ola and
I.:. '1oT:t:ath atnd V'rtnon J Wilty 4
and l.rtni.t'a .\uIdrson wetre the wit
ns'. Trhe, c'ouplep are residing in
1.l. )so tth I: II , i
(;lIad s Itatnsey. :0, Pa'tterson St..
Syears old. received injuries of her
teft foot while swinging on an iron
gate of t he' vourlthotuse ill Morgan
atret t(lads and Julia lhinoit of 210
Seguin street, were playing on the
iron gate whn i;ladyvs' foot caught he
tween tihe t'ate and the gate post,.
e'rlushin-i one of her toe. She was
treated at the hospital.
NEW "4'AL C'LUH1.
On Friday evening a crowd of young
boys and girls met at the home of Mr.
Fred I'mbach for the purpose of form
ing a so'.ial club. After the election
of officers, dancing was indulged in
and refreshments were served in
abunda;nce.
The following officers were elected:
Mr. Edgley Schroth. president: Miss
Esther Puckett, secretary: Miss Alma
Hawkins, treasurer. We feel that we
could not have selected a better set
of officers. a
MIr. Harry Evans who is also a
proud member of the club as well as a
professional pianist, furnished the 1
music for the occasion. Mr. Evans is
the popular young man who returned i
home recently from a tour of the
"Orpheum Circuit". Mr. Earl Cayard
furnished the laughter for the evening
by rendering a Chinese solo, accom.
panied by Mr. Red Hornosky. All left
happily, after an evening long to be
remembered. This club is open for a
few more members. Applications. can
be secured through any member, but
only those with select reputations will "
be considered.
wear and tear deducted from the
earnings will give you the result.
This difference represents the un
u just and unfair tax wrung from our
r people in the past by an archaic
system, as old as it is wrong and
wicked.
We believe in the City ownership
and operation of our ferry system
for the benefit of our people and not
a lease of the system for an immoral
revenue to the City. and princely in
come to the lessees, all at the coat
and discomfort of a fractional part
of the citizenship of our City.
We are here to appeal to you to
give us relief from our present un
bearable situation and to give it to
us in that form and manner which
alone can be scientific. To give as
the relief in a way that the tariff
will be elastic, permitting changes Ia
charges and regulations as exigencies
from time to time may require, and
not again to bind us, as we have been
bound in the past, through fifteen
years more of serfdom.
In our opinion, the only manner
and method by which this can be
accomplished is for the city to own
end operate its own Perry system.
The City, from a moral point of
view, should forego all Ideas of en
riching its treasury from the opera
tion of the Ferries and should set
aside from the net revenues sneh
I sums as may be necessary for varl
ous purposes appertaining to the
SFerry system and the balance, after
I doing this, returned to the people in
Sthe shape of comforts and a lowered
Stariff.
I am awat' that under existing
Sconditons, a municipally owned ferry
Swould be more expensively operated
Sthan a privately owned one, and hi
i saying this. am gulded by the work
(Continued on Pagre )

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