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Claiborne guardian. (Homer, La.) 1877-188?, January 02, 1878, Image 1

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OLAIBORNE LUARDIAN.
L. 1. HOMER, LA., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 1878.
Tea of saugrlptpm
OIes var in advaiae,...............t r,
tit u nth " ............... 1 50
Three " ............... 1 00
Terms . Advortig:
Ono squal, of ofne ioeb in asree or less,
first inse'rion, $1 (0; each addtienal iuser
lion. "'A cents.
nlu. m o ej r year
I square. M (.0, .l ., 0 o .
2 " / t; 9 91 It51 16 >,t "215 (I
I " M o iI 4 0 00
S I ot a 4l 25( :3 l ri) 0
( colun 1im :B 01 33 50 IN 756 u
S jl 3i 0 4:3 i( 1000
I'rotý"uional, sand business cards, uf ten
It.r, or hle itn l16t4 1t:, lper anlnll; for
eti nllilths, .lft for three months. $7.
ltlulsulc. alvt.l leminlenits of greater length
will 1 ilnserted at above rates.
L,.i.gal .ldvertiselllentsli will be chargl l at
leg..l rates, where lieal by law; otherwise
at w.'.cial rates as pnbliahed above.
r ipelwealnotlces 2 ) centa'per line.
Pli ral notices .if less than ten lines,
andll in rriage andl religious untices inserted
gratis.
.lobl-wrk executed in the neatest style,
uul at re.to.iable priices
Ingst 2", I1!7.
HOMER MASON(C FEMALE INSTITUTE.
ilghteeath Anausl siioan bllgim lpt. 1ih, 177?
T'YFI('IE\T TEA('llER.S will All every
FI lh.artmeuu . Eulecial attentiou given
to MUSIC.
IloardI per'man,th of four weeks, includ
lug waihing, lights, &e.. El,.
Tuition, f$, $t anit 15. No extravagances
'illuad.
Tril, Ill.titntion ij strictly non-nectarian.
.wls Jar E'afalogue.
T. 5. 8LIGIIl, Prest..
Ilnner, Clatborne parish, La.
Aug. 2l. lt7'7. Iug
TE.PERAN4E MEETINGS.
TheGrand Coanel. U. F. eT. North La.,
1IjIll.L hold its next annual morting at
Il WilElRt. ic'tmletuinlg on Tlursday,
July Ith, I .7".
.. L. .L'ukuls, "Gr 1" P': Mi' Mattie MaY .
fir W A: Adlam R Ihrvidson. (r C; MiNN
'lh,.,s1.ia 1IMc Farland, (;r A C: Max Fea:l'h,
G(,r ; Allen Iarksdartle, Or A S; John W.
MrFlarlandl, Gr Tr; .1IMs Fantnie Parker. Or
A Tr: John A. Miller, Or Chap; - Ives.
fir Sent.
Pi't-Office t Orand .crlbe,'.Vienna, La.
Aug. 9'2. ul77. 1:0
Homer ('ounil No. I, U. F. of T.,
.Vrle at A -e rt-HoJ Frsse w F 'riday Night.
o(.FICERU:
T. ,i. iligh. W P; Mrs. Adella ligh,. W A;
A. I. l,rnman, R S; Mis Lid Soott, AR i ;
J. B. OUit, Conl: Miss Kate Simmons. A C:
J. A. Parker, Chap; .. P. Harwell, Sent;
L 1'. Vaughn, F S; I. W. Kirkpatrick, Tr:
A. C. Calhoun, C Ily.
Aug. `r2,1;57. l:s
JOHN YOUNG,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
HIOMER, LA.
llW IL.L p irace in the Court. of Clai
I orllnr, Jacknll, , Bienvill., Lincoln
andUn ion, and in the Salreme Court at
Monroe. Aug. St, I$77.--:y
Judgeh J. S. Young. Jno. A. Richardson.
OL'NE O RiUCHAMRsON,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
IIOMER. LA.
DARrTNErtsnIP limited to the parish of
S('liamherne. Legal businees attended to
hi, either partner in Jaekson, Union, Mieu
illoi and Lincoln parishes, and Itwfore the
inpreme Court at Monroe.
Aug. '2, 177. 1:y
DRIIATON 3. AVEYBS,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
HOMER, LA.
WILL practice in te Courts of Clai
Srne, lRienville, JaLckson, Union,
and Webster, and the Suproeme Court at
Mnroe.
Ang. 2', 1077. 1:y
R3. *. 3. RICHARDSON,
.IAVING resumed the practice of Medl
11 rine offers hlis service to the cithtens
of Claiberne parish, in the various branches
of hi Iprfesion.
Oltice at the Drug Store of Joe Shelton.
Ang. 22, idtr. 1:y
3. 3. COLINEAN,
PARISH SURVEYOR,
W ILLTii-Wid promply asd ellciently
to all li in- ti ae. Chargesa l
Susotalte. WosiWe oe 8 lils sathe.t of
Afouer, * Trlenton seed. P. O., olmer.
wIll l varanti OLD FUMITTURE and
REPIR CIAMS UATRED CHAIR. MiY
a . reas smable to sett the Us.
Cull ·aase me at thes b e ud o igh
Wer & ldl , aEmr, S. erm . ui a.
Aug. 92, 17. 1y.
ept. t.i. 15. JUUI LAN E-L.
DANIEL T. IEAD,
o TRUWTO, LA.,
RFCELVING, FORWARDING AND
COIMISSION 1ERCHANT.
DEALER IN
r DRY GOOD1. CLOTHING, DOOTS
SHOES, HATS, HARDWARE, IRON,
CASTINGS, BAGGOING, TIES,
k1 WAGONS, CARTS, BUOGIES,
ROCKAWAYS, COOKING
to STOVES, FURNI
TURE AND
Plantation Supplies of all KInds.
r Liberal advances made on Cotton, in
ech and supplies.
h Aug. 22, 1"77. l:y
Lt S. W. RAWLINS,
(.S~cesor to Iawline & Murrell,)
,ftomn .~*Lact and
,fIamnmiJ.i ian [etrhant,
No. 88 Unleo Street,
NEW ORLEANS.
Nov. , I.77. I:ly
E. J. HART A CO.,
E. Importert and Wholetale
DRUGGISTS,
Grocers and Comnmisson
) Merchants.
Store. 7 75, 77 and 79 Tcbhupitoulan st.
Warehloune 99, 9, 97e and 99 Tchoupitoulu~
-" treet, New Orleans.
Aug. 22, 1~77. :ry
L. C. Jurey, M. Galli,.
JUREYV GILLIS,
OTTPON F ACTORm AND) GENERAL
V COMMUSsION MERCHANTS,
Otcc ................. I1.4 Gravier Street,
NIEW ORLEJA.V., LA,
t Aug. 22, 177. I:y
Christolpher ('haf, Jr.
SJOHN CUhAFFE & SONS,
, NOI'roN FA'CTOIS AND (;ENEIRAL
SC'OMMISSION MEI'IHANT'IS,
r Office................No. 52 I'U lou Strcet,
NEll" OltLE.IN.V.", L.I.
Aug. W, 1.77. I:y
WeSTEA A VALUE,
Wholesale Dealers in
FOREIGN and DOMESTIC
DRY GOODS,
t Canal Streit, and 125 ('ommnu, Street,
AVEW' ORLEJAS, LA.
Aug. 22, 1 ,7,7. l:y
E. Page. P. Moran.
PAGE t MIORAN,
fll'halehale 'ealerjt
-IN
BOOTS, SHOES and BROGANS,
t ts, Cap mand Truaks,
No. 10.................. Magaczine Street,
S NEVW "t12LF.0.3. L.1.
Aug. ', 1'77. I:y
JOHN HENRY A CO.,
Wholesale Dealers in
Boots, Shoes, Brogans and
HATS,
Noe. 121, 123 and 12i..... Common Stret,
NEIl ORLEI.%N, LA.
Aug. 22, 1577. I:y
STAUFFER, McREADY At CO.
Importers and Dealers in
Hardware and Agricultural
Implements,
No. 71...................... Canal Street,
- YEli" ORLE.LS,, L.I.
Aug. 22, 1477. l:y
A. BALDWIN k& O.,
a (Successors to ISl#seb, Baldwin & Co.,)
Dealers in
ardware, Steel, Iree and lallread
CUTLERY, GUNS.
AGRICULTURAL
IMPLBMENITS.
No. 74 Canal, and 91, 93 and 96 Common Sta.
,EW OiLEANS, LA.
SAug. 9, 1877. 1:y
I.aMMNsI u.AWAuI C*,
Importer. and Jobbers in
Hardware, Catily, uans
and Pistols,
I NHe. 601, 603 and 606...North Main Street,
S BT. LOUIS, MO.
SAug. 99, 1877. 1:y
-BBPI I WPtt BBI tts
itrl nt or.lp I ,r s ell llei-
IC coma- wio FIN FAT 53KV, e;ly
P* wIe W1t e* * lt
g Iser ::p I tm
prest ese stmeem.
THOMA8 D. KINDER.
IAug. 9, 177. It.m
The Daville, Ky., Advoaie, of years
ago, saye: "The following was composed by
our talented and, with one exception, the
finest American poet now living, Henry A.
Stanton, of Maysville, Ky. It was recent
ly resited by one of the finest aceton on the
English stage in the city of London, sand
won the applause of thounsald of Eng
land's mlot choice and refined."
They n ill bar repeating at this day, and
their force will be felt by many thonsands
who have of late years realized the trath
fulwes of the lines;
TME MONEYLA IMAN.
Is there no secret place on the face of the
Where Charity dwelleth, where Virtue hath
birth?
Where Iosoms in merry and kindness will
heave,
And the io*sr and the wretched shall "ask
and receiver"
Ia there no place where a knock from the
Will brin a kind angel to open the doore
Ah! eearch the wide world wherever you
can,
There is no door open for a Money less Man!
Go look in youn ball where the chandeliers
light
)rives off with its splendor the darkness
of night:
Where the rich hanging velvet its shadowy
foldl,
Sweeps gaeefily down with its trimmings
of slsd,
And the mirrors of silver take up anl renew,
In long,lighted vistas the 'wildering view
Go there n. your patches, and find, if you
can,
A welcoming smile for a Moneylen Man!
(Go in yon church of the cloud-reaching
spire,
Which givren back to the sun his name lok
of red sre; C
Where the arches, and columns are gor.
genus within,
And the walls seem as pure as a snl with t
out asin;
(;o down the long aisles-see the rich and
the great,
In the pomp anly the pride of their worldly
eCate-
Walk down in your patches-a-sd find, if
youllt cu,
Who will open a pow to a .sMoey leas Man! I
Go look to, on ljudge in his dark, flowing
gow n- t
With the meal's wliercin law weigheth equi
ty doswn.
Where he fro ns on the weak, anld sIilse
ao the strong,
And punisheI right, while hlie jutifie t
wrong:
Where jurorP their lips on the bible have
laid,
To render a verdsit they've already made
(Go there In the court-romn, and finud. if you t
can,
Any law fsr the cause of a Moneyleas Man!
Go lImk in the Bank, where mammon has
tolhl,
}his hundreds and thousands of silver and
gold;
Where auf,. from the hanls of the starving l
and poor.
Lisia pile upon pile of the glittering ore: ii
Walk up to the counter-ah, there you may
stay,
Till )our ihmbs grow cold, and your hair I
turns grey,
And you'li flsud at the Bank, not one of the c
clans
With ms,uey to land to a M)onylss ian!,!
Then go to your hovIel; no raven has feel
The wife who has suffredl too long for her
bread; ag
Kueel sdown hy her pallet; and kiss the
death frost a
Fromfthe lips of the Angel yousr poverty o
sat:
Thenl tiurn inl your agony upward to (o*d.
And bless while it smites you,. the chasten
ing rod; U
And yoat' II find, at the end of vour life's d
little span,
There's a welcome above fsor a Moneyl"ess 
fe
Washington Correspondence. h
W-iios.ars. D. C., Dec. 24, l"77. h
The fading days of Autumn still
tint the sky with gold, and the am- a
bient atmosphere casts a halo upon a
the sleeping river, the parks and a
the historic hills across the Poto- C
mac. Environed amid this beauty, h
the bhurry and bustle of life in the 1
Capitol goes glidinig down the cor
rent of time. Each section of our
domain has its representatives here
swelling the tide of humanity, that n
interwoven, forms the fabric of soci
ety. Every alty has its joys and
sorrows. In none is It more ifoly t
veribed than in the Nation's metro- L
polis. Amid the luxuzrance - of
wealth, with the eonmn itatat that
money purehuases, stalk the hlaggard
features and tanned hees of the U
equalid poor. As elsewhere many
needy omst eat a mimisera~ble d
Istence as the sits of inabriety, ,
while otLbhr gy. been brought to l
wat by ui~lg too mash apoe the
GovemrasEt hr ianport and at d
lmiang to do for themselves. lamy
diuagrding the advite of the ls. 5
amated . G. to "Go W gt" have
eemes to this imetb saMu y ple to H
try to aure a G Qvpmrs at pel t
MOs Utpjdefp the 4oor~o eeeh
Dearment ssamd.t h weases0
whomemaul une4Ie cvil bEr
vis, whibh isa "thinug of bImea,
bat a joe--muerP A a u ii
earsted member nkin a plras far r
a friead brings him to this city frot
his distant home, boards him at th
best hotel for a month awaiting th
long delayed examination. The aun
picions time arrives and the appl
cant comes out of the contest wit
a score well up in the nineties. Th
M. C. supposed he had a sure thing
but "hope deterred makes the hear
sad" even when applied to an M. (
After repeated calls at the Deparl
meat he is blandly informed the
there is no vacancy. The profanit
of that MI. C. would do credit to
soldier of the army of Flander
In the recent farce in the Paten
office-called an "Examination" b;
the authorities, the conundrum
that were fired off would have beel
tolerably creditable to a muinstre
show, but certainly were beneatl
the dignity of a great Govermment
Economy! Herald the news! Tb
(-overnment has really set this here
tofore ideal project into practice
working. There has heretofore beet
a large open entrance from 7th St
into the P. O. Department. This
is a busy thoroughfare and hbn
dreds have been in the habit of en
tering the bualding through them
doors every day. Economy hal
closed them, simply to save a mes
senger's meagre salary. Here comet
the man in great haste and flattenm
his nose half an inch betore he dim
covers that the door is closed
Profanity! That does not expres
it. The days wear on, but thi
swearing and ill temper producec
by those closed doors are not aba
ted. All to save $50 per month
Congressmen are enthusiastic ove,
economy and yet they fail to lower
their own fat salary, or even to ears
what they draw trom the Treasury
Nature made a Congressman an
rested from her labors. dhe novel
oould make anything else until she
had recuperated. The effort wouli
have been too great.
Congrees remained in session just
long enough to unsettle the busineat
interests of the country. People
complained' at this but they should
be charitable and think of the opt
pressing burdens placed upon their
representatives. IDo they not meet
at least eight days in every month
at 12 o'clock and remain in contin"
tied session until half past four or
fire P. 31. Could any complaining
constituent really understand the
weight of responsibility that rests
upon the average Congressman,
driving him oft times into an easy
chair, or on to the sofa in the smo.
king room, or into the ladies gallery
for a quiet little flirtation, he would
know more of what wonderfual labor
is required to frame the national
law.
A gentleman said the other day
when looking down from the gallery
apon the floor of the House "What
a farce!" And sure enough it is.
Congress could do in a week all that
has been accomplished since Oct.
15th.
Fzx.
There are more young American
men in the penitentiaries of this
country learning trades than there
is outside of them. The principal
ceause of this is, that we are educa
ting our young men for gentlemen,
trying to make lawyers, preachers,
doctors and elerks out of material
nature intended for blacksmiths
and brlcklayers, earpeaters, tailon
and other honest "hewers of wood
and draeas of water." It lesa mi
take and a big one, to teaph boys
aibd girls to believe thst to tlabor
disgrasefal, and to do nothing fmo
a liviag is oa binmalag to speliet
in which they espet to more and·
bove tie respect of. Ing soob as
lety! "It is reties to the ese to
day, sad mth ma s 7 en mem _u
_arted to P~oJ~th gUtt t of -
i the great dream? 111 ,i will
lighteat fori peeethode or pral
temsty hoefe nbr lave played
A marrie4 wema in Indlma -
sue a her uo r am tom eoe
sell lw to her hsb d
Wm rite fs the Clalbsesem G tia.
he THE NHOE OF OUR IrlTH.
be
,i After an absence of ten or twelve
1i- years ronl the land of our birth, by
th what varied feelings are we infu
e ened; a sadness mingling with the
] sweet happy reminiscences of gone
rt by days, as we take a retrospective
v. view through the kaleidoscope of
z. memory back through the vista of
It fast-receding years as we loiter on
t. the threshold of an old homestead,
a now metamorphosed beyond reog
a nition, once as familiar to us as our
it own reflected image, though the im.
pression of what it once was is still
as vividly and indelibly fixed upon
the memory as if bieroglyphed there
el with a pen of iron, never to be ob
b literated whilst reason maintains its
throne. It seems as if it were yester
to day only, we strolled 'midst the
e- overhanging boughs of the wide
tl spreading shrubs and culled the
flowers for a- wreath, or to decorate
t a play-house. We have no very
is strong attachment for but one home,
the one where our earliest recolleo
tions of infancy were spent, at the
, age when our minds are most facile
of the ineradicable impressions made
around our mother's knee, listening
a to stories, mending broken toys, and 4
s anon unconsciously drift into dream. I
land, by her low sweet ohants of
. ullaby songs. 'Twas there we re
ceived our first lessons of religion
e and morals, where our infant lips
d lisped their first prayer, sand felt so
accomplished when we spelt our first
words of three letters. Then dawn
ed childhood, the time of castle
r building "ou the sand," and to dis
cuss our tutnre greatness and hap
piness that wetbhen felt so confident
was in store for us. Too ignorant to
a know of obstacles or disappoint
meuts--all the world seemed bright,
dl knowing nothing of its evils, we had I
over confidence ia the benevolence,
hebarity and philanthropy of man
kind at large. How credulous, sym
pathetic and unselfshare children,
in this their golden age of iuno
oeuce. We listen in vain for the I
once familiar footsteps. The foot- I
fall and the voices of dear loved t
otones are hushed forever. The few
remaining uones scattered far away
r over distant lands. Where are the
hopes of foml parents, who, in their
blind affection for the pride of their
Shearts, thought so promising) We
see around us only a few common.
place grown-up people.
As we glance over the yard, so
long a delightful play-ground, and
beyond to the paths which once led
to the orchards, our hearts ache to
sI ee it furrowed with the plow. We
loo~ for the sheltering boughs of the
old oaks-they are gone. We feel
as if we could have stayed the wood
t man's axe by the old plea of "spare
that tree." We look in vain for the
old well, longing for a cooling
draught from the "old oaken back
et"-alas, no trace of it remains.
A short time ago, the writer was I
at such a place, and wandered to
the old school yard, and whilst pon
a dering on the days of "Auld iong
s Sync," the words of the old pathetle
song, "Just twenty years ago," in
voluntarily sprang to mind. The
place was suggestive of many little 1
Sincidents that were amusing ad
Sgratif~ing to our misbchtievous as
Sturns at that time, with playmates
-that have pased away from the
serna of life's ations. ome are t
laid in the church-yard, others eat
Stered like leaves before a orthern
blas, oamiag n a tfar-o slme.
They have left the ldmomMte ieel I
to Ill the vried puoition that x-I
actlag uelety demands in the dfier
eat esations of Ulfe. Someof ear
little eotmpurriof the othrs ,
w with bt ,*.adbH, ed to yel iMle I
Ia pares ofitr twle (' ydi
I the war ath; *ss, jinve
wldhe-mmy am se dsewm the
sitaceben ,easvd pi ag d weule f
gpow rank and high wbsfeemwwghs
trodden smooth and eat by 11tW
bare feet. The pi to the rig
is hidden. But the spring-timse 4
life will come agait, when there ill
be nodeeay or change. Life 1
ing rapidly by, each day beiag a
little life, and inl the an lifi i'l t.
a day. Thea we .Vll pas free mtf
ephemeral ebryabM state t fbelid
of the leal, where we Ubptope h k.'
asited throegh the eadlesm qgee e(
eternity, where the dalaig is ave
beautiful-there Is no unigb q( W
there.
NORA tL L. H.
We have girl abies, ý am s
eight years and foiunt ldies
twelve and fqq I , bt an o
fashioned little irl is seldom met
with nowadays. Ont need Sl"t
watch the children issuing from ry
school to become orlvinced of the
fact. The e Amerienea hbl
girl of twelve years wouldd be d
ended at being called a eblS .
Does she not ar an overskirt
with the tightest o pof lbahs' iMd
hair banged and frlaed Mi s
older sister? With our old hIen's
ed ideas we cannae help thinking
that te air of obrmine' nd gel.
la innocence which we miss e
the faces of the girls et day d
owing in a gre et meare to their
style of dress. Twety years 6a
girl of twelve was only  I4,
wore a dress of mod est heg t
pantalettes re to o
her shoes. Utd t
fashion was ae
looking; but if a l
at all indueoed'by her aoe of
dress she had better look
than to look "hast.' Of tMl.i
er must be her own Jad'e a
alone is awerabte fo ti twe
of her girls. That the A
girlD needs to be obscperoned isLe
only too painthlly appareAt by t
shocking deta1lp or every 
newspaper, bt t bph
should begin 0oeg h deb be
belongiug to parelts whges erp l
entitles them to ve better Isens
are allowed to remain in toe tats
until nine or ten in the
playing or taking log w
boys of their own a gg
seem and may be perctly noeast,
but the girl wheat twelve' basier
boy lover, at sixtea will be Nsime
love afsirs. A mother should pil
the confidence of her dauhtr Iso
entirely that no step would be to
kun without her wrledge. Mfeny
a mother, beahkee ever 'Ls
shame of her girl, knaws toe iSt
that confidence on the peat her
daughter and advise san rets
on her own part might have saed
them both from shame and sorrow.
It mayv b hard on girls who'vak
in milfl and shope to requie taem
to remain at hore after desk, bet
their mothers should at least bow
where and with whom theyr .u
We would urge upon mothers the
importance of keeping tur l
children as log as possible. T sdo
this use every meas in year powew
Dress them modestly evesUIf
be not so piquant
iab. Teach them to fbtat thl
mother is their best sedaut d
friend. Do not my that pr
daughte can take eaesthe.t
for if it be true that e m, the
she has lerned a reel at
and teeances are tht, thet,
her knowledge, will o
without the god euol ofat me
older person.
"The Lord will provide" is san
cellent motto, bat "The Lord
those who bdl
suppersad 'bot lsa
thoa t a vehw a i s t
werd mesa 'sle nw dirs
Mwhi teb bas wtWal~ll
- _',' '
tm** e l
we to

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