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The Colfax chronicle. (Colfax, Grant Parish, La.) 1877-1981, October 12, 1912, Image 1

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THE COLFAX CHRONICLE
Absorbed the GRANT PARISH DEMOCRAT May 1, 191
A DImocratic Journal, devoted to Local and 6cneral News, Literature, Science, griculture, 6tc.
VOL. XXXVI COLFAX, GRANT PARISH, LA., SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1912 NUMBER 50
Capt. Teal Favors the Proposed Tax
Amendment.
Colfax, La., Oct. 5, 1912.
Editor Colfax Chronicle:
The only excuse I have for appearing
in print at this particular time is the
fact that the people of this State are
being offered the best tax scheme that
they have had the opportunity to em
brace since the territory has become a
State, and I am afraid it is so little un
derstood that they will reject it for that
very reason.
1 hav' carefully read and analyzed it
from every view point, and the more I
think along that line, the more I am
J convinced it is good, and the less com
plicated it seems, and the object of this
communication is to invite criticism
through the press. I do not, as a rule,
like newspaper controversies. But I do
invite this because there is nothing fac
tional in it. and it cannot be made per
sonal. Blanchard stood for it in his
platform, Sanders did likewise, so did
Michel and Hall and Aswell, so no one
can oppose it on that ground. The
scheme addresses itself to me especial
ly, because it is local.
The police jury of each parish takes
charge of all the property in Grant for
example, except the railroads, telegraph
and telephones, and bank stocks, and
fixes a value for the purpose of assess
ing, and in order that such value shall
be equalized. The Assessor must lo
cate the property on the assessment
roll geographically, that is to say, you
must be next to your neighbor, even
though your name commences with "A"
and his "Z,"'so that you can see his
assessment as well as your own wheb
you go to pay your taxes, as well to as
sist the police jury when they examine
equalization. Again, the land is assess
ed separately from improvements to
further facilitate equalization. Now
this value put upon property can be
anything from 25 to 100 per cent of its
actual cash value; just so everybody is
assessed alike, and "each tax payer
when he can see his neighbor's assess
ment will look to that."
Now, suppose 16 mls on a 50 per
cent cash value of the assessment roll
does not give you the desired revenue
for local improvements as well as cur
rent expenses, (I mean to build school
houses, pay teachers and build 'model
roads, etc.), then the police jury lev
ie3 on all the property of the parish,
including the railroads, bank stocks,
telegraph and telephone properties
"which are now known as segregated
property," at a uniform, or equalized
assessment, a sufficient millage to raise
the desired amount. Let us look at
Grant applying the new system. The
total assessment roll of Grant parish
for 1911 is $4,237,498.00. Under the old
system you would get for the perish
·-4224 for the State $25,424.88.
Under the new system the parish would
get on the 16 mills, (now taking out
railroads, telegraph and telephones, and
bank stocks), $57,906.18, you see again
from the State of $15,580.20, and the
State has pledged you the revenue
shall never be say less. I make my
estimates at 16 mills because if the
Confederate Veteran tax carries it will
be 16 mills for all the future, "or more. "
I say more because the institutions of
the State must be cared for; and her
schools, asylums, etc., have grown fast
er than the values on the assessment
roll, and there is not money enough to
maintain them on the old basis of 15
mills and it must be increased.
Again, one of the beauties of the new
system is, you pay taxes to yourselves.
Not a dollar of it is ever taken out of
the parish for any purpose. In other
rwords, if you adopt the proposed scheme
you will never pay another dollar State
taxes as long as you live, yet you get
from the State your pro rata of school
funds, the same as before, as well as
'the good roads fund, and each are
pledged by the State to never be any
less than in 1911. Yet the State, ex
pecting to raise flve million dollars on
her segrqgated property, pledges you a
corresponding increase as is 6,800,000
to about $4,900,000 State's revenue in
1911. Under the old system, Grant got
for schools something more than $9,500.
Under the new system she will get
something more than $10,000.
Another thing; with the State's oys
A Log om the Track
of the fast expres means serious trouble
ahead if not removed, so does loss of
appetite. It means lack of vitality,
loss of strength and nerve weakness.
If appetite fails, take Electric Bitters
quickly to overcome the cause by ton
ing up the stomach and curing the in
digestion. Michael Hesheimes of Lin
coin, Neb., had been sick over three
years, but six bottles of Electric Bitterp
put him right on his feet again. They
have helped thousands. They give pure
blood, strong nerves., good dlgestion.
Ontly E aes at Dixie Pharmay.-Adv.
ter bottom, of which she has 4,500,000
acres, worth more than her public lands
before she parted with one dollar's
worth, will be developed and pay thou
sands of dollars per annum into the
State treasury. This amendment is so
worded that the State at any time by
two-thirds vote of the Legislature can
return to the parish any portion of the
segregated property to be used by them
for local taxing purposes. Now if this
scheme carries, in order that the sher
iffs and assessors shall not lose one
dollar in commissions, the State agrees
to refund to them every dollar they
lose based on the roll of 1911.
I think I heard some one say, "what
will become of our present special tax
es?" We will go right on collecting
them. I have already told you how to
get new ones.
In the foregoing I have attempted to
show that in the future we will pay
taxes only to ourselves if the new sys
tem was adopted, and that we have 16
mills instead of 10 as heretofore to
draw from, which difference makes a
gain in Grant of more than $15,000.00.
One more idea I forgot, that the par-,
ishes are interested in. That is, thi
practical passing away of the pernic
ious system of licenses- putting a tax
on man's industry or enterprise. The
State will impose no license except on
such business as will fall within the do
main of the police power (I mean sa
loons.) They cannot impose licenses on
persons engaged in trades, occupations
or callings involving personal labor or
skill-nor on those engaged in industrial
or manufacturing pursuits, whose capi
tal stock or capital and business is less
than $5000. Nor those engaged in agri
cultural or horticultural pursuits.
As a safeguard to the revenues of
the parishes, the power to license cer
tain occupations now taxed by local gov
ernment was allowed to remain, but it
cannot be exercised until the local tax
ing power (police jury or town council)
have exhausted its other resources on a
basis of 60 per cent.
It is conceded by well advised think
ers that if the assessment is made geo
graphically, on a basis not greater than
the 1911 assessment, it will produce am
ple revenue without the license tax.
Now, the trouble that has brought
about the new system by the State, is
to obtain more revenue for the State,
lnd after careful thought it is conclud
ed that under the segregation plan that
seventeen enterprises would furnish the
needed revenue. They are, the rail
roads, telegraphs, telephones, express
and sleeping car companies, banks,
street railroads, canal and pipe lines,
pumping stations, steamboats, sugar
refineries, petroleum refineries, rice
mills, cotton oil companies, mills, and
railroads taxable in 1914. Then comes
mines, stone quarries, sand and gravel
beds, shale, and oil or gas wells.
Thp one subject-mines. It seems
the sulphur output in Calcasieu parish
aggregates more than $5,000,000 per
annum. Its output is taxed 3 per cent,
1150,000. Now; I have been asked why
this cannot be done under the old sys
tem. Simply because this great mine
of wealth would accrue to Calcasieu
only, while under the segregated idea
it accrues to the whole State, and
through it to all the parishes.
When I speak of sugar refineries, I
do not mean the ordinary refinery, of
which we have in south Louisiana very
many, but factories like Gramacy, that
cost several million(, and are assessed
under the old system for only a few
hundred thousand. These under the
new system would be assessed by a
board at Baton Rouge that would con
sider the cost and assess them on the
same basis as other property of its
kind, say 60 per cent of its first cost.
It is this class of property, property
under the old system that escaped tax
ation altogether, that will bring up the
State's revenues fully one million more
than the rolls this season will earn.
There are 'other good things offered
to the parishes, too. My friend Walter
Burke, of New Iberia. proposes an
amendment exempting from taxation
all institutiona that will lend money to
the farmer on country farms at six per
cent, and on long terms for lessathan
that; my friend, Senator Pavrot, offers
an amendment exempting from taxa
tion any money you have in bank; and
my friend, Bertrand Well, of Aiexan
dria, an amendment exempting from
taxation homesteads, by a vote of the
locally interested people.
Another amendment by Senator Bar
row authorizes the police juries, on
proper petition, to submit the question
as to exemption of municipalities from
parish taxes.
In conclusion, let me say these pro
posed changes are not experimental,
they have been tried suceeesftlly in
quite a number of States, and I am
sure they will do well here.
Sicremmly yous, C. H. TaL.
Official Proceedings of the Police Jury
of Grant Parish.
Colfax, La., Oct. 7, 1912.
The police jury met in regular ses
sion at the court house in Colfax, R.
W. Richardson, president, and all the
members present.
The minutes of the last meeting were
read and approved.
Dr. J. D. Bqucum, of the State Board
of Health, came before the police jury
and asked that the sum of one hundred
and fifty dollars ($150) be appropriated
for the purpose of aiding and assisting
in the work of eradicating the disease
of hook worms.
On motion by Mr. Watson, seconded
by Mr. Dunn, the appropriation was
made.
Dr. F. O. Maxwell came before the
police jury and asked that his salary as
president of the parish board of health
be fixed at the sum of three hundred
dollars ($300) per annum. Mr. Dunn
moved that the consideration of Dr.
Maxwell's proposal be postponed until
the next meeting of the police jury.
The motion was defeated.
On motion by Mr. Blewster, seconded
by Mr. LaCroix, the salary of the presi
dent of the parish board of health was
fixed at the sum of one hundred dollars
($100) per annum from and after July
1, 1912, and for all such extra services
as he shall render in case of an outbreak
of epidemic sickness, he shall be paid
in addition to the said salary.
A petition was presented asking that
a public road be created leading from
near Bentley to the parish line. On
motion action was deferred on the pe
tition until the next meeting of the po
lice jury.
Mr. Hays, representing Austin Bros.,
of Dallas, Texas, bridge builders, came
before the police jury for the purpose
of offering a bid for the contract to
construct a bridge across Bayou Darro,
on the model roaid leading from Colfax
east.
Mr. Blewster moved the adoption of
the following ordinance:
Section 1. Be it ordained by the po
lice jury of the parish of Grant, Louisi
ana, in regular session convened, That
the fees to be paid for the public print
ing for the parish of Grant shall be as
follows: Thirty-five cents per square
of one hundred words for the first in
sertion, and twelve and a half cents for
each subsequent insertion, to be pay
able quarterly at the regular meetings
of the police jury.
Section 2. And be it further ordain
ed, That all ordinances and parts of
ordinances in conflict with or contrary
to the provisions of this ordinance be
and the same are hereby repealed, and
that this ordinance shall go into effect
at once upon adoption.
Mr. Blewster's motion to adopt the
ordinance was seconded by Mr. LaCroix.
Thereupon Mr. Watson moved as a
substitute that the police jury shall
contract with the lowest eligible bidder
for the parish printing, after having
advertised for bids, provided such bids
are within the requirements of the law.
Mr. Watson's substitute was second
ed by Mr. Preuett, and when put to the
vote was defeated by four to two.
Upon the defeat of the substitute,
the ordinance proposed by Mr. Blewster
was put to the vote and was adopted.
On motion the police jury proceeded
to elect a parish printer. The names
of H. G. Goodwyn and E. A. Mathis
were put in nomination, and H. G.
Goodwyn was elected parish printer,
the vote being four for Goodwyn and
two for Mathis.
A petition was presented asking that
the public road leading from Rochelle
to Pollock be changed so as to leave the
model road just west of the Iron Moun
tain railroad, and running parallel with
said railroad to the road crossing south
of Lincecum where it intersects said
Rochelle and Pollock road. On motion
the petition was granted, and Ransom
Rambo, J. L. Kent and T. H. West
named as reviewers to locate and es
tablish the road.
Mr. W. H. Rexler came before the
police jury and proposed to make cer
tain necessary repairs to the plumbing
in the jail and the court house for the
sumn of fifty-one dollars ($51). On mo
tion the proposal was accepted.
The police jury then took up the con
sideration of the bid of Austin Brothers
to build the steel bridge across Bayou
Darro.
On motion the president was author
ised and empowered to sign a contract
Saves Leg of Boy.
"It seemed that my 14 year old boy
would have to lose his leg, on account
of an ugly ulcer, caused by a bad bruise,"
wrote D. F. Howard, Aquone, N. C.
"All remedies and doctors treatment
failed till we tried Bucklen's Arnica
Salve, and cured him with one box."
Cures burns, boils, skin eruptions, piles.
29c at Dixie Pharmacy. -Adv.
with Austin Brothers for the construc
tion of said bridge, for the-price and
sum of two thousand three hundred and
fifty dollars ($2350), the same to be
completed on or before Jan. 1, 1913.
On motion the president was author
ized to purchase from Austin Brothers
twelve steel road drags at twenty-two
dollars ($22) each.
The police'jury then adjourned until
9 a. m. October 8, 1912.
R. W. RICHARDSON,
R. S. CAMERON, President.
Clerk.
Continued next week.
H. M. Beatty, Little Rock, Ark,
says: "For the past two years I suf
fered with kidney trouble, had severe
pains across my back and over my hips
that almost meant death to me at times.
I used several well known kidney rem
edies, but got no relief until I used Fol
ey Kidney Pills. These I can truthful
ly say made me a sound and well man."
J. W. Duncan Co., Ltd:-Adv.
Syrup cans at J. W. Duncan Co., Ltd.
Offcial Proceedings of Grant Parish
School Board.
Colfax, La., Oct. 5, 1912.
On the above date the Parish Board
of School Directors for the parish of
Grant met in regular session with all
members present, except W. N. Creed,
of ward three, and T. M. Bradford of
ward five.
The minutes of the previous meeting
read and adopted as read.
The field report of the parish super
intendent was read and approved.
On motion of Mr. Stewart, duly sec
onded by Mr. Jackson and carried,
$150.00 was approprinted for the build
ing of a school house at Willow Crove,
and the Willow Grove and Summerfield
schools were ordered run four months
each instead of eight.
On motiou of Mr. Nugent, duly sec
onded by Mr. Stewart and carried,
Messrs. H. A. Roshto, N. S. Roberts
and I. McMills were appointed as a
building committee to act with the par
ish superintendent and the ward mem
ber in the erection of a house at Wil
low Grove.
The question of making some repairs
on the school house at Simms and the
consolidation of the two schools of that
district into one came up for consider
ation, and after being discussed by
Messrs. Robertson, Williams, Miller,
Curry, Dove and Hazel, it was finally
decided to have all necessary repairs
made on the Simms school house and to
co-operate with the citizens of that
district in their efforts towards con
solidation.
On motion of Mr. Nugent, duly sec
onded by Mr. Stewart and carried, Mr.
Ligon was appointed on they local school
board for the Rochelle school, vice Mr.
Greenor, removed from the district.
On motion of Mr. St. Andre, duly
seconded by Mr. Nugent and carried,
H. A. Carpenter and C. C. Chapman
were ippointed as a committee to as
sist the superintendent in arranging
the premium list of the club members,
also for drawing and writing for all of
the schools of the parish.
On motion of Mr. Stewart, duly sec
onded by Mr. St. Andre and carried,
the claims of Mr. E. S. Murrell for list
ing polls and extending special school
taxes on the rolls were allowed and or
dered paid.
A nnmber of other claims were ex
amined by the board and ordered paid.
On motion of Mr. Stewart, duly sec
onded by Mr. Jackson and carried, the
request from some citizens of the Big
Creek school for a change of trustees
of that school was laid over until a fu
ture meeting.
There being no further business be
fore the board it adjourned subject to
the call of the president
J. H. McNEELY,
J. N. WARNER, President
Secretary.
Paint Put-On
Think of paint put-on and not by the
gallon.
A gallon of paint in the can is of no
account to anybody. Put it on. Now
reckon its cost and value.
The secret is: one paint goes twice as
far as another. A good one goes twice
as far as a bad one.
You have a job, say an average job.
It'll take 10 gallons Devoe and 12 or 15
or 18 or 20 of middling poor very-poor
and trash. You know paipter's wages
in your town. Put the price of a gallon
of paint and the painter's day-wage to
gether. You can, we can't
Devoe costs less than any inferior
paint; there are hundreds of them.
One paint is as good as another, so
long as it laste good; one lasts months
and another years; and the one that
goes furthest lasts longest
DEVOE
Valley Drug Store sells it-AdM.
RESOLVED
TIMES MAY CHANGE AND MEN MAY
CHANGE WITH THEM.AND TASTES MAY
CHANGE Too- BUTSQUARE DEALING
NEVER CHANGES- WE KEEP UP WITH
THE TIMES
BUSTERJ BRo4N "
{ Ch ed,
No SUN-DIAL METHODS-IN OUR STORE. WE
DON'T CARE To CARRY OUR STUrr UNTIL IT
GETS OUT-of-DATE. WE WOULD RATHER SELL
AT LOW PRICES NOW AND SELL oVR GooDS, AND
SELL MANY or THEM, THAN To SELL NOW AT
HIGH PRICES AND NOT SELL MANY. STYLE,
QUALITY AND THE SQUARE DEAL ARE THE
THREE THINGS THIS STORE STANDS-FoR. COME
IN AND WE WILL DO BUSINESS WITH YOU RIGdHT.
THAT'S, ALL.
PEOPLE'S CASH SToRE, LTD.
RAILRoAD AVE. COLrAX, LA.
"TrE IIT EAT SOT LE COLLEGE.
ssL SF BUSI NSS.'
NEW ORLEANS, LA.
hoae ýavs ý ý
sNo Is a seee
dwae, l"eti le s a a
dets. e ti seses of its
Mn ic F cwa6 6e101166e
MANSFIELD, LOUISIANA
Offers Domestic Science, Teacher Traiin, Piano, Voice, Violin, French,
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Each member of faculty choeen for her training, experience, Scholar
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Fine buildings and beautiful campus. Expenses reasonable. Number
limited. 57th session begins September 4
WRITE FOR CATALOGUE
* R. E. ROBBITT, : Presldent
÷-~~~ ~ - ,. ::::::::::::::::
Every Business M an
should conduct all of his outside affairs over the long distance
lines of the Cumberland Telephone & Telegraph Company,
RATES REASONABLE, SERVICE PROMPT
For information, call Long Distance Operater
Gu mberlnd TdIone _r Te"leg ra b GO.
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Can now be reached in through car via the
OBSERVATION SLEEPER ON TIER TEXASCOLRADO
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Dt ALLAS, - - TEXAS £
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