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The Banner-Democrat. (Lake Providence, East Carroll Parish, La.) 1892-current, June 01, 1895, Image 4

Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88064237/1895-06-01/ed-1/seq-4/

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Rheumatism
Is a disease of the blood, and the acid
which causes it is neutralized and ex.
pelled by Hood's Sarsaparilla, the
Hood's great blood purifier:
"In the fall of 189a I be
Sarsaparila gan to have aciatic rlhenm
tiam, and soon my suffering
ake was so ntense that I could
not rest day or night, except
Ri under strong opiates. I wa.
fast breaking down in my
'Red Blood general health, and felt that
S my days were near an end.
In February I began to take Hood's Sarsa
parilla, and before I had taken the third
bottle I was free from pain, could do farm
work, and to this day I have not felt the
least symptoms of a return of the trouble.
We all feel that we cannot afford to gel
along without Hood's Barsaparilla and I
Hood's Pills in the house, and I cannot ex
press my gratitude for the benefit I have re
eired from them." W. R. DAvs, Marrow
Bone, Kentucky. Remember
Hood's Sarsaparilla
Is the Only 1
True Blood Purifier
And It is therefore the ideal Spring Medi l.
cine. Be sure to get Hood's. 1
I
Hood's Pills bt:u~ habi'al constUP i
J-IIGHEST AWARD
WORLD'S FAIR [
SFoR cONDITIONS*DIGESTI VO g
Dyspeptic,DelicateInfirm and
MAGE PERSONS
THESAFESTFOOID 1N
THE SICK ROOM FOR
INVALIDS
. No CONVALDESCOEdRS i
EFO TFOODIN
THE SICK ROOM FOR fe
INVALIDS a;
rI O t~r- A
t'NURSING fMOTHERS,INFANTS, f
CHILDREN
DRUG GISTTS. nt
JOHN CARLE&SONS.NEWYORK, t
to
ý 1
11 y
of
0' o s9 S og 1 m ed
Ir!1 E g ra rs~t.
'U~r BB i r Bte
B ~C~s' ,'
i ~f~ e1i
FARM AND (;ARDEN.
THE PLEBEIAN PEANUT.
It Pltss a Usefal Pat a the Esemsey of
Mae sad Beast.
The plebeian peontt, which rejoices
in such other homely nameh as earth
nut, groundnut, ground pea, goober
and pindar, has assumed a new dignity,
having recently been honored as
the subject of a special report by
one of the experiment fficers of the
national department of agriculture.
The report corrects some prevalent
mistakes as to this little article of con
sumption, gives astonishing statistics
as to its value as a food product, and
presents many interesting facts as to
its uses.
It is pleasant to be informed, first of
all, that the peanut is not a nut at all,
but a pea, and that Its shell is not a
sheli, buta pod. Itis alsowell to know
.cd that while cotton, Indian corn, pota
ex" toes and tobacco have usually been
the considered the four plants of commer
cial importance which America has
be given to the world, the peanut must
ns be added, as the weight of authority
ing fixes its birthplace *in Brazil. The
aid crop has become of primary impor
opt tance since 1866, and Virginia, North
vas Carolina and Tennessee produce the
my largest part of it. There are seven
hat varieties cultivated, some of them bunch
nd. and some running vines. The yield
sa* of this underground pea is astonishing,
ird and the amount consumed is a testi
rm monial to its popularity. The yearly
the production here is about 4,000,000
bushels of 22 pounds, which supply the
nd present demand in this country. This,
x-. however, is but a small portion of the
re. world's crop. The exportation from
,w Africa and India to Europe in 1893
amounted to nearly 400,000,000 pounds.
The crop of the world may be safely
8 estimated at 600,000,000 pounds.
The value of the homely little ground
pea, however, becomes especially ap
parent when its uses are considered.
) It is sorted in the factory into four
di- grades, the first, second and third be
ing sold to vendors of the roasted pea
nut, either directly or through jobbing
pa houses. The fourth grade is sold to
a confectioners, and after their manipu
lation reappears as peanut candy,
) burnt almonds and in cheaper grades
of chocolates. The report says in this
connection: "The extent of the use of
the peanut by the American people
will be more fully appreciated when it
is remembered that they use 4,000,000
bushels of nuts yearly (at a cost to the
consumers of $10,000,000), which do not
form a part of the regular articles of
food but are eaten at odd times." The
planter uses the nut as a fattener for his
hogs and the vine as peanut hay for
his stock, and the feeding value is in
creased when some of the nuts are
cured and fed with the hay. Millions
of bushels are used in the old world
S for the production of oil, which is
regarded as equal to olive oil. In fact,
great quantities are used, unknown to
d the consumer, instead of the latter,
Marseilles alone taking 230.000,000
pounds a year for the making of al
leged olive oil. In India, ]urope,
Brazil and this country the oil is used
medicinally. It is employed by manu
facturers in fulling cloth. It makes a
good lighting fluid, and is largely
used by the manufacturers of soap
and as a lubricant in machine
shops. The oil cake is used in Germany
for fattening cattle and sheep. It is
pronounced an excellent cattle food.
A grade known as "peanut meal" is
made by grinding the hulls, immature
peanuts, and those of inferior grades
and a certain quantity of sound nuts
mixed with other ingredients. The
residue, known as "peanut cake,"
makes good soup, griddle cake4, muf
fins, etc., and is one of the most nutri
tive foods for human as well as animal
consumption. The report says: "Al
though the experiment made with pea
nut meal and biscuits as food for the
German army was not so successful as
- to induce the authorities to adopt it as
a part of the rations, still analysis has P
shown conclusively that it is a most
nourishing food for man, and as com
pared with other well-known forms of
vegetable and animal food it has a
high nutritive value." From all of
which it appears that this little nut or
pea, which hitherto has been looked
down upon as the stock in trade of the
street corner vender, the food of the 0
gallery god, and the luxury of the cir
cus, has other and higher uses and is
one of the important staples of com- s1
merce and plays a dignified and useful la
part in the economy of man and beast. i
-Chicago Tribune. le
TIGHTENING FENCES. rc
A Peunsylvanlan's Easy Way of Drawing
Wires Taut.
Wire fences are frequently difficult t as
tighten. Edwin G. Walker, of Butles
county, Pa., sends the plan below, pl
which he uses successfully. Set a post, D
a, in the fence line of any desired
length and stretch as many strand.
Lee
Pb
of wire as wanted. Unreel the strands
to within a tfoot of the post and fasten
securely to a 2x4 santling (b). Two
long bolts, c, e, of 3W feet or thers
about., with long threads and barr'r,
are placed through the center of the
pat. The soantlia may he kept a t
place by reatlgea bokt Af~ste t em
strands are ssesst tassinsd to tohe e
sloanaligt, with wrseah tist the
bolt and draw tbp wrtm ilgbt. 4lwo
seetaous may thr be tlgk~s ee tMhe
same time, but a Usae sen atrqp c
not be tithtemofl ay sthq
the tension equally
tightened sectiess aee heMt sth
nailed.-Parm aEa _me.
watuUl 1b
wtM~ll~F.t
r, A YOUNG GIL'S TRIALS.
Nervous 'Troubles End in t. Vi
0o tUa' Demee.
o55 ha tsuea tI.iew es-Th as Tod by
th- t s chd's oethse.
ber
ty*, [Rea the Reporter, Someeset. Ky.]
a Among the foot hills of the Cumberlan d
by Mountains, near the town of Flat Rock is
the the happy home of James McPherron.
re. Four months ago the daughter of the farm.
ýnt fly, a happy girl of sixteeon, was strickea
n with Bt. Vitus' dance. The leading physl
ica cians wore consulted but without avaiL She
*d grew pale and thin under the terrible nery
ous strain and was fast losing her mental
powers. In fact the thought of placing her
in an asylum was seriously considered. Her
of case has been so widely talked about that
Lll, the report of her atre was like modernizing
t a amiracle of old. To a reporter who visited
)w the home the mother said:
a. "Yes, the reports of my daughter's sick
en ness and cure are true as you hear them.
Her afliction grew into St. Vitus' dance
er- from an aggravated form of weakness and
nervous trouble peculiar to her sex. Every
ist source of help was followed to the end, but
ty it seemed that physicians and medicine were
he powerless. Day by day she grew worse un
til we despaired of her life. At times she al
th most went intoconvulsions. Shegotso that
be we had to watch her to keep her from wan
en dering away and you can imagine the care
ch she pas.
Id "About the time when our misery was
greatest and all hope had fled, I road of
g, another case, almost similar, that had been
ti- cured by a medicine knownas Dr. Williams'
ly Pink Pills. AlmostindesperationI secured
00 some of the pills and from that day on the
he wonderful work of restoration commenced;
is, the nervousness left, hercheeksgrew bright
he with the col1 of health, she gained flesh
m antd grew asbng both mentally and physi
9, cally until to-day she is the very picture of
good health and happiness.
"It is no wonder that I speak in glowing
lY terms of Pink Pills to every ailing person I
meet. They saved my daughter's life and I
id am grateful."
p- The foregoing is but one of many wonder
d. ful cures that have been credited to Dr.
ar Williams' Pink Pills for Pale People. In
many cases the reported cures have been
investigated by the leading newspapers and
a- verified in every possible manner. Their
ig fame has spread to the far ends of civiliza
o tion and there is hrdly a drg store in this
country or abroad where they cannot be
u- found.
9, Dr. Williams' Pink Pills for Pale People
es are now given to the public as an unfaiing
is blood builder and nerve restorer, curing all
forms of weakness arising from a watery
i condition of the blood or shattered nerves.
le The pills are sold by all dealers, or will be
it sent post paid on receipt of price (50 cents a
box, or six boxes for t2.50-they are never
sold in bulk or by the 100) by addressing Dr.
e Williams' Medicine Company, ScBohenectady,
>t N. Y.
PICKINGS FROM EUROPE.
Is Tnm people of Great Britain consume
r less tobacco per head than those of any
,- other civilized country, only twenty
'e three ounces to the inhabitant.
Is Tuz German reichstag has voted to
d appropriate 4,000,000 marks for the Kat
Is ser Wilhelm memorial. The second in
t, stallment of the fund has been ordered
A paid.
r, Ter Belgian government has decided
1 to propose to the chamber of deputies
to annex the Congo Free State to Bel
glum. Premier De Burlet says the
d powers will not object.
' Pasxsnzwr FAua is still reaehing
a out for popularity in France. He has
y just paid a bill of $20,000 for a quarter
P of a bottle of wine supplied to every
e soldier in the army with which to drink
Y his health.
A MONUMENr to King Ludwig II. of C
Bavaria was erected some months ago
at Murnan, but not paid for. The com- 9
e mittee in.charge sent the bill for the
n deficit, 4,000 marks, to theprince regent, I
a who paid it.
ATr Berne recently a husband and v
wife, both Russians, took their degrees f
of doctor of philosophy at the same
I time. They were examined in adjoin- R
ing rooms, the examining professors a
going from one to the other.
e Is a Hungarian village recently a a
farmer tried to shoot his tenth wife t
and her father lie explained that the
previous nine wives had all consented tl
t to be divorced when he asked them, t
but that this one had annoyed him by
refusing, owing to the injudicious ad
vice of her father.
ABOUT BOATS.
In all particulars, save slize, the Vene
tian gondola, the Siamese barge and the a
old Scandinavian Viking ship are very
much alike a
AT Portsmouth, the Majestic, sister
ship to the Magnifleet, Ihas just been
launched. It holds the record forspeed
in construction, having taken five days
less than a year to build.
Tir hay barges on the Swiss lakes,
rowed by women standing, and the
sailboate, with tall brown sails stand- P
ing very high to catch filckle winds, are
among the most pilturesque of craft.
MIss Doa. Wr-Ls is owner and
purser of the Puget sound steamship
Delta, which runs from Whatcom to
the San Juan islands and Victoria,
B. C., tri-weekly. Miss Wells collects
fares, makes contracts for freight, and
also assists in navigating her steamer.
Hew's Tbal 0
We offer One Hundred Dollars rewardfor si
any caseofCatarrh that cannot be cured b at
alls's Catsrrh Cure
F. J. CUnsNr & Co., Prop., Toledo, O.
e, the und have known F. J. s
Cheney for the /es 15ys ', and belleys a
him perfectly honorable in all busidnes n
transactions and finncially able to carry ,
otany obateon made by tirirm.
West A Truas, Wholesale DrugtsTo- at
ledo, 0. Walding, Kinnan A- drin, so
Wholesae Druggists, Toledo, 0.
Hall's Catrrh Cure is tahke internally,
acting directly on the blood and mucos
srfaces of tesstem. e c per hot
th
Phladelpa Record.bl
A us knows that it must either hide or f
dMi- hen truth gets on its track.-Ba-'s
DIEcaasaleO teer ss*
CEDAR BALJ .- ri
sp ltrse!'sq Bths a thm
spe as ss. Atar tArn
~s ~ybvi~ad 4
.8 STANCHIONS FOR COWS.
M atirig Dairy Animals Comfortable sa
S ~epiasg theom cl,.
Clean cowi and comfortable cows
the two factors go together in making
the dairy business profitable. I have
bi worked hard to keep cows clean in
their stalls, but could never sueceed
until I had them hitched on a plat
form at least eight inches above the
ad bottom of the gutter, and arranged so
is that their hind feet would come just at
* the rear edge of the platform. Then
" no manure falls upon the platform and
. the cow is always dry and clean.
It requires some skill, however, to so
rv. arrange the cows as to stanchions, or
tal ties, that they will stand naturally,
ter and for most of the time, with their
[er hind feet just at the rear edge of the
iat platform. The upright stanchions will
ng accomplish this, and where they are
made to swing from side to side they
ek- allow considerable freedom of move
m.
fre
nd
Vei
in
ýn
ment to the cows, but at the best they
as are not wholly comfortable, and to do
of her best a dairy cow must at all times
n be comfortable. There is another plan
Is' which is shown in the accompanying
illustration. The cows are hitched
with chains that slide up and down
lt upon a rod, two cows in each wide
sh stall, or one in a narrow stall as
si. preferred. There is a solid partition
ýi between the stalls and the cribs,
a hinged door admitting the head
i of each cow to her crib at feeding
I time. When the ration has been eaten
the doors are closed and buttoned,
which forces the cows to stand back
r. until their hind feet come to the edge
f, of the gutter, and to lie down also in
in that situation. When the doors are
d closed any manure that has fallen
i upon the platform while the cows
a have been standing ahead feeding is
e scraped into the gutter, and the cows
left until the next feeding.
e Where the manure cellar is under
l the cattle it will be found most con
y venient to have the manure traps in
s the raised walk, as shown, rather tlhn
a in the bottom of the gutter, where
ir they are buried beneath the manure
ý and filthy to handle. Handy shelves
' that are hinged and folded against the
wall when not in use are shown at the
rear of the raised walk. The doors
admitting the cows' heads to the cribs
in front will be found exceedingly
convenient when feeding grain, roots
or ensilage. One can then put the
ration in the crib without molestation
from the horns or nose of the animal,
eager to get at its breakfast or dinner.
The door can then be unbuttoned and
allowed to swing in against the side
of the crib, when the cow can come
forward and eat. 'The crib can be
made to fold down against the outside
of the partition if more room is desired
at any time in the feeding floor.-
American Farm JournaL
GARDEN AND ORCHARD.
POrLTBY for the plum and hogs fof
the apple orchard.
TaxEE should never crowd one an
other in the orchard.
MAxa the garden long enough to
work handily,with a team.
Ia pruning remember that diseased
wood will never become sound.
AxaUAL manuring of the orchard i
will help in securing annual crops oJ e
fruit i
A Tnma that has plenty of room to
grow naturally needs very little trim
ming.
It a tree makes a slow growth it is
advisable to cut back the shoots a lit.
tie in the spring.
SUILIOUT is absolutely necessary tc
the health and growth of the tree and
the production of good fruit.
IT is a mistake to set trees in or
around the garden. The vegetables
need all light and sunshine possible.
Ixa~vJa from borers can be prevented
to some extent by placing a mound of
coal ashes around the stem of the trees.
Arran pruning the grape gather up
all the prunings, old decayed leaves
and other rubbish in the vineyard and
burn them.
Moaz benefit will be derived from
burying bones near grape vines, if care
is taken to break them up fine befor,
putting them in the ground.
Ozu of the best and easiest ways of -
propagating currants is by using wood
of last season's growth cut into pieces
six or eight inhes long.---St. Louis Re
public.
VALUABLE VEGETABLE.
A D.eripgae ot Edae aand Wh tad
eow to )Orw It.
What is endive and how is it grownl
we are asked. Its leaveemake a splen
did salad when properly blanched, and
one that is very useful, as it comes in
after lettuce is gone. It may be grown
at any season, but is usualjg grown for
use late in the fall. For Nearly crop
sow in April, in drills 15 inches apart,
and lateron thin out to 12 inches in the
rows. It an also be sown in beds and
transplanted to the above distance after
attaining auedlest size. The ,mainl
owings are made in June and July
Ordinary good soil and cultivation t i
all it requires. When nearly full
grown it is blanohed in the following
manner: Gasther up the leaves and tie
them by their tips in eouleal form,
thereby enlcdingt the light and sai
from thed inner leaves, which then e
blanch to a beautiful yellowish white.
This process takes two to bye weeks,
according to the temperature, bleach
ing fastest in warm weather. An
other method is to lay. clan boards
right over the plants whish emelades
the air and lhgBht Tie up at dtierent
times as It only keeps a short tgie
_fte blanehing. Foe winter ase tahe
up with earth and store n fa frmesr a
dri4U--JFasers' oes,
Cbd meny ,mumels.r v S5'b
homes*~- 4hl;
You want the Best
Royal Baking Powder never disappoints;
never makes sour, soggy, or husky food;
never spoils good materials; never leaves
lumps of alkali in the biscuit or cake; while
all thest things do happen with the best
of cooks who cling to the old-fashioned
methods, or who use other baking powders.
If you want the best-food, ROYAL
Baking Powder is indispensable.
aiI muIMI a ýe , NS00La. &., II n -w-r.
Iv takes all sorts of men to make a world
as it takes all sorts of notes to make music.
B-natural if you can, but with respect to
others it is well to remember that it is a
poor tune that has neither sharps nor flats.
- Young Men's Era
You cannot always tell what a man is by
what he thinks. Show us a sluggard who is
not brim full of ideas about work.-Young
Men's Era._
TEACHEa-"Tommy, what was the name
of the wife of Napoleon?" Tommy-"It-it
-it wasn't Tritby, was it?"-Cincinnati
Tribune.
aseekig a Paregl Otmae
in search of pleasure or business, should be
precoded by the purchase of nature's great
invigorator. IHostetter's Stomach Bitters,
the best and most genial medicinal safe
guard in existence. Mariners, miners, com
mercial travelers, tounists, and all who
travel by land or sea, speak of it in the
highest terms. Malaria, biliousness, consti
pation, indigestion, rheumatism, nervous
ness and kidney trouble are remedied by it.
"TaERa's some satisfaction in being a ko
dak fiend," mused the amateur photogra
pher, as he sent a bundle of pictures to a
friend. "At least, a man can express his
own views."--Philadelphia Recoý.
The Skill and Knowledge
Essential to the production of the most per
foct and popular laxative remedy known,
have enabled the California Fig Syrup Co.
to achieves greatasuoeas in the reputation of
its remedy, Syrup of Figs, as itis conceded
to be the universal laxative. For sale by all
druggists.
MoTHaE-"Jact, are youstill bead of your
rP\ssi" Jack-"No, ma'am; some one had
a better head than I, and he is there now."
-Harper's Young People.
8ous obliging people think it kind to
break into your conversation and finish
rour jokes for you.-Galveston News.
Like an open book;
our faces tell the
tale of health or dis.
ease. Hollow cheeks
and sunken eyes,
listless steps and
languorous looks
tell of wasting de
r bilitating disease
some place in the
body. It may beone
place or another, the
cause is generally
traceable to a com
mon source-im
' pure blood, and im
pure blood starts
in the digestive organs.
Dr. Pierce's Golden Medical Discovery
purifies the blood, stimulates digestive
action, searches out disease-germs wher
ever then exist and puts the whole body
into a vigorous, strong and healthy con
dition. It builds up solid, useful flesh,
rabs out wrinkles, brightens the eyes
and makes life really worth living.
SIII I
S. FOR
To find the time
required to clean your house with
S Pearline, take the time required to
' clean it last with soap, and divide by
, two. Use Pearline, and save half your
time and half your labor-then you can
S find time to do something else
W` besides work.
- Pearline will clean your
carpets without taking them up.
It will clean everything.
From the kitchen floor to the
daintiest bric-a-brac, there's
nothing insight that isn't cleaned
best with Pearlie. It saves rubbing.
Are You Feoted?
? q
When fee Wast a Thresher,
Horse Power, Swinging or Wind Stacker,
saw Mill, Self Feeder or an Engine, ad
dress the J. L CAss T. i. Co., Racine,Wia.
They have the largest Threshing Machine
plant in the world, and theirimplements may
be relied upon as the best. Businese estab
lished 1842. Illustratedcataloguemailed free.
Tas trouble is, the second thought rarely
comes till the first has been defeated.
Cleveland Plain Dealer.
I use Plso's Core forConsumptton both in
my family and practlce.-Dr. G. W. PArrsa
sot, Inkster, Mich., Nov. 5, 189.
A arraTswSuNT.-Two beautiful cats for
sale, to vegetarians.-Fliegende Blaetter.
From early cild
CZE• hood until I was
grown my family
ECZEspent a fortune
tryingtocure me
of this disease. I visited Hot Springs
and was treated by the best medical
men, but was not benefited. When
allthings bad failed I de
termined to UK try S.S.S.
and in four i I months was
entirely cured. The terribl eczema
was gone, not a sign of it left. My
general health built up, and I have
never bad any return of the disease.
'"CHILDHOOD
recommend-l
ed 88.8. and nd
have neverCýILLDHOOD
yet known a failure to sura
GRO. \W. IRWIN Irwin, Pa
Never }ils to cure,
'eae when an other
remedies have. Our
treatise oablood and
skin diseases mailed
free to any addre.
ar ls IC co. Atlas CG.
tUml A Dunr re.
T"suii sMýesATTsurna
ALL U$IN6 CLAiRETTr gIAAR
MILLIONS Do TWNEAEI,
Sold everywhere. Made only by
THE N. K. FAIRBANK COMPANY,
/L. iagu.
THE POT INSULTED THE KETTLE BECAUSE
THE COOK HAD NOT USED
SAPOLIO
GOOD COOKING DEMANDS CLEANLINE88.
SAPOLIO SHOULD BE USED IN EVERY KITCHEN.
WALTER BAKER & CO
?b. Largesm M(a betre os
PUR, NIIIGH OIADE
IOC1AS AND CHXIRUTES
8II8T AWARDS
I lia aI Fd
- . * .r *.w .V'..wr.i....
ýýrn ý tIEI&. NuBTIUJD
mR vmLt -Fla
W:r..i -m - ..as r ,
~ ~rr 4
il br 1 a,
RO LMUE is
/cakes fir seetal
blacking of a aife.
Tis SUN PAsT8
Morue Dae.. Prep.. Casto. Mae..,. L..A.
The Greatest Medical Discovery
of the Age.
KENNEDY'S
MEDICAL DISCOVERY.
ONALD EllEDY, of OXSURY, MASS.,
Has discovered in one of our common
pasture weeds a remedy that cures every
kind of Humor, from the worst Scrofula
down to a common Pimple.
He has tried it in over eleven hundred
cases, and never failed except in two cases
(both thunder humor.) He has now in his
possession over two hundred certificates
of its value, all within twenty miles of
Boston. Send postal card for book.
A benefit is always experienced from the
first bottle, and a perfect cure is warranted
when the right quantity is taken.
When the lungs are affected it causes
shooting pains, like needles passing
through them; the same with the Liver or
Bowels. This is caused by the ducts be
ing stopped, and always disappears in a
week after taking it. Read the label.
If the stomach is foul or bilious it will
cause squeamish feelings at first.
No change of diet ever necessary. Eat
the best you can get, and enough of it.
Dose, one tablespoonful in water at bed,
time. Sold by all Druggists.
McELREES'
WINE OF CARDUI.
For Female DIseases.

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