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The Banner-Democrat. (Lake Providence, East Carroll Parish, La.) 1892-current, May 22, 1897, Image 2

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88064237/1897-05-22/ed-1/seq-2/

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THE BANNER-DEMOCRAT,
PUBLI8HEDD EVERY SATURDAY Atby
LAKE PROVIDENCE. LA. by
JAIES N. TURNER. stu
tru
publisher and proprietor, Er
irr"
SUBSCRIPTION : 200 PER YEAR. of
Saturday, May 22, 1897.
ma
BISHOP SESSUMS AND THE of
CLERGY. me
.- tst
On the 6th. instant there appeared
in the Picayune a'formal -protest of ap
presbyterian, Methodist, Baptist tn
and Lutheran clergymen of New Or- wl
leans against some of the expressions ne
advanced by Bishop Sessums in his n
notable series of lenten sermons de- or
livered at Trinity Church. In this
protest the Bishop is accused of pan- P
theism, denying the personality of de
God and reducing him to mere flesh. th
He is accused of denying the fall of tIc
man from a state of primitive holi- ri
ness ; of denying that Christ hath "re, or
deemed us through his blood," the
atonement being not a sacrificial off- 3
ering for sin,,but consisting merely H
in the influence of a good example h:
reclaiming mawfrcm Tbe error ofiis '
way. ' It accuses him of the absolute a,
denial of the future punishment of oi
the wicked in the world to come, and C
the assertion of the final restoration tl
of all men to the favor of God in a w
state of probation after death. The y
protest also accuses the Bishop of h
sinking religion into mere huuLanita
rianism; that he denies the necessity
of faith in the Redeemer and of re
pentance for sin, of love to God or d
any of the graces of the holy spirit. s
In other words the Bishop's ortho- d
doxy is questioned very pointedly, e
and the clergy of New Orleans are o
very much setrred up over his relig
ious views as set forth in this lenten e
sermot. The following, so say the t
clergy, is pantheistic:
e According to the modern process I
of reasoni g, religion is a grouping of
Sthe divine around the human, instead t
of the human around the diving; in- C
stead of relegating God to the out- t
aide, he is .brought closer to man.
Therefore, the great mystery of the I
trtnity is understood now to iean s
not that the mysterious triad exists I
alone, Ip. soa esert abyss of space,
=,..frt God the father, God the son,
and God the holy ghost are part of
e universe and dwell in it, and that
the external world is but a manifes
tation of the living God; that ulan
and God and the universe are fused
into one. This is the christian con
ueptioA of the trinity.
Here is the part that strikes at the 1
tieal restoration of man to God:
The old idea of the church being
a select company of God's elect, who,
after the wreck of matter and the
crash of world, will be gathered to at
personal God, has been rellae-d by I
the geand and inspiring conception i
of .he sublime truth that the true I
church embraces all humanity as a
family, under God our common Fath
er, because God is God.
Here is the part that denies the fu
tnrepunishment of man:
And if by sin man lapses troA 'the I
sublime, divine ideal, the penalty will I
aot be tuconsagn him to some infer
ata aphere, to eternal damnation, but
~he pomshment will rat!er be the in
ae, agomnliig realization of having
hattered the divine ideal, of contem
Spitintg the height at which he stood
" ad the deptn'to which he has fallen.
The length of that punishment will
depend upon the duration of tlme
which the soul will take to acknowl
edge its errors, its guilt, its rebellion:
until the soul purges out its smn,
claims kLiship with God. Then wi;l
the merciful father stretch out his
hand and rescue that pleading soul
from its abyss of we and receive it,
serene and enianelpated, into his in
enite mercy.
These religi~ius controversies have
been going on ever since the dawn of
elulllzatiop to the present time, and
they will continu'e to keep society
stilrred up as long as the prld lasts,
at 1oat until the millennium. In the
antiumte, whatever man may say, to
whatever seet he may bulong, or how
everr;much the world is divided , and
split into religious or fanatical aggre
a , oUa--tt matters what not-the
ealtnl purpose of the Great Being
is going steadily on, and the problem
Sof creation, of hife, of nlversat be
. ag, both animate and inanimate,
will continue through the ages to
come according to the will of Him
SLwho seeth a!) things as in the light
ol dsy, S o it doesn't hatter much
e" boot religious creedes dogmas, sects
m dectrnce, so long ag man wr
Jo+ .God pecordi7g to the diitea
o kI' own ccrieseltzrce, It be aees
- , l he will rebelve whatevei reward
iIs Il store for him; God's
.:u·ctry here on earth is the ha
- heart ere tM(a this hidden
- w py et wort out his own
Sak a aptE-O ist oop,tie e gre
Protection From Floods.
%Ie publish below an article written
by a prominent New Orleans gentle
man upon the d) ke system of Holland, La]
who has gained his information by
study and personal observation. We
trust the reading public will derive
some instruction from its perusal.
The article appeared in a recent issue
of the Picayune:
The following article on levees, out
lets and dikes is from the pen of Mr.
Ed. Elsenhauer, a prominent business
man of this city, and a former member
of the New Orleans levee board. His
information concerning the Holland
method of levees has been gained by n
study and personal observation. Au
Much controversy has lately again Air
sprung up as to the efficiency of levees Can
to protect our lowlands against the
annually recurring floods of the river,
with the usual results, viz: The engi
neers unanimously in favor of levees tc
and the people divided, with perhaps a To
majority in favor of levees and a min
ority in favor of outlets. Pt
All must admit that outlets are imn. Pr
possible above Red river, and the advis
ability of outlets below that river Pr
depends entirely upon the capability of
the levees to withstand all possilble Pr
floods. If the levees can be built strong
enough to confine all such floods to the
river there would be no necessity for Se
outlets and nobody would want them.
In view of the general interest taken
just now in our levees, a few remarks
may not be amiss about the famous
Holland levee system frtom one who Sr
has had an opportunity to see it. The
beginning of the present levee system
in Holland dates some 500 years back
and the present perfection is the result
of 500 years labor, study, disasters, dis- S,
couragements, hopes and the spending
of vast sumo of money. W.e now have
the advantage of their long experience,
which accounts for the satisfactory
tesult attained here in the last few S,
years. Our engineers are all level
headed men who know a good thing
when they see it.
In the beginning, and for a long
time thereafter, not only the people of S
Holland, but also their engineers, were
divided in regard to outlets, as is
shown by their old records, and a good
deal of experimenting was done in this
direction. Traces of such outlets are
even now visible in the neighborhood
of the lower Rhine. Careful observa
tions, however, convinced them soon
that they are only harmful and that
every outlet cause d the river to shoal
through the sluckening of the current,
and consequent deposition of silt.
The engineers then closed these out
lets, and the result was an almost im
Stmediate deepening of the channel of
1 the river. There is only one outlet
- now still open in the neighborhood of
- the city of Bois le Due, and even this
will soon be closed. Formerly the
e Rhine had innumerable arms near the
2 sea, which, for the same reason, were
a gradually closed, until now It is re
duced practically to two branches, the -
Waal and the Lell, of which the former
is much the larger, and discharges
about two-thirds of the total volume.
A third branch, the Yssel, carries little
water, and is of small importance.
These former, and now closed branches
i'still exist in the shape of lakes, canals
and low, swampy depressions. Some
have been utilized for drainage, or
e navigation canals, or both combined,
in which latter case they are still con
nected with the river through locks.
g All this shows that the tendency has
, been steadily towards an all-levee
e system, and all outlet theories have
a been utterly repudiated, after having
y given them fair and extensive trials. t
n No engineer in Holland would now
e advocate outlets.
a Their'levee system is the most pet
feet in the world, but in the beginning
they had to pass many trials in the
form of failures, weakness and cre
-vasses, causing much misery and at
times complete despondency. Most of
e their disasters was caused through
I failures of their sea dikes, but now
Sthey are so perfect th.' they can with
t stand the highest fury of an ocean
storm without showing any considera
ble damage. What a magnificent bul
g wark, for instance, is that great dike
of Westkapefle, on the island of
d Walcheron. It has a base of 350 feet,
i. and a height of 251eet above low water,
11 but the main point of interest is the
e ingenious devices for the protection of
I- this dike against the waves. 1 omit a
:fuller description of this dike, as we
, do not require such works here, and
i consequently it would be of no interest
a to our people.
i. Their levees, which are the ones that
interest us, are built somewhat differ
Sent than ours. We have one standard
Slevee here, viz, 8 feet crown, with slope
of 1 to 8 feet on both sides, with here
e and there a particularly exposed levee,
Sor one crossing some low spot re-en
d forced by a banquette on the landside.
The D)utch engineers built their levees
tY In all sorts of shape apd form, accord
a, ing to the requaremedts of the!ocatron,
but with few exceptions give them
mere slope on the river side than on
to the land side. Such levee offers less
r- resistance to waves, andin consequence
ad causes less wash, and has the further
advantage of giving a broader base to
Sthe levee. Their aim, when building
be a levee, always is to throw all possi
g ble strength nto the base by widening
it as much as circumstances will sallow,
Sand, not satisaed with this, usually add
** a banquette of about 20 feet to it on
te, the inside, whilst particularly exposed
to levees have banquette on both sides.
Such levees, with an ordinary 8-foot
im own, will stand dany pressure of
tht ater, and umy be said to be beyond
c any danger. -
The ubject of snob broad base and
ct the additional banquette is'not only to
r- give strength to the levee, bute) is also
te an important factor in preventing seep
age. as the water has to travel so muoch
further in order t& pass through the
ird levee. It alst serves as a good pre
, rveutive against cray~fhb leaks, as it is
so much more dificult for this little
peat to dig tbrodgh it. The building
lea of a levee is done in a most systemati
wo eel maI r. After the gronud is prof
Serly leared of all uidceirablematerial,
bhey buil4d go lere by layers of about
so' 1 foot tbickaels, eiach layer belngoase
uea elly rtammeddown before another Is
Sput down, and when inshbed, it is
cevered.ithl a layer of hard clay "'t
lrk p tc , idaerk which it is plos
Alps Lt
..·C;-rr
Fifth Annual Statement
- OF TIE---
Lake Providence $uilding and Loan Association, Limited, for the
e "Year ending March 31st, 1897.
REV. C. MAHE, President. C. F. DAVIS, Secretary,
NAT MURFEE, Treasurer.
RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES.
d ASSETS.
Amount of Loans In force .............................. 18,800 00
Dues. Interest and Fines delinquent ...................... 197 70
n Amount to debit Individual accounts........... ......... 309 3)
)s Cash in Treasury........................... 66 26
$19,999 26
LIABITITIES.
es Stock Account... .... . ............. ..............812.431 25
D)ues delinquent......... ................................ 8 00
To credit individual accounts .............................. 471 77 12,990 02
n
Difference, total profits in Associatilo......................... 7009 24
. Profits paid out during year ................................... 403 62
- 7.412 86
er Profits as per last Annual Statement......................... 5,256 44
of 3.156 42
de Profits for present year....................................... 2.156 42
'.l VALUE OF SHARES.
he
or Series A-Value at last report...................... ......... .........$75 18
m. Dues 12 months ......... ................................. ...10 10
en Profits for year ................ .................. ............ 10 10
ks Present value........ ..... .................................. 7 $
us
ho Series B-Value at last report.................................... ................. 60 57
be D ues 12 m ouths........................ .................................. 12 0
Profits for year................... .......................... 11 49
ck Present value............ ............................................... S 06
Lilt
- Series C--Valueat last report..................................5 $ 5G
Dues 12 months.............. .............................. 12 00
ýg Profits for year................... ........................... 12 31
«eC
ce, Present value............ ................................$74 87
ew Series D-Value at last report.............. ................ $38 92
Dues 12 months............................................ 12 00
Profits for year................ . ............................10 59
Present value.................. .............................$61 15
of Series E-Value at last report.................................$32 54
Dues 12 mouths .......... .................................. 1 00
erP rofits for year .......................................................... 8 3
)od Profits for year.................. .........................5.. 2 90
his
Series F--Value at last report ............. ...........................81 04
re Dues 12 months.............. .............................. 12 00
od Profits for year.:.. ............... .. ............................ 7 81
va
)n Present value............................... ................$40 85
hat Series G-Value at last report.............. ......................... .$14 29
)Dues 12 months..................... ...................... 2 00
ant, Profits for year............... ... ...-.... .... -......................... 6 86
Present value............... . ............................. $33 15
im- Series IH-Value at last report.... .................$ 6 24
of ues 12 months... 12 00
tlet P rofits for year........................................................... 5 49
Present value.................. ...................... ....3 73
the Series I-Dues 12 months ..................................................... 12 00
the Profits for year .. ......................................... 49
Present value ................................. ........ ...................16 99
the Series J-Dues 6 months ...................................$ 600
ter Interest......... ....... .............................. 24
Present value................. .................. .......... ...24
ace. As shown above, Series A will maluro on payment of the June dues.
hes C. MA IIE, l'resideut.
RBls CLiFTro F. DAVIs, Secrelary.
>me Lake Providence, La., April 10, 1897.
500 feet back from the river.
But, however careful they are in the
building of their levees, the essential i
feature in connection with their dikes,
and .he main difference between our
levee system and theirs is the protec
.ion they give to their levees. The I
'river levees are protected wherever
they are exposed to waves, wind or
current. They usually use willow
brush, which they put in layers on the
river slope of the levees, conmmenciug I
at the foot of the levee and placing it
as high as the highest floodlmark. This I
is then pinned down to the levee with
wooden pins sufficiently long to hold
it down securely. As soon as the water
rises over this the sediment settles in
and between the brush, filling it up
very soon, after which grass is allowed
to grow over it. This gives an almost
absolute security against wavewash
and is also a great protection against
boring animals. Of course, it must be
kept in good repair, or it might do
-more harm than good. Wooden revet
ments, which are so extensively used
here, are utterly condemned as soften
ing and of little service. Willows are
growing in great profusion on our
river banks and should not be an ex
pensive material.
Many of their levees are graveled and
macadamized and used as roadways,
which they consider of benefit for the
levees, as affording protection against
rainwash. In some parts of Holland
they have interior levees running
through the fields in all directions thus
dividing the country into different pol
ders, so that in case of a crevasse only
a part of the country is flooded.
They have an admirable system of
watching the levees in times of high
water. A levee is divided into sections,
say two or three miles in length,. and
sometimes only one mile in dangerous
places. Each section has at a convey
ient place a small cabin in which is
stored all such material as would be
required to close an incipient break,
such as all kinds of lumber, sacks.
tarpaulins, nails, saws, spades, axes,
hammers, mauls, wheel-barrows, etc.
Such section during high water is in
charge of an experienced watchman,
who constantly patrols his section, and
if at any time he diseaders a weak or
dangerous spot he dgnals the next
watchman, who immediately summons
all the help he can find, whilst the first
one in all-baste runs to the tool cabin
Sand in a few minutes is bacK to the
danger spot with his tools repairing it.
It is a well known fact that most of our
b large crevasses would not have'occur
red if help and material Lad been on the
spot mt the beginning. It is considered
e money well spent for thus guarding
the levees, as it Is only for a compara
Stively short time during very high
t water. The principal expense is the
building of the cabins and providing
them with necessary tools..
SIf a h eak is allowed to run for
e'veral bouts before any help arrives, it
s isn most cases too lbte and a full
Sflgdged crevasse is the result:
' good deal more could be- said
w levees in Uo ltsd, partie-.
larly the trouble they have with unsta
blu foundations of peat and quicksand,
but this is matter.for the engineers and
not for the public.
Let our people take heart and be as
sured that, with the present progress in
our levee building, it is a question of
only a short time and our levees will
give them complete immunity from
overflow. Unfortunately, there are so
many who denounce levees because
they have not been made perfect in a
few years. What has taken Holland
fifty years cannot well be done here in
a few years, but our progress has been
much more rapid and the end is' near.
Rome was not built in one day.
Our lands are the richest in the
world and well worth fighting for.
Land in Holland which was valueless
before the levees were built is now
worth $500 the acre.
Our levee taxes are very low, in com
parison with those in Holland. We
pay from 10 cents to 20 cents per acre,
while in Holland they pay from 50 cts.
all the way up to $4 per acre annually.
With all these taxes, Holland is rich
and prosperous, although they can
raise only grain crops and dairy pro
ducts, while we have much more profi
table crops in sugar, cotton and rice.
JURY LIST.
List of the jurors drawn for the June 1897
criminal term ol the lion. 7th District
court tor East Carroll parish, La.
JURORS FOR TIHE FIRST WEEK.
Andrew Powell 1 Aaron Sutfeld 2
Ben Fleming 3 T S Sitton 4
SFM Taylor 3 G H Sutton 3
Nat Wilson 3 Isaac L Lewis 2
SJ GOldfleld 3 S E Overton 3
Henry Franklin 3 Philan Bullin i
Levi Frisby 2 Joe Washington 4
Sam Gibson 2 Robt Lowns 3
i,) B Pond 2 Wm Fore 4
SC A Williams 2 Gus Strother 5
Sam Goodwyn 3 M M Goodwyn 5
Goza McWilliams 3 (Ghas Scott, Jr., 2
5 Willson White 1 Hen Speaks 4
e Tom Godfrey 5 Chas Staples 3
Henry Lee 4 Milford Knox 4
Freeman Abcket 2 Wm Young 2
Jim Irwin 2 Jonas Russel 4
,Max Levy 3 Dolph Reese 5
Sandford Tyler 3 Wm Hogan 2
Steve PulHn 3 John Boatner 4
n Pet Walton 4 Peter Jackson 4
, Robert King 8 Nelson Wright 5
d Henry Smith 2 Henry Jones 5
r Alex Stephena 5 J C Fittman 2
Frank Smith 8 Gentry Jones 5
JURORS FOR THIE SECOND W.EEK.
Chas Ward 3 Eli Johnson 5
W II Benjamin 2 Abe Williams 5
0 Henry Johnson 2 Wm Mathews 5
ie Sig Wolf 1 T J Powell 3
C A Seeghers 8 Abe Wyatt 1
Mose Sargeant 1 Andrew Griffin 8
ir Henry Cronninger 2 Andrew Suttfled 2
r- Burl Oley 2 Gus Turnee 4
ie V Montgomery a J B Kerlin 5
Robt Giltiard 5 Aaron Johnson 2
Jesse Powell 2 Cbas Johnson 2
ig Jonas Scott 2 Parker Gaines 1
a- J N b|organ 3 Ben Griffin . 2
SGee W McKee 8 EM Noland 1
Frank Moore 2 Wright Foster 1
I hereby certify that the above is a true
and correct copy of the original.Ventre List
now on ile and os REcordin my 'ice.
or Witness my seal and signature this 6th
t day of May A. D., 1B7. -
IJ. D. TOMPKINS.
II- tClerk Wh Distrnei Court.
fa , rr
.r e ^Ra ..ý ti . . ý:''~i _ :.. R , ch - -.: "s'.m, `
MA LE VY,
* -*e ** Lake and LeYee Streets, LAKE
PROVIDENCE, LA,
Deolor in
I GENTS FURNISHING GOODS,
The finest line of Clothing carried in the city. Ladles Dress ooda,
alts, Caps, Boots and Shoes, Mackintoshes and Hunting Coats; Trantk
St Valises and Bags
2 9 CALL ON ME Before Purchasing Eleowherer
12 . B. RBANDEL sea, and Tr~M :i
OUR MOTTOs
"18 Q'ALITY, NOT QUANTITY."*
The Providence Lumber o.,
(LAMITEf)
0cPfITRL BTOCA a $5,OOQ
000 S-DEALRS H
Cypress, Red Gum, Red Oak, White Oak. Ash, Cycamore, Rough and Dre
00 Lumber, Plain and Fancy Heart Cypress Shingles, Box Boards
and Barrel Heads.
C ORRESPONDE~ C SOLICITE Lake Providence, La.
I The Only Family GROCERY, S
* lea
. se. A. x['NAlA Proprcto'. at
i LEVEE ST., LAKE PROVIDENCE, LA. a
Dealer In Fine Family Groceries and all kinds of. Fuits p.
* and Nets, Meat, Meal and Flour, Winee, Liquors and Cia- , le
* Hay, Corn and Ot'a. Fine Keg Beer.
ai - 93 le.,
*..gl - UU..O..Oe OE@E . .
S. W. GREEN,
Cor. Lake and Church Stes, Lake Providence, a
Clothing; Boots and Shoes,
General erohandise, (Irooeries and Plantation BSupplies.
Wines iiquors and Cigars. Call before purchasing elsewhere.
H. L. JONES,
Levee St, ,Lake Providence, L.a,
" ..DEALEB IN....
Fine GROCERIES, FRUITS
Flour, Meat and Meal. Wine., Llquot s and Cigars A
Chbap and Finas-olas Grocery House.
A. D. & S. SPENGLER, AGTS.,
-Manafactuere of
Sash, Doors, Blinds, Stain-work, Interior Finish,
and All Building Material.
2 Chepes Place in the South. Write for prices before purohasing elsewhere.
W. B. THOMPSON. P. Lý MoCAY.
W. B. Thompson & Co.,
Cotton Factors & Commission Merchants
NO. 808 PERDIDO STREET,
SNew Orleans, : : Louisiana.
2,,i~i-lle,4m I- ýI Xmº- -
FOR SALE.
A BEATIFUL FIVE ACRE LOT. having
a front of two chbinas and sixty-.slxnks. on
the lake road, next to the property of Mr.
.J.C. Bass. This is beyond a doubt the
~inest dve acre buidlag lot to Est'Chrrolf
parish.
For terms, rly to _
Ior LLfKIIN & HAMLEY.
Heal Estate Dealers,
Lake Prorde*sc, La.
"mu. -
1.W ante d A n Idea ýbo eraHatr coýiýj RS
oc two Ana f ...ese" sir(.
WsCamnpbfl da&CbpZtý bOw e lbWIAed
hbeir stock o~f 4ugig.rd sUqTrieS: et .o
ca On swat, 4f IratºZf-tP C
ue . .-:A
·~1 :''"~
information for the
Public.
The following is the sihedule of the
Y. & M. V. R. R., taking :effect from
Sept. 13.
New Orleans Division--Train 5 will
leave Vick·lurg at 3.10 a.ni.aud,arrive
at Now Orleans 10:35 a. m.
Traiu 21 will leave Vicksburg 8:00
a. mn. and arrive New Orleans 5:30 p.
m.
Train 6 will lecaveNew Orlenais 4:20
p' ni. and arrive Vicksburg 11.50 p. in.
Train No. 22 will leave New Ot.
leans at 8.0,. a. in. andtarrive at Vicks.
burg at 5.55 p. m.
Memphis Division-Train No. & wil
leave Memphis at 7.55;p. m. and arrive
at Vicksburg at 3:00 a. m.
No. 23 will leave Memphis at 8:45 a.
m. and arrive at Vicksburg it 6:45 p.
im.
Train No. 6 leaves Vicksburg at
12.01 a. m. and arrives at Memphis at
j7. 10 pi n.
7.10p. ran No. 21 wilt leave Vickeburg
at 7:3 a m. and arrive at Memphis at
15:30a. m.
Alll trains run dally.
For information as to rates &o.
write to
W. D. BREN1, C. T. A.
SVicksburg, Miss.
JOHN WILLIAMS
Undertaker.
Lake Providence * .
Keeps on hand a large assortment of
Burial Caskets Now, Plain and Orna
mental Metal ic Cases and Wooden
Collins Made and Trimmed to Order;
[april 13-89-1Vl a
Chas. Swoflord,
House, Sign and Ornamental Painter,
Buggy Painting and Paper Hacgiag.
Lake Providence, La.
Wanted-An Idea E-g
:Mmte lo Intwre thenvon. blbtnos wan
80milTI o10 YIFUAII
*D TRIADIE WARIKC
o G r lleLae Pot
jalal tC t to
MUNN ,l i co@0.
n 81 o reendw a ate nd daertpLo.
For- Haelena. Greenville, .Lake Ptd .
i dene.a Vicksburg. anrd Allte
WTy~ O At .ndt L Se0a t t *::,S-AdtS
881 I Cl t.dwaw, A4f ,0 M ,aI
Th.OIIU1A) It -·;
.e1t P~~ fRip ji~Ei ~I~
-· · s

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