OCR Interpretation


The Era-leader. (Franklinton, La.) 1910-current, March 18, 1920, Image 4

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88064305/1920-03-18/ed-1/seq-4/

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CHARTER
United States of America, State of
Louisiana, Parish of Washington.
Be It Known, That on this day,
before me, Delos R. Johnson, a No
tary Public, in and for Washington
Parish, Louisiana, duly qualified, and
in the presence of the witnesses here
inafter named and undersigned, per
sonally came and appeared:
J. E. Kennedy, Angie, La.
G. S. Pierce, Varnado, La.
S. Farmer, Angie, La.
W. W. Boyles, Varnado, La.
W. Plummer Knight. F'r-nuklingrmn,
La.
Isaac M nIle, V ici, I..
Mrs. Annie Gann, Varnado, La.
James Williams, Varnado. La.
Walter Green, Varnado, La.
Joe D. Beal, Varnado, La.
Mrs. Nellie Willis, Varnado, La.
Dr. P. R. Bacot, Varnado, La.
T. E. Warner, Varnado, La.
H. A. Kennedy, Varnado, La.
C. E. Fortenberry, Varnado, La.
W. R. Seal, Varnado, La.
J. W. Seal, Varnado, La.
R. H. Magee, Varnado, La.
I. D. Pittman,. Varnado, La.
All residents of this parish and of
full age, who declared that, availing
themselves of the laws of this state
relative to the organization of cor
porations, and especially of Act No.
267 of 1914, of this state, they have
covenanted and agreed, and by these
presents do covenant, agree and
stipulate and bind themselves, as well
as such other persons as may become
associated with them, and do form
and constitute a corporation and
body politic in law, for the purpose
and objects and under the stipula
tions and conditions following, to
wit:
ARTICLE I.
The name and title of said corpor
ation shall be "THE FARMERS
STORE, INCORPORATED."
ARTICLE II.
Said corporation shall have power
to sue and be sued; to make and use
a common seal and the same to
change and alter at pleasure; to ac
quire, purchase, hold, lease, grant,
sell, pledge, mortgage, encumber and
handle generally all kinds of prop
erty, real, personal and mixed, to
make by-laws, rules and regulations
not inconsistent with this charter or
the laws of this state; to appoint
such offers, agents and employees as
its business may require and fix their
compensation; to wind up and dis
solve itself; and to have such powers
generally as is conferred by law on
corporations.
ARTICLE III.
The object and purpose for which
this corporation is organized is here
by declared to be the following, to
wit:
To buy and sell, at wholesale, or
retail, for cash or credit, all kinds of
goods, wares and merchandise, chat
tels, live stock, and all kinds of per
sonal property; to purchase, hold,
lease, own, mortgage, pledge, sell,
convey, improve and handl- all man
ner of property, real, personal and
mixed; to establish and operate one
or more branch stores and places of
business in Washington Parish, La.,
or elsewhere, as permitted by law, as
the Board of Directors may deem fit;
and generally do all the acts and
things necessary, incidental and
proper in carrying out the purpose
and objects of this corporation.
ARTICLE IV.
The Capital Stock of this corpora
tion is hereby fixed at the sum of
Tea Thousand ($10,000.00) Dollars,
divided into 100 shares of a par
value of One Hundred ($100.00)
Dollars each.
ARTICLE V.
The domicile of this corporation is
hereby fixed at Varnado, Washington
Parish, Louisiana, where all meetings
of the Board of Directors shall be
held, and upon the written consent
of all directors may be held else
where.
ARTICLE VI.
This corporation shall continue for
a period of ninety-nine years, unless
sooner dissolved, in accordance with
the provisions of the Charter and the
and the laws of this state.
ARTICLE VII.
All the affairs of this corporation
shall be managed and conducted by
a Board of nine (9) Directors, who
shall have full power to manage the
the affairs of the corporation and
pass such rules, regulations and by
g laws as they deem proper for the
K conduct of its business. They shall
I have full power to appoint all agents,
managers or employees, and confer
- such power on each director and of
ficer as they deem necessary. A ma
fority of the Board shall constitute
a quorum, and their acts shall be
valid corporate acts. A director to
. be eligible must own in his own
f' ame at least one unpledged share
of the capital stock, fully paid.
The first Directors of this corpor
stsi hall be the following: WAL
T RGEEN, R. H. MAGEE, P. R.
;AOO JOE D. SEAL, S. FORNEA,
. AN JAMES WILIAMS,
MILEY and J. E. KENNEDY,
of Washington Parish,
and who shall serve until
m.;~ Molnday in January, 1921,
'wbditohinm a new Board of Direc
be elected. The regular
for the election of
*all be held on the ftst
9 January 'of each subse
,or in the event of the
elct on said date, the
the corporation shall
to. cal a meeting of
e 9ra that proe
~itkE the poiin
cppa~id rlatveto no
DtSo7i3 shall serve Un
hannal meeting, or an
are elected and
tely after the
as herein stated,
meet and elect
one to be
be Vice-President,
, and one to be
4etporstlon, during
respective offices.
mneeting, on the
Prefidt of
All of whom reside in Washington
Parish, State of Louisiana.
The stockholders' meeting for the
election of Directors, as herein pro
vided, shall be held at the domicile of
the corporation after notice to the
stockholders, which notice shall be
;:livered to the stockholder person
ally, or deposited in the Post Office,
addressed to him at his last known
residence, at least fifteen days be
f.ire the meeting. Other stockhold
irs' meetings may be held when or
dered by the Board of Directors, or
on applicatiuoi of 25 per cent of the
out.stndinil stock. Notice of .Uh
m' ting :l<t be given in the -sear
manner as provided for in meetings
to elect Directors, provided that in
all cases of stockholders' meetings, it
shall not be necessary to give notice
if all the stockholders waive notice
in writing.
ARTICLE VIII.
The. Charter of this corporation
may be amended, the capital stock
increased or decreased, or the objects
and purposes of the corporation
changed, at a regular meeting of the
stockholders called and held in pur
suance of this Charter and on com
plying with the law relative thereto.
ARTICLE IX.
No stockholder of this corporation
shall ever be held liable or responsi
ble for the contracts or faults of this
corporation in any further sum than
the unpaid balance due on the shares
of stock subscribed for by such per
son; nor shall any informality in the
organization of this corporation have
the effect of rendering this Charter
null, or of exposing a stockholder to
any further liability beyond the bal
ance, if any, on his stock.
ARTICLE X.
This corporation may be dissolved
by complying with the provisions of
Act 267 of 1914, and whenever this
corporatiqn is dissolved, its affairs
shall be liquidated by three liquida
tors, elected by the stockholders at a
meeting called for that purpose, at
which meeting the stockholders shall
determine the manner of liquidation
to be pursued; the qualification of
the liquidators, and the powers to be
given to them in winding up the af
fairs of the corporation.
ARTICLE XI.
This corporation shall be a going
concern as soon. as the amount of
stock is subscribed and paid in, as
is required by Act 267 of 1914. The
initial stock subscription subscribed
by each of the incorporators herein
is indicated as follows:
J. E. Kennedy, one share....$ 1,000
G. S. Pierce, five shares .... 500.00
S. Farmer, one share .......... 100.00
W. W. Boyles, five shares.. 500.00
W. Plummer Knight, one
share .............. ............... 100.00
Isaac Miley, five shares ..., 500.00
Mrs. Annie Cann, one share 100.00
James Williams, five shares 500.00
Walter Green, 10 shares.... 1,000.00
Joe D. Seal 10 shares ........ 1,000.00
Mrs. Nellie Willis, 1 share.. 100.00
Dr. P. R. Bacot, 1 share.... 100.00
F. E. Warner, 3 shares...... 300.00
H. A. Kennedy, 5 shares.... 500.00
C. E. Fortenberry, 1 share.. 100.00
W. R. Seal, 3 shares ........ 300.00
J. W. Seal, 4 shares............ 400.00
R. H. Magee, 2 shares........ 200.00
I. D. Pittman, 1 share ........ 100.00
Thus done and signed at my office
in the Town of Franklinton, Wash
ington Parish, Louisiana, in the pres
ence of T. P. Wilks and H. A. Ken
nedy, competent witnesses, on this
the 31st day of January, 1920.
Witnesses:
T. P. WILKS,
H. A. KENNEDY.
DELOS R. JOHNSON,
Notary Public.
WALTER GREEN,
J. W. SEAL,
H. A. KENNEDY,
R. H. MAGEE,
W. W. BOYLES,
I. D. PITTMAN,
ISAAC MILEY,
T. E. WARNER,
MRS. NELLIE WILLIS,
MRS. ANNIE CANN,
C. E. FORTENBERRY,
P. R. BACOT,
J. E. KENNEDY,
W. P. SEAL
JOE D. SEAL,
JAMES WILLIAMS,
S. FARMER,
G. S. PIERCE,
W. PLUMMER KNIGHT.
CLERK'S OFFICE
State of Louisiana, Parish of Wash
ington:
I hereby -certify that this instru
ment was filed for record February
27, 11 a. m., 1920; recorded Febru
ary 27, 1920, in Charter Book No. 1,
Page 128 of the official records.
M. A. THIGPEN,
Clerk and Ex-Officio Recorder.
(Publ. March 18-April 22, 1920.)
w-s.s.
Bids WVanted.
Franklinton, Louisiana,
March 5, 1920.
In aooorda:ice with Act 205 of
1912, as amended by Act 8 of
1916, notice is hereby given that
the Police Jury for Washington
Parish, Louisiana, will receive,
at its next meeting, on April 2,
1920, bids for the fiscal agent for
said Parish during the ensuing
two (2) years. Said Police Jury
will, on that date, at noon, open
all bide received and award the
contract in aocordance with law.
By order of the Polioe Jury.
This 5th day of March, 1920.
W. E. Banister,
Secretary.
Wanted.
To contract hardwood Jogging,
Apply to
A, L, Hickman, Supt,,
Rioab4 P. Baer & Co,
8oQpNla, 1T
MARCH 1-BACK ON THE JOB
\T LOOKS MORE
COMPLICATEO GD00 Luc OLD
fow, Iur IT ATu'L
MAlKE 0t Tg
Joe -B-U1i3ST
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OEFERRED WOE! !MS
TO RAILROADS' TASK
Large Capital Expenditures Re
quired, Says Hines-Impos
sible to Do All Now.
In order to keep pace with the
growth of business and production in
this country and the demand for in
creased transportation facilities an
enormous amount of railroad worl:
must be done in the next few years
which will require the investment of
billions of dollars of new money. This
is essential not only to maintain the
railways at their normal high standard
of service and efficiency, but also to
make up for ordinary expansion and
improvement needs on existing lines
which were interrupted by the war
and to a large extent deferred alto
gether.
Railroad managers realize that even
if the necessary new capital was avail
able it would be practically a physical
impossibility for the railroads to ac
complish any large part of this de
layed and accumulated work during
the present year. Consequently the
most vital needs of the railroads will
receive first consideration in the plans
for the immediate future so that the
public demands in the months of heavi
est traffice may be served as efficiently
as possible.
Vast Amount of Work to Be Done.
Walker D. Hines, Director General
of Railroads under goveruneit con
trol, emphasized this task facing the
railroads after their return to private
operation in a letter to Senator Albhert
B. Cummins, chairman of Senate Inter
state Commerce Committee, and RIep
resentative John J. Esch, chairman of
the House Committee on Interstate and
Foreign Commerce. Mr. Hines prec
sented this phase of the railroad prol
lem to them in urging the necessity
for pressing the railroad legislation
and to point out that delay would "se
riously impair the public service by
virtually suspending improvements and
the acquisition of equipment"
"In order to keep abreast of the
growth of business in this country,"
wrote Mr. Bines, "it is indispensable
that railroads should continue to spend
large sums in the acquisition of new
equipment, the enlargement and unifica
tion of terminals and the construction
of additional and the enlargement of
existing shops, engine houses, turn
tables, etc., and in the carrying for
ward of normal programs for the revi
sion of grades, construction (f addi
tional main line tracks, longer and
more numerous passing tracks, etc.
"A vast amount of work now re.
mains to be done," he added, "which
tho Intervention of the war has neces
sarily delayed and accumulated, and
the result is that during the year 1920
very large capital expenditures ought
to be made to make up for the Inter
ruptions inevitably due to the war and
to prepare the railroads to serve ade.
quately the increased traffic throughout
the country.
"In the year or two prior to the be
ginning of federal control this work
was largely arrested by the dfificulties
of securing materials and labor and
also by the diffculty of securing new
capita1. During the year 1918 this
work was largely restricted to things
which could be promptly done and
which would have a relation to win
ning the war and also restricted by
the scarcity of materials. The result
was that comprehensive programs for
developing the railroads were largely
interrupted.
"During the calendar year 1919 there
has boon unavoidablj an almost com
plote stoppage of all these marters be.
cause of the prospect of early termina.
tion of federal control and the result.
ing indisposition on the part of Con.
gnu t l11nuI9 appreprlstlbn,,'
TRAFFIC INCREASE
TREBLED SINCE 1898
Greater Efficiency Enabled Rail
roads to Meet Country's
Growing Demands.
The American railroads are more
than one-third of the railways of the
world. The traffic hauled on the rail
ways of the United States is now three
times as great as it was twenty years
ago. In four months now the railroads
carry as much freight and as many
passengers as they did then in a year.
In the three months alone of the har
vest movement in 1919 the traffic equal
ed that of the whole year of 1898.
In 1898 freight ton miles carried by
the railroads of the country were more
than 100,000,000,000 a year. In 1910
they were more than 250,000,000,000,
In 1918 more than 30),000,000,000 and
in 1918 more than 400,000,000,000. Al
though the railway mileage increased
only about 65 per cent since 1890, im
Sprovements in tracks, terminals, equip
ment, etc., have been so marked that
the volume of goods carried (measured
in the number of freight tons carried
one mile) increased more than five
times from 1890 to 1917.
Increased Efficiency.
Taking account of both freight and
passenger service, the railroads in 1900
hauled 186,000 traffic units (freight
tons carried one mile, plus passengers
carried one mile) for each railway em
ployee. By 1917, the last year of pri
vate operation of the railroads prior to
the entry of the United States into the
war, that 186;000 had been increased
to 206.000.
TheII following table shows the in
crease in efficiency of American rail
Sroads since 1900, which enabled the
railroads to keep pace with the growth
of the country:
Ton miles increased........ 190%
Passenger miles increased.. 170%
Trackage increased ........ 56%
Cars and engine increased.. 75%
Workers increased ......... 85%
Output per worker increased 60%
Average train load Increased 130%
These figures show that the traffice
hauled by the railroads of the country
has increased more than three times
as fast as the trackage, more than
twice as fast as the equipment and
more than twice as fast as the number
of workers. This has been made pos
sible.by far-sighted investment of new
capital to increase the efficiency of the
transportation facilities and thereby
enable the railroads to increase the
amount of traffice handled and reduce
the amount of labor required to handle
it.
Urge Adequate Rates,
In a resolution adopted by the Asso
ciation of Life Insurance Presidents
the heads of the country's large Insur
ance companies express their attitude
toward the railroad situation as fol
lows:
"Rehabilitation of the railroads and
establishment by law of rates adequate
to provide for the present and future
demands of our growing commerce and
to stabilize the credit and securities of
the roads."
Protection for Public.
The executive couneil of the Nation.
al Assoclation of Credit Men in a pub
lic statement on the credit situation of
the country says:
"The conncil D ibts consideration of
the tranbfer of the railways to private
control felt that itis of the highest in)
portance that the railways be protect
ed from the dangers of receivership
and the pubtle asuroed apainet uia
terruPted servic,''
D. BIENN
OF
Bogalusa, Louisiana
Wishes to.supply i ),
an attractviv
Columbia
/ Graphaphone
I which will make it
for you to enjoy all of
latest music by popular
performers.
Columbia
Talking r
Machine
installed Full line of all the lat
in your home records and your choicefro
on easy
monthly our stock will reach you
payments. same day you mail order
us.
THE UNIVERSAL CAR
The Ford Model T One Ton Truck with its
manganese bronze worm-drive is really a
necessity for the farmer because it solves his
problem of economic transportation from the
farm to the city. And in farm work alone, it
will be found a great money saver as well as a
big labor saver. Has all the merits of the Ford
car multiplied by greater capacity with greater
strength. No extra cost in operation. We'd
like to talk it over with every farmer. Bring
your Ford car to us for necessary repairs and F
thus get the genuine Ford parts and reliable
Ford workmanship.
Motor Sales & Service Co.
j
Sheriff Sale.--Nc. -.
Louis Crain
Vs.
Avey Rawls et ale.
26th Judicial District Court of Louisi
ana in and for Washington Parish.
Notice is hereby given that by vir
I tue of a commission of sale issued
out of the 26th Judicial District Court
of Louisiana, in and for Washington
parish, in the above entitled cause
and to me directed, I will proceed to
sell at public auction to the last and
highest bidder, on
Saturday, April 24, 1920
at the principal front door of the court
house at Franklinton, La., between
the legal sale hours for judicial sales,
the following described property be
ing and situated in Washington bar
ish, Louisiana, to-wit:
First: The South Half (81-2) of the
South East Quarter (8E1-4) of Section
27 and the North Half (N1-S) of the
North East Quarter (NE1-4) of Sec
tion 84; Township 1, South Range 12
East.
Second: Fifty (50) acseres of land
more or less in the Nathan Blackwell
Headright 41, Township 1, South,
Range 18 East St. Hel. Mer., and de
scribed as follows: Bound on the
North by lands of - Hedge, and John
Green, on the East by the East line of
the said headright, on the South and
SWest by Pushapatappa Creek.
Terms of sale: CASIH.
To be sold for the purpose of effect
ing a partition.
This 16th day of March, 1920.
J. E. Bateman. Sheriff.
Ott & Johnson, Attorneys.
(Publ. March 18" April 22, 1920)
Everyone is interested in an
item of local news. If you know
of any local happening that is
not generally known, communi
sata the ha t to this 0898.
Sheriff Sale-lNo.18
Richard P. Baer &
Vas.
Willie Stewart ekat1
26th Judicial District Coaul
ana in and for Washln
Notice is hereby given tal
tue of a commission of salei
of the 26th Judicial DistritA
Louisiana in and for W
ish. in the above entitled 814
ed cause, to me directed #a
ered for execution, I will
sell at public auction to the
highest bidder on
Saturday, April24,,
at- the principal front
Court House at Fzankllintd
ana, between the legal
judicial sales, the follo
property, being situated'
ish of Washington, State of
towit:
All timber 5 inches in
and over 2-4 feet from the
the butt, standing, lying o
one hundred (100) acres of
or less, being a part of the
Peters Headright 40 in TPI
14 E. St. Hel. Mer. and
the land in the said H
East of "COut off" and
North, East and South by
The said land being sitoutedl
ington Pariesh, State of
Also full and complete
for all purposes over and
land. The right to nee
the said timber expires at
15 years from February 19,
Terms of Sale-CASH.
To be sold for the parpold
ing a partition.
This 16th day of Masrdhi
J. E. Batedma,
Ott & Johnson, Attorney
(Publ. March 18-Aptil 2
$uy War 8aiY P

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