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The true Democrat. (Bayou Sara [La.]) 1892-1928, November 02, 1912, Image 2

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The True Democrat.
ELRIIE ROINSON i
MRS. MAY LEROBINSON (Editors
Official Journal of the Parish of
West Feliciana, the Towns of Bayou
Sara and St. Francisville, and of
the School Board.
We also own and publish the Feli
clana Record, a weekly newspaper
for the town of Jackson, La. Ad
vertisers will do well to get Joint
rates for both papers.
Entered at the Post Office at St.
Frar.cisville, La., as second class
mail matter.
Subscription $1.50 a Year in Advance.
Saturday, November 2, 1912.
VERY UNFORTUNATE.
Archbishop Blenek has issued a
formal letter to his clergy, directing
that same be read at mass in the
Roman Catholic churches of Louisi
ana to-morrow, urging Catholics to
vote against the proposed tar revis
ion, because its inheritance tax "ea
ture will possibly cause loss to the
Church in donations and legacies.
There can be no doubt that this is
a severe blow to tax revision, as
many Catholics may take the Arch
b'shop's utterances as mandatory,
and vote against Amendment No. 1,
regardless of its many good features,
and of the fact that the inheritance
tax provisions are not fixed by the
amendment, but are subject to legis
lative action and can be corrected at
a later session of the Legislature.
Mr. Edgar H. Farrar has character
ized the Archbishop's position as "un
fortunate," and it must be admitted
that this word but mildly describes
the situation thereby evolved. It is
not only *unfortunate for tax revis
ion since it arrays against the sys
tem, many devout sons of the church
who will put her claims against their
own material advantage, but it is
doubly unfortunate because it precip
itates the Church into politics, some
thing all Americans are agreed is
unwise and dangerous.
It. is unfortunate because it gives
color to the charges made that re
ligious organizations have already
been playing a hand in the politics
of the state. These charges have
been denied, but the Archbishop's
frank declaration cannot be denied
or overlooked. He is using the vast
and powerful machinery of his church
to combat a purely political question,
a precedent full of danger. Had any
great moral and unsectarian issue
been involved, it would be proper for
churchmen to take action, but no
such cause is at stake. It is sim
ply an economic proposition. On
the one hand, hundreds upon hun
dreds of plain laymen, Catholic and
Protestant alike, will be benefited
by relief from state taxation, while
on the other hand, the Church may
stand to "ose something through an
inheritance tax on an enormous lega
cy, which may "happen" once in a
decade.
The common-sense and the piety
of Roman Catholics will suggest to
them that they may vote for tax re
vision, and later attend to a meas
ure that will protect donations to
their Church.
SHOULD RECEIVE YOUR VOTE.
The Fifteenth Judicial District
Court, composed of Cameron and Cal
casieu parishes, is in session 313 days
in the year, and 314 in leap year,
when the extra day is not Sunday;
and at that, can't keep up with its
business. That it has not been tho
roughly swamped is due to the mag
nificent distance to court in Calca
sleu, it being cheaper to compromise
small cases than to pay court costs.
The Legislature has now divided
Calcasieu into four small parishes,
each of which will require two regu
lar terms of court. Court fees will
be much smaller, and the number of
cases proportionately larger. Proba
bly the business of the district court
wll be doubled.
That is why the voters are asked
to vote yes on the Constitutional
amendment marked "Act 147" amend
ing Article 109 of the Constitution.
The people of the district ask its
o(loption, not as a convenience to
the lawyers, but as a real necessity
to themselves.
Important as is the tax amend
ment, and valuable and interesting,
it cannot be denied that everybody
is getting very tired of it, principal
ly on account of the columns of stuff
printed about it, written not only
by men, who know what they are
talking about, but the multitude of
others who can produce platitudes
about it-or sophistries.
The wish may be father to Ihe
thought, in some quarters, prompt
ing the rumor that Gov. Hall will re
sign, if the tax reform measure be
defeated. The Governor emphatical
ly states that he will not resign in
such case. To our mind, it is the
more necessary that he should re
main at his post, and "save the
pieces."
LOCAL EFFECTS OF SEGREGA
TION.
West Feliciana Parish.
Total assessment ....... $2,009,111.00
Withdrawn from local tax
ation .............. 322,373.50
Remaining for local taxa
tion .................$1,686,737.50
Six mills surrendered by
State on $1,686,737.50 10,120.42
Less ten mills surrender
ed by parish on $322,
373.50 .............. 3,223.73
Gross gain to parish..$ 6,896.69
Compensation to be made by par
ish to towns:
BAYOU SARA.
Total assessment $79,750.
Segregated property
Railroads .... .... .... $1,242.00
Telegraph .... .... .... 6,340.00
Total ........ ....... $7,582.00
Compensation by parish to
Bayou Sara (10 mills
on $7,582) .......... $75.82
Pius 5 per cent bonus... 3.75
$79.57
ST. FRANCISVILLE.
Total Assessment $366,850.
Segregated property
Railroads ............ $10,440.00
Telephone ........ .... 6,040.00
Express ...... .... .... 200.00
Banks.... .... .... .... 96,420.00
Cotton-seed oil mills .... 27,000.00
Total ........ ........ $140,100.00
Compensation by parish to
St. Francisville (10
mills on $140,000) .. $1,401.00
Plus 5 per cent bonus... 70.05
$1,471.05
Total compensation to be
made by parish to
towns ............. $1,550.62
Gross gain to parish.... 6,896.69
Net gain to parish .... $5,346.07
SQUARE DEAL IN TAXES.
(Continued from first page)
tlIeir gross premiums, with certain
restrictions.
In fact this article of the proposed
amendment goes into every detail
about assessments.
In order to reimburse parishes and
municipalities now free from parish
taxes caused by the withdrawal of
the sources of State revenue, each
parish and municipal corporation has
the right to levy an additional tax of
six mills on all unsegregated prop
erty.
In order to similarly reimburse mu
n'cipalities now free from parish
taxes, each parish shall levy annual
ly for eight years after Jan. 1, 1914,
the six mill tax aforesaid, or as
mu~h thereof as may be necessary,
and out of the proceeds of this tax
each parish shall, under the super
vision of the State Tax Commission,
compensate each such municipailty1
within its limits for loss of revenue
caused by such withdrawal.
If the proceeds of such tax re
maining to each parish, added to
the proceeds of the levy of 1 per
cent tax now permitted to be levied,
after making the compensation afore
said, shall not be sufficient to repay
the said parish the sum it would
have received by the levy of its pres
ent alimony tax on the basis of the
assessment rolls of 1911, plus the in
crease of 5 per cent on the amount
of the said tax, then the State shall
compensate each parish the amount
of such deficiency as fixed and re
ported yb the Tax Commission.
The obligation to make compensa
tion shall not be made after the
year 1912.
It is provided that all revenue re
ceived by the State shall go into the
general fund, and the General As
stmbly shall apportion the fund
among all of the public purposes for
which taxation is levied. It must
set aside each the following:
For the general public school fund
not less than ond-fifth of the gross
revenues of the State, provided that
the apportionment shall never be
less than $1,030,000, general engi
neer's fund not less than $400,000,
Confederate pensions, the constitu
tional limie, good roads not less than
$150,000, public debt not less than
$525,000, or not less than $630,000 if
tihe public debt amendment is adopt
e'd.
If adopted this amendment, gener
ally speaking, goes into effect Jan.
1, 1914, except that as to special
taxes shall go into effect as soon as
the General Assembly shall pass
laws carrying them into effect.
After Jan. 1, 1914, the office of the
State Board of Appraisers and the of
fice of the State Board of Equaliza
tion shall be abolished, except that
the incumbents shall hold office un
t:. their terms expire and they sha'l
render aid to the State Tax Commis
- sion.
All State taxes and licenses le
maining uncollected on Jan. 1, 1914,
for the year 1913 and previous years
shall be collected and accounted for
under existing laws by the sheriffs inll
the parishes and the State tax col
lector in New Orleans, but all such
collections must be completed by
June 30, 1916. After that date the
taxes unpaid shall be collected by
the State Treasurer, as the office of
tax-collector in New Orleans will go
out of existence.
The amendments to the Constitu
tion to be submitted to the people
at the time this one is, proposing to
exempt from taxation certain things,
shall not be affected by the provis
ions of this amendment. This amend
ment is not to be construed as af
fecting any property now exempt
from taxation under the Constitu
tion of 1898 or any of its amend
ments. If the public debt amend
ment is adopted it shall supersede
this one in respect to the mode of
providing for the funding of the
public debt.
If the amendment is adopted die
Governor must call an extra session
prior to Jan. 1, 1914, so that the
proper laws may be passed to put
the various phases of this amend
ment into full force and effect.
It is unfortunate that tax reform
has thrust all other subjects, cover
ed by the proposed amendments in
to the background, indeed so far in
tc the shade that they are likely to
be overlooked altogether by the aver
age voter. To such, the article on
first page giving a dispassionate sy
nopsis of the several amendments
proposed is earnestly commended
with the hope that the voter will
give each subject earnest and care
ful thought.
AS TO FIVE MILL PARISH TAX
Editor True Democrat:
The advocates of the five mill tax
are trying to give the impression
that the working of the roads will be
controlled in each ward by a ward
commission, should the tax carry.
This apparent concession to the
people shows the weakness of their
position. Those who vote for the tax
under this impression will wake up
to find themselves woefully deceiv
ed.
This five mill tax is being voted
f0'r under Article 291 of the Constitu
tion, which reads as follows:
"Other taxes may be levied by the
police jury for roads and bridge pur
poses, not to exceed five mills ;or
five years on the property of the par
i. h or any ward thereof, where the
rate of taxation and the purpose
thereof shall have been submitted to
the property tax payers of said ward
or parish entitled 'to vote under the
election laws of the state. And a
majority in numbers and value of
those voting at said election shall
have voted in favor thereof."
There is nothing in the above art!
cle that gives the power to estab
lish road commissions either in he
wards or parish.
To the police jury is delegated the
power, the responsibility rests with
them and them alone, nor can they
delegate it to others.
Again, the resolution ordering the
election makes it a parish, not a
ward election. The mere statement
that the taxes collected in each
ward shall not be used outside cf
them has no binding effect what
ever.
The writer wishes to disclaim any
desire to unjustly criticise the police
jury. Many of its members are his
personal friends, and for every mem
ber he has only the kindliest feel
ing. The strongest criticism of our
police jury, past and present, is con
tained in their own acts and ordi
nances. The court house is a mon
ument, either to their indifference or
want of common judgment. The
bridge debt of several thousand dol
lars, and the attempt to float a thir
ty thousand dollar bond issue contra
ry to law, were other grave mistakes
of policy.
It follows that it will not do to
vote a five mill tax for any purpose
without the proper safeguards, even
if we all agreed as to its justness
and necessity.
The ordinance as adopted by the
police jury has loop-holes enough
in it to drive a four mule team
through.
Our parish roads were never in
better condition than they are now.
There is absolutely no need to
spend a dollar on them. Should we
have a continued wet spell and
heavy traffic they will cut up, but
this would be the case were they
model roads. The writer was in
East Feliciana last January during
the bad spell of weather, and he
found the model road from Jackson
to McManus the worse cut up road in
the parish.
A short time ago our police jury
attemuted to correct the evil of plac
ing gates a·ecss the public roads, but
signally failed. It was perfectly
nnamazing to learn how few public
roads we had. Better locate the
roads and have their title placed in
the public before attempting to es
tablish a road system.
Another evil we suffer from is
that more than half the roads of the
parish are of iasufficient width. The
fences along these roads are up to
the road's edge. Will the owners
COME TO THE
LOUISIANA, STATE FAIR
OCT. 30-MLOV. 6l1
$25,000 ifs PREMIUMS AND PU1eSES.
GREAT AGRICULTURAL AND LIVESTOCK FAIR..
BIYS' CORN AND PIG CLUB - ALSO GIRLS' TOMATO CLUB EXHIBITS.
WONDERFUL AMUSEMENT PROGRAM
SEE LOUIS DISBROW-id HIS 290hp JIC AUTOMOBILE IN IHORSE RACES-S DAYS*
AUTOMOBILE RACES - 3 DAYS- NOY. 3-5-6 ocT 3o-3- Nov 1-2-4 .
SHREVEPOsT BRASS BAND w FREE, EVERY NIGHT
GOOD SHOWS ON THE GLADWAY GRL FIEW S DISLY
HORSE SHOW N THE COUSEUM AlT NI FIEW0KS DISPLAY
ADMISSION-DAY-504- AT NIGHT AFTER 6 P.M. -FREE"-
EXCURSIONS ON ALL RAILROADS
WRITE FOR CATALOG. LOUIS N. BRUEGGERHOFF. Sic'v.
THE SOUTH'S REATE S E COLLEGE
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS."
NEW ORLEANS, LA.
Should be given the best tainlnlr to pra
pare them for success in business.
:fYoU Personal Instruction. Free Employr
Sment Department. complete College
Bank. College Store and Wholesale
Offices.
No mlsepresentations to secure stu
dents. Through the success of its
22000 former students, Soule College
is recognized everywhere as a Wide
Awake, Practical, Popualr and Suc
cassfal School.
GO0. SOUL1S & SONE,
$3.60 TOAD REVERORT $3.60
VIA
EDENBORN LINE I
(LA. RY. & NAV. CO.)
FRIDAY1 ST RETURN LIMIT
NOVEMBER NOV. 3, 1912
FOR THE
STATE FAIR OF LOUISIANA.
LOW ROUND TRIP RATES DAILY OCT. 29, TO
SNOV. 6, 1912.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, SEE OR WRITE
F. E. FARR, E. C. D. MARSHALL,
AGENT, GEN. PASS. A6T.
BAYOU SARA, LA. SHREVEPORT, LA.
of these lands remove these fences
when ordered to do so, or will there
be a squabble? Better settle these
matters beforehand and avoid squab
bles and law suits. Unless this is
done the road system would end in
a fias;co-Just as a former system did.
And last, but most important of
all, will we have any better roads
than we now have, after voting this
tax, that so many of us can but ill
afford to pay?
To impose a useless burden on a
people, who are in as sore straits
as we are at present, would be al
most a crime.
Yours truly,
MATT GILMORE.
There is likely to be a bootblack
famine, ,so many Greeks have gone
home to fight.
NEED OF GOOD ROADS.
In writing of cost of roads and val
ue, an expert shows that if 20 per
cent of the country's highways were
put in good condition, at least two
hundred and fifty million dollars
would be saved in the moving of the
crops of the year 1912. This amount
would suffice to improve five thous
and miles of roads and thus in the
courpe of five years two hundred
and fifty thousand miles of highway
would be developed to meet the
needs of the farm.
When it is reflected that the aver
age cost of hauling in the United
States is 25 cents per ton per mile
a.s compared with only 2 cents per
ton per mile in France and Germa
ny and England, the urgent econo
mimic need of highway improvement
and extension in this country be
comes painfully evident.--University
Extension.
ORANGES MAY BE CULTIVATED.
RIDDLE, LA., Oct. 31-That or
anges, large, juicy ones, too, can be
successfully grown in West Feliciana
parish is the statement of Mrs. D.
Hamilton, of this place, who also
claims that it takes no improved
methods of scientific culture either
to accomplish this end. "Several
years ago," said Mrs. ,Hamilton, "just
for the novelty of it, I planted an or
ange seed on my place and without
care to the young seedling, it sprout
ed up to be a well-matured tree,
from which dangled over 300 oranges.
Since then many more trees have
grown on my place, and are all blos
soming with the finest of fruit."
SHERIFF'S SALE.
State of Louisiana, Parish of West
Feliciana, 24th Jud. Dist. Court.
Mrs. Henrietta C. Vaughn vs. Ed
ward E. McGehee et als.
By virtue of a Writ of Seizure and
Sale to the Sheriff directed by the
Honorable Court aforesaid, in the
above entitled cause, I nave seized
and will offer for sale to the high
est bidder, at the front door of the
Court House in the Town of St. Fran
cisville, La., at the hour of 11 o'clock
A. M., on
Saturday, November 30, 1912,
the following property to-wit:
"A certain piece or parcel of land
with all the buildings and improve
ments thereon, lying in the Parish
of WVest Feliciana, La., and known
as the 'Shirley' plantation, and con
taining Six Hundred and Eighty (680)
acres, more or less, bounded on the
North by lands of Mrs. M. C. Evans;
on the East by the Estate of 3. N.
Evans, and on the South by lands of
A. N. McGehee."
Terms of sale--For what it will
bring on 12 months' credit with good
security, with 8 per cent per annum
interest. Costs amounting to about
$55.00 to be paid in cash.
J. H. CLACK, Sheriff.
Every Progressive
Planter and Farmer
is having telephone service install
ed, that he may instantly communi
cate with the merchant, the physi
cian, and, in fact, every one of any
importance. He can secure daily
market quotations. Telephone ser
vice on the farm is a source of pleas
ure to every member of the house
hold-it keeps every one perfectly
CONTENTED.
Call or write our nearest Manager
for Information regarding FARMER
TELEPHONE SERVICE. Interesting
literature will be sent also.
CUMBERLAND TELEPHONE &
TELEGRAPH COMPANY.
(Incorporated.)
"LITTLE ADS."
FOR SALE-A few tons of fine
sugar cane. For particulars apply to
MRS. H. M. WILLIAMS, St. Franci
ville, La.
FOR SALE-Red Rust-Proof Seed
Oats and Pea Vine Hay.-JAS. P.
BOWMAN.
LOST STRAYED OR STOLEN
One black mare mule about 11 years
old, 15% hands. Suitable reward for
her return to
J. F. IRVINE CO., Ltd.
FOR SALE-Grade Hereford Cattle,
Lespedeza Hay and Seed.
EDWARiD BUTLER,
St. Francisville, La.
Public is requested not to purchase
corn from tenants on Rosedown, In
heritance and Hazlewood plantations
until settlement for rents has been
made. JAS. P. BOWMAN.
5oct8t.
I will be in the market for sweet
potatoes the year round. See me for
prices and shipping instructions.
W. R. DANIEL,
St. Flrancisville, La.
SOLDIERS' CHRISTMAS BOXES.
Miss Lise Allain, custodian La. D;v
tT. D. C., is sending out the annual
appeal for the Christmas feast for
the veterans at Camp Nicholls, the
State Confederate Home. In a per
sonal letter to West Feliciana Chap
ter, Miss Allain says: "I hope you
will be able to respond as gener
ously as you have always done."
This will serve as a reminder to
those who give so freely, each year,
to cheer the old soldiers' declining
3 ears. Donations of the usual kind
will be received at this office for
shipment to the Home, with the pro
viso that every thing be sent in be
fore Dec. 1.
FiOct.4t.
00000000000000000
o o
o FOR SALE. o
o 1 self-measuring 120 gal "Bow- o
o ser" oil tank, cost $60, sell o
0 $15; 1 Standard computing o
0 scale, cost $45, sell $15; 2 dou- o
o ble-story counter show cases, o
o each $5. o
o ESTATE H. W. JONES, o
o Wilhelm, La. o
o o
00000000000 0 00000
Don't forget when fall house-clean
ing to send your old magazines to
this office to be sent to the State
Farm a Angola. No reading matter
has been sent there since the high
water, and the supply must be run
ning short. As soon as a box can be
filled, it will be shipped. Mrs. Wm.
Kahn has sent in donations of read
ing matter.
SHERIFF'S SALE.
State of Louisiana, Parich of West
Feliciana, 24th Jud. Dist. Court.
The Mutual Building & Loan Associ
ation vs. William C. HowelL.
By virtue of a Writ of Fieri Fa
eias to the Sheriff directed by the
Honorable Court aforesaid, in the
above entitled cause, I have seized
and will offer to the higlest bidder
at the front door of the Court House
in the Town of St. Francisville, La.,
at the hour of 11 o'clock A. M. on
Saturday, November 2, 1912,
the following property to-wit:
"A certain tract of land situated
in the Parish of West Feliciana, Lou
isiana, and containing Two Hundred
and 18-100 acres, more or less,
bounded on the North by lands of
Mrs. A. D. Turner; South by lands
of Maynard and Polly Jones; East by
Woodville road; West by Bayou Sara
creek, with all buildings and mkprove
ments thereon."
Terms of sale-Cach with benefit
of appraisement.
J. H. CLACK, Sheriff.

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