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The true Democrat. (Bayou Sara [La.]) 1892-1928, November 09, 1912, Image 1

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The True Democrat .
Vol. XXI St. Francisville, West Feliciana Parish La., Saturday, November 9 1912
• 1% ,r, g'llI P
K. C. SMITH, President. DR. C. F. AOWELL, Vice-President.
DAVID I. NORWOOD, Cashier. ANCEL ARD, AssWstant Cashier.
THE PEOPLE'S BANK
} St. Francisville, La.
Capital-- $50,000
Surplus - $10,000
DIRECTORS: +
K. C. Smith, A. F. Barrow, Samuel Carter, B. E. Eskridge, C.
Weydert, C. F. Howell, Ben Mann, F. O. Ham
ilton, Wnm. Kahn, D. I. Norwood.
A general banking business ransactod. Liberal accommodation
in accord with sound and conservative banking extended patrons. *
Certificates of Deposit Bearing 4 Per Cent. Interest to Time Depositors.
ýf~a$ ttt"tttta"~tý" "ýý ,ýýt~rtt·9+tta94.
PRESCRIPTIONS
Our Prescription Department is
our Pride and we make the filling
of Prescriptions a Specialty. We use
only materials of highest standard of
Purity and Strength.
Close attention to this Department
and years of experience have won
for us the confidence of both Phy
sician and Patient.
ROYAL'PHARMACY,
ST. FRANCISVILLE, LA.
S. I. Reymond Co., Ltd.,
Cor Main and hird Streets
Baton Rouge, La.
Dry Goods, Notions, Shoes Hats,
Clothing, IHousefurnishing, Etc.
CHAS. TADLOCK
CARPENTER AND BUILDER
Estimates Furnished on
Application
Wire Doors and Screens
O SpecialtyO
Window and Door Frames,
Mantels, Etc.
First-Class Heart Shingles
Always On Hand.
| lll~~I mm .............~K
"Do Unto Others As You Would
Have Them Do Unto You."
This is to inform the people that I have moved my store in
the old Gastrell building, where I shall be glad to see my cus.
tomers and to serve them.
As the high water has crippled me considerably and as I had to
go to heavy expense, I would like to see everyone I have favor
ed come forward and do unto me as I have done to them.
Columbus and Weber Wagons, Parry Buggies, American Wire
Fence 192 Ibs. to the roll and 26 Inches high, Deering Harvester
Tools, International Engine, and all the leading hardware imple
ments obtainable always on hand or on short notice.
Champion Potato Digger--the kind to dig peanuts and sweet
and Irish Potatoes--can be seen in operation at W. Daniel's, Jr.
CHIARLE3S WEYDERT'S
OF COURSE.
....~ ~ ~ -- i mIIm in
SEND YOUR PRINTING TO THIS OFFICE,
WHERE IT WILL BE DONE PROPERLY......
S Di
o We Won With Woodrow Wilson. o
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DEMOCRATIC LANDSLIDE SWEEPS WHOLE COUNTRY
SEGREGATION AMENDMENT GETS SNOWED UNDER
Wilson and Marshall Win by Tremendous
Majorities from all Sections.
Fate of Some Amendments Still Hangs in
Balance Waiting Final Count.
Surpassing even the most sanguine
expectationa s the victory that the
national Democracy has won with
Wilson and Marshall at its head.
Thirty-nine states declare for Wood
row Wilson, his policies and those of
the Democratic party. It was known
aljmost certainly, prior to the elec
tion on Tuesday that the Princeton
Schoolmaster would run far ahead of
the truculent Bull Moose or *he
suave and smiling Taft, Returns
, show that the last-named made a
poor third. Col. Roosevelt carried
the progressives of the Republican
party along with him, and the result
It that the "grand old party" is now
disrupted and disorganized by his ra
pacity for a third term.
The vote of the electoral college
stands thus according to returns up
to Thursday:
Electoral College.
Roose
Taft. Wilson. velt.
Alabama .. ...... 12 .
Arizona .. . ... .. 3
Arkansa .. ...... 9 .
California .. ... .. 13
Colorado .. ...... 6
Connecticut .. . 7
Delaware ........ 3 ..
Florida .. .. .. .. 6 ..I
Georgia .. .. .. .. 14 ..
Idaho .. .. .... 4 .. .. r
Illinois .. .. .. .. .. 29 1
Indiana .. .. .. .. 15 . i
Iowa .. .. .... .. 13 .. s
Kansas .. .. ... .. 10 ..
Kentucky .. ..... 13 ..
Louisiana .. ... .. 10 .. s
Maine .. ....... .. 6 . v
Maryland.. .... .. S ..
Massachusetts... .. " 18
Michigan .. .... .. .. 15 a
Minnesota ....... 12 .. k
Missisppi ...... 10 .. b
ie Missouri .. ...... 18
le Montana .. ... .. 4
th Nebraska ........ 8
d. New Hampshire. .. 4 ..
d- Nevada ... .. .... 3 .I
) New Jersey ...... 14 t
'n New Mexico ...... 3 ..D
c- New York ........ 45
n North Carolina ... 12 .. c
)f North Dakota ... 5 .. c
e Ohio .. .. .. ... .. 24 .
a Oklahoma ..... .. 10 .. .
a Oregon ........ 5
d Pennsylvania... .. .. 38
l Rhode Island ..... 5 h
t South Carolina . .. 9 .. a
V South Dakota .. . .. 5 s
Tennessee...... 12
Texas .. ...... .. 20
Utah .... ... 4 .. i
Vermont ...... .. 4 .. i
Virginia ...... . 12 h.
Washington ..... 7
West Virginia .. 8 .. a
Wisconsin ..... ... 13 in
*Wyoming ..
. N
Totals ..... 12 422 94 N
.Doubtful (three votes). N
N
The vote in Louisiana was over- NI
whelmingly Democratic, Roosevelt Ni
did not get half the vote that was Ni
claimed for him in advance. He car- NE
ried one town: Abita Springs, the St. NE
Tammany health resort. The surprise No
in the presidential race was *he No
showing made by Eugene V. Debs, N(
Socialist. He made a surprising run N<
out in the western portion of the N<
state, particularly In the mill towns N(
where recent I )or troubles have oc- Nc
curred. Nc
The Democratic gains in the House Nc
and Senate are large. It is not yet No
known as certain that the latter will
be Democratic.
A phase of the general election
was the success of woman suffrage
in four of the five states where con
stitutional amendments were submit
ted to the people. The victory of
the women was complete in Kansas,
I Arizona and Michigan; late returns
from Oregon indicated they had suc
ceeded there also; while from Wis
consin alone came returns showing
decisive defeat.
Nothing distinctive is shown in the
Louisiana returns, as all the Demo
4 cratic nominees went in without a
hitch: The interest centered in the
amendments, although it was fore
seen that tax revision would be lost.
How Amendments Fared. 1
The following figures, represent- ,
ing the vote of twenty-one parishes, c
including Orleans, where the count r
has been completed, or practically so, c
indicates the fate of the nineteen I
amendments, as the parishes report- e
ing are in all sections of the State. e
Amendment- For. Against. p
No. 1 ..... - - .. 9,708 26,042 n
No. 2... ...... 8,310 20,608 1;
No. 3 .. . ........20,982 7,961 a
No. 4 .. . . ... . 8,701 18,991 11
No. 5 .. ... . . .. - 8,235 19,768 p
No. 6 . .... .. .. 8,105 19,508 '
No. 7 ... .... ....16,370 10,147 i1
No. 8 ............20,656 7,241 ti
No. 9 .. .. .... ....25,010 5 447
No. 10 .. ...- . .. 7,743 19,827 o
No. 11.. ......-.. 22,977 6,413 a
No. 12...... ..- .. 9,663 18,254 o:
No. 13...... . .. ..21,301 6,448 tf
No. 14 ........ ..22,171 6,031 n
No. 15.. .. .. .. .. ..21,022 6,506 b;
No. 16.. .. .. ....20,486 7,096 g,
No. 17 .. .. .. .. ..20,576 6,946 al
No. 18.. .. .. .. . ..11,422 14,376 of
No. 19.. .... ......10,746 18,363
Wilson has carried Illinois.
D: ALL AMENDMENTS GET
MAJORITIES IN PARISH
No. 9 Receives Highest Vote
With Tax Segregation
Running Second.
West Feliciana complete gives
Wilson, 281; Roosevelt, 30; Taft, 3.
All the amendments received ma
jorities in the parish, the vote being
as follows:
Amendment-
No. 1-For, 187; against, 34.
No. 2-For, 119; against, 79.
No. 3-For, 156; against, 45.
No. 4-For, 128; against, 72.
No. 5-For, 153; against, 50.
No. 6-For, 143; against, 48.
No. 7-For, 122; against, 72.
No. 8-For, 119; against, 61.
No. 9-For, 203; against, 26.
No. 10-For, 141; against, 53.
No. 11-For, 150; against, 42.
No. 12-For, 133; against, 66.
No. 13-For, 151; against, 34.
No. 14-For, 135; against, 72.
No. 15-For, 138; against, 40.
No. 16-For, 117; against, 53.
No. 17-For, 113; against, 41.
No. 18-For, 101; against, 78.
No. 19-For, 149; against, 38.
ROAD TAX DEFEATED.
The proposition to levy a five mill
tax for the roads was voted down
about two to one. The vote, exclu
O sive of the sixth ward and Poplar
Springs boxes, being 97 for, and 188
against.
REDUCING PARISH EXPENSES.
True Democrat:-An effort should
be made to cut out useless parish ex
penses. Allow me to mention a few
such burdens: Six elections this year,
expense to the tax-payer, $1,445.00;
votes cast at the last primary, about
375. Remedy: Have nine voting
places in the parish, each managed
by three commissioners at $2.00 per
day, said commissioners to be made
executive, cutting out sheriff at $5;
S reduce police jury to five at $2 per
day, without mileage, as none of
them ever use more than one day
to go and return; reduce school
board similarly. Why assess real e:
tate more than once in four years?
Very few changes occur in ownership
of this property, and when su.h
changes do occur the change has to
be made in the assessment by the
police Jury. Why does it cost so
much to transfer land by deed when
the whole deed can be made and re
corded for $1.50, at a good profit?
TAX-PAYER.
on THE TELEPHONE AS A BLESSING.
> William Jennings Bryan, who fre
1t quently lays aside politics for the dis
of cussion of other questions of equally
", absorbing interest, delivered before
ns the Conservation Congress, recently
LC- held in Kansas City, a most interest
5 ing address on "COonservation and the
" Improvement of Farm Life."
"What will make our farms more
leattractive?" Mr. Bryan asks, and ie
o- plying to his own question, gives
a first place in his thoughts to the tel
ie ephone-the farmer's telephone-in
e- these words:
t. "It seems to me that Just now
there are a numlber of things that
t- conspire to add to the attractiveness
s, of the farms. Invention has al
it ready added largely to the comforts
>, of the farmer. I live nearly four
n miles from the city. The telephone
t- enables me to send and receive tel
egrams; it enables me to call the
t. physician in a moment. I know of
2 no one thing that hangs more heavi
8 ly on the mother than the fact, when
1 sickness comes, or accident, it is .o
I long before one can be sent to the
8 physician, and the physician brought.
8 To-day, with the telephone, we cut
7 in two, at least, the time between
1 the accident and the relief."
7 The rural telephone, however, has
7 other uses which make it Invaluable
3 as a time saver and an annihilator
I of space. Their homes will be bct
i ter safeguarded, their social life mPde
I more agreable, their facilities for
3 handling business increased, and, in
i general, life made easier and more
iattractive as a result of the advent
iof the rural telephone.
Republicans.for-revenue-only got an
awful jolt in Tuesday's election.

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