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The Rice belt journal. (Welsh, Calcasieu Parish, La.) 1900-19??, February 14, 1913, Image 1

Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88064402/1913-02-14/ed-1/seq-1/

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Official Journal of Jefferson Davis Parish
riI. VWELSH, JEFFERSON DAVIS PARISH, LOUISIANA, FEBRUARY 14, 1913. NUMBER 38
JEFFERSON
-ItS POLICE JURY,
-llt--Action Taken
o-Ordinance
in Each Ward
- Tax Carried.
gnS, La. Feb. 6, 1913. I
Jr of the Parish of t
met in the Court p
jin regular session. s
called to order by b
jIa-H. Cooper, with t
Fresent:
Ward
1
...""" .... .
-~""... "...... 6
I
of January, 22, were
Reports
jchairman of the Or"
to whom was
of making arrange
Parish of ,Calcasieu,
with Jefferson
to the joint control
1Draw Bridgeson the
id Parishes, reported
the President of
Juries, and had not
O : and recom
• subject matter be
.ember of the Police
td the Draw Bridge
ocated. This recom
amotion, carried.
by the Clerk, from
Monument Associ.
the oil painting of
'ltded for presenta.
of Jefferson Davis.
or about February
the Police Jury de.
Ito have any special
connection with its
and carried, the
to advise the
the Police Jury would
for some fitting
cgcasion, but at this
a date.
. Oscar Dowling,
4t Health, was read,
'Jt.ry to appropriate
td make a record of
of the Parish, and
record would enable
to reduce the
n page 4)
INCOME TAX AMENDMENT R
BECOMES PART OF CON,
Democrats Framing Bill to Make VI
Effective New Amendment But
One Other Amendment
Pending.
J
Washington D. C. Feb. 10, 1913.
With the favorable action of the J
legislatures of Wyoming and Delaware, V
the income tax amendment is now a P
part of the Federal Constitution. Not a
since 1870, when the famous civil rights V
bill became a fundammental law, has
the Censtitution oeen amended until
now. b
The new amendment provides: "XVI.
The Congress shall have power to lay
and collect taxes on incomes, from what
ever source derived. without appor. d
tionment among the several states and
without regard to any census or ap
portionment."
The democrats are greatly pleased
over the final ratification of this amend
ment; and are already at work on a
bill providing for an income tax,
Representative Hull, of Tennessee, who
has fought for an income tax for many
years, will be the most active member
in framing this bill. Some favor a tax
on all incomes over $3500 per year,
with a proportionately greqter tax on
incomes over $25,000.
One method suggested to insure
collection of the tax is the British plan
of collecting at the source, by requiring
firms to certify the salaries and fees
paid their employees, and to pay the
amount of the tax direct into the treas
ury, this would surely catch the salaried
man,whose income is large enough to
tax. Congress will provide every pos
siule safeguard for the collection on
great incomes and to prevent every
dodging. Severe punishment for false
representation will be provided, and it
is safe to say that at the bottom of each
stateman's heart is the desire to "get
after" some of the great incomes, the
staggering amounts of which have been
revealed by recent inquries and court
records. The great estates of the
Astors and Vanderbilts, and the enor
mous incomes of Carnegie, Rockefeller
and others will be carefully included,
and after a few years of practical oper
ation, tax rates may be changed and
made easier on the man of moderate
means.
The only other amendment now pend.
ing is that for the direct electing of
United States senators, submitted to
the state legislatures last summer; but
t the advocate of several more are active
in Congress. In the Senate there was
e vigorous discussion of the proposal to
limit the President to a single term of
six years: and the close vote of 31 to 36
against the proposal to nominate the
REPORT OF MEETING OF
PARISH SCHOOL BOARD,
W. P. Arnette, of Welsh Choosen I
Parish Superintendent--School
Census Ordered Taken.
Jennings, La., Feb. 7th.
The second regular meeting of the 1
Jefferson Davis Parish School Board I
was held here today, with all members
present excepting Mr. William Fenton
and Dr. V. A. Miller, Mr. R. M. Briggs
was chosen Sec. Protem in place of Mr.
Fenton.
Among the important actions taken
by the board was the election of Dr. V.
A. Miller by acclamation, and the elec.
tion of Prof. W. P. Arnette, of Welsh as
Parish Superintendent as Vice Presi.
dent of Education.
The following resolutions were sub
mitted and passed:
Resolved: That a careful and com
plete enumeration of the school children
of Jeff Davis parish(i. e. between the
ages of 6 and 14 years) shall be com
piled in compliance with the Louisiana
state law.
Resolved; That the members of the
parish board shall superintend the work
of enumerating the school children of
JeffersonlDavis parish (each in his re
presentative ward) and that all reports
of such enumeration shall be submitted
to the chairman of the board not later
than March 18,1913.
Resolved: That it is the sense of this
board that all public schools of the
parish of Jefferson Davis shall begin at
9:00 o'clock a. m. in accordance with the
state law: and shall riot close earlier
than four o'clock p. m. whenever the
completion of the daily program or the
execution of the full duties of the
school demand it.
On motion of Supt. W. P. Arnette was
authorized to purchase a book for the
use of the Recording Secretary of the
parish board.
On motion the meeting was adjourned
subject to the president's call
R. M. BRIGGS,
Sec. pro tem.
Jos, Villien has just installed a Giant
r Wonder Disc Sharpener, that will
' sharpen a whole section of discs at
one time without removing-them from
the axle shaft. This will enable plant.
e ers to have their discs sharpened in less
timne than it usually takes to take the
discs off the shaft, and'do it better than
it could be done in the old way. Mr,
0 Villien has also secured a competent
horse shoer for his shop. 37-42
e
s President by direct primary, and to
o elect him by popular vote, is significent
)f of the wide-spread and deep-seated de
16 mand of the people for closer participa"
le tion in the affairs of the government.
STRONG DEMANDS MADE A
FOR CENT LETTER POSTAGE
5'
Ni
Campaign Being Waged For Reduc
tion in Letter Postage Rate
Double Cost of Transportation
One cent letter postage promises to
be the next live issue effecting the post A1
office department at Washington, ac
cording to Senator Theodore E. Burton
of Ohio, who is leading the campaign to
secure a lower letter rate.
A new one cent letter postage bill has
been introduced by Senator Burton in
the senate and Rep. John W. Weeks in
the house, and active steps are being S
taken to promote its passage. The bill -
provides for a one cent rate by July 1 of C
this year.
"Without doul;t the time has arrived
when the people of the United States
are entitled to one cent letter postage'
declares Senator Burton. "The present -
two ent rate has been in existence PI
since 1883, and no important changes -
have been made since that date, despite cli
the fact that the population of the it.
country has increased immensely, and e
there has been an astonishing increase
in the amount of letter communication th
between our people. m
"The most important reason why PC
citizens of the United States are en
titled to one cent letter postage is the
fact that although we are charged two
cents each for the carriage of letters, it
actually costs only about a cent apiece
for the government to handle them.
This results in the accumulation of a
surplus of over $62,000,000 each year on
first class letter mail.
"The post office department was
never ietended to be other than self.
supporting. The government is entitled
to sufficient compensation for the actual
cost involved in carrying first class
postage, but any rate which rolls up so
enormous a surplus, is nothing less
than a tax upon the users of postage
stamps throughout this great country.
"In 1843, the rate of postage on a
letter weighing one-half ounce or a I
fraction thereof, carried from the city
of New York to Buffalo, a distance of
less than 500 miles, was twenty-five 9
cents. On October 1, 1883, the two 6
cent rate became operative on letters
weighing half an ounce or a fraction 0
thereof. This rate, with slight changes I
has existed for thirty years.
"In the meantime, the correspond- d
ence of the country has increased enor. 4
mously and transportation facilities
have improved in proportion. There is
no question but that the government
can carry letters for less than one
cent, and make a profit."
"For the fiscal year ending June 30,
1912, the total government receipts
from first class mail were about $172,
500,000 of which amount about$70,000,000
is estimated to have been clear profit to
the department, thus demonstrating
that the lower rate, which would vastly
stimulate the growth of this class of
mail, with a resultant further increase
of revenue therefrom, would amply
compensate the government, particular
ly as no reduction in postage on postal
cards is contemplated.
"I have introduced in congress, a bill
providing for the inauguration of one
cent letter ratei on July 1, next. This
I have done upon the insistent demand
of many thousands of people of all
classes throughout the entire country.
An organization known as the Natlona,
One Cent Letter Postage Association
with headquarters at Cleveland, Ohio,
has been formed to support the move
ment.
"The immense profits made on first
class letters are a direct tax on every
person who writes a letter. That this
view of the situation is reasonable no
one can doubt In no other department
of the government does such a situa.
tlon exist-the reaping of an abnormal
profit from a public service which is
supposed to be merely self.supportlng.
Although all letters pay two cents a
piece, only a very small portion weigh
the full ounce permitted.l They actually
average over forty to the pound and
hence pay at a rateof about $1680 per
ton, which is an unwarranted charge
forgtransportation in these day.of easy
eommunication between cities, states
and continents. First class mail sup-.
plies only 14 per cent of the total ton
nage of the mail, yet it pays at the
present time 75 per cent of the total
reyenue.
Chaes William Burrows, president
onan-d g T. Mcintosh, secretary
treasurer of the National One Caent
Letter Postage Ashociation, who have
made an exhustive study of postal
rates, extending over a period of many
years, were among the flst to prove
that the present rate is -extortionate,
and that the people of the country are
entitled to a one cent letter rate.
"One reason which has been advaneed
against cheaper letter postage," con*
cludes Senator Burton, "has been that
its inauguration would prevent the
establishment of a parcel post system.
Now that we are enjoying the advant.
ages of parcel post in active operation
this argument loses its validity. It is
my firm belief that one cent letter
postage will be the next 'important
postal reform inaugurated by congress"
PROCEEOINGS OF JEFF,
DAVIS PARISH POLICE JURY
Ordinances Providing for and Procla
mations Calling Special Elections
in the Nine Wards of Jefferson
Davis Parish.
On account of lack of space I'roclama
tions calling for special elections In
each of the nine wards of the parish,
and Ordinances Nos. 34 to 42 inclusive
will be found on pages 2 and 7 on the
inside of this issue of the JOURNAL.:4
Call for Mass Meeting for Monday
Afternoon.
A mass meeting has been called to
meet at the School House Auditoriam,
Monday afternoon at three thirty
o'clock, to di: cuss.the proposition of ex
tending the boundries of the Welsh
School District so as to include all of
Ward Six. except the Roanoke School
District, and also to include a strip one
mile wide on the cast side of Ward
Eight.
This is a very important matter and
every one interested in the wellfare of
the public schools of this territory
should attend this meeting aid assist
in arranging whatever plans are to be
adopted.
Arcade Theatre
LAKE CHARLES
Sunday FEB. 16
Night
FIRST TIME SOUTH
WEBER A FIELDS
(THEMSELVES)
AND THEIR OWN ( RLL CAST)
COMPANY OF 100
-IN
"HOKEY-POKEY"
SPECIAL ORCHESTRA
COMING IN A SPECIAL TRAIN
Seats Reserved Now
If Accompanied By Cash
PRICES 50c 75c $1.00 $1.50 $2.00 $2.50
L. LE
RALLS
urday and
oday on'y
15th and 17th
-79c
Proposition
Working Men
ignal
gStore
MKMKMxMKMxMxMK XMMXKXXMMKX
_ FOR SALE OR RENT
A BARGAIN
On account of winding up an estate I will
SELL or RENT the 123 1-2 acres of land near
the pumping station 12 miles from Welsh, on
FRIDAY, FEB. 21, 1913. 1 will be in Welsh
on that day, at Mr. Smith's store.
Don't miss this opportunity.
x Terms reasonable.
l J. STERNBERG.
xXXXXXXXXXxxX XKxxxxxxxxxK
Big Stock New Goods
Just Araived .
This is YOUR
Golden Opportunity
We are unpacking this week a Big
Shipment of New Spring Goods,
that will especially apDeal to our
I Lady Customers.
1 Our stock of Spring and Summer
Dress Goods, consisting of
Pin Checked Silk Poplin
both White and Colored
Natural Colored Linen
Suiting
s -Just the thing for a Spring Suit
D Linen Lawns, Ginghams
and Calicos
is the latest and best
.I the market affords.
SWe have the Best Stock of Shoes
r for Ladies', Gentlemen and Children
that the markets afford.
S LACES & EfIBROIDERIES
S_ _ A Big Stock of the Newest and
Most up.to.date Laces and Embroideries the Big Markets afford.
* Come In and See What We Have
SMITH, THE LITTLE STORE

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