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Lower coast gazette. (Pointe-a-la-Hache, La.) 1909-1925, December 31, 1910, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88064433/1910-12-31/ed-1/seq-1/

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The Lower Coast Gazette.
DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF THE LOWER COAST AGRICULTURE, HORTICULTURE, FISHERIES AND COMMERCE.
VOLUME I ii. I'PI0'1I' T-A-IA-I L\('IIE, LA., SATURDAY, I)E(EMIBER, 31, 1910. NI .
GOUL STflKlET
NOW SETTLED
MACHINISTS AND CRAFTSMEN
SIGN AGREEMENT WITH THE
ROADS EFFECTIVE TODAY.
EACH CLAIMS THE VICTORY
Strike on Since May 2 Terminates
in M :'sjari Pacific ,:nd I 3on Moun
tain Shops-All tc Be Rein.
stated Withi: 30 Days.
St. loA,'. Al, -The st. !.( ou
the 1M ', ;t Pa Il and btrot M ,i -
iait .;i!'  ,t th,, ! iia('hii  l ,at
in&g lilh II)I i ilt ...: . la:-r, was sItt!led
tho uigh a;, a g cv 'nint rearchld be
tHeenl the cfflit ials et( the riaiirulads
and the m 'ni .s in\olled. Buth aide s
claim , (I Oip, te \lictory.
The workinrg agltreeilenlt is il-t)nl by
A. \\. Sulli\ivai, general mauinaer, and
George K. Smith, supi'rirnteltiier'nt of
mat hirr, of the Missouri I'acitic,
and b) .lanies O'('(nnell. presidlit I lu
tlrn.tio nlal Asouciati,,i l o," .~lac. hin Jts;
J. A. Franklin, prtý.,idtlul lintor atitnal
Brotherhood of Hile, Altakers and
Helpers of Am erita; i. %W. Klinr, pres
ident luteitnatiouitl 15rotherhoutl of
Blacli sroiths anti lIe:llprs, arid .1oiin E.
Bray. secretary..reasurer illttIilatioual
Associationu of Sheetluetal \Workkrs.
Settled at Opportune Time.
The number of machinists on stiike
on the sytem totaled 1,280, while the
blacksmiths numbered 1.,075, making
a total of 2.355 men. The strike, ac
cording to those in position to know,
was settled at an opportune time. Had
it not been it would have reached
great proportions within the next 30
days. and probably resulted in a par
tial, if not a complete tie-up of the
Gould lines.
Part of the men are to get a nine
hour day and all are to be reinstated I
within 30 days. The foremen are to t
come back, Into the ranks. Half of
the new workers put on are to retain
their jobs.
-8Since October 21 th, wages lost by t
the strikers has amounted to more t
than $9,500 per day. The total value
of lost wages has amounted to $867,- t
000.
THREE KILLED BY NEGRO E
a
Charred Bodies of Man, Woman and a
Child Found in North Caro.
lina Town. if
i~lDrbam, North Carolina.-Three i
charred bodies were found in the p
ruins of the burned home of Dr. J. L.
Staders, near Heater. 20 miles from re
here, and strands of a girl's hair dis- g
covered in the yard led to the arrest
an hour later of Nathan Montague, a
young negro, on charges of attacking
the gil, murder and arson.
The bodles are believed to be those
of Dr. Sanders, his daughter, Mary,
and his 2-year-old granddaughter.
Neighbors discovered the Sanders
home on fire about 10 o'clock at night.
The house burned in a short time and
when the three members of the fam
ily were found to be missing a search
of the premises was made.
At a spot in the yard near where
the house had stood there was blood,
in which were found strands of hair. t
Near by the searchers found a large
pocket knife, stained. Soonll after.
wards the bodies were discovered.
One of the neighbors identified the
knife as belonging to Montague. He
recognized It as the one he had seen
the negro using the day before in
killing hogs at a another neighbor's.
He also remembered that Miss San- .
ders was there at the time.
SHERMAN GETS A REBUKE t
Motion Appealing From Ruling of Vice
President Sustained.--First Time 5
in Long Period of Years.
Washington, D. C.-For the first
time in mnlany years the senate sus
talned an appeal from the decision of
the vice-president, and revoked a rul
lag by which senators announcing f
their pairs were counted along with he
seuators recording aye and nay votes ~t
in order to make a quorum. e
The senate was loath to administer nit
the rebuke to the presiding officer and pe
the action was not until Mr. Sherman Pr
made the ruling a second time.
--- Ye
Husband Convicted of Wife Murder. la
Cbeyenne, Wyoming.--James Mc
LIchliln, charged with the murder Vi
of his wife, was convicted of murder
in the first degree. McLachlin shot co
his wife last September, and tried to r
kill himself De
$150,000 Ohio Plant is Burned.
Shelby, Ohio.-The big plant of
the Brightman company was destroyed col
by fire. The plant was one of the
filet in the state and was valued at Ta
os The re originated in the to
gre
me
School Teacher Gets $100,000. eat
S Atlanta, Georgla.--Miss Alma Stant
l eb, an orphan and a teacher in
the IublIc schools here, inherited
S1[00,000 by the terms o: the will of of
e. Josephine Aboott. her great aunt, thE
wib left an estate worth 1750,000. tie
ýý' ` ý WAT
" 9RL is
-
GŽ -tnf
News Note.-Secretary Meyer H as Recommended That the Naval
Supply Fund, Amounting to $2,700,0 00. Be Turned Into the Treasury.
FIGIT ON fU[[E BA[~IN AB[[S CAPT Vfl[ VARADO
"MOTION TO DISCHARGE" RULE
ike PROVING UNSATISFACTORY.
the -
;ing Senate Confirms Knapp and Reports
ac- Are Favorable on McChord and
ow, Meyer-Claim Bill Passed.
fad
lied Washington, D. C.-Three prom
:30 ibes to be more or less trouble in the
ar, house when congress resumes busi
the ness after the holidays over the ruling
made by Speaker Cannon in connec
ne. tion with the motion to discharge com
ted mittees from the further considera
to tion of certain specified bills.
of The "motion-to-discharge" proposal
aiu was one of the reform measures
adopted incidental to the fight over
by the rules at the last session. It was
ore regarded by its supporters as a long
lue step in advance toward the moderniza
;7, tion of the rules. For years there had
been complaint that the speaker, by
agreement with chairmen or commit
tees, was in a position to bottle up
U0 measures that did not meet with his
approval or that of his lieutenants. So
nd a rule was devised and passed under
which a committee may be discharged
from further consideration of a bill
if the member making the motion can
ee induce a majority of the house to sup.
he port.
L. The motion-to-discharge rule is not
tm regarded satisfactorily by the insur
is- gents.
'st
g HOBO ARMY IS TO MARCH
se How's Organization to Hoof it to Mil
, waukee Meeting of Brotherhood
Welfare Association.
St. Louis. Mo.-The march of
Coxey's army is to be duplicated on a
ad smaller scale by some of How's hobos.
mn members of the Brotherhood Welfare
ch nsociation, who w~il leave St. Louis
in a body January 10 to tramp to Mil
re waukee, Wis.. where they will attend
id, the annual convention of the National
ir. Brotherhood Welfare association,
30 which is to meet in that city for a
'r week beginning January 31. The jour
I.ey of over 300 miles will be made en
.e tirely on foot and the hobos will sub
le sist on food begged from farmhouse
SI doors.
in Not only will the tramp be novel in
- experience and privations, especially
n" in cold January weather, but the par
ty may contain a few business and
professional men of St. Louis as well.
E Dr. James Eads How, president of
the association, will lead the army.
SUGAR MEN GET TERMS
Two Had Been Convicted of Taking
3t Bribe Money in Connection With
s" Sugar Weighing in Gotham.
1- New York, N. T.-Charles D.
g rrew and Charles N. Nardell, former
h bcss government weighers, who were
'a onvicted last September in the Unit
ed States circuit court of taking bribe
r money from Thomas S. Doyle, em
4 ployed on the Arbuckle docks, in
n Prooklyn, were sentenced by Judge
Martin to ten months each in the New
York penitentiary on Blackwell's Is.
r. iand.
r Van Devanter and Lamar Confirmed. 1
r Washington, D. C.-The senate
t confirmed the nominations of Su
p Dreme Court Justices Lamar and Van
Devanter, proposed by the president.
Taft Devising Canal Toll Rate.
t Washington, D. C.-A plan of
d collecting tolls at the Panama canal
e is being worked out by President
t Taft. He believes the toils ought not
to exceed $1 per net ton to obtain a
gross income of nearly $7,000,000. The
maintenance and operation cost is
estimated at upwards of $3,000,000.
n School Fraternities Abolished.
1 Rochester, New York.-The board t
I of education has formally abolished i
the five fraternities and five sorori- I
ties in the high schools.
E DIAZ GENERAL REPORTED TAKEN
IN PEDERMALES BATTLE.
ts Mexican Revolutionists Throw Feder
als Into Confusion and Have
Them Hemmed in, It Is Said.
a- City of Mlexico.-General Navar
ae ro, according to reports, has been
.i- ~aptured by the rebels, and Is now
held prisoner This information was
.. received by letter from high authority
in Chihuahua. Navarro is said to have
been taken in the last battle at Pe
dernales. It is also said that the reb
1 els captured two cannon of small cal
; ibre, the kind designed for mountain
r use, during the same battle, lassoing
s them and dragging them away.
K It is further said that during the six
hours of lighting the rebels charged
d the governnaent troops twice. The
second time they threw them into con
. fusion, calpturing Navarro and the can
non.
' The rebels now have the govern
ment troops shut up. in Padernales
r and practically surrounded. Pickets
have been stationed at. all points to
see that no move is made by the gov
ernment to get re-enforcements
through from Chihuahua.
Messages from Marfa, Tex., say
t there has been further fighting south
of there in the vicinity of Ojinaga,
and that Texans have been forced to
collect money to provide for Mexican
refugees.
Efforts are being made by the insur
recto agents to hire soldiers of the
Twenty-third infantry, who have been
discharged by reason of expiration of
enlistments. Several hundred more
are to be discharged this week.
CHICAGO GETS $10,000,000
Rockefeller Makes Final Donation to
Western Educational Ir)stitution
and Officially Withdraws.
Chicago. Ill.-John D. Rockefeller
gave the University of Chicago
$10,000,000, and severed his official re
I lations with the institution.
The benefaction completes an
amount of $35.000,000 which he has
given to the university since he found
ed it in 1880. The school is to re
ceive no further support from the oil
king.
The- donation c(onsists of income
bearing securities "of the present mar
ket value of $10.000.000," set aside
from the funds of the general e(duca
tional board, Mr. Rockefeller's $53,000,
000 educational foundation. The sum
is to be delivered in ten equal annual
installments, beginning January 1,
1911.
EXPRESS INQUIRY COMING
}Baltimore Hears That Government
Plans Sweeping Investigation of
Rates and Charges.
Baltimore, Md.-Advi\es received in
Baltimore show that within two weeks
the interstate commerce commission
will begin an investigation of the
rates and charges of the express com
panies operating throughout the Unit
ed States.
The investigation will be based
upon. complaints from more than two
hundred commercial organizations in
different parts of the country, and
will include the money order business
conducted by express companies.
Postal Banks January 3.
Washington, D. C. - Postmaster
General Hitchcock stated that every
thing will be in readiness for the pos
tal savings banks in the various states
and territories to receive deposits Jan
uary 3, the first working day of the
new year.
Cable and Telegraph Amalgamate.
London, Eng.-It was announced
that negotiations have been completed
for the amalgamation of the Western
Union Telegraph company and the
Anglo-American Cable company.
2 FIRES CLAIM 39 LIVES
CHICAGO FIRE MARSHAL ONE OP
TWENTY-FIVE VICTIMS THERE.
Fourteen Dead at Philadelphia Over
100 Sustain Injuries in Two
Conflagration,.
L'hn,,,-o . --Fire \l ishll il. t I , . I.n l,:an
alld tt, l it v-)!ir(le 1 Ili- ! 1,' n1 t-, w" rel
kill ,, I T tI.I l i. 4 l . % %I, 1h . , .H ,,l d
$1 2.,4. , 4..., t.4 , ti. i,' ,, ' ,t '"i
u id -",1t k ,'l4 114 I1, &. I., l.. l 1t 'l ;tai
Sto' k I. r i . i 4i 1iI ,., ' .d i l ll;;i tlher
1m t1 !=, 1.t l li 1\+i
Si , ,,4 \lurri- A (I .. t hIr, lit, lire
h .1 'f ',1i. ,: A'41 14 V 1141h :t l ,l'I- ; l,,ir
1,n t l4 4 ,- l - ,f l ' l. 11 11. 111t1. 1,11), i
I"I, l i,"4 , f 4 li,' i .l h I t . 1 1 " . 1t'li i,'1, i' 4 '1 4 l lll,4,1
thil l i to iltl , ,l ,II. , I I~ ll I1 4,44 I:. l '
; ,1t,4li4 'III.' t , ! ll , I .,. . 1 a' ',l ' t l 4t '1,1 r.I il t
i ltls; ,. 144'i44j11. , 1.1 141t4'. ,'.l 44i 1 1114 ' I la-ss, n 4
14 , 1114,,11 I; . lof ,1, ,It1 h ill t h.' i i It 4,4 1 ,lIlT
1'41 1t I ll l 1ed. l f I 4't "h111 thI, 'l, I4 1:'.
,lm u ild ',,, ,. 1,1 t h ,h re
\-,i : `I 1 t 14 i'l l I I1 \\ illi ll 1hin l'u11
tl , I.,' lnt . itl -'er thl 4 1'1 41 i iltr l w . -1t ;0i l
tI ir, il' ti e'l l 4 1 ,44 a t4 a l t44i I ,4 t, it.
:fIe ll , ,l t c l ut1o1 I to 1h1- r th1111 11111i
I hei r i llt. of.
tli-r l Iill,, ii , w1 iti'1 .me of hll4 ,i -11 4 4
ter i' hich i 'V ilted in the t11 'atll Oi thleir
h11i1',, 11 11' 4i 11i4 f 111i1 1 dt"I'lt ',d 1'i otherllll
l tl'l- ,l llct ' bl 11 4 tllrs 'lc il1 l4 . 'Il. h
i g llt4 t li' pyre'.lll, - hll. It ilh 111111 hi4' hlel' I
anl d tol lllt i 1; 111 ti tllh , hritc kt ;ili tr eiid
to bri_ thel bo ldy of their hIlefi ,and his
canl al1,~oiul- l ot t hto thl" bri-s FindihIg
this a.i v ii, fo11 r.t(i4, h1 \ f1114 l444 , I lhl, or
,t11- of .\ 4il' l 1t . l1ar)al `4 l l ylr llIth,
:lill rtd1u41 4 i lel tih eii l ef1 1 t o ll ut in the
. ,rai',I, tii_ trSl'Ii of ih'a r ll' tiun. !.
.\4ll.lll-t- lb41 t) llel lt' t he StL14:1 ih tof
their c ,hi , , who \ \a,, ol i llir ill thl' d'e
11 r4 l t, firell n Iiii tx Ihe ,eli, tes
rIt't l ':'--I 4l ito th4' M lrik of tl Il'c ring
awaylt 1hl faihllen . t . haill ' h flo' t a liftyt
dlroltp d I ll't4 i iil it itiin a n llto ld there ca
Tiel1l b ko rot l t'n el intol'ni heat of thej
b rnin; arehuouse.
tll e lloiies of l it't i ii takll ll to
tiul'ertakl I'0011 oltlilo West Iorty-third
street. i'al;tir th e l,',,. W\ 'ido 4s anrld chlii
drolli of thit dead len. tlhite twc d and
I fraliti,.. 1 4owhe -.d lil t-t ti iieg . The
1 odife 0r1l t I ltso saily nutil4atl ill n mostl
I eao.e tillttl the epolile l t woul not pelii
thb e rel ; ti, l, to view theli ielm.
1i 4', i l-fl 'd, hil h'iic , 4 t4 ( ii h't4 i iti'. oie
Fire \lii1sh-r !loran. at his hoSem on
the West ,idtl,,, ieard the leclut.1 l all for
fire apparats an tll itldashed to the stock
ya k---; hlld u o his death--iil his auto
nmobile. n
li tohe time he nt trit ed hlis ;, islants,
whore1i ha reitel ht ile ( lene etarlir, ohad
abaitoined th' e1ffort to save the bel f
Lhoiie and were eltdeatVoringld to head olff
the rtlshi of hi, towr i other knbiihhlgs.
Pluines ittere is.ingi from several strut
tires llnerh\"y whe'n the l'.shail arrived
and the ilhterno \tla . li4tering the 41 oinds
ialll fet's of the plillet',lt anld ladder
meni, hto w'erle sticking by their posi
tions under th1e enouragmentie of their
1con4 lit igh,'$ 4o t hemiigil f' e411 I
roar.~
bu thrned and blis tered by the fierce heat.
Thre canopy which later became tih de-n
strover of a score of lives seemed to
oftfe r from he e feate e lnig,'n stave
of het4t that radiated for 1 1un1nred feet
froi t t4 V irbe . Unh1 r thi.S the ill-fated
,iroiw hia for protectiok , en d by iloran 1
Burroughs tilrl Fitzgerald.
On top of the h aeopy another group oft k
ilfernlo, .4till played (breamin of water
ito tit l hart of thel fire. 0 u44 d1 ' ily
brovr b(tf ligi .4 , felt the wall going
vuI .Žho1u4ld warning to tho.le l'toi
hilt b1 neli th th4l14 t11 i velollyU' maJ l 1
of" t14 4,allo1 4 y fou' iti it4 victini. . llld
th29 lh4 , h4ght1rs k wtere elogtilf d 1 ith a
14 DEAD AT PHILADELPHIA.
Upeferno Alive.
a1li$ ,oli''n e are klowe to l i e dead r nd i
mnorII ith for41 ar4 iPn hoil ital. 1rSter- h
i'4g fro( in uii.Of fo1 n whii h so4' 4 will
nol't r lc'ov i.+, as th 1 r 41'11, lt of t he gollaile, n
of the wal.ll. of the bnu'iiig lina-ytory 2
Wthoough evharths Edletatn's body was
lhosto direoply beberth woillnu lra
ziro ac helvtter hay on tcn sdiownlk,
buthe reci ri walls had to be azi bew
fork it wly dweked safte to saometie th
work of dipoimno i the r ei edh. e
like ne of the fily comnithen thoise '
tagi eern dsmath on injury ih the fmir l
isd trlelated me i raticwall o wiuldo ojut
che ifrortheteat omentgivensomeliioh
loaier herts. The nw 'hango is to
families
MINNESOTA PAIR WHO
S ELOPE ON A 'CYCLE'
DAUGHTER OF A FARMER SPEEDS
er AWAY WITH HER LOVEH IN
LATEST FASHION.
Los ueur , Iill! Tn'I'h! rte Vats an
an elovens n' t X ':on!ina rv fromt t he
e h ioi0e I of Wiibur 1 , thmen. a ri, h
,re ~~i
farller of ('lot elantd 1lot n5i1i:1, w\henr,
his ti.. c t vear-olI da'lght*r. Eliza
both. sped away wilth her loer,
(C ,or-ge Iletting. She w;as seated in
front of l1etting onl the lhandilears of
a Iliitortv( l.'' , 1i hhh ( is excPediulg
t , I) lim i ilit I; hie arle of 31 11,4.
ire L t111 ' o l Or 110l1 10 t0 goodi c(o4u1 trv
ro:,ls. They 0\,i iursi edl by the
wratlhfull parents in an atItolllohile
SThe roilte was along the dvhioIls
wi i ings itof t he old I othl road. 1and
1t 1 hlm e. 1 ll , t hIe ht ase. n \ever
, ii: , than a half 1ilt, behiiid, a'rtos-4
ho ' e:,lova and into \,\t, r) ille iownishi ,.
li until ua iloitt t of ai Iont tire laltled
hint awl Ihi' nm1 hin' in a ditch.
7,
fr
III
Eloping on a Motorcycle.
( eorge, with the race and the bride
both won, sped on across the county
Sline and down to Waseca. where the
couple were married and soon after c
it forgiven by telegraph by the defeated t
father. b
'I t
BANK NOTE IN AN OLD BIBLE o
Currency of Ninety Years Ago Is in P
the Form of Personal Notes
of Today.
.Jeffersonville, Indl.--A bank note for
$5, more than 90 years old, was dis.
covered a few days ago by Gray Morri
son, but it is doubtful whether the note
lhas any value except to a collector.
Recently Mrs. Edward Bradley of
Newport, Ky., presented an old Bible
to Morrison, her grandson. Mrs. Ba1.
ley Is past eighty and the book had be.
longed to her parents. While turning
the leaves of the volume, Morrison
found the bank note. The local banks
said they did not believe it could be
cashed, as It was not natiojial cur.
rency.
Part of the writing is so faint as to
be undecipherable, but the president's
name stands out as clearly as writing
only a few days ohl. The note reads
as follows, as far as It can be read
r at all.
V "No. 861. - months afterdate
e (number is torn off) the President,
Directors and Co. of the Bank of Vin
cennes, the State Bank of Indiana,
' promise to pay on demand at their a
I Branch (this is written and is barely
decipherable) Bank, at -- , Five c
Dollars to the Bearer. Vincennes, April
7, 1819. Nathl. Ewing. President,
-, Cashier." fo
The place where It is iuayable and
the cashier's name cannot be read.
The back is blank and the plaper
was apparently white with black let.
tering, and it bears a picture presumn.
- ably of Vincennes and its bank, but re.
semmbling a small cross-roads settle it
meat. I appears to have bion print.
ed from a wooden blol'k.
KNOW? HIS MASTER'S VOICE
Pet Hidden In Cellar Squawks Loudly o0
When He Hears Owner S
Shout "Bill!" tI
Allentown, l'a.--"Bill," a pet gander, go
knew his master's voice, and Gustav gr
Conrad, of this city, recovered a flock er
of geese that had been stolen from his of
poultry yard.
Conrad began a house-to-house
search on discovering that his geese
were missing, constantly yelling "B1ll!
Bill!" At last there was an answering Br
squawk from a cellar, which he recog.
nized as the note of his gander. re
Conrad went into the house and be- al
gan to ask questions. The woman ad.
mitted she had a number of geese in
the cellar, which she said she had
bought from a man in a neighboring
house, who said he had won thern at a on
raffle in the country. Shb, returned the
geese to the owner.
co
Says Cat Meat Is Fine. hc
Cleveland, O.-Recently Edward lei
Sanders bought a big black Tom cat of
for 25 cents. Toilay Sanders would I
have to pay $1 for the same cat. o
Young men of the neighborhood of
East Sixteenth street and Hinds ave
nue organized a secret society called
the Cats Jammers. According to mem
bers, cat meat has a certain piquant La
flavor found in no other animal. tam
"Cat meat is irresistible," said Ed. ati
ward Dufek. "After you have once be
overcome aversion to the meat you on
can relish it more than venison or
squab." tin
GYPSY UEEN THE
CHILD OF BANKER
JESSIE HABERSHAM MITCHELL
n WAS SCION OF DISTINGUISH
ED BALTIMORE FAMIL'r
PASSES AWAY IN CINCINNATI
g Remark; ble Story of Her Life iN;th
the Nomad;c Banci Wnose King Sipe
Married-Was a Descend:?rt of
e Francis Scott Key.
i .11ltet lt l. v i!, of .1. 11 .!; , l., . 1,1,4p
S camine knoeelo I, \l t the iit Ii:ihtll" of !l.
hantkr, :him ; r',itr(`' it , - il-'- .
here rI'iconly.
Thel discovery Ila! I hIe gy Itei,
Was a scion of one (ofi the oldest I ani
tits in Maryland ont' at(',ed a S(lnisatloll
in St. ILoulis so(,i, time" go I)etec
liv'es 1alnl agents \Vwho were sellt by
the womanI's relatives and who tried
I to get heti to returnt to a life of lix.
tilry anii eas', failed to illiIt'isi h'l'i
She said sire Iir'elerred the life if a
nomnad.
.\ccorldiig to th,- death-bed siiory,
told by .ilrs. .litlchell at the hosi,it:al
inll Cincinnati, xhe was stoleIt from h(i r
home live years ;ag by a Ihand of
ypsies andti shil to one of the' tribe
for $9 (1i.
I)iUring ill this time her father
l)Ielt several frltin:ll's IIn silrllchiing
for his daulghtllr. Iast April she was
located in St. Louis, but the search
was all in vain. Je:: ie had become
innured to the life of the nomad andl
refused to shake off its fascination
and lure, despite the prayers of her
relatives. Her mother died several
months after her abduction.
During the first few years she was
held in bondage and not allowed to
communicate with her father. The
tribe would quietly leave a neighbor
hood whenever she was suspected ,of
having made any attempt to get in
touch with her own world. Accounts
of her abduction and the endeavors of
her parents to trace her, which ap- t
peared in the newspapers, she was
compelled to read to all the gypsies.
Later she was wooed and won by
King John H. Mitchell and married
* .
The Gypsy Queen.
him. While in camp with her band c
of rovers south of St. Louis she made
a small fortune from the curious so
ciety girls who took the long journey t
to the gypsy tent to see the white ,l
queen. Like the women of her band, a
she was learned in the art of telling
fortunes.
Cincinnati folks were apprised of
the strange life of the American gypsy (
queen only after her death. Her con- d
lession of her career to the Sister Su
perior of thlie Seton hospital was the s
channel through which her story be
came lublic. Shl told the sister that
she was not allowedl herici freedom un
til she r(eally becarne infatuatedl with
tlhe life ledi by the roving poplite.
Mrs. :Mlltc'hell was a great-grand
daughti:r of Mrs. Marie Lloyd tKey.
one of the most famous beauties of the
South; gralnd-nice ot Rtoger 13. Tainey,
the IJustice of ti Supl)reme ('ourTt;
cousin of ,loy-d Lowlndes, a for:ier
governor of Maryland; great-great
grandniece of the first Ipostmaster gen
eral of the U'nlted States, and niece
of a comnmander inl thie 'nited States
Navvy.
Gets $10,000 if Sober Three Years.
New York.--If Andrew L. Colvin of
Brooklyn takes a seat on the "water
wagon" and is still there when he
reaches the age of forty, which iimeans I
abstinence for at least three years, he
will become the sole owner of a $10,
000 estate left by his mother, Mrs.
Susan ('olvin. If he fails he will get
only the interest on the estate during
his lifetime.
Mrs. Colvin's will wa. filed In the aS
Kings county surrogate'n offlce andl it l
contains a long clause providing for t
her son to inherit her estate if he is
leading a life of sobriety at the age C
of forty andl has not been under the dl
influence of intoxicants for the prievi- ei
ons three years. w
Hiccoughs Kills Pastor.
Asbury Park, N. J.--Rev. James VW.
Laughlin, retired Methodist Protes. la
tant minister of Belmar, who after an ,
attack of htccoughs lasting four days, m
became unconscious, is dead. Water t
on the brain developed as a result of t
tie hiccoughing and other compllca. k
tions.
GETS A BROKEN ARM
IN POOL BALL DUEL
ATMOSPHERE FOR A FEW MIN
UTES IS FILLED WITH FLY.
ING IVORY.
A shinu.:;. i, hal, thrown ,with th.
{ rac, (ti .: 11'th("w oI- putting oml
I" _ ", 1w .n ,nld ~t l l ight in a l'Pitts.
l,'iB : il. . ,, thr it ot" r night. thI ,
!tr ', 'i 1, 'hV. 'iig,-' . an ! I it , i." l
, 0 o r I +i'. i ','l
l e I I I i,,' 0 . t m:, ', ,
1 o person seeied to know lhat
s next. l the pool balls alae
D ulacng several tables between them,
,. they opened fire. erom the street the
crowd gazed in through a window at
Keliky, who Is said to have tome rep
utatwon as a diamond star, threw an Int
curve which caught Rosebehrg in the
Sright fiorearm. Ro seberg took the
balls. l th ool alls
Offendrng Headgear Obttructed Nn
braskan'e View o the r ootagen and
l He Lands on the "ae e od." f
the Omaba police court has suddenly
hone ofne his deisions. Harry Bstruckle,
a young man about town, was at one
f the itheaters and occupied toa seat
ndir ctl, behind a young womanu whoc
wore a x.at that carried a brim iully
two eet wide, hiding the stage from
Bucklty and the da ersons to his right
and left. eang aover, Buckley said:the
so that oeI can see the play?"
The girl answere. bacrk that she
count, and foh eng tollowe d the de
didn't propose to be insulted."
Instead of calking an usher, Buckley pool room and
helpedstruck the manager gather up thinning
Offending Headgear Obstructed Ne
braskan'. View of the Stage and
He Land. on the "Lid."
the Omaha police court has suddenly
jumped into popularity by reason of
ad young man about town, was at one
Sof the theaters and occupihed a seat
tw9 feet wide, idin the stage from
Buckley and the persons o his right
Slari ends wer Wat chin a g e, ofpool
heand left. Ltaning over, Buckley said:
"Will you please remove your hat,
fo thaeit I can see the play?" ow
The girl answered back that she
rhad paid fob seeing the show and
didn't sro pros e io e nsul thtedt"
hey openb . From the treet ther
uear, tnasarntly indisterent over the
facnstead ofh caubg had ser, Buckln he
struck the hat and lont it spinning
ball.
KNOCKS OF F a ay. Buckl. NAT
fact that he cubs had forsakeu her.

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