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The weekly messenger. (St. Martinsville [i.e. St. Martinville] La.) 1886-1948, October 28, 1893, Image 4

Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88064454/1893-10-28/ed-1/seq-4/

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Let Them Resign. I i
Mr. Sherman was pruably right "
when he remarked in a recent ha
speech that the Senate would lose you
the resp,.ct of -ensiblo business the
men, if it ),,ntinuctd its Ipresent
ettitude, of helplessness. Certain- rea
ly there has been among 1)emo- un,
cratic Senators no manifestation the
of nerve in facing the1 situntion. and
They are all me1n of broad intelli- all
genco a;m comllmanding influence, ash
but evidently their instincts of the
pronounced imanhood have not po
as yet asserted themselves notice- has
ably. 'Thero is a timidity, an ir- ap
resolution, a hbesitation that shows pel
the absence of any ian among ar
them with the gifts of a leader.
The millionaire senators from cat
mining States are commonly sup- w
posed to be men of no special
statesmanship, culture or intellec- the
tual superiority of any kind; they del
are credited with representing lat
their so-called States through the fat
fact of owing their mines. Yet of
the.se it te.n-orough statesmen I Ti
,epresentiu g nobody and nothing set
but their own pockets have been wl
shrewd enough, bold enough andl th
shifty enough to fail the learning u
uf their gifted adversaries ani It
hold their everwhelming majority dii
st bay up to this time. pie
The attitude of the SenatesA
amounts simplly to this that one ge
single member, or at any rate two Bf
members, can prevent that body an
from passing any measure what- l
ever, and for all time. They can pi
come from a discontented State th
and put a veto on any legislation l
by Congress. fihe Lower House
muay pass all needful bills, but the E
House of Dotards will say to those fo
two Senators: "Talk as long as L
3you please. Occup)y the whole idl
session if your physicial strength p,
will hold out. We have no power bi
to stop you; the Senatorial tradi- U
tion of free discussion prohibits n;
such a thing." This is no exag- le
geration. We have the proof and th
the examnplification before us.
Just as this miserable minority he
has prohibited, legislation on the lii
repeal bill, it could .prohibit ac- ht
tion on any other subject. It
could prevent all legislation and L
render the whole session a nullity. bi
It is possible that the Constitu- t
tion contemplates such a result? re
Does conmmon sense justify such al
a conclusion from the right of k
free discussipn? Does free dis- s1
cussion mean endless discussion? U
In a word, does deliberation mean t
final inaction? The answer to all
of which is plainly: No! Discus- ri
sion contemplates final action. di
Its purpose is to give wisdom to a al
c.onclusin which it is intended sl
shall ie reached. Nobody wishes p
to take any step that will really i,.
threaten that right which the hr
sis (,f freedom-the right of free ti
tliscussion. But no timid super- 4
stition ought to hedge that princi- o
pile about with such divinity as to ,
isake it an intolerable abuse.l
Andl no imbecile old philosopher
ought to be left in charge of a
practical emergency where such y
an abuse is going to result from
their timorous scruples. They a
ought to do something, and if
that something should hereafter I;
prove, somewhat unadvisable, then
amend it under the light of cx
pcerience. They could err on the
side of leniency and still provide
for final naction at some time or
othIr.
If our venerable, and in smine
ways rcslpectable, relrresntatives.
the l)emoeratic senat,,,rs. cannot
sulnlon u1i enoulgh tf manhIoodl
to give ibacklboe to their majestict
wisdom, there is one thing lthe y':
ought to, do. They ought to re-!
sign and let their resplective Go
verlnors or Legislatures send m-,r i
to Wa: hington who can not. only 1P
think and talk. Int act. -1,'rnig
The Story of Evangeline. M
Nearly all Louisiana children
have heard of the beautiful Ba
you Techo which flows through
the prettiest portion of our State m"(
-perhaps some of my young r
readers live on its banks and play
under the great spreading oaks
that keep the grass there so cool
and pleasant. I wish we could atta
i all get together under one of those ma&
[shady trees and I could tell you <nli
the sweet story that a famous ,aki
poet, named Henry Longfellew, c
has written, but as we live so far the
apart I shall have to make my
pen speak for me and when you a
Sare older 'you must read the poem; -
you will like it all the better be
n cause it tells so much about our
own Louisiana.
i A great many years ago, before
the American Colonies became in
dependent States, the little vil
g lago of Grand-Pr6 was settled in
e far-off Novia Scotia by a number
t of French people, called Acadians.
n They were a quiet, industrious
g set, paying little heed to the wars
n which were carried on between
d the French and English, who
g quarreled constantly over their
American possessions. The Aca
' dian settlement was a happy,
peaceful spot, and fairest and
to sweetest of its maidens was Evan
1e geline, only child of rich farmer
ro Benedict, the pride of the village,
and as good as she was beautiful.
't- Great was the rejoicings in Grand
n Pre when its inhabitants learned
to that handsome young Gabriel, the
n popular son of the blacksmith,
e was soon to marry dark-eyed D
1e Evangeline. Everyone prayed
se for blessings on the young couple.
as + But before the wedding day arriv
Ie ed the English capturned Grand
th Pr6 and carried many of its inha- -
or bitants to distant lands. Young
i- Gabriel was among the unfortu
ts nate number and Evangeline was
g- left to mourn his loss. Her fa.
id ther's home was burned by the
18" soldiers and he soon died broken
ty hearted; so poor, lonely Evange
10 line began a journey of search for
, her lover. She knew that some
It of the Acadians had been sent to
d Louisiana and hoped to find Ga
:Y briel there. Through long months
U- she continued her search till she
t? reached Louisiana and wandered
•1h along the Bayou Teche to the -
of town of St. Martinaville, where
is- she found her countrymen; but
n? Gabriel had gone to seek her and dt
an though she followed, the years to
all passed and still found them sepa- M
s- rated. At last, when Evangeline C'
i. dard hair had grown gray and her
Ia smooth skin had become wrinkled,
Pd she became a Sister of Mercy in
its Pennsylvania, always working
among the poor and sick, beloved A
- by all for her gentleness and pa- la
ec tience. One quiet Sunday even- ai
Sing she was called to the bedside il
e- of a dying man. He was old and am
to withered and his life was fast
s. ebbing away, but Evangeline rec- p
gr ognized him as the handsome Ga- -
a briel of long ago. So after many
ch years of waittng and hoping, the
nU faithful lovers saw each other
ey again for a few moments on earth. T
Gabriel passed away with his
ter head resting on Evangeline's true
en heart, her dear name on his lips,
'"- and before long she was sleepingl
le by his side in the quiet cemetery.
e A great city has grown up
"r where her labors of mercy were -
wrought tuand the graves of the lo
"i' vtrs are unknown and uncaredl
.' for. but I never listen to the mur- a
mt1 murs of the Teche waters, or hear Ii
I tihe breeze sigh through the oaks,
ti that 1 do not fancy it is sad-heart- d
i v, Evangeline, calling in vain for t
•- hr beloved iGablriel.-By Jennie
(;. rgers in the Ladies' C'om-
Lj c !nrvoue Htada,'be. Dr. lilre' liervine.
MERCURIAL
en Mr..T.C.Jon' ,of Fulton,Ark.,saysoI
la- "-.blut ten years ago I con
I traeled a scverocaseof blood
l pInson. L',:iiug l)hysicians prescribed
ite mdiicine after medicine, which I took
withoiut any relief. I also tried mercu
Ug rait andl p)t.t h rcm,- lies, with unsuc.
RHEUMATISM
col
ri cessful resllt s. but which broughton an
ski attack of mnercuri d r..eumatism that
)se made my life one of agony. After st
oriag four years I gave up all remedies
'oU and comm"!ced using S. S. S. After
us ,aking several bottles, I was entirely
cured and able to resume work.
Uw, is the greatest medicine for
far blood poisoning to-day on
the market-"
my -
Trettlo on ari d inp'n pil-ese n mlled
rou bee. lwr riTc rul Co., Atlanta, Ga.
be- T J. LABBE,
ou Druglget and Appothecary,
ore MAIN STREET,
in- St. Viartinville, La.
ALl DRUGS ARE GUARANTEED TO
In FILL PHARMAOOP(EIA RBE
her QUIREMENTB.
n us. Bulk Purfume, IMedicated
ars and Toilet Soaps.
D Ill Sndri Kept in a First Olss Drug
Store.
icir
WOOD FOR SALE.
no SAWED SPLIT
anL- - ---
uer -FOR
o: STOVES
and
-AND
the FIRE PLACES.
lith,
yed Delivered in Quantities to
.yed Suit.
ple.
ri- G. W. BAN KE$,
ind- Agent for D. R. Carroll
Iha
ung Scientific American
rtu- AgSey for
was
fa.
the
ken- " CAVtATS.
TRADE MARKS,
uge- DESION PATENTS.
for COPVYRIHTS, eto
For Information sad free Handbook write to
omne MNs a Co i 31l B3u,AIWTAY. 5NW YORK.
Oldest bureau for securlng paents In Amric
Sto Every patent taen out by us is brougbrt bef
the pubiiC by a novIcs rven free of cbharge iathe
Srieatifii mericaa
li se clrerlatlou of any scintititc paper In the
world. 5olendudly illustrted. No tintenllgeat
ian sbould be without it. Weel. $3.0 a
ered $1a,: 5sx months. Adden.. ( ~suNatc
Pu ea aas.361 roadway. ew eork atr.
the
here FOR SALE.
but Imlnored town lots, with good resi
and dences, and a well located lot and store
ears thereonf with good patronage, at 8t
epa- Martinville, La., alto lot and store at
line Cade station, La. Robt. Martin,
St. Martinville. La.
her
ded, FOR SALE.
y iln
A small farm. two miles from St. Mar
in tiville, measuring about fi arpents
Arable land, and 1I arpents of timbered
pa- land. The prairie land is all fenced in,
ven- and is well improved, all buildiugs be
[side lng new. It is not sulject to overflow,
and and Is well drained. Conditions.
$500 cash, and the balance on easy
ast ternms to suit th, purchaser, for further
rec- partincular apply at tlii offlice.'
tany BRICKS! BRICKS!!
the P)GAS AND BAKER.
ther Bricks in any quantity at their Brick
arth. Yard. back of tihe jail.
First choice brick at $t per 1000,
his second choice at 4.5 per ItWwi.
lips, rabIES
'ping Seeding a tonic, or clhildren who want build
trig up. should take
y BRO1VN' IRlON BITEIB.
It is plcant; caree Malaria Indigeatlon.
up Biousnes Liver Compapainias and Neuralia
were
a lo- Land For Sale.
We are reqellietl to offer for siale, 40
mur- acres of first class land, adjoining the
hear limits of this corporation.
oaks, Also, one ftine property, with good bull
eart- ding, out houses, stables etc For fur
or ther particulars, terms etc.
Adtldress this office.
I ·I ' - l \Iuul' ria. lr,.ii, O
uoL .' i·1.·-l - ...C~~ZUC L~
OFFICE, .
When You Need Any Kind
J~OB PRINTING
-TO BE
*ETLY and PROMPTL
EXECUTED.
WOfl AISIUP OIG~ARNT~SD,
At the TIwest Price.
Mrs. EB, V. BIEVEWI,
--XEEBPS Ti'E
The Tinest and Most Comrplc
tc Stock ef
FRESUH nl BEST GOODS.
If you want the boet and
freshest Goods, comu to mo.
L. De St. Germain,
BLACKSMITH
--AND
WHE"LWRIGHT.
I MAKE CANE CARTS, OF
THE BEST AND SYTROKG
EST KI-."!).
All Rpa irs in my line will
be prump,ntly nm'cc, and my
work is ýuar' te d.
I s; i it tlhe lr'o:oa:ge of
the lulic, lrolmisinf them
the bt -,,,k ,t r(;asonable
p .; t" . * L. . : r. GERMAINm
7F YOU'R IACR' AuftIi.
Or yoa are all worn ort. really golo f,r nothing
it is general delility. 'ly
- BROIl N' IRON lllTTl.fRR.
I wdllvure %oa, adIl v'1 am gvw..l it : tj bold
lv all .1 zi r" 1,1 in 1ifin(
it) REDUCTION (
-IN
PRICES.
JOB PRINTING
d -AT
" REDUCED PRICES.
. In order to meet the
} reduction of prices in
the Printing Line by
the city and other
printing houses, we
9 have made the follow- i
a ) ing reductions:
NOTE PAPER.
600 sheet. reduced to $2.2:
1000 " " " 3.75
LETTER PAPER.
500 sheets reduced to $255
1000 - t " .2L
The note and letter paper is
nicely printed and put up in
tablet with blotter cover.
BILL HEADS at accord-(
10 inly low prices,
e jNVELOPES.
2.50 White No 6 at .
r U00 White No 6 at. -
1000 White No 6 at 3.50
These envelopes are put up
by ¼ n in a box and will Inot
tick in damp weather.
_
J. A. HITTER,
SADDLES, CAFRRIAGES
-AND
Firemen's Equipments.
Marble work and Tombstones
Carved.
mples of work can be examined.
Moderate Prices.
. rt.. Imartinvill. L.
d
VICTOR ROCHOR,
FI.':; FA:.iI.Y AN) FANCY
GIiac;::ll:s, Cl;.u:s, T o
TI.
Frc:;h Good; Ecci d 1.y.'
All at prices that d.fy irowl, ition.
i Mali Stret. St. ,:ailtinville. La.
THE TIMES-)EMOCRAT
m Special Wires,
N. Special Correspondents,
Special Writers,
Special Artists.
- They COST MONEY but
They MAake a Great
PAPER.
TIMES-I) i CR
Gets ALL TIxt: HE'lW d ahd
PRI iNT' IT.
GET IT REGIL A RL ' L N SEE
ILY.L : t ' .
1 per }ear. 'f:. r ,- ,:. $:.-,i ear
The New Oras l' icaynn. is on., of thU
newsiest and most reliahle papners Pb
5 lishel. Its Editorials are judlirious and
timcly ; it gives all the news witbhout feat
or favr qr; it Associated lreil t I id Special
Southern Telegrams cover all inlportain
Foreign and Donetvaie News: its COl3e
tnereial aud Market Reports are eompl0es
and are accepted standards; its Le.tet
I from New York and Parin, and th
special Contrilbutiuns of Pearl Rivetr*
Catharine Cole. Mlilie Moore Davkla
Jeuuie .Tunne. Marie Po',nts and othes lae
nnfailing sources of interest and informer
tion and are of atl high order of literprV
Smerit. 'rhe Pie·ynne is printed in cl.r,
nsew type, of size sllcrieut to be rte
without ntraininng the e'ye'.
To keep ahreast of the timen and knId
all worth knowing that a newtm3p~d
should tell, send Thre'e lDdlars for thres
)t. sonuths' nllscript ion to the Daily Pieac
i.'lune. or sulibscrilb for it" splendid Weekl.
Edition at (De Dolla:r a year. The
Werc;:ly is sixt it :,e::,. ,nd i. ie.

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