OCR Interpretation


The Voice of the people. (New Orleans, La.) 1913-19??, October 23, 1913, Image 1

Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88064458/1913-10-23/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Militants! Shall The Voice Die? If Not, Rush Remittances!
IMMEDIATE DEMANDS: Power THE GOAL:
A SIX HOUR DAY. Organization Is Power A FREE RACE.
ONE DOLLAR AN HOUR. IN A FREE WORLD.
THE VOICE ba PEOPLE
"AN INJURY TO ONE IS . AN INJURY TO ALL."
k\(II.t Mi. II l..li 1i l.,,Rlt." NEW O()RLEANS, LOUISIANA, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23, '1913 "TIRUTH CONQUE'S" NUMBER 42
..1... . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . • ,i
sT 41
\ It
Strong Foot, The Great Kickapoo Chief, On the Narpath.
Bodine & Co. Expelled.
San Pedro, Cal., Oct. 3, 1913.
In your issue of September 25th I
notice a "Watrning to the seamen on
the Atlantic Coast." In connection
with this, I would like to say that the
Executive Board of the International
Seamens' [tniQn of America has re
voked tie chartcr granted to lGodine
& Co. Now, wihen the A. F. L. does a
thing like that'there must certainly be
something rotten. The charges were
that he split initiation fees with the
hoardingmnastrs and stulff like that.
Of course, here on the Pacific Coast
Andrew. Furn.iethl has them all h ypno
tized yet with his seamens' bill before
Congress. but there are also a lot of
class-consciousi men here that have
enough of hini; especially the younger
men. The slow hut steady growth of
the M. T. W. in Frisco shows this. I
was in !Lo. \ngeles a few days ago,
the local a :e get t ing along fine, espe
cially tl ,e Slinish Local. I remain
yours for t le rev, lution.
1 (. I n I ,'\' V ,
In Con,,ct in with the albve letter
we 1,ull- rt. following taken from
"The Jour n, nua .I:tarher," .( A. F. .
of ()ctober. 1913):
%Seamnen Are Anxious.
Washinrrton. o('rnress has been so
slow in c,ni'idet i ng iisla:tioºn rela
tive to alwli- hmg i:,\,luntaryv servi
tiude among the sea,'en tlat it is re
ported the seamn'n are lt, ,m ingr rest
tve and in all prottbiaility will aplpal to
the President for r, lief. Iuring the
Sixty-second Congress the llouse
pased the Sean'ion': 'll and in ti e
very last hours of tl at Congress the
Senate also passed the hill with nu
merous amendments. The final result,
however, was that the measure died
with the ('ongress. There is now a
threatened strike of the seamen and
the matter has been presented to Sec
retary of h~lir Wilson. and in turn
referred to Prisident Wilson.
Querry By The Voice:
This blamed "bill," a pure and un
('oi|n1ed .on Page 4.)
"D. and C. C. Rules"
Ruled Out.
And this is what our reporter saw:
On the 8th he saw a colored "union"
foreman on one of the cotton ships
hired 5 men. Along comes Mr. Steve
(lore and he hires 10 more men. The
contract with the shipping interests
specifically provides thlat the hiring of
men shall be done by the Union. The
Union foreman made no protest
against this clear violation of the five
year contract.
Querry: When is a contract not a
contract?
Answer: When it interferes with
In h I:scs' I'ockl tlooks.
On the 8th of this month he saw a
white "Union" foreman work six men
in a hatch when tie rules call for
eight.
Querry: What is a "Union" fore
man ?
Answer: One who drives for the
Boss all of the time, part of the time,
and some of the time.
Fullerton "Sucked To
Death.
I came into Fullerton on payday and
I never heard so much howling about
shortage in checks, so I asked some if
this was the case all the time. They
said yes, and had been for some time;
that Mr. and others were suck
ing so hard that they would kill the
husiness dead if the Superintendent
could not get them weaned soon, but
that he said there was only one
chance he knew and that was to splin
ter their noses. Men work for $1.50
per day and then claim they are short
from $1.00 to $5.00 every Saturday.
It makes business WEAK. The first
two negroes I met said they were
short that evening $5.00 and I saw
,piite a lot who said they were short
from that amount down, and, that
counts a heap where there a e as
l 'onttnued on Page 4.)
Ed. Lehman's Ringing Ap.
peal For Cline and
Rangel.
Why let the fourteen Fellow-Work
ers of Pearsall, '1 exas, be railroaded?
Again the Plunderbund is trying to
railroad workingmen to the penitenti
ary or the gallows under the old hum
bug called law and order and justice.
What have they done? They are ac
cused of killing a deputy sheriff. What
if they did kill him? Do not deputy
sherills kill people? Are they ever
prosecuted for killing people? What
about Del Charlan when he shot Fel
low-Worker Smith and killed him, was
he prosecuted ? Oh, no, he worked for
for the interest of the capitalist class.
And then the judges on the bench tell
you that the present courts "recog
nizes no classes and are courts of jus
tice." To hell with such justice! Did
the Fellow-Workers at Pearsall com
mit any worse crime than the deputy
sheriffs commit nearly every day?
You know they have not. Why then
let the Texas Plunderbund railroad
them? If you do, the working class
wil have to stand and be branded
as moral cowards. You, the working
class, freed me and fifty-eight other
Fellow-Workers from the gallows in
Lake Charles by showing your solidar
ity and standing behind us; you, the
working class, can save Cline, Rangel
and the rest of the Fellow-Workers at
Pearsall, Texas, if you show your soli
darity.
I don't give a dam what the Fellow
W'orkers at Pearsall did, for I know
they did not commit any worse crime
ti-an the capitalist class commits
every day. For humanity's sake, do
not let the savages of Texas send
these Fellow-Workers to prison or to
the gallows. If you think it is worth
while to save them send your dona
tions to Vincent St. John, Gen. Sec.
Treas. of the I. W. W, 164 W. Wash
:ngton St., Chicago, Ill., or to Jay
smith, Box 78, Alexandria, La., and
(Continued on Page 4.)
Cline, Rangel and Compan
ions Being Rushed
To Doom.
Letters from Pearanll, Texas, and
Los Angeles, Cal., say the Heurtaistas
are rushing the cases of Cline, Rangel
and Companions in order to "try"
them before their friends can come to
their assistance. The whole "machin
ery of justice" is oiled against them
and the entire REBEL PRESS must
turn its batteries upon these lawless
officers of the law in order to drive
them from their prey.
Here are tle facts in the case as
told to THE VOICE by a correspond
ent:
"THE FACTS OF THIS CASE IS,
TIAT THESE DEFENDANTS
WERE NOT DOING A THING IN
VIOLATION OF THE STATE LAWS,
BUT THE SHERIFF WITHOUT
WARRANT WENT TO ARREST
THEM AND KILLED ONE OF
THEM--SHOT HIM IN THE BACK
OF THE HEAD, WHEN HE HAD NO
ARMS AT ALL, WAS DEFENSE
LESS."
So that you can see that it is Law
rence, Grabow Little Falls and Wheat
land over again, only the work of
"justice" is moving swifter under
Satrap "Whiskey Ring" Colquit than
Startling Confessions
of Railway Union
Chiefs.
"lIAMMERkM DOWN" GARREiT
SON AND "SAVl1''i VALVE" LkE
t'at&O 1.W.. W. CHAIGE THAT
OLD LINtE (JMONS Ji. "'WOUK
rLi' L'I I' ifE!KSG '' 0 BOSSIS.
"It was made plain yesterday by
thle representatives of the Eastern
trainmen and conductors, whose de
mands are being arbitrated in the
Manhattan Hotel that whether the ar
bitrators grant the demands or not
the men will not rest with what they
gain by present arbitration.
The rank and file of the men, their
representatives said, will not be satis
fied ,and they did not know when the
demanding of higher wages was go
ing to stop. It was intimated that the
demands on the railroads by their
operating forces which have been go
ing on for years may be a continuous
performance at intervals for some
time to come.
This came up when A. B. Garretson,
one of the representatives of the em
ployes, who was on the stand during
the greater part of the forenoon and
afternoon sessions in rebuttal of some
of the statements made by witnesses
for the railroads, had nearly finished
his testimony. After testifying at
some length as to his views of the rel
ative wages and conditions of work in
the East and South, as compared with
the West, he said "the train men and
conductors gained something by the
settlements of their demands in 1910,
but they wanted three times as much
as their demands indicated and it took
a deal of hammering down by Presi
dent Lee of the trainmen and myself
to bring the demands down to what
the men actually asked. The men
it is even under the great "Reform
ers" Luther and Hiram.
Over the objection of the attor
neys for.the defense, the "Court" has
sent the rest of the cases from Dimit
to LaSalle County for "trial." LaSalle
is a small county adjoining Dimmit
and both counties are in close "busi
ness relations" with each other, it is
said; that is to say, the same gang
runs both "temples of justice."
Rebels of the World, Get Busy I
These innocent men are at the mer
cy of as merciless a gang of human
wolves as ever hunted for human
blood, in the hands of that gang
known in the South as the "Sheriffs'
Ring," or the Rurales of the United
States.
Act To-day.
But send all funds contributed until
furtehr notice to Vincent St. John,
Gen. Sec. Treas. of the I. W. W., 164
106 W. Washington St., Chicago Ill.
DO NOT send them to Almade at
Pearsall, Texas, as the Sheriff is
reported to be opening the mails
of the prisoners and doing as he
pleases with its contents. But..........
GET BUSY!
want more and more al the time."
"Can you not start a wage move
ment," asked Elisha Lee, for the rail.
roads.
"Al I can do is to keep a near fire
down," replied Garretson. If the men
do not get wages commensurate to
their work and the increased cost of
living, they will keep on asking until
they get what they want."
"The rank and file of the men, said
Garretson, "are never atisfied. The
officers of their organizations have to
keep hammering at their demands to
keep them down. The only way to
keep any one of these men quiet as to
demands would be to kill him."
He said that the officers of the men
could easily arouse them, but their
policy was to soothe them.
Here W. C. Lee, president of the
Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen
took a hand in the discussion and
said that the men in the West had
been clamoring for another wage
movement for some time.
Chairman Seth Low, of the Arbi
tration Board, then said:
"If the men in the West get an
other raise of wages will the men
in the East not want more in spite
of this arbitration ?"
'ntifnlled on Page 4.)
NEW ADDRESS:
Address All Communications
For The Editor or: The Voice
of The People to 520 Poydras
Street, New Orleans, La.

xml | txt