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The Daily telegraph. (Monroe, La.) 1870-1886, December 14, 1870, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88064499/1870-12-14/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. 1. MONROE, LA., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1870. - NO. 2.
THE TELEGRAPH:
An Independenit Newspaper;
PI'BLISHED DAILY AND WEEKLY, AT
MONROE, OUACHITA PARISH, LA.,
BY G. W. MeIRANIE.
TERMS OF D.AILt:
Single copies .......................................$ 10
One copy per week................. .50
Five copies per week....................... 2,00
One copy for three months .......... 4,00
Five copies, one address, for 3 months.. 17,50
i7.-If not paid in advance 25 per cent.will
he added to the above rates.
TERMS OF FWEEKLLY:
The following rates of subscription will be
rigidly adhered to in all cases:
Single copies..... ....................$ 10
One copy for six months ................. 2,00
One copy for one year........................... 3,00
Arrival and Departure of the Malls.
From Monroe to Vicksburg-Carrying
all mail matter for the Western, Eastern,
Middle, Pacific and Atlantic States, and New
Orleans,
Departs daily at 5 A. M.;
Arrives daily at 7 P. M. (Sundays except
ed. )
From Shreveport to Monroe
Arrives daily at 4 A. M.;
Departs daily at 6/ P. M.
From Camden, Ark., via Farmerville to
Monroe, La.-
Arrives Sundays, wrednesdays and Fri
days at 4 A. M.;
Departs Mondays, Wednesdays and Fri
days at 6;6 P. M.; closes at 6 P. MI.
From Monticello, Ark., via Bastrop, to
Monroe
Arrive$ Tuesdays, Thursdays and Satur
days at t6 P. M.;
Departs Mondays, Wednesdays and Fri
days at 5 A. M. Closes evening previous at
9 o'clock.
From Hillsboro, Ark., via Ouachita City
to Monroe
Arrives Tuesdays, Thursdays and Satur.
days at 2 P. M.;
Departs Mondays, Wednesdays and Fri
days at 6 A. M. C('loses evening previous at
9 o'clock.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
R. RI('HARDI).ON. JAS D. M'INERY.
Richardson & McEnery,
A 'T()RNEYS - AT- LAW, Monroe, La.,
practice in all the parishes of North Lou
isiana, in the Supreme Court at Monroe, the
Federal ('ourts, and in the Land Office T)e
Ipartnllent of the ( ll(eral Governmllllent.
decl2-d:ani
ý'. H. MIORItlN*. W. W. "ARMER.
Morrison &t Farmer,
T'FOltNEYS AT LAW, Monroe,Monroe, La.,
£ will practice in the ('courts of the Pa
riles if () Ouachita, Morehouse, Richland,
Franklin mand 'ialdevcll, in the Supreme
4'.urt. and in the United States Courts.
XWill al, aittend to all businecss intrusted to
t'1,rl in !h St:iat, :illt Frderal Lanid O4ffices.
n41v3
Stubibs A C(obb.
IT.TTtRNFlY8 AT' LAW, Mnroe,, La.,
. i W ill prt ice in ithie ' luris of tihe 12thl
.Indicial istrrut, eoniiposed of tihe Parishes
. .Mor nhouis . I ia,.ililta, ':alld'vell, ( 'at:a
Inla and Frankli: in ' i1: lh l':ariishis ill
.Jacksi and lUnion. v43:;2
MONROE ADVERTISEMENTS.
. A. FILANNAGAN,
:I1 l '( 'II.A![.l I'E i, .i I>, II "'L l,'Lr ,
.,l )N" -tH .:, l1..
.t1! m - k iltlisrt (lto hlii~r rl' wil! e eex'e
,'iited with i ileatnir. I:tar ari dlispiatcih and
O1,IVEli & YRIINE,
•MO(iN ROlE, LA.,
lc,'Hes.,ir!, , dw, Iorwardi"n Mrlllerchant.
P)a/i'ur in (ceneral Merchandi. e.
or Agrtl nts for Agricultural lnmpruclmnts
,f all desciptinrir, alsto licr iitl Fire hins
niil. iinni alutrli Express ('olmliaiy.
roe'i2--idllim
(3 RGI (. ENC. MINGER'N
('()NFE('T]IONERY,
Cakes of all kinds, plain and ornamented;
t'andies; 4;andlied Fruits; Nuts; fresh, pro
served and caSniled Fruitri; Fancy Articles;
Nick-Nacks, and everything kept in first
class (onfectionery. Particular attention
given to Dinners, P arty, Ball and Wedding
Suppers, StrxMI.l SEAsON.-Ice CreamnSO
da and Mineral Waters, and Refreshing
Drinks of all kinds. decl2-danu
MONROE ADVERTISEMENTS.
E. DREYFUS de CO.,
Grand ASreet,
MONROE, LA.,
Have just received a splendid assortment
of latest styles
GENT'S WINTER CLOTHING,.
manufactured to theirorder.
-ALSO-
An invoice of tine hand-sewed
BOOTS' AND SHOES,
--AND
HA TS,
C('A PS",
DR Y G OODS,
BOOTS & NHOES,
and a variety of other articles.
FINE GOODS JUS'T RECEIVED,
AND OF THE
GREATEST VARIETIES.
-dLadies are specially invited to call
and examine the superior and latest styles
of Goods expressly selected for them.
decl2--d3m
GEORGE CHAMBERLAIN,
WHOLESALE DEALER IN
DRY GOODly
GROCERIE',
A 1iD PROD UCE,
MIoNROE, LA.
WVINTEr1 (OI)DS 0. GRtC('ERIIES.
I anm constantly receiving additions to, myi
already large and well selected stc:k of
,Napleh mo+( F)'ay.V D,:I (;ood.s,
I,(d (,,v'ri .:f all kiuds,
h. \- )d w i l l s e l! l t h an.' ;:; c h e a p , i f n o t c h e a p -
ir, th'i :lyiv housei in North Louisiana.
U ;E l.OýIE ('HAMBERLAIN.
WAREIIHOUSE NOTICE.
1lH\'iiing a lar.ie and coulllnodious warc
house aind cottonl-shed, I ani l)repared to re
ceiel\ c ad frward cotton and freight ,f :all
kind., oin the most liberal teriis.
V. 13.-Will pay' the highest market price
for cotton, hides, and produce of all kinds.
de.l2-d3m G. ('.
J IOIFFM' IN,
JDealer in J)' (iood.x , (Ir oceries, 1 ard
wore, Furniture and IPlhntat io, 1'Yulie..
gar-Keeps constantly on hand a variety of
fine Cigars and Tobacco, Wines 1and Iiquors
of every kind.
Th-od'ue. decl2:d( n
JOlIN G(. SANDERS,
-DEALER IN
('ocerie.,, IbbwCoo, I T7news (and Liquors,
Fanc tandSatlle Dry, Good.v, Hard
Jv1re, Bair Iron tnd Oaiztn!gs,
a(,nd I.andreth's Gardlen ,'eed,
Corner Grand and DeSlard sreets,
MONROE, LA. deel2':3m:n
MONROE ADVERTISEMENTS.
GRAND FAIR
For the benefit of the
METHODIST E. CHURCH SOUTH,
in .eMonroe, Lol.0ii(tSUt,
December 21st, 22nd, 23rd and 24th.
EVERYTHING AT S TO RE PRICES.
The place to buy your Christmas Presents.
The place to buy your Christmas Candies.
The place to buy your Christmas Fruits.
The place to buy your Christmas Cakes.
The place to buy your Christmas Toys
The place to meet your Friends.
The place to get a tine Supper.
The place to enjoy Yourself.
The place to do Good.
The Ladies propose this method of supple
menting their collections for the new and
beautiful BRICK CHURcH, now in process of
erection, and promise the community a
most elegant and agreeable entertainment.
As the supper and many fancy articles have
been contributed,and other things have been
purchased in quantities at reduced rates,
they can afford to retail them at prices pre
vailing in our own town.
They hope to obtain all the CHRISTMAS
TRADE they are able to supply, and solicit
that orders for special articles, or fruits
fancy goods, etc., in quantities be handed
in at the Parsonage, to Rev. C. F. EVANS.
They assure their friends there will be no
disappointment in their prompt delivery.
For the benefit of persons living at a dis
tance and others debarred attendance at
night, the Fair Room will be kept open
during the day.
Everything that the country and city
markets can afford will grace the Supper
Tables, and, as the Restaurant plan will be
observed, purchasers will pay for only what
they receive.
Come one! come all ! Enjoy yourself, and
aid a noble cause.
AI)MINION 25,c.
At the shute pliace and for the samie cause,
onl the night ,f the 24th of l)ecelmber, there
will be
A '.RAN I 'II I rt!,TMIA,4 'l't! EE
l t miontu1ey'.- wortth  glllarItlýt'd.
'he c'hldirel's jubilee.
At 5 o'cloc k, ('hristnias Eve., the cirtain
will e wit hdrawn front the tree,whn \-very
one ill the rliotl wtill receive a present.
n'iI person wiihing to use the opIort ulii
t', will bls allowed this imeans "1f proseitin
to hliis or her 'rionis their liiit erial e l.':trt
Ilulat i .
-kdili.ssioin t .. h, T l'o,: .;lTh. le, :0,:
tIll.l)REN 2'w.
will please copy.
E . AI'STIN,
; -RANID S'ITIR0EET:'',
I)ONROE, , LA.,
itlcives. stores and ifrw.i'rds eotton anti
merchandise at ruling rates, anid deals, at
liberal prices, in Family Groceries, Wiestern
Produce, Liquors, lnhtqin, Flourl, d,c.
)Dec. 1:1, 1s70. d::tni
SH. GARIRETSONv'S
('OF'FEE HIt ;'lE,
) YS'T.ER ,, O LOON,
.A N) TEA'-PI.V A LLE Y
Srand Street--1o0nroe, l.a.
del2-d3mn
ABB'~S SALOON,
(;rend u 't., betceer (/rtoai..oat rou DeSierd,
MONROE, LA.
This is imn entirely new saloon, conve
niently leoited, and furnishe4 entire with
new ibar-fixtures. The et brands of liquors
and cigars ,kept for customers, and polite
attention gilaranteed. The saloon Is opened
every mnorninf at day-break- decl -dlnm
The Federal Election Law Decided in Part
Unconstitutional.
Judge Cadwalader of Philadelphia,
in the Unit*'dfti ' TsiMrict Court,
was on Friday engaged with the trial
of Patrick MoFadden, charged with
illegal voting at the last election, in
violation of the act of Congress of May
21st, 1870.. The Philadelphia North
American says:
" The facts as proved by the Govern
ment were, that at the last election a
member of Congrtes was voted for at
the t elth division Of ,the Second
Ward, and that in th1at divirion the
prisoner voted under the name of Fred
erick Rameden. There was no proof,
however, that he did or did not vote
for Congre man, and upon this; point
arose a very warm argument.
The section of the act under which
this case was tried, says that where a
member of Congress is to be voted for
and a man votes at that election, the
fact of his having voted at all shall be
prima facie evidence that he voted for
Congressman. This, of course, throws
upon accused the burden of proving the
negative--that he did not vote for that
ofice-before any evidence has been
offered by the prosecution to prove the
atfirmative-that hedid not vote.
Counsel for the prisoner argued that
this was an invasion of the rights of
the citizen, and against the maxim of
the law that says a man shall be pre-
sumed to be innocent of crime until
that presumption is rebutted by evi
dence, and that therefore this section
was unconstitutional.
Mr. Valentine argued against the
position, and in favor of the constitu
tionality of the law.
Judge Cadwalader held the section to
be unconstitutional, and said before
conviction could be sustained, the jury
would have to say that the prisoner
had been proved to have voted for Con
gressinan.
There are several other points in the
law equally unconstitutional.
Orchards.
Every Farmer should raise an abund
ance of fruit for his own use, and it will
be found profitable for market. Fall
planting is decidedly the best for ap
ples, and now is the time to prepare
the ground for setting. Decide upon
your location and the number of acres
desired and where the rows of trees are
to be plow a land of eight or ten fur
rows, andl horrow, well. This will
facilitate planting very tnuch. We'
prefer thirty feet apart each way, which
will give about forty trees to the acres.
Having prepared your ground 'take it
off each way, placing a stake four feet
high at each place, and when done
planting drive the stake firmly in the
ground and secure the tree to it. it
will pay. Get your trees from your
nearest reliable nursery and plant a:
soon as possihltb after taking from the
ground. Two year old trees are thet
best. They can be bought for ten or
fifteen cents each, according to Inumntber
wanted. From tihel middle of ( etober
to the middle of November is the tilme
to plant. Strawberries do well et at
the soallle time.
Prev ent the Decay of Wood.
An English Journal gives the follow
ing: " A prtx*ess has been discovered
for the prevention of the decay of wood.
As the result of a five years' experience,
a paint is reconmmended, which at the
same time possesset s the advantages of
being impervious to water. It is conm
Isuled of fifty parts of tar, five hundred
parts of fine white sand, four parts of
linseed oil, onef part of the red oxide of
eoppr in its native state, and finally,
one part of sulphuric acid. In order
to manufiwture the paint from this
mnultiplicity of materials, the tar, chalk,
sand and oil, are first heated in an iron
kettle; the oxide and acid are then ad
ded with a great deal of caution. The
mass is very carefully mixed and applied
while hot. When thoroughly dry, this
paint is as hard as stone."

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