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Feliciana sentinel. (St. Francisville, La.) 1877-1892, April 20, 1878, Image 1

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TELICIANA N SENTINEL.
L. 2. ST. FRANCISVILLE, LA., APRIL 20, 1878. NO. 43
nd A. CROSS
eol At:orsev at Law,
and Clinton, Louisiana.
or C. ARDEE,
LI Attorney at Law,
Clinton. Louisiana.
0)AS J. KEINAN',
sa® 'EY & COUNKEELOR AT LAW, I
lish, Clinton, Louisiana. 1
Ilc ectico in the Courts of East and
;'liciana.
IA gliOUN FLUKER,
A Attorney at Law,
aB Clinton, Louisiaa.
dlpractice in the Courts of the 5th
a W District. Aug.2'76.-ly
oage, AM. PO WELL,
ten Atloreey at Law,
St. Franiesville, Louisiana.
Will practice in the Parishes of West
d, I East Foliciana. and Pointe Counee.
J. WEDGE, J
"ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Clinton, Louisiana,
dl practice in the courts of East and
Feliciana and the Supreme Court of
dtate.
31. W. LEAKE,e
Altorney at Law,
St. Francinville. Louisiana.
Will practice inl the Parishes of 'cest
East Felici:lna. and Pointe Coupee.
E 8. JONES,
ATTORNEY AT LA N,
Clinton, Louisiana.
ce on the North side of the publlic
are.
.tiE$MPE. Jl . JOS. 1. (;OLSAN -
EMI'LE & G(OLSAN,
AT''OION'EY, AT LAW
it. Frincisvilh l,:i.,
Will ipractic.' ini the Courts of W\ si
Cd. WICK i.iFi:i. C. L. FC el il.i
St. F.ra nciville, la.
1W II lrnietice ili he ,Co"rtsi olf Wes\'t
! E'ast l'elieiain. Paoiute iitpee and
joiiung Parishes.
l)ENTIST1Y.
Dr. E'. Green Davis olliUn
':i. s ,vices to the Ipeolel of
thi. acl aslgjininig Parishes.
y orders adllressed to, him, at his resi
alice will receive promilt atteti.iun.
L'ENI'ISTRY: IDENTISTRY !
-I I will attend all calls ionh
t-lie (Co:ist, frone Natchez to
New OrleIans; also the back
untry. when leceCliabl, with a hbilggy.
Persons wishing my services, canl pro
Sir tthe lntsui by alddlressingi ue, atl Iy
idtienice.
S 1). STOCKING, D). P. S.,
:+t. lFran.isville, La
MARITINEZ,
Sun Street, Bayou Sara, La.,
DEALE.R IN
Dry Goods, Groceries, Confections, To
lacco, WVinies and Liquors.
0-EPII VACARO,
Cnrpeatter and Undertaker,
Will give prompt attention to all busi
nes in his line in this andadjoiniug Par
a hes. June 2y '76.-1
ITY 11OT'1L,
Corner of (rnatp and CLomnn,, svlrects,
New Orleans. la.
'MUMFOORD & WATSON.
PI'ROP I ' TOR,'.
BOAtID.-Two dollars and flJty
rlnts per day.
iNO F. IRVINE,
Bayou Sara, Louisianta,
8ObLE.5ALE AND IIETAIL DEALER IN
&roceries Provislions, Western
Produce and Gesseral Plan
. tatton saupplies.
ALSO
RECEIVING, FORWARDING
& COMMISsION MERCHANT
AND
STEJ!MBOAT AGENT.
II TE IIHENRIETTA HOUSE.
. BAYOU SARA. LA.
Board cnun le procnred by the day, week
Gaon month, nd at reasonable rates. In
the future as in the past, t the table will
b suppliod with the very best fare t.he
market affords. leganut iand well fur
lieleed rooms. Acconeunodating servants
eon.tantly'in attendanee. Patronage o0
icled, and satisfaction guaranteed.
H. ARNAUID'S
h-EW IARBIER SIIOP AND IHAIR
DRESSING SALOON.
Opposite M. & A. Fischer, Front Levec
Bayou Saroa, Louisiana. Sept. 1, '77
NEWMAN,
T. AILOR,
i erw the ..Sntinel ofi~ce,
- t. Franoivillo tL.ie.
C NEAsP SOOTK S uand SHOE'
MADE
A -BY
M. ROS EN TrH %L,
Bayou (STVTI ST.) Sara.
(VRESINS KY'S OLD STAN D) O
Gaiters $G. Shoes $5. Boots $12. Fan- =
cy Gaiters $7. All made of the BEST
LEAvTIER, and the
WORK GGUARANTEED TO PLEASI CUSTOM
era.
pICAJD & WEIL,
Bayou Sara; La.,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers min
FANCY DRY GOOD,
CLOTHING, FURNITURE,
BOOTS, SHOES, O
GROCERIEM AND FI'ANTATION SUP
F'LII8S GENERALLY..
I."Highest market price paid for cot-.
ton.
N O. & BAYOU SARA U. S. MAIL S
11r PACKET
The superb passenger
steamer, 2
Gov. Allen. 4
.J. .. Bitow .................... Master. I
S. S. STRECK.....................Clerk.
Leaves' "Bayou Sara for New Orleans 1
every IFednesday after the arrival of the
cars from Woodville, and every saturday.
at 7, p. in. Returning, leaves New Or
leans every Monday and Friday, at 5, p. m
. AND THE STEAMER
A. DUGAS ............... -......Master.
Leaves Bayou Sara every Monday after a
the arrival of tle cars from .Voodlville,
and every Thursday at 7 p. m. Return
ing.'leaves New Orleans every Wednes
day and Saturday at 5 p. in.
JOHN F. IRVINE, Agent
S'ONRA D BOCK EL.
sman Strert, Bayou strn, La.,
[I)ealer- in Fanicy and ~taple Dry
(;Goods. Ludies' Dress goods,
White Goods. liouse keep
ers' Articles Clothinir,
Ilat", Caps. Bo,' and
$hoes, HIosiery.
Cutlery. Toi
let Arti
cles.
Notiong, .Fancy and Family Gro
crries,
corrn,ý,
rniciplrone
Westerrn Produce.
Grain. lrxggrring and
Tie," and a ful'l line of
Plan'ation i-upp'ie., Ilard
W:lre GI z ware, etc. etc. Al-:
Sn . Exr n.r:v' and varied asnort
menit of everythlur' in the hine of
-addlerv and larne- .
S)lli ili2e.t market pr'ice paid
e for cotton.
T. GASTIRELL,
lBayou Sara, Louisiana,
DEAL R IN
PLOWS. AGRICIULTURAL IMPLI:
menulltts, Bridlles, Hare.-ss, Hardware, (Gun,
Pistols, Puinps, Pipes, Machine Fittings
Cocks, 'alves, Castings, Ropes, Hollow
Ware,, Wagon and Carriage .4oodwork,
hil:a:ksmith's Materials, Etc., Etc.
TIN 'COPPER AND SHEET IRON MAN
UFACTORY.
Also Agent for the celebrated
"CHARTER OAK" STOVES,
Urie, Garrett & Cottman, Brinley, Jas.
H. Hall and other plows. Allen's Horse
HIIos, Wood's Mowing Machines, Horse
Hay Rakes, all of which I will guarmn
1 tee to sell lower than can be purchased
elsewhere.
Granii'ers and oth,ers will find it to
their al'v:nitage to call and examine my
stock and prices before pucahasing else
wherer.
y G. B. & U. 1' VOO El S
DEALERS IN
.MO NUJI. E.W './IL. WORK,
W E ARE. Noow prepared tofxrnish all
kinds of Grave Work and Iron
Railing at reduced prices. Parties ad
dlressing us at Bayou Sara, or at William
H, Piper's, Baton Rouge, wewill call and
N see wcith our designs, of which we have
n a large variety. Ot. 1
Oct. 13'77 -6
GUN--SMI TH.
Adjoining B. Farrelly's Store
Principal St. Bayou Sara...........La.
- Fire arms of all descriptions put in first
Iass Order. Gun atooke made or repaired.
Sewing machines repaire&, Scissors and
all kinds of small tools sharpened. All at
eaesonable rates of chartge.
SDec. 1st. tim.
? lTHE ADLER HOUSE,
r- * Clinton, Louisiana,
tn Is constant y open for the accoummada
- tionr of the public. Meals by the day,
week or month at reasonable rates.
SINGLE MLEALS FIFTY CENTS.
Elegant and well fuirnislhed rooms can
Salso be procured. Respectfully,
June "25, '6l--Iy. Mrs. S. ADLER.
FOR SALE.
'IE onue story bnilding on the old
- Whiteman property, in Bayou Saro,
suitable for store house or cabins. Pur
lchasor toremove building within a spe
lied time. Can be had at a bargain.
A pply to E. W. WIITEMAN.
i)1t.i 5, '77-tI.
FFLICIANA SENTINEL
A DEMOGRATIC P.PER."
OFFWQIAL, JOUnsAL u WEsT FEICANL A
OFFICIAL,TOURNAL CITY OF BAYOU SARA
PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY.
S. LAMBERT... PROPRIETOR.
JNO. D. A USTEN...............Editor.
SUBSCRIPTION RIATES.
One copy, one year (in advance)....3 00
"i 6 mo. " " .... 1 7.
" t " 3 " " " .... 1 00
ADVERTISING RATES:
[A Squaxe is the space of ten lines solid
brevier.
Space. I .  ' I
1sq'ro. 1.00$ 3.00oo 6.50 $ 9.00 $ 12.00
2 " 2.00 5.00 9.50 15,00 20.00
4 " 4.00 8.50 15.00 2l.00 30.00
I col'm, 5.00 10.00 18 00 34.00 40.00
S 19.00 20.00 40.00 50.00 70.00
1 " 20.00 40.00 60.00 90.00 125.00
Announemnq Candidates:
For State and District offices; ...... $25.00
For Parish offices, ............... 10.00
For police District offices,........ 5.00
(to be paid invariably in advance.)
Transient Advertisements will be"iib etted
at the rate of $1.50 per sqeare of ten lines
for.the first insertion, and 75 cents for acel
snbsequent insertion.
Personalities charged at transient adver
tising rates.
The abore scale of rates must be the basis
of all contracts with advertising agents.
Obituaries, tributes of respect, resolutions
etc., charged as advertisements
sOMEBODY'.ý I)51 Li G.
In award of the white-washed walls,
Where the dead and dying lay,
Wounded by bayonets, shells .and halls,
Somnobody's darling was borne one day ;
Somehody's darling! ,o young so brave,
Wearing still on his pale, s tet face
.Soon to be hid by the dust of the grave
The lingering light of his boyhood's
grace.
Mztted and damp are the curls of gold
Kissing'the snow *of that fair young
brow,
Pale arethe lips of lelicate sthoul :
Somuehody's darling is dying now.
Back fromn the beautiful blue veined
face
Brush evary wa:ndering silken thread;
Cross his hands as a sign of grace.
Somebody's darling is still and dea:d !
Kiss him once for sotcbod yt'ssake;
Mltrul, r a prayer sof.ft and low;
Onet bright curl front the cluster take,
They w.re somebody' s pride, you
Someobody's hand bath rested there;
Was it a mother's solt and white'?
And have the lips of a sister's fair
lb en baptized in those waves of light ?
God knows best. He was somebody's
love,
Somebody's heart enshrined him there ;
Somebody wafted his name above
Night and morn on the wings of
prtyer.
Somebody wept when he went awa3
Looking so handsone, brave, and
grand,
Somebody's kiss on his forehead lay
Somebody clung to his parting hand.
.Somebody's watching and Waiting for
him,
Yearning to hold him again to her heart.
There he lies with his blue eyes diit,
And smiling, childlike, lips apart
Tenderly bury the fair young dead,
Pausing to drop ont his grave a: tear;
Carve on the wooden slab as his head,
"Somtebody's darling lies buried here."
S . --
MADISON WELLS RETRACTS.
SMr. J. Madison Wells in a conmmunica
tion addressed to the Neow York Times,
which is copied below, withdraws the
charges souse time ago brought
by hius against Hon. R. L. Gib
son. Mr. Gibson has very properly,
never noticed these charges ; and it must
be gratifying to hint to know that they
have never produced the slightest effect
on the public :
NEw ORLEANS, April 2, 1878.
To the New York Times:
Aft. Editor-Unwilling to do an injus
t fice to anyone, I feel it a duty, in view of
t subsequent information, to withdraw
what was contained in my letter upon
Louisiana affairs in regard to Lion. IL
L. Gibson.
J. MADIsoS WELLS.
A BEAUTIFUL GIFT.
On the evening of the Rosobery-Roth
schild wedding Lord Rosobery received
n a package from the bride. It contained
a small gold box, and in a separate oen
velope a pretty gold key. No letter ac
compsnied the gift, nor instructions of
any kind. Mr. Lord, however, did not
hesitate as to the use of the key. He
d opened the box. It contained the last
, check which Hannah do Rothschild
would over sign as a spinster. Beautiful
ly written in her ownitfr.ir hand, it was
drawn in ftavor of Lord Rosohery, tl.n.Oct,
tOn payablbt to his own order.
THE JETTIES.
STAR'tLING DEVELOPMENT$.
CORRESPONDENCE ]NDICATING A
CONSPIRACY AGAINST THE
'OUTHa PAss JeTTIES.
The following correspondencti explains a
itself:
Owrca SopTl PAsl Jmrr Wons,
New Orleans, April 12, 1878. F
, Editor Famookfa -Believeing that the
lkbe I* Iti nd'ned itratistb th"
a~rchants and business men of New Or- s
leans, I submit it to you without com- i
ment.
Respectfully, etc., ' JA.'B. fAD8.
S Niw OaLicANs, April 12, 1878.
6jpt. Gee. M. McLellan, Acting Levee
Agent, New Orleans Towboat3.Asso
elation, New Orleans :
Dear Sir-I have learned recently, with
mueh astonishment, of a deliberate de
sign to injure the channel of South Pass,
which is said to have been frustrated by
you, acting as levee agent of the New
Orleans Towboat Association. Will you
please do me the favor to state the facts
in the case T
- Very truly, etc., JAS. S. EADS.
Naw ORLEANS, April 12, 1878.
Capt. Jas. $. Eads, 122 Common street:
Dear Sir--In reply to your note of this
date I have to state: hat on or about the 1
twent~y-fifth of Fprnsary last the ships
Thorodeap and Viola were about to be
put to sea by the towboat Calhonan I I
was directed by J. W. Black, then acting t
as manager of the association, to instruct i
Cap:. Riadle, commanding the towboat
Calhoun, to tow said ships to the head of a
the passes, and in towing them out of the e
jetties to ground then in such a way as
to ol.struct the channel, in retaliation for
the townug or some vessels by one of the
boats wnIed by the coutractors at the i
jetties.
I declinped to give such instructions, I
and le then told me to send Capt. Rid- I
die to Itmt for orders. I went to my bro
ther, Capt. Thos. McLellanu, and inform
ed him of Mr. Black's design, aid he told a
me to go and inform Mr. Coyle, president t
of the Good Intlnt Towboat Company, 4
as the Calhoun betenged to hli coipany,
and this I did.
The Viola's draft was twenty-two feet
The draft of the Thorndean I do not re
mel,,ber, but she was a vessel of deep
draft also.
Yo urs, truly,
GEORGE M. McLELLAN.
P. S.-Capt. Riddle, of the towboat
Calhoun. has made the following state
men t. in connection with this matter.
G. M. M~L.
Mr. Black, at the time referred to by
Capt. McLellan, said to me that he was
determined to block the channel through
South Pass bar, and that he had instruct
ed two of his own captains to stick their
ships in the jetties, add that I would
know when I was to put the one 1 was
towing aground by a telegram that would
say, ' Don't lpart cables." I answered all
right. I talked to Capt. Flynn, of the
tugboat Mary Lee, one of the captains
he referred to, and we discussed the mat
ter together, and decided we would not
do it, as the pilots would. have charge of
he vessels, andl we did ndt think it either
right or.practicable.
W. II. RIDDLE,
Master of Calhoun.
OUTLOOK.
(1iaton Rouge Advocate.)
Should the New Orleans Pacific carry
out its programme; this point will occu
py the singular position of being sur
monuded by railroads without being the
objectivepoint of but one, and that at
present of little avail.
The Jackson Railroad marks a trail of
commerce forty miles to the east, the
Clinton and Woodville lines point direct
t ly toward us, but form river connections
elsewhere. The Grosse Tote road in
deed makes this its initial point, but in
complete, water strangled and threaten
Scned by the Now Orle:ans Pacific, its prom
ise is a still continued struggle; and
now comes the proposed New Orleans Pa
cific bearing direct upou us, promise of
Sthe full tide of Texas commerce, yert
f swerving to the right in view of the
SState hoase tower, crossing the river
probably nine miles below, and' at best
throwing out in this direction a tap line
which would extendl through to Clintoi~;
leavirg us a way station, deprived of our
own local trade.
May be aome one may propose a rome
- dy for the prospective evil at the meet
d inug next Thursdiay evening. "Keep moy
d ing"is our only reliance, and if the
s- slightest glimmer of hope is discerned,
> let it not be smothered by harsh com
f ments, but rather fan the flame until the
blaze ot enterprise lights the hills of old
t "Bingen' time objeqt of so muuch devo
le tion and pride to her children at hbme
at and abroad.
Id
1- Call at Mumford's or Brooks' Drug
Store and get aL trial package of Dr. A.
S Q. Simmons' Vegeotallo Liver Modicine.
It costn i yon nothing and may uasc ,Our
hlf..
WILLIAM M. TWEED GONE TO IS. L1
LONG HOME. I
I
N 'iw YdRluJ April 12. a
Win. M. Tweed died at noon to-day in
tudlow street jail, his death resulting t
from the illness from which he has been q
suffering for a week past. He bleathed 4
his last at precisely twelve o'clock. The
annomncezent ereated great exeitentent.
Tweed's illness dates ss far back as a
week from Thursday, when he com
plsinied of cold and pain across the chest.
Dr. Csanoohan, who has been lipaoutant
.t*4end nspo hidm dmSiig C ipris-.
onment, -visited him on the fol~rirnga. '
and prescribed the usual kemedies. Dur
ing that day and Friday, however, he
grew worse and took to his bed, from
which he never rose again.
On Sunday last he said. that he felt
better, and chatted good-naturedly with
his old nurse Luke and the keepers who
called to see him. On Monday he was a
great sufferer and complained of de
pression in the region of the heart, and
found it diflcult to breathe with free
dom. One of his attendants, who was
suffering from a severe cold, visited hilt
as usual on Tuesday,. and while talking
over their troubles Tweed said, '"My
cold is very bad; worse than youru, I
believe. If it wasn't o bad you would
not tind me on my back, as I don't go to
bed for trifles."
During Wednesday and Thursday he at
times railied, but it was t to all
who called that' .. ange had
overtaken him. Hew aut. in .his
language; his eyesseedinelto save: lost
their brilliancy, and he complained of
triviaLthiugs like a child. Wtill it was
not thought for an instant Lhat hias case
was so serious, it being the impression
ofhis friends that his strong, rugged
constitution would bring him out. At
3 o'clock yesteglay afternoon Dr. Caruo
cuan, who had been with hint during the
glseter part of the day, left the prison,
and btfore taking his departure said to
one ot his attendants that he was afraid (
his patient would not get over his ill
During the early part of the night Mr.
Tweed coruplained of eaerateiating pain
abuMt thi chest and throat, and tossed
retlessly On his c4uch. His nuritd and
other attaches of the prisoa attended him
tenlderly, riasisag hsll 'head higher when
he appeared to be strangling, cooling his
parchled lips and oothing him in various
ways. This morning he was somewhat
easier for a while, but at b o'clock, when
"Dr. Carnochan had arrived, he hadi
again grown worse. Shortly after the
Doctor had entered the sick man's cham
bers, Mr. Douglass, his son-in'law;
John Develin, his old and staunch friend,
and Mr. Edelstein, his counslc and rela
tive, reached the prison and were at
once shown to the room.
Tweed recognized each of them, and
held out his hand. Dr. Caruochan theon
examined his pulse, and discovered that
it was gradually growing weaker, andia
from certain well known indications, he
became satisfied that his patient had
but a short time to live. He info raued
the gentlemen present of this fact, and
they gathered near his bedside. Dr. Car
nochan approached him gently, and, as
briefly and mildly as he could, told the
sufferer that he was past all hope of re
g covery.
Tweed, who evidently knew that his
fiual dissolution was near at hand. said
in a film, clear voice:
"Iv'e tried to do some good. If I
have not had good luck, I am not afraid
to die; I believe the gnardian angels will
protect me."
These words were uttered between 9
and 10 o'clock, according to all accounts.
r Shortly afteruttering them he addrossed
Mr. Edelstein by name, and whoen the
latter leaned over the dying masn ho
e spoke a few words in an incoherent Ian
t . nor, which were to the offect that his im
prisonment would have a moral effect on
f something. He did not finish the sen
e tence, as he was stricken with a parox
-ism and laid Iack in the bed.
is After that he never rallied, and pro
s_ cisely at 12 o'clock, while the whistles of
t_ the factories outside were blowing their
i. signals to cease work for the noonday
2 meal, Tweed gave oneo or two convul
1 sire struggles, threw his head back on
,. the pillow and expired.
>f Not a word was said for some mo
t ments by the gentlemen who were pree
e ent. Finally silence was broken by the
sr sobs of old Luke, and then those in the
t ofice were madle aware of the Boss' end,
Saansd from thence the news spread like
, wildfre'through the streets.
in As required by law, the first county
afficial to be notified was Sheriff Reilly.
e- Amessago was sent to this oflice at five
t- minutes after 12, but he did not reach
v. thojail for inearly two hours afterwards.
so CoronerUhlman and his deputy were
, nextootitied, and came to the jail. They
a- were quickly followed*by a throng of re
o porters from all the nbwspapers and nu
merouspersonal and political friends of
e the deceased.
The warden of the jail refused to per
mit any of the visitors, save the coroner
and his assistants, to visit the chamber
in which the dead muan was laid. The
sr body was afterwards laid out preparato
rytS being no.rel to tha' residc: s of
Mr. Douglass, in Seventy-seventh street.
Immediately his servant began to p:ack
his luggage and a van % as called to re
note *i t.:
Coroner F*dltannu held ah inquejs on
the bdly at once. The remains looked
quite natural, lbut very much amnaciated.
After hearing the testimony the jury rt"
turned a verdict in accordance with the
medical testimony that deceased died
from pertetit sa; with ffl'usiou and heart
clbt; with tomplication 6f bronchitis,
pnunnmoana And chranic tbnjestion of the
kidtieya.
i"l news bf Tweed's dtath was re
eeted firs t Atthe Shiriff's office, and
sprbad quickly through the courts and its
the city Half; hd e rdoms of the Board
of Aidermeai t ero soon thronged with
anxious iuquirers, who were desirous of
ascertainilg the truth or falsity of the
report. Spdcial inestangers wef6t sent
from the Maifor's office, and retured only
to, confirm the news.
Then followed a scene of thre greatest
confusion, people crowding in and fill
ing'tho corridors.
An attempt was made to converse with
Controller Kelly on the subject, but he
positively declined to see any one. All
expressed sympathy for the dead nian,
and one politician remarked that his cue
mies had killed him at last.
Tweed's family, who are in Pari,;
were at cneb notified of his
death by cable. Nd arrangtlients
have as yet been mrade for the funeral;
but the undertaker has taken charge or
the .body.
BiogrIpl ical.
William Marcy Tweed was born ilr
New York April 3, 1823, and thus at the
time of his death was fifty-five years of
age. He learned the trade of chair mak.
ing, and later in lfte was admfited td
the bar; in 1852--53 he was chosen ailder
man.; in 1853--f5 he was a member of
Congress ; in 1856 he was supervisor of
the city and chiirman of the board
in 1856--57 he head the office of 'school
commissioner ; from 8lirto 1867 he servedu
as deputy street comaissioner, and fromn
1867 to 1871as State Senator.
In April, 1870, Tweed was appointed'
commniissioner of tA' taepartment 'f Pub
lie Works, and while he held this office
the mammoth Tamaney Ring Frauds
were 6ominittBd.
Tweed was arrested Oetobeq 28, 1871,
in a civil suit and on charges of malfess
ance. and gave bail in $1,000,000. In the
following November the party of his dis
trict re-elected him to the State Senate,
but T.'ted did not dare to take his seat
in the then excited state of public feel
ing. On December 16 of the same year
bhewas arrested on a criminal charge
and furnished $5000 bail.
The first of the suits nag:inst hint was
brought to trial i .January, 1873, 7, and the
jury disagreed. On November 19 he was
found guilty on the charge of fraud, and
was sentenced to t welve years' itnpris
onment in the penitentiary, and to paiy d
fine of 12,550. He t;-as released by order
of the Court of Appeals, after an impris
onment of fifteen nmouths, buit a civil suit
to recover $6,000,000 had previonsly beenr
brought against him, and hle as con
! fined in Ludlow street jini, in detnfil 1t 6~
$6,00b,00f' bail.
His subsequent escape from jail and
a flight to Spain, and the many efforts made
to secure his release frotf imprisonmen t
are familiar to the public.
THE MODERN COLLEGE BOY'S LET
TER , HOMI.
[From the Graphic.]
Dear M.other-1 'am' not making so
much progress as I expected in my stud
i~s,- bedaiuse there's a great deal else to at
tend to here. Bat we have lively times.
I have just returned frol' t.htý funeral of
e Billy Cook. He was shot last Tuesday
e night because he wouldn't allow the
_ Sophs to take off his pantaloons and
paint his legs red and green, bhrbhor-pol
fashion. This is is the last degree cojafer
red oh tlce Fi+shmnen by the ,olphs. I
wish youi would send me a six-shooter,
one hundred caitridges and a double-bar
. reled shotgun. We ain't a going to stand
f any more nonsense from the Sophs; Af
r ter prayers'this mdrning our class were
all busy makihag sand lbags. We're put
1- ting up a barricade on the east end of our
Sbriildihg, and iitdad to mouont it with a'
six-pound cannonade. The losses in oar
Sclass have been prdtty heavy thi week.
. John Hilton is very low 4ith a bullet in
Shisa stdmac, and Seward Livingstoni is
e not expected to recbver from the stab iu
i, bhis side. Jack Rhinoloh~dUr is lamed for
: life by a bullet in the knee, and Sam
Astor has lest the eight of one eye from a'
Sbrickbat. Thdre isn't a whole window
. left in oelr college buildling. Buat you'
' wait, mother! You must wait a
h fbw days anid you'll hear some
. thing. We're undenrniuing the
u Sophs qularters. We're working
, ldayand right. Thot Innel is now 120
yards long. It goes straiglht over the
campus and under old Prex's building."
- We'vo established a 'c'mmunication with
f his cellar, and I tell you a drop of elart-t.
or Burgnudy is very nic6 to have after a
fellow's handled a pick and shovel half
' the night. We shall use dynamite. Keep
r shlady, mother. There won't eo a toph'
r left bly this tije next week..
YThur affectionate son,
- VmRE "KEt'a.'
f Priucc',tu: Match 12.

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