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Feliciana sentinel. (St. Francisville, La.) 1877-1892, April 27, 1878, Image 1

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!.EL ICIANA SIENTINEL.
.2. ST. FRANC1SVILLE, LA., APRIL 27, 1878. NO. 44
-------n- m I ,m
CBOss C
AtlrneV at Law,
g.lARDEE,
hitomIeY at Law, B
Clintonll. Louisianllra.
-A J. IKERNAN,
'EY & COUNSELOR AT LAW, L
Chtuon; Louisiana.
tlce in the Courts of East and
liciana.
OUIN FLU KER,
Atuoru'Y at Law,
" Clinton, Louisiana.
etice in the Courts of the 5th
istrict. Aug.2'76.--ly
J. PO ELL,
Attorney at Law,
ct Frtncisville, Louisiana.
prctice ill tlut Parishes of West
Felicitani. and Pointe Counee.
j. WEDGE,
ATTORNEY AT LAVW,
Clinton, Louisiana,
practice in the courts of East and
liciana and the Sulprcue Court of
W. LEAKE, ca
AltOlrney at Iaw, nat
8t. Frtnucisvilhl. Louisiana.
practice in t ho Parishes of West
Felician.: and Pointe Coulpet'.
L JONES,
thc
ORNEY AT LA AK,
Clinton, Lotlisiaua. i II
on the North sitlde of the lpulice
ATT'ORNlYS AT' LAW
St. .'ranrsviile L.,.
practice inl the Couits of West
auil lt'al P loilnte Co le.
icaI '1:. C'. L. FISHER
ICKLI.F'v: & F1ISHIII:,
Attorneys at L:Iwi,
Ft. lrnri.- ilh'. La.
I practi.e ill the (',trts tf W est
-t Felici:nt. l oi t Cintc tltlt.e itltd
ing Parishls.
: TIt"' iY.
1r. EI:. Green l)avis oilers
his services to the 1eople of
this :tall adjoining P'arishes. W
ers uhidre.sted to ilnt, at. his resi
rill receive prompt. attlittion.
"ffITI TY DI:NTIS'lTRY
the (Coast, frolt Natcllt to t
New Orleans; also the hiack
Salle :c·essable with a buggy. -
5nswishingniyservices, can pro
es:une hiy addlressing lte, -it mn 1
I. STOCKING, D. D. S.,
St. Fraoucisville, La
n
MARTINEZ,. P
Sun Street, Bayou Sara, La., V
DEAI.LEIt IN
Goods, Groceries, Confections, To
,Wintlestud Liquors.
EPH,.VACARIO,
tpente'r and UIndertaker,
ll give iprotipt atteutionu to all lntsi
his line iu this audadljoining Par
i an e 2- '76.- I
HOTEL,
rner of Camp and Common s'rcctsa
New (Orle;ians. La.
UMFORD & WATSON.
PR 0 P l I E 'T O R~.
AID,-Two dollars and fifty
per day.
F. IRVINE,
Bayou Sara, Louisiana,
LESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN
eres. Provislotns, WVestern
ace and General Plalt
tationa supplies.
ALSO
EIVIN , FORWARDING
COMMISSION MERCHEANT
AND
STE.MBOAT AGENT .
" IENRIETTA IHOUSE.
BAYOU SARA. LA.
tteau be procured by the day, week
, and at reasonableo rates. In
" as in the past, the table will
plied with the very best faro the
affords. Elegant and well fur
Ot.ns. Accommnodating servants
Ily in attendance. Patronage so
snd satisfaction guaranteed.
H, ARNAUJ)'S
1WARBER SHIOP AND HAIR
DRESSING SALOON.
ite M. &A. Fischer, Front Levee
.sara, Louisiana. Sept. 1, '77
NEWMAN,
TAILOR,
the Sentinel ofice,
St. Francisvill La.,
A HEAP 3BOOTn and SHOES
MADE
-BY
M. ROSENTHAL, 0
Bayoun (S"Iv" ST.) Sara.
CVRESINSKY'S OLD STAND) 01
Gaiters $0. Shoes $5. Boots $12. Fan
cy Gaiters $7. All made of the VEST
LEATHER, andl the
WORK GUARANTEED TO PLEASE CUSTOM
ers.
CS
PICABD & WVEIL,
Bayou Sara, La.,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
F'ANCY DRY GOODS,
CLOTIING, FURNITURE, O
BOOTS, SHOES,
GROCEi ES~ AND PLANTATION SUP
PLIES GENERALLY.
-ifllighest market price paid for cot
ton.
N O. & BAYOU SARA U. S. MAIL
PACKET 1
The superb passenger 2
steaner, 4
Gov. Allen.
J. J. Btos.............- .......Master.
S. S. Sr -... --..................-Clerk. I
Leaves Bayou Sara for New Orleans
everly il'ednesdav after the :arrival of the
cars from Woodville, and every satnrday. I
at 7, p. ImI. Returning, leaves New Or F.
lc;aus every Monday and Friday, at 5, 5,p. F
AND TlHE STEAMER -
A. DUGAS ......................3laster. a
Leaves Bayou Sara every Monday after A
the arrival of the cars fromnt Voodville, 4,
andt every Thlllrsday at 7 p. il. Retllrn
ilg. ealve's New Orleans every Wedncs- tg,
day antd Saturday at 5 p. nl.
.JOIIN F. IRVINE, Agent oJ
S(ON) A ) BOCK EL.
slan Sutre 1, Bayou Saa, La.,
l)nle,- in Faucy and Staple Dry
(;oods. iLadies' Dress good-,
White Goods. House keep
ers' A,\rticles Clothingr,
[Ints. Ca('ps. Bootsand
Shoes, Hosiery. A
Cutlery. Toi
let Arti- I
cles.
Notion., Fancy and Family Gro-.
ceries,
Provision, (
WVestern Il oduce.
Grairf. Hgring and (
Tl'ies and a full line of
Plan'ation iupp ies, [lard
w:are Glass ware, etc. etc. Alsot
an Extensive and varied assort
ment of everything in the line of
' addlery and Harness.
gair-flihes.t market price paid
for cotton.
A T. GASTRELL,
Bayou Sara, Lonisiania,
)DEAL It IN
PLOW`, AGRICULTUIRAL I1PL'LE.
nments, tBridles, Harn...ss, Hlardwar, GulLs,
Pistols, Ponlps, Pipes, lMachine Fittings
Cocks, V alves, Castings, Ropes, LHollow
\Ware, 'agornl andl Carriag"e ".oodwork,
Bllacksmit It's Materials, Etc., Etc.
TIN 'COlkfIA'-R 1 1tS ET IRON MAN
Also Agent for the celehrnted
"CH IARTER OAK" S'TOV ES
ITrie, Ghirqtt (Y Cotatnan, Brihta Jas.
it. Hall andaother pllaws, Allen's M1orse
Hloes, WVool's Mowing Machines, Horse
hlay Rakes, all of which I will .guaran
tee to sell lower than can be'.purchased
elsewhere.
Grangers and others will find it to
their advantage to call and examine my
stoclcanid prices before pucahasing also
where.
I@MIS ..@@520 -
G. BI. & E. ENOC EIS
DEALERS IN
MO N'UMkEJNT.L WORK,
W ARE NOW prenared ftofurnish all
kinds- of Grave Work and Iron
Railifig at reduced prices. Parties ad
dressing ils at Baynou Sara, dr at William
H, Piper's, Baton Rouge, we will call and
see with our designs, of which we have
a large variety. Oct. 13 '77
Oct. 13 '77
GUN-- SMITH.
Adjoinring B. Farrelly's Store
Principal St. Bayou Sara---.......----.La.
Fire arms of all deseriptions plt iIn firsut
class Order. Gun stocks ~al[e or repaired.
Sewing machines repaireJ, Scissors and
all kinds of stall tools sharpened. : All at
reasonable rates of oharge.
Dee. 1st. 6im.
I'fHE ADLER HOUSE,
Clin'tou, Louisiana,
Is constant y open for tie accomumnada
- tion of' the public. Meals,by the day,
week or month at reasonable rates.
SINGLE MEALS FIFTY CENTS.
SElegant and well furnished rooms can
also be procured. ResBpectfully,
June '25, 'ti.--y. Mrs. S. ADLER.
FOR SALE.
THE one story building on the old
suitable for stoire ioutse or cabins. .Pur
cl'aser to remova building within a spe
fled time. Qan b b had t a bargaiu.
SApply to • . W,. IITEMAN.
Opt.l', '77-tF.
FFLICIANA SENTINEL.
A DEMOCRATIC PAPER.
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF WEST FELICIANA
OFFICIAL JOURNAL CITY OF BAYOU SARA
PUIBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY.
S. LAMBERT... PROPRIETOR
JINO. D. AUSTEN............. Editor.
St. Fra'anisville, April 27, 'T8.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES.
One copy, one year (in advance)....3 00
" " "£ 6 mno. .... 1 75
." " 3 " " " .... 1 00
ADV ERTISING IA TES :
[A S'qluae is the space of ten lines solid
brevier. 1
Space. I I
1 sq're. $ 1.00 $ 3.00 $ 6.50 $ 9.00 $ 12.0)
2 " 2.00 5.00 9.50 15.00 20.00
4 " 4.00 8.50 15.00 23.00 30.00
} col'm, 5.00 10.00 18 00 :0.00 40.00
, " 19.00 20.00 40.00 50.00 70.00
1 " 20.00 40.00 60.00 90.00 125.00
Annoouncntn Candidates:
fror State tndi District offices, ..... $25.00
For Parish offices, ................ 10.00
For police District offices, ..... 5.00
(to bie paidi invariably in advaince.)
Tranuieut Adrertisements will be inserted
at the rate of $1.50 per square of ten lines
for the first insertion, and 75 cents for eacl
subsequent i,sertion.
?Prsonalities charged at transient adver
tisingl rates.
Tne abore scale of rates must be the basis
of all contracts with adrertising ascents.
Obituaries, tributes of respect, resolutions
etc.. charged as adrertisenwnts
Dil • _ -
Written for the Sentinelt.]
'"TIE SOLDIER'S GRAVE." it
A pleasant vale, between two hills
Beneath a summer's sky, t,
And near the bank of P. little rill c
Meandering slowly bye,
A mound of earth,-the grass grown green t
A headboard old and gray,
Raised by some comrade's hand to mark
The spot where a soldier lay t
I looked around with awe .-truck eye s
And thought or battles fought,
Of conflicts raging fierce and long,
And victories dearly bought;
Of bold and brilliant charges made
Then gazed I on the mound,
"At last he is at rest," thought I
Beneath this spot of ground.
Uupon the board in letters rude
This Epitaph I read ;
"A Louisiana Soldier lies
Here numbered with thd dead,
lie fought with Stonewall and his men.
Than he,-none were more bravo
His soul is free; his body rests
Within this quiet grave."
I could but stand beside the mound
Ill reverie to pause,
"The same sad tale,-retold" thought I
"A martyr to the cause"
Some loved ones ill that distant home
BMust have looked for him in vain
His form lies 'mid Virginia's hills
IHe'll ne'er return again.
II. E. CurAMBERS.
St. Francisville, April 15th, 1S78.
ARE DEMOCRATS PLEDGED ?
(Ouachitac Telegraph.)
The question has arisen, strange to
tell, whether or not Democrats of this
State are pledged to a change of Consti
tution. We have heard defiant chal
lenges given publicly by Democrats to
the effect that no such issue was over
raised, and that the framing of a new
constitution is no part of the Democrat
ic creed. We thank and bless our stars
1 that we live and died not a few short
i months ago, tor c. er we an angel now,
- instead of being alive aqd kicking, we
should be in glory with a pledge resting
upon us to redeem Louisiana from radi
cal misrule and to change the organic
law of the State. Living, we see and
recognize our folly, and confess that our
ignorance has been supreme. We trust
that this' point will not be disputed.
To that, at any rate. we stand pledged,
and we know of no law, or creed, which
forbids any one from acknowledging his
ignorance and being sorry for it. In the
t light of recent revelations, we discover
i. that we have sinned most egregiously.
at Hence we apologize. In this confession,
however, we are bothared by the files of
the Telegraph. The 'situation is
Sperplexing. How are we to "take back"
column after column of editorial for a pe
riod of some ten or twelve years, favor
ing a change of Constitutions We can
not eat it all-there is too much of it,
And besides the quantity,. o must say
that as an article of food we never took
n to dirt. Among our earliest acquaint
ances wasa little scrawny, tallow-faced
boy-we see hint now-who had a relish
tor dirt. This boy induced us once to
sample his favorite food. He had eaten
whole mud chimnies in his little life, but
d try as much as we could, dirt as a diet,
somehow failed to please our boyish pal
r- ate. It was a valuable lesson, and con
e- vinced us that, in spite of all our honest
1 and well-meaning, efforts, we could not
succeed as a dirt-cater, and we have ncv
er tried dirt since. Ifwe cannot eat dirt, Pi:
how can we swallow fourteen volumes of
the Telegraph T
To be more serious, we invite atten
tion, on the question of constitutional of
reform, to what was said by a distin- om
guished Democrat in the last campaign. chi
We refer to Gov. McEnery, who, in a wa
speech made in Monroe, June 3, 1876. wa
said :
"The Democratic party did not in- Ag
tend to deprive the negro of any of his aw
rights ; on the contrary. they would be an,
protected. Their schools would receive Ag
proper attention, and they would re
ceive their joint benefits out of the sw
school fund and it was the intention of dal
the Democratic party to educate them." ter
What did.he mean ? Simply that not- the
witlistand'ng it was our purpose to` su- the
percede the Constitrtion of lb68 and ab- she
rogate article 135, wherein mixed schools
are established, yet the colored people in
would be protected and provided for in a ha
new constitution. dre
At the Baton Rouge Convention in Ju- the
ly, 1876, the Governor developed his dnl
meaning more comprehensively as fol- ge
lows: eyi
"I predict to-night that under the ad- on
ministration of General Frank Nicholls the
we will have genuine substantial reform ha
in the State of Louisiana. I predict that pa
under his administration-for he is bound
to be elected, that fact was settled the W,
moment the fiat went forth from this no
convention that he was to be the stand- in
ard bearer of the Demoocracy-I say that the
under his administratipn we will have wl
reform, and we will extirpate all the ne
abominable resaets of Radicalism in the an
State of Louisiana." (Tremendous ap
plause.) by
Extirpalte is a powerful and expressive br
word, and Gov. McEnery knew full well we
its meaning. There is no possible way lit
of evading the conclusion that to root Et
out existing evils was the pledge, and ta
to substitute therefor a new and just r.,
constitution, and good laws thereunder th
was the- obligation of that Conveu- tl
tion. hr
If Gov. McEnery meant to lop off this th
and tOat of the statutes and strike out th
this and that of the articles of the con- gr
stitution with the option of omitting the pe
worst fteatures of both, then we fail to st
undertaud him. A;
Gov. McEnery meant then, just as he p;
will acknowledge now, that every can- n,
didate for office, every orator on the Jr
stump and every gossip on the corner, sC
pledged himself andl is now bound to use m
his influence towards the extirpation of
all the abominable results of Radical- a
isin in the state of Louisiana. ri
sl
TUE PRESS. fl
P
There is no question but the press has k
received hard usage at the hands of the tl
legislature both during its first and sec- 0
oand session. The radicals were on one C
extreme but the denmocrats have been on o
the other-the former were rascally but v
shrewd, while the latter have been, we
presume, honest but excessively stupid. v
In the name of retrenchment and reform t
they have cut down rates to the starva
tion point..
We are very well aware that tile argu
ment could be used that papers are not
compelled to take contracts at these
rates, but this is not a fair argument.
Newspapers are designed more for the
subservience of public interests than any
other institution and therefore are deser
ving of at least a moderately fair remu
neration for their labor. No intelligent,
unprejudiced man doubts for a moment
that the crushing out of carpet-bag goy
erniment in Louisiana has been of incal
culable advantage to the tax-payers of
the State. Nor does lihe doubt that this
desirarblo result has been mainly due to
the efforts of the democratic press. That
e press for long years was kept down in
the very dust of poverty through radical
legislatiure, and it was not an unreason
blo hope that when the tight was won
and the democrats canme into power the
st press would be fostered to a reasonable
d and legitimate extent. That this hope
has never been realized is a fact sadly
it felt by every paper in the state. We
-have a realizing sense that the Tirmes has
Ssunk at least $15,000 during tile seven
er years it has been run. That it could
Shave made money by a betrayal of the
, 1public interest no mali not a thrice sod
Sden ass doubts. And we assume that
overy one of our suffering contemporaries
in the state has a similar record.
Fair wages for hotiest work is a rule
r every honorable aud tight-minded lian
- adopts in the conduct of his private af
it, faiirs, antd 'there is no good reason why
Slegislative, parish or municipal bodies
k should not adopt the same rule. If a
t- merchant in Shreveport had a vacant
el clerkship for which there were a half
s dozen applicants whoseo necessities would
to virtually force them to accept any wages
n the merchant might see lit to offer, is it
Sat all likely that he would put the place
tup to the lowest bidder and knock it
al- down to the impecunious applicant who
n should ofier to work for say $10 per
st month, when he well knew the man could
ot not live on that amount? ? We think
1Pritten for the Sentinel,]
THE LONG AGO.
Away from far off, down in the shad
owy distance of thepast, comes the music lit
of Long Ago, sad and low, reminding eN
one of the departed friends and lovers of Ju
childhood, who played together and no
walked arm in arm on the great high- TI
way of life, and died before their journey pr
was finished, or their work was done. de
Again, the music swelling and dying TI
away, louder and louder, and now soft on
and low, the sad sweet music of Long tb
Ago.
The thoughts of Long Ago. sad and at
sweet even in their remembrance ; some m
dark and fearful ; some ghostly and mys- w
terious, like the shadow of the trees in eO
the moonlit and silent graveyard, where ro
the tall church spire points upward, ux
showing the way to Heaven. th
The haunting faces of the Long Ago, w
in youth's bright hour, when all was v
happiness and love, come like dark et
dreams of right, dim and indistinct ; r
they rise and vanish; again they come Ill
und are gone. Am o thm one dark and Jo
gentle-eyed, with long, wavy hair, and DI
eye- Like stars-bright stars-shining as
on the cold earth, and warming all with ti
their dark and gentle beauty ; how the C(
haunting faces of the Long Ago have w
passed- again they rise and are gone. bt
The companions of the Long Ago, who it
were then in their pride and beauty, are D
now-some lying under the waving grass as
in the green and silent graveyard, with to
the wind sighing through the trees, and 89
whispering of the Long Ago; some be- be
neath the foaming waters of the dark T
and bounding sea.
The wdil of the Long Ago, was whis- tl
by the winds to the meadow, where the n
brook runs babbling along ; to the dark 1I
woods, where the tall tree trunks look b
like. the palace-pillars of the great P
Earth King far below the dark moun- P
tains. Then t.he spirits of the flowers g
r:"ised their heads, and wondered what a
the mournful words meant; but when Cl
the low. sad wail was again heard, they C'
hung their heads in grief, and said : "Ah ! b
the Long Ago, when all was happy on Il
the green earth; when the flowers and a
grass were left to grow! and they re- t
peated, "Ah, the Long Ago." The winds n
still whispered their wail of the "Long
Ago." and bore it off to the great ice
palace of the Frost King in the far
north. When the rivers heard it, they
froze at the words ; but when They were
so, they were not busy, so -they thought I
mpre of the "Long Ago."
And the winds car led it into the pal- t
.ace of the king, who sat dark and ter
rible on a throne of clear ice. The hall
shone with a thonsand lights, for the
lamps of the king were lighted, and
flashed and flickered along; which the
people said were, "Northerr Lights," not
s knowing they were the torches of
e the Frost King. Dark looked the king
upon his throne, with a crown of fire
cones npon his head, and the great staff
1 of \Vodea in his hand. In rushed the
t winds and stood beforetheking. "What
meanest thou by this ?" said lie, and the
. winds trembled ; but the north wind
took courage and told the tale of "Long
- Ago," to the king, who said, "Go." The
word was repeated by the long dark pas
sages and caves of the mountains,
which echoed "Go" ; and even the king
was mnade sad. Out rushed the winds
6 and carried it to the dark pine forests,
where the trees were laden with snow;
and when the winds whispered the story
ry to the trees, they shook with grief, and
the snow fell to the ground.
An angel hearing of the wail of Nature,
caume to the earth ; wherever she went,
t the light from her eyes warmed all, and
lmade them tlink no more of the Long
of Ago, but of the Present; and the angel's
s nanme was Hope.
to
at INCENDIARISM IN THlE COUNTRFY.
in
al (Correspondence of the Picayune.)
NEW IBER.A, April 14, 1878.
an About 12 o'clock last Friday night the
he cotton gi:: and sugar-House o(n the plan
le tation of Mr. J. D. Olivier, live miles be
po low New Iberia, were fired and entirely
ly destroyed. The incendiary, a colored
Ve ex-preacher namued Isaac, was discovered
as torch ill hallnd, going to-ward the stable
en to set it on fire, when he was arrested.
Id The people in the neighborhood as
,he sembled en masse, Saturday morning, anud
d- oxecuted him near the scene of his last
at crime.
is Before his execution, some doubts hay-,
uing been expressed regarding his sanity
do in view of the wholes'ale destrluction con
an templated and heretofore execluted by
af- him, he was examlined by several physi
hy cianls, who prolnounced himn perfectly
ies sane, but imbued with a tdeep feeling of
f a hatred and revenge to-ward both white
nt and black. He confessed ils gulilt in the
alf Ipresent case, andll only regretted lie had
ald not comlpleted hisi work by burnling tile
ges stable and dwelling of Mr. Olivier ; also
it the colored chlsrcli in New Iberi:a, frolm
sce which he had beeoon expelled, lie also
it conifessed having set on fire live sugar
ho houses on Bayou Toche last fall-one of
per whicl, Mr. Fay's, was entirely destroyed,
Id thle others having been extiinguishe: by
uk the officers and crew of the st:eamer Mary
Lean is.
THE TEXAS TRAIN ROBBERSj
(Memphis Appeal.)
Highway robbers are making things
lively in Texas. Their daring deeds and
exploits bear comparison with those of
Jack Shephard, Dick Turpin and other'
noted highwaymen i u their palmiest days:
Trains have been stopped and the ex
press and mail cars plundered some halt'
dozen times within the past four weeks:
The last of these daring deeds occurred
on Thursday, at Eagle Ford, a station iti
the Texas and Pacific Railroad, about
six miles from Dallas. At this point an
armed gang, about a dozen in number
mounted the train, a portion of whom,
with pointed pistols, took charge of the
express messenger, mail agent and rail
road employees, while the balance leis
urely devoted themselves to plundering
the express sate and mail bags, and
when they had secured everything of
value, they quietly drove olf in a west
erly direction. After the second train
robbery over there, about three weeks
ago, the Governor, railhoad and express
jointly organized a large force for the
purpose of hunting down the robbers,
and in addition offered a reward of nine
thousand dollars for their capture and
conviction. But the unterrilied high
waymen are still at large, and seem to
be pursuing their villainous career with
increased energy. As the Post Office
Department is not liable for the loss" of
any money, valuable packages or regis
tered letters sent through the mails, a
great many poor people will no doubt
be made sufferers by these robberies.
The express company, ef course, is liable
for all losses, and those who remitted
through that channel are all right. WVe
understand that the express company
has lost immensely by this series of rob
beries in Texas. Still, every loss was
promptly mnade good by the company on
presentation of receipt. M. J. O'Brion.
general superintendent of the Southern
and Texas express companies, was in the
city during the past week, and on re
ceipt of dispatches announcing the rob
bery at Eagle Ford, he immmediately
left for Texas, with the determination tts
adopt such measures as will bring abotrt
the capture of these daring highway
men, regardless of the cost antl
trouble incident thereto.
THE LOUISIANA LOTTERY.
[Natchez Democrat.]
The tremendous power possessed by the
Louisiana Lottery Company is attracting
the attention of prominent newspapers
abroad, although most of those in Noew
Orleans seem to be under the control of
that nmaminoth gambling concern. A vig
orons fight tas been and is still being
e made upon this lottery concern by the
t New Orleans Democrat, but the immense'
rf profits of this concern enable it to resist
, successfully all the attacks of this able
paper. The chief of the lottery company,
SMrcisas. T. Howard, by his shrewd man
r ipulations of the Louisiana Legislature.
t Ihas acquired a power .'. hich is likely to
overshadow that once exercised by Var
tl oth or Kellogg. With the aid of the'
,g press of New Orleans. he has only to gain
e that of the neighboring country parishes
to give him absolute control of the Lou
isiana Legislature.
Lottery dealing has been so generally
I recognized as one of the most dangerous
and demoralizing species ot gambling,
that in nearly all the States of the Union
ry it is prohibited. There is a law forbid
fb ding the use of the United States mails
in carrying on the lottery busiihess, but
from the manner in which the circulars
I and schemes of this peculiar company are
id circulated it would seem to be a dead
letter. Bat the magnitude of the opera
tions of the Louisiana State Lottery is
lbeginning ti attract the attention of in
ilueutial newspalpers outside of the State
in which it is located.
DISASTROUS TORNADO.
T'oereiA. April 15.-A tornado struck
le Cottonwood station, on the Atchison,
ni- Topeka and Santa Fe railroad, about four
)e- o'clock Saturday afteruoon, the thir
'l1 teenth. The Cottonwood hotel and sev
ed eral buildinigs were blown down. Mrs.
'ed Miller was killed, and lher hls!lnudl and
'e four children were dangerously hurt
ed. Mrs. V.alter and two children, Fred
11- Smtith, wife and thren chillrem, John
id Merrit, Lizzie Merrit and Mrs. Matthew
ist were seriously hurt. At .TJacob's creek
Mrs. Bogo had her leg badly Iroken. At
'D Phenis creek Edward )Davis's youngest
ty child was dangerously hurt; IMr's OsbJrn,
Mi- Mrs. Katce Ross, living on Dry Creek, so
by riously, perh:aps fatally hurt. The storm
5i reached 1Enporia about Ihalf-lpast four o'
ly clock. Sod(en's mill was badly damnaged,
of and the root of the normal school buildl
to ing injured. But little damage wasdonme
he in the center of tihe city. In theo country
ad the destrCetton of prioperty was great.
Ie Ihouses and barns were torn to fragments.
so amid trees were tl or' ll). Tlou lo:dedl cars
\mI were blowni fmoni tile tlraek :at Cotton
so Iwood st'at ion.
of Dr. Hl:lrter's Iron TIonic is adaptedl to'
e, 1all circllnlisthil(cs alind sitluationsm, rel'q iros.
Iy no chanige of diet, particular regimncu,
iv or cnro aga.inst. taking cold. ]For side'
hy all lotae:i sts.

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