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Feliciana sentinel. (St. Francisville, La.) 1877-1892, April 27, 1878, Image 1

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.ELICIANA SENTINEL
. 2. ST. FRANC1SVILLE, LA., APRIL 27, 1878. NO. 44
.cROSS
AttoeV y at Law,
Clinton. Louisiana.
cIARDEE,
Alteraey at Law,
Clinton. Louisiana.
A J. IKERNA',
Ey & COUNSELOR AT LAW, L
Clhuton, Louisianla. 1
tlc in the Courts of East and
IOUN FLUKER,
Attornýsy at LaRW,
Clinton, Louisiana.
tice in the Colnts of the 5th
]istrict. Aug.2'7(;.-ly
J. I'0 'ELL,
Attoruney at Law,
St. Francisville, Louisiana.
practice in the Parishes of West -
tFeliciana. and Pointe Counce.
j. WEDGE,
ATTORNEY AT LAVW,
Clinton, Louis:ian,
Ipractice in the courts of East and
FFelicianls and the Supreme Court of
late.
I. W. LEAKE,
Alrornuey at La.w,
St. Frllncisvill'e. Loullisianlla.
plractice in Ithe IP I'ishes of West
lasFelicianal, and Pointe Coupie. A
IS. JONES,
tI
10ORNEY AT LA.N,
Clinton, Louisiana. '
;,on the North side of the lull+lie
,SE1I'LE .It. JUS. I. GeO.SAN.
PLE & GOLI.AN,
A'TTO1ILIEYS A' LAW
St. Francisvill. ILa..
I prtliice ill the Courts of West
tialti Pl inte Ctaupct'.
CCi :. c. L. FISH.ER
CK i.IF',t: & l'IS"Illlt,
Attarnu'eys at L:aiw,
St. F'r:a it' illh. La.
I praclice in the ('tl'rts of West
iast Feliiana. l'Pointe Coun pet :tnd -
ng Pa risht.
NTIST'I':Y.
Slr. E. Green I)avis oelirs
his servites to the people of
this adto adjoining Parishes. N
nlersadldresstdI to hin. iat his resi
will rc,.eive prloinp t atteltitIon.
IS'lTUY'I+ ! DI:ENIST'Y !L !
I will attend a ll call o
the Coatst, from Natchez to
_New Orlea:ns; also theac Iek
ii, wthen a:cessa:ble with a, buggy.
lls wvislhing tlly serviLes, can pro
tel same by tadclrcssing ie, at lily
1). STOCKING, D. D. S.,
St. Frintiisville, La
MARTINEZ,
Sun Street, Bayou Sara, La.,
DEA LEIt IN
' Goods, Groceries, Confections, To
, Wines and Liquors.
EPH.: VACARIO,
rpenter sAnd Uude'rtalker,
i11 give llprotpt attention to all butsi
i his line in this autdadjoinig Par
.j'an e ti '76.- 1
Y HOTEL,
Corner of Camnip and Conuiionio sd'rcts,
New Orleains. Ia.
JMFORD & WATSON.
'P 0 OP R IE TO R, .
oARD,-Two dollars and fifty
per day.
SF. IRVINE,
Bayou Sara, Louisiana,
LESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN
eries. Praovisions, WVestern
educe anid General Plan
tationn supplies.
ALSO
EIVING, FO RWARDING
COMMISSION MERCL H ANT
AND
STE.AMBOAT AGENT.
HENRIETTA HOUSE.
BAYOU SARA. LA.
lcau be procured by the day, week
nth, and at reasonable rates. In
ire as in the past, the table will
PPlied with the very best fare the
et affords. Elegant and well' fur
Srooms. Accommodating servants
atly in attendance. Patronage so
Sand satisfaction guaranteed.
H. ARNAUD'S
SIARBER SHIOP AND HAIR
DRESSING SALOON.
site M. & A. Fischer, Front Levee
.Sara, Louisiana. Sept. 1, '77
NEWMAN,
TAILOR,
the Sentinel oflice,
St. Francisville La..
C HEAP BOOTS and SHOES
MADE
-BY
M. ROSENTH A L,
Bayon (SDTTI ST.) Sara.
(VRESINSKY'SOLDSTAND) C
Gaiters $6. Shoes $5. Boots $12. Fan
cy Gaiters $7. All made of the ]EST
LEATIHER, and the
\WORK GUARANTEED TO PLEASE CUSTOM- 6
ers.
PICARD & WEIL,
Bayou Sara, La.,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
:ANCY DRY GOODS,
CLOTIING, FUIIRNITURE, C
BOOTS, SHOES,
GROCERIES AND PLAN'TATION SUP
PLIES GENERALLY.
UTilIighest market price paid for cot
ton.
N O. & BAYOU SARA U. S. MAIL
PACKET
The supersb passenger 2
steamer, 4
Gov. Allen.
J. J. BRows...................Master.
S. S. STECK.............-----........Clerk. 1
Leaves Bayou Sara for New Orleans
every IJWedlneday after the arrival of the
cars from Woodville,and every saturday. r
at 7, p. um. Returning, leaves New Or 1
leaus every Monday and Friday, at 5, p.m 1
AND T''HE STEAM1ER
A. DUGAS ............----- ..-------Master. a
Le;ves Bayou Sara every Monday after f
the arrival of the cars from Voodville, a
and every ThlLrsdwly at 7 p. in. Return
ing, leaves New Orleans every Wednes- t
day and Saturday at 5 p. m.
JOHN F. IRVINE, Agent
()ONA) BO(K EL.
lun Stres I, Balyou Slarn, La.,
I)n.ale, in Fa,cy and Staple Dry
(;ooda . iLadies' Dress good-,
White Goods. House keep
ers' Articles Clothilinr,
Hats. Cars. Bootsand
Shoes, Hosiery.
Cullery. 'I'oi
let A rti
cles.
NotionP , Fancy and Family Gro
ceries,
P,rvislon=,
Westclern 'rodcee.
Grairf. HBa.ring and t
Ties and a full line of
Plan'ation Supplies, [lard
ware Glass ware, etc. etc. Also
an Extensive and varied assort
ment of everything in the line of
;addlery and Hlarnees.
r HWcliuhest market price paid
for cotton.
T. GASTIhELL,
Bayou Sara, Louisiana,
DEAL It IN
PLOWS, AGIRICULT URAI, IMPLE.
nlllts, Bridles, Har,...ss, l-lardwarc, Gulis,
Pistols, Pninps, Pipes, Machine Fittings
Cocks, Valves, Castings, Ropes, Hollow
uVare, WVagou and Carriage" .. oodwork,
Blacksmuitihs Materials, Etc., Etc.
TIN 'COIskER 1 rAL o HpT IRON MAN
Also Agent for the celerated
".CHARTER OAK" STOVES,
Urie, Gairett 4 Cotttamn, Brinlol, Jas.
II. Hall and 4othir plows, Allen's M.orse
lloes, Wood's Mowing Machines, llorse
Hay Rakes, all of vhich I will .guaran
tee to sell lower than can be purchased
elsewhere.
Grangers and others will find it to
their advantage to (all and examine nmy
stockland prices before pucahasing also
where.
G. 1. & E. E OO EIS
DEALERS IN
MO 1NUMIENTA/L WORK,
W V E AlRE NOW prepared tofurnish all
kinds- of Grave Work and Iron
Railiiig at reduced prices. Parties ad
dressing us at Bayou Sara, dr at William
IH, Piper's, Baton HRouge, we will call and
see with our designs, of which we have
a large variety. Oct. 13 '77
SGUN--SM ITH.
Adjoining B. Farrelly's Store
Principal St. Bayou Sara ........... La.
Fire arms of all descriptions put in first
eiassOrder. Gun stocks inamio or repaired.
ewiung machines repaire"3, Scissors :and
all kinds of small tools sharpened. All alt
reason:able rates of charge.
Dec. 1st. 6m.
11 'Hl ADLER HOUSE,
SClinton, Louisiana,
H Is constant y ol0n for the accoamnada
tion of the public. Meals-by the clay,
veek or mouth at reasonabe rates.
SINGLE MlEALS FIFTY CENTS.
Elegant and wvell furnishedl rooms can
also be procured. RespeActfully,
June '2S, '6.--ly. Mirs. S. ADLER.
_.___,-
FOR SALE.
HE one story building on thie old
- WiteWtantau im ty,
suitable for store house or cabins. .Pr
Oa'user to remove building within a spe
tied time. an he bhad at a bargain.
Apply to - ""E. Wi WHITEMAN.
FFLICIANA SENTINEL.
A DEMOCRATIC PAPER.
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF WEST FELICIANA
OFFICIAL JOURNAL CITY OF BAYOU SARA
PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY.
S. LAMBERT... PROPRIETOR
JNO. D. AUSTEN...........Editor.
St. Franscsville, April 27, '7S.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES.
One copy, one year (in advance)....3 00
" " " 6 me. " " .... 1 75
ex " " 3 " " " .... 1 00
ADVERTISING RATES:
[A $quaie is the space of ten lines solid
brevier.
Space. J j o l
1 sq're. $ 1.00 $ 3.00 6.50 9 0.00 $ 12.0()
2 " 2.00 5.00 9.50 15.00 20.00
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+ col'm, 5.00 10.00 18 00 '0.00 40.00
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1 " 20.00 40.00 60.00 90.00 125.00
Announcsnq Candidates:
for State and District'offices, ....... $25.00
For Parish offices, ................ 10.00
For police District offices,......... 5.00
(to li paiid invariably in adlvance.)
Tranusient Adrertiseenwnts will be inserted
at the rate of $1.50 per square of ten lines
for the first insertion, and 75 cents for each
subsequent insertion.
IPersnalities charged at transient adver
tising rates.
'The abuoe scale of rates nust be the basis
of all con tracts with adrertising agents.
Obituaries, tributes of respect, resolutions
etc.. charged as adrertisements.
Irritten for the Sentinel.]
"TILE SOLDIER'S GRAVE."
A pleasant vale, between two hills
Beneath a summer's sky,
And near the bank of P little rill
Meandering slowly bye,
A imonnd of earth,-the grass grown green
A headboard old and gray,
Raised by some coLmrIde's hand to mark
The spot where a soldier lay.
1 looked around with awe .-truck eye
And thought ot battles fought,
Of conflicts raging fierce and long,
And victories dearly bought;
Of bold and brilliant charges made
Then gazed I on the mound,
SAt last he is at rest," thought I
Beneath this spot of ground.
Unpon the board in letters rude
This Epitaph I read i
" A Louisiana Soldier lies
Here numbered with thd dead,
lie fought with Stonewall and his men.
Than he,-none were more bravo
His soul is free; his body rests
Within this quiet grave."
I could but stand beside the mound
In reverie to pause,
"The same sad tale,-retold" thought I
"A martyr to the cause"
Sonic loved ones in that distant home
Must have looked for him in vain
His form lies 'mid Virginia's hills
He'll ne'er return again.
II. E. CHAMn.rS.
St. Francisville, April 15th, 1878.
ARE DEMOCRAT S PLEDGED ?
(Ouachita Telegraph.)
The question has arisen, strange to
tell, whether or not Democrats of this
State are pledged to a change of Consti
tution. We have heard defiant chal
lenges given publicly by Democrats to
the effect that no such issue was over
raised, and that the framing of a new
constitution is no part of the Democrat.
ic creed. We thank and bless our stars
that we live and died not a few short
months ago, Ior , ere we an angel now,
instead of being alive aµd kicking, we
should be in glory with a pledge resting
upon us to redeem Louisiana from radi
cal misrule and to change the organic
law of the State. Living, we see and
recognize our folly, and confess that our
ignorance has been supreme. We trust
that this' point will not be disputed.
To that, at any rate. we stand pledged,
and we know of no la]r, or creed, which
forbids any one from acknowledging his
ignorance and being sorry for it. In the
light of recent revelations, we discover
that we have sinned most egregiously.
Hence we apologize. In this coufoession,
however, we are bothered by the files of
the Telegraph. The situation is
perplexing. How are we to "take back"
column after column of editorial for a pe
riod of some ten or twelve years, fLavor
ing a change of Constitutions? We can
not eat it all-there is too much of it.
And besides the quantity, e must say
that as an article of food we never took
n to dirt. Among our earliest acquaint
ances was a little scrawny, tallow-faced
- boy-we see hinm now--who had a relish
tor dirt. This boy induced us once to
sample his favorite food. He had eatenl
whole mud chitniues in his little life, but
d try as much as we could, dirt as a diet,
somehow failed to please our boyish pal
r- ate. It was a valuable lesson, and con
- vinced us that, in spite of all our honest
and well-meaning, efforts, we could not
succeed as a dirt-cater, and we have nev
er tried dirt since. If we cannot eat dirt,
how can we swallow fourteen volumes of
the Telegraph ?
To be more serious, we invite atten
tion, on the question of constitutional
reform, to what was said by a distin
guished Democrat in the last campaign.
We refer to Gov. McEnery, who, in a
speech made in Monroe, June 3, 1876.
said :
"The Democratic party did not in
tend to deprive the negro of any of his
rights; on the contrary. t.hey would be
protected. Their schools would receive
proper attention, and they would re
ceive their joint benefits out of the
school fund and it was the intention of
the Democratic party to educate them."
What did.he mean ? Simply that not
witlistand'ng it was our purpose to' su
percede the Constitc.tion of Ib68 and ab
rogate article 135, wherein mixed schools
are established, yet the colored people I
would be protected and provided for in a
new constitution.
At the Baton Rouge Convention in Ju
ly, 1876, the Governor developed his
meaning more comprehensively as fol
lows:
"I predict to-night that under the ad
ministration of General Frank Nicholls
we will have genuine substantial reform I
in the State of Louisiana. I predict that 1
under hisadministration-for he is bound
to be elected, that fact was settled the
moment the fiat went forth from this
convention that he was to be the stand
ard bearer of the Democracy-I say that
under his administratipn we will have
reform, and we will extirpate all the
abominable results of Radicalism ib the
State of Louisiana." (Tremendous ap
plause.)
Extirpalte is a powerful and expressive
word, and Gov. McEuery knew full wdll
its meaning. There is no possible way
of evading the conclusion that to root
out existilg evils was the pledge, and
to substitute therefor a new andt just
constitution, and good laws thereunder
was the obligation of that Conven
tion.
If Gov. McEnery meant to lop off this
and that of the statutes and strike out"
this and that of the articles of the con
stitutiou with the option of omitting the
worst feiatures of both, then we fail to
uudertaud him.
Gov. McEnery meant then, just as he
will acknowledge now, that every can
didate for office, every orator on the
stump aud every gossip on the corner,
pledged himself and is now bound to use
his iutluence towards the extirpation of
all the abomlinable results of Radical
isiu in the state of Louisiana.
TILE PRESS.
There is no question but the press has
received hard usage at the hands of the
legislature both during its first and sec
ond session. The radicals were oil one
extreme but the demuocrats have been on
the other-the former were rascally but
shrewd, while the latter have been, we
presume, honest but excessively stupid.
In the name of retrenchment and reform
they have cut down rates to the starva
tion point..
We are very well aware that the argu
ment could be used that papers are not
compelled to take contracts at these
rates, but this is not a fair argument.
Newspapers are designed more for the
subservience of public interests than any
other institution and therefore are deser
ving of at least a moderately fair reimu
neration for their labor. No intelligent,
unprejudiced mar doubts for a moment
that tile crushing out of carpet-bag gov
ernment in Louisiana has been of incal
culable advantage to the tax-payers of
the State. Nor does he doubt that this
desirable result has been mainly due to
the efforts of the democratic press. That
press for long years was kept down in
the very dust of poverty through radical
legislatiirc, and it was not an unreason
ble hope that when the fight was won
anld the democrats came into power the
press would be fostered to a reasonable
and legitimate extent. That this hope
has never been realized is a fact sadly
felt by every paper in the state. We
have a realizing sense that the Times has
sunk at least $15,000 during the seven
years it has been run. That it could
have made money by a betrayal of the
public interest no man not a thrice sod
den ass doubts. And we assume that
every oue of our sutfering contemporaries
in the state lhas a similar record.
Fair wages for hottest work is a rule
every honorable and tight-nuinded mlan
adopts in the conduct of his private af
fairs, antid'there is no good reason why
legislative, parish or umuicipal boedies
should not adopt thie same rule. If a
merchant in Shreveport had a vacant
clerkship for which there were a half
dozen applicants \vhose ineeessities would
virtually force them to accept any wages
the merchant might see lit to offer, is it
at all likely that he would put thie place
up to the lowest bidder and knock it
down to the implecunious applicant who
should ofier to work for say $10 per
month, when he well knew the nanl could
not live on that amount.? Wo think
t..sh .-Shirc enIo, t lins.
, written for the Sentiuel,J
F THE LONG AGO.
Away from 'far off, down in the shad
owy distance of the past, comes the music liv
of Long Ago, sad and low, reminding ex
one of the departed friends and lovers of Ja
childhood, who played together and no
walked arm in arm on the great high- Tr
way of life, and died before their journey pr
was finished, or their work was done.. do
Again, the music swelling and dying TI
away, louder and louder, and now soft on
and low, the sad sweet music of Long the
Ago.
The thoughts of Long Ago. sad and an
sweet even in their remembrance ; some ms
dark and fearful; some ghostly andmys- wI
terions, like the shadow of the trees in ex:
the moonlit and silent graveyard, whore ros
the tall church spire points upward, ur
showing the way to Heaven. the
The haunting faces of the Long Ago, wI
in youth's bright hour, when all was va
happiness and love, come like dark crl
dreams of right, dim and indistinct; rol
they rise and vanish; again they come ag
I dnd are gone. Amongthem one dark and joi
gentle-eyed, with long, wavy hair, and on
eye- Like stars-bright stars-shining an
on the cold earth, and warming all with the
their dark and gentle beauty; how the col
haunting faces of the Long Ago have W"
passed- again they rise and are gone. be
The companions of the Long Ago, who i"i
were then in their pride and beauty, are De
now-some lying under the waving grass an
in the green and silent graveyard, with tel
the wind sighing through the trees, and gri
whispering of the Long Ago; some be- be
neath the foaming waters of the dark Th
and bounding sea.
The wail of the Long Ago, was whis- tlt
by the winds to the meadow, where the un
brook runs babbling along; to the dark ha
woods, where the tall tree trunks look be
like. the palace-pillars of the great pr'
Earth'King far below the dark moun- pr
tains. Then the spirits of the flowers ge
r:.ised their heads, and wondered what an
the mournful words meant ; but when Cit
the low. sad wail was again heard, they ce
hung their heads in grief, and said : "A! be
the Long Ago, when all was happy on let
t the green earth ; when the flowers and ad
grass were left to grow! and they re, tb
peated, "Ah, the Long Ago." The winds me
D still whispered their wail of the "Long tr
Ago." and bore it off to the great ice
e palace of the Frost King in the far
north. When the rivers heard it, they
a froze at the words ; but when they were
, so, they were not busy, so they thought
e mpre of the "Long Ago."
f And the winds car ied it into the pal- th
nce of the king, who sat dark and ter- al
rible on a throne of clear ice. The hall O
shone with a thousand lights, for the ti
lamps of the "king Were lighted, and o'
flashed and flickered along; which the "u
people said were, "Northers Lights," not N
s knowing they were the torches of p"
e the Frost King. Dark looked the king si
upon his throne, with a crown of fire- P;
e cones upon his head, and the great staff
n of 'oden in his hand. In rnshedl the IP
t winds and stood beforethe king. "What l
n meanest thou by this ?" said he, and the 0'
1. winds trembled ; but the north windl nI
n took courage and told the tale of "Long l''
Ago," to the king, who said, "Go." The ti
word was repeated by the long dark pas
sages and caves of the llountains, i
- which echoed "Go" ; and even the king
was made sad. Out rushed the winds r
S tand carried it to the dark pine forests, a
Swhere the trees were laden with snow;
and when the winds whispered the story
to the trees, they shook with grief, anl d
the snow fell to the ground.lll
An angel hearing of tile wail of Nat~ure,
t'cause to the earth ; wherever she went,
Ithe light from her eyes warmnetd all, :and I
nade them think no more of the Long
of Ago, but of the Present; and the angel's
is name was H-ope. * * i
to -
At INCENDIARISM IN TIlE COUNT1Y.
ill -
al (Correspondeuce of the Picayune.)
u- N iEW IBEIA, April 14, 1878.
mu About 12 o'clock last Friday night the (
he cotton gin and sugar-House on the plan- 'j
ale tatiou of Mr. J. D. Olivier, live imiles be- r
pe low New Iberia, were fired and entirely t
ly destroyed. The incendiary, a colored
Ve ex-preacher namncd Isaac, was discovered
is torch in hand, goilg to-ward tile stable
on to set it on fire, when he was arrested.
Id The people in the neighlborhloold Is
be emnbled ei mnasse, Saturdlay muorning, anli
d- eoxecuted him nt ear the scene of his last ,
at crime.
es Before his execution, some doubts ha-, I
inug booeen expressed regartding his sanity
he in view of the wholesale destruction coi
an tenmplated antd heretoforo executedl by
If- him, he was exanmined by several p113hysi
by cians,. who pronoiunced him perfectly
CS sane, but imbuedt with a deep feeling of
a hIatredl and revengeo to-ward both white
ut and black. He confessed Ins guilt in the
If present ease, andt only regretted he-lu had
id not eoltpletedl his work by burning tile
es stable andtdweclling of M1r. Olivier ; also
it the colored church in New iLberia, fronttt
co which lie had been expelledt. lie also
it confessed having set on fire live sugar
ho houses on Bayou Toche last fall-onIe of
er which, Mr. Fay's, was entirely destroyed, 1
Il tihe others having been extinguiishedl by 1
uk the onicersandt crew of the steaielr Ma.ry
I ..is. 1
THE TEXAS TRAIN ROBBERS.
(Memphis Appeal.)
Highway robbers are making things
lively in Texas. Their daring deeds and
exploits bear comparison with those ot
Jack Shephardi Dick Turpin and other
noted highwaymen in their palmiest days:
Trains have been stopped and the ex
press and mail cars plundered some half
dozen times within the past four weeks;
The last of these daring deeds occurred
on Thursday, at Eagle Ford, a station cit
the Texas and Pacific Railroad, about
six miles from Dallas. At this point an
armed gang, about a dozenr in number
mounted the train, a portion of whom,
with pointed pistols, took charge of the
express messenger, mail agent and rail
road employees, while the balance leis
urely devoted themselves to plundering
the express sate and mail bags, and
when they had secured everything of
value, they quietly drove olff'in a west
erly direction. After the second train
robbery over there, about three weeks
ago, the Governor, railhoad and express
jointly organized a large force for the
nurpose of hunting dovwn the robbers,
and in addition offered a reward of nineu
thousand dollars for their capture and
conviction. But tile unterrilied high
waymen are still at large, and seem to
be pursuing their villainous career with
increased energy. As the Post Office
Department is not liable for the loss' of
any money, valuable packages or regis
tered letters sent through tile mails, a
great many poor people will no doubt
be made sufferers by these robberies.
The express company, of course, is liable
for all losses, and those who remitted
through that channel are all right. We
understand that the express company
has lost immensely by this series of rob
beries in Texas. Still, every loss was
promptly madte good by the company on
presentation of receipt. M. J. O'Brien
general suporinteudent of the Southern
and Texas express companies, was in the
city during the past week, and on re
ceipt of dispatches announcing the rob
bery at Eagle Ford, he iunmmmediately
left for Texas, with the determination ter
adopt such measures as will bring aboth
the capture of these daring highway
men, regardless of the cost and
trouble incident thereto.
THE LOUISIANA LOTTERY.
[Natchez Democrat.]
The tremendous power possessed by the
Louisiana Lottery Company is attracting
the attention of prominent newspapers
abroad, although most of those in New
Orleans seem to be under the controlof
that mammoth gambling concert. A vig
orous tight Las been and is still being
nmade upon this lottery concern by the
New Orleans Democrat, but the immense,
profits of thin concern enable it to resist
successfully all the attacks of this able
paper. The chief of the lottery company.
Mrrlhas. T. Howard, by hisshrewd man
ipulations of the Louisiana Legislature,
has acquired a power '. hich is likely to
overshadodw that once exercised by War
moth or Kellogg. With the aid of thle
press of New Orleans. he has only to gain
that of the neighboring conutry parishes
to give hitm absolute control of the Lou
isiana Legislature.
Lottery dealing has been so generally
recognized as one of the most dangerous,
anld demoralizing species ot gambling,
that in nearly all the States of the Union
it is prohibited. There is a law forbid
ding the use of the United States mails
in carrying on the lottery busil.ess, but
from the muauver in which tihe circular
rrand schemes of this peculiar company are
circulated it would seemnt to be a dead
letter. But the magnitude of the opera
tions of the Louisiana State Lottery is
beginning t %attract the uittention of ii
fluential newspalpcrs outsid, of the State
in which it is located.
DISASTROUS TORNADO.
TOPEKA.t. April 15.-A tornado struck
Cottonwood station, on the Atchison,
Topeka and Santa Fe railroad, about four
o'clock Saturday aifternooun, the thir
teenlth. The Cottonwood hotel anid sev
1 eral buildings were blown down. Mrs.
1 Miller was killed, and her hinsir:ird and
four chiliren were dangerously Ihurt
hi's. Walter rand two ehlildrei, l.red
- Smith, wife and throe children, Jolhn
i Merrit, Lizzio Merrit and Mrs. IMatthew '
were seriously hurt. At Jaceoln's c-reek
Mrs. Bhogn had her leg iadly biroken. At
SIPhcnis creek Edward l)av-is's youngest
r child was ldangeronsly hurt; Mrs Osb(rll,
- Mrs. Karte Ross, living on l)ry Creek, so
F riously, cperhaps fatally Ihurt. Thie storrr
reached IEmrilporia alioeut half-lunst foruir o'
r clock. Sodrn'is nill wrs badly damnaged.
aud the root of the normal school build
ing injured. liutlittle dlurage wrisdoni
in tie center of thie cityv. In tihe country
1 tile destrnetnon of proplerty was great.
SHouses allnd Iarnrrs were torn to fragmenets.
iand trees werte i clin rip. Tello loaded cars
awere bilown front tile track at Cotton
wood station.
f Dr. llrrter's Iron Tornic is ladapl td to'
hall cirern urstancesan lld situations, requir-es
i no chanlge of' dicet, particular regirmen,
7"or ,are against. iaking cdl. For stilt"
hy null dhi'uig:uis..

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