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Feliciana sentinel. (St. Francisville, La.) 1877-1892, July 13, 1878, Image 1

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ELIJCIANA SENTINEL.
)j. -3. . ST. FRANCISVILLE, LA. JULY 13, 1878. NO. 3'
L CROSS
Attorney at Lawv,
Clinton. Louisiana.
cIARDEE,
' Attorney at Law,
Clinton. Louisiana.
OAS J. KERNAN, C3
Li
IRNEY & COUNSELOR AT LAW, \V
Chnton, Louisiana.
practice in the Courts of East and
'eliciana.
NOUN FLUKEI4,
Attorney at Law,
Clinton, Louisinna.
practice ill the Courts of tho 5thli
District. Aug.2'76.-ly
j. poVELL, G.
Attorney at. Law,
St. Francisville, ]ouisiiuna. t
Spranti lin the Pari. ues of West
EastFelichln. and Pointu Collneo.
J. WEDGE,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Clinton, Louisinna,
lractice in the courts of East and
ifcliciana and the Spretume Court of
dtate.
.L W. LEAKE, "
Attorney at Law, at
St. Francisville. Louisiana. le
practice in the Parishes of West
ant Feliciauir, and Pointe Coulpec.
_SEI'PLE Ill. JOS L (tO)I.SAN.
LE & GOLSAN,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
St. 'rancisvillc La.,
practice in the Courts of Vecst
ianaautd 'ointe Coulpicc.
WICKI.II;FE. C. L. FISllhI:.
?ICKlLll'FE & FISIIHER,
Attorlneys, at Laiw,
et. F 'rai i.v\ilhk, l.:I.
Will rneticre in . the Courts of West
IEast Ie'li.riliei', Pointe (ouliec iand
hicieg l riis,hces.
ETITII 1: ! I)ENTISTI, Y !
M I will :lattend l etils on
thei ('oast, ilne Niatehe'z lito
New )lIehlais: al.so th l- lh.k
tr, when e':esse,a.lhe' with Ii hViaggy.
sm wishinitg oyi services, elU |-i
)tlesaiu'e by udtr"essing oile, at nly
- e . " .
D. STOCKING, D. D. S.,
.i St. l'ran:titiville, La
-TIsTRY.
1D1:. E. (l eli Davis oflers
his servicea t.he 1see:lple.o
this aiud~elltlJing "*':isi"d'.
oMitxrs nddrese t tithi , it his rem.i
e ill receive pronlmpt attentionn.
P. G. K FlI1ANN, f
PHYSICIAN AND SUlG TON.
at residence in St. Fraucisville.
o 16 77. *
zIARTINEZ,
Aan Street, Bayou Sara, La.,
DEAIEti IN
Goods, Groceries, Confiections, To
N Wines and Liquors.
ITY HOTEL,
Corner of Camp andii Coeniatoi streets,
New Orleans, La.
UMFORD & WATSON.
PROP RIETORS.
AtD,-Two dollars and fifty
per day.
'. IRVINE,
Bayou Sara, Louisiana,
OeISALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN
lies, Provisions, IVestern
ace aund General Plan
: tation supplies.
AAND
BASOU ARA, LA.
&I bprocuredby the day, week
th, and at reasonable rates. Ii
as in the past, the table will
ed with the very best fare the
 affords. Elegant and . well fur
'Othe. Accommodating servants
t in attendance. Patronage So
U- eatisftiction guaranteed.
"H. ARNAUD'S
S'ARBER SHOP AND HAIR
to M. & A. Plseher, Front Levee
O Sara, Louisiana. Sept. 1,"77
TAILO R,
the Sentinel of0lee,
St. Francievfl1e La.,
0RDS ASIA WOOD F6E SALE
red if eesired. Apply to
O. BOCKEL,
I'784th Bayou Sara
C HIIEAP BOOTS and SIIOES
-BY
M. ROSENTIHAL, o
Bayou . (STN , ST.) Sara =
(VR INS KY'SOLD ST'AN D)
Gaiters $U(. Shoes $5. Boots $12. Fan
cy Gaiters $7. All Mhade of the BEST
LEATIIERI, 11id the
WORK GCARATEED TO PLEASEI CUSTOM
ors.
.ICARD & WEIL,
Bayou Sara, La.,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
FANCY DRY GOODS,
CLOTIHING, FUIINITIURE,
BOOTS, SHOES, O
GROCEllIER AND PLAN'TATION SUP
PLIES GENEI1ALLY.
'tiIIighest market price paid for cot
toll.
N O. & BAYOU SARA U. S. . MAIL
The superb passenger
steamer, 4
Gov. Allen.
J. J BROWN........----------.......... -------Mster.
S. S. STECK....--....--............Clerk 1
Leaves IIayou Sara tir Ne'v Orleans -
every Ji'cdnesdayir ater the arrival of the
allrs frolu \Voodville, arldevery s:tlrday.
at 7, p. Ii. Returniig, leaves New Or F
leansievery Morailay and Friday,at 5, p.m F
AND) THE S'I'T.A1 Ell
A. DUGAS.........-------............3lastr. 0
Leaves layou Sara every Mondl:ay after fo
the arrival oft the cars frolll Weoodville, s
and every Thursday at 7 p. in. Returin
ing, leaves New Orleans every \Vednes- Ii
day. and Saturday at 5 p1. in.
JOHN F. ItRVINE, Agent o,
1NRD BO0i EL. a
tuani Stcer , Bayou sara, La.,
Dealer in Fnanicy and Stalple l)ry
(ood'. Lndles' DrIess..grood,
W\Viite Goods, liouse keepl,
cry' Articles Clothin-x, t
lants, Ca(:as. ootsand I
Shloes, Hosiery. t
Cutlery, Toi- I
Slet Arti
cles. t
Notion', Fancy and Family Gro- I
ceri('s,
Western Prodluce.
Grain. lHaurgring and
Tie and a full line of
Planatlion -up lp'ier, Hard- 1
waro Glass ware, etc. etc. Alsc,
an Ixtettsive and varied assort
ment of every thingl it, the line of
.addlery and l]arne I.
hIam- Ilihest nmarket price paid
for cotton. t
S T. (;.i.rIi .IL,
-livern Slnra, Louriisian:i,
S1 ,I.A IEI IN
PLOWVS. AGIICIuLTHA'1LkL I1Ll' .
nlllnts, li .ridll, , l lrr ,..ss, IHlrdwar c', I .rn s,
Pistols, Plunps, Pipes, Lachine Fit Ii) 5s 1
Coks, V:lves, Custings, Ropes, ollow I
Ware, Waron- and Cu.ralring: -aoodwork,
I:lacksmith's Materials, Etc., Etc.
TIN 'UOIPI R ANDI SHIE'T11 lltO MAN .
UJFACTOIiY.
Also Agent foir tlhe c(lbh)rlated
"CII AlTrE I OAK" STOVES,
I'rie, (lGarrel t & Cottianr, Blrinley, Jas.
It. lihll ald other plows, Allen's horse.
Hoes, nodil's Mowiilng Machlinnes, Hlorse,
hay R'akes, a:ll of which I will guaran- 1
tee to sell lower than can be l)urchlat 1
elsewhlrere.
G(rangers land others will find it to
their tLavautage to ca:ll and ealllllno imy
stock alid plrices belire 1,cc.tlhasiung also
where.
I No. 40. Mlsl.gaazine 8t,. Near Ca
anal.
OPPOSITE
MAORGAN'S TEXAS 1. It. & STI.AMSIIrI'
OFFICIE.
W. S. Bell,
In Office, A. P. Watson,
It. M. Leake.
- Having 'leased this Hotel for five
years, it is my purpose to keep it open at
:all seasons, and make it a desirable abode
for guests, both permanent and transient
k The table will corltinue to be the leading
a feature of the St. James. Terms orly
S2 $50 per day.
JAMES R. LEAKE,
SPropriotor.
HIIIE ADLER IIOUSE,
Clinton, Louisiana,
Is constatitly oplen for the nccommodila
tion of the prillic. Meals by the day,
week or nl blin t r,-tqsllll ie rate.
7 Elegant and well furnis~hed roous can
also be 1)rocnred. lesieetftlly,
June 28, 'i.--ly. Mrs S. ADLER.
JOHN WAGNER.
Carriage Maker, WeIeciyright
And Blacksllnitlhe.
E SnoP ON TIE WOODVILL1u ROAD, NEtIA
TIE STonRE OF Johs BROwN.
Patronage solicited. Charges reasolna
ble and satisfaction guaranteed.
Sma'r-16-6m.
F.LICIANA SENTINEL.
A DEMOCRATIC PAPER.
OIrcrIAL JOURNAL or WEsT FELICIANA
OFFICIALJOUhRNAL CITY OF I3AYOU SARA
PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY.
S. LAMBERT... PROPRIETOR
JOIN D. AiTT STEN
Editor and Business Mrnnager.
St. FFrancisvilli, July 13, '78:
SLUBSCIIPTION RAT'ES.
One copy, one year (in .dlvancae)....3 00
. " 6"rte. 'a ', .... 1 7
it " " .: e. " " .... 1 00
AiD IERTISLG :A TES:
[A Square is the space of toen lines solid
brevier. i
Space. I . . . ..
1 sq're. $ 1.00 3.00.o I .50 t .00 $ 12.00
2 " 2.00 5.00 9.51) 15.00 20.100
4 " 4.00 8.50 15.00 '23.00 30.00
+ col'm, 5.00 10.00 18 00 30.00 40,00
S 19.00 20.00 40.00 50.00 70.00
I " 20.00 40.00 60.00 90.00 125.00
.itnllroitcitq Candidates:
-'-or State and District offices...... 25.00
For Parish otlices, ................ 10.00
For police District ollices,........... 5.00
(to lue paid ilnvariably ill advance.)
Tranenict ldrcrtisentcntct will be inserted
at therate aof $1.50 per square of ten lines
for the firsD insertion, atod 75 cents for enda,
subsequent inserlion.
P'crsonalities clarJed at transient adler
tising rates.
Tic abore sntle of rates mtist be the basis
of all contracts rwith adterilsintUg aentls.
Obiluaries, tributes of r'espect, resolutions
etc.. charned a adrertisemetnts
E. L. Weber, brother of Weber who
was killed, read a lengthy statement,
which he made untder oath, setting forth t
that he had no personial knowledge that
Deoe-ratie intimidation ihad existed ini
the Parishes of East and WVest F'eliciana. f
I-his brother, DoI We\ber, iand Jalnes
E. Andersonu had inftirmed him at ai the
two Parishes naued ihad gone fairly
l)emocratic. (reat inthlIicce was brought
to heatr ipon lhis brother to make his
protest, :alld le hldl iien approachedl
very freqicnetly to use his intliuece
with his brother to eftict the signing of t
pltttst-. 1he s:tw Anlerson sign his 1
prtot*est, and saw bllllnis therein' after
Andersmon had left. .Judge Camplbell at
tactted the jllrat to the paper ; it was not
sworn to by Alderson.. It was nlotoriols
fact in the Custoniilhoise that Kellogg,
Packard anlld oehers were pressing An- 1
derson andl Weber to imakle their respec
tive protests. Mr..Jidih Jherniman, he said
was spolkeslllat for the visitillgstatestene , I
and lie (Wecber) knew that Sherman had I
given his brother assurances which
causied him to allow his protest to c
stand after it hald been made. Weber
haid in conversation with Sherman ex
ptlained to himn that his brother thought
his parish had gone Democratic and he
was disposed to take back his protest.
.Whereupon Sherman assured himn that
his brother would be cared for. The
statement farther adds that in 1877 the
Sherman letter was a subject of mortili
cation in the Weber family. Mrs. Don
Wober had endeavored to find it among
her husband's papers. It was after wards
found d and destroyed. In this connection
the statement adds: Mrs. Jenks ihad been
in no way connected with the authorship
of the Sherman letter.
Witness referred to his readiness at
one time to believe anything against the
Nicholls Government.
Mr. Cox exhibited a letter to witness,
dated March 24, 1877, which the latter
acknowledged was written by him to
his cousin, J. H. Weber.of St. Louis, but
which lie did not want to form part of
the record, for the reason it would
place hint in a false position, as the
statement therein concerning 1). A.
Webe's death was not ill accor:ldance
with the facts. He founded his state
e luent in the letter *in newspapers ,on
,t informatio'" which had been given him.
o Having been misinformed he accordingly
t mis-stated the facts as to his brother's
g having been killed for political reasons ;
Y the letter lie admitted was written for
political effect. Circumstances were
exaggeratecd for the purpose of creating
sympathy for Packard. lie was a party
in interest, but .at the time believed
that Packard was fairly defeated, -al
though in his letter he said the Republi
cans demanded a recognition of the law
I. ful Packard Government to secure the
', maintenance of law tandt order. ]Knew
Packard, perhaps, hald had no just right
or title to the Govorminnt, his claims
beitn founded on cheating and false re
turns, and this lie knew at the time lie
wrote the tter. Witness admitted the
falst.y of other statements made by him.
SWitness in reply to questions by Mr.
Potter said the letter, though private,
was intended for publication to show
how horribly the Democrats had been
bulldozing the Republicans and was
intended to bring the Government to the
support of Packard.
Wiitness also wrote V letter to Kellogg
for political effect. HI at that tinme
was ready to believe anything against
the Governmllent. It suemeled it was
commolllln in his Country to write such r
lettesa for political eflimt ill order to
excite symmlathy for the Rlepublicanms.
Witness haid a statement prepaired by
him six days ago relative to his brother's b
oeath. Deimorats and. Republicans
alike dIeprecated the act;, cerain persons tr
ra
are smuspee'ed of the murder, but nmome
have been arrested. Ilis brother mlul
tllreatened to publish it his paper tile
defaultinlg t:ax'lists; several gentlelmen
whoes naumes were mLentioned therein a
welo his brother's personal ellellies. t
Previous to that his brother hjad a difti
culty with Col. R1. II. IDarrow. 11e beat t
the old malllm Iterribly. ci
E. L. Vm.:tim:It I; CALI.I--INTEI:IRESTIN' ti
RIEVEILATIQNS.
WASHINGTON, July 3 -The Potter ir
Committee miet at 11 a. m. E. L. Weber n
was recalled, and testified that the conl
ference held at New Orleans duritng the it
count in 1876 was understood to be led cm
by senator Sherman. In conversation b
with MIr. Sherman the witness was assur- ft
ed that if his brother stood by his protest A
he would be protected. At Sherman's k
request lie went alter his brother and Ii
Auderson. His brother had a long con- b
versation with Sherman regarding the It
protest.
Two or three days after this his broth, a
er showed him Sherman's letter of as- C
sunrance, and told hint Sherman gave it g
to him at the conclusion of the confer
ence in relation to his standing by the re
protest, and remarked that it was the it
best he could Co at the time. Witness, ii
in response 'o questions, said that he hda tl
had the letter in his hand. It was writ- o
ten on double. sheet note paper:. Wit- o
miess theni showed the size of the paper It
lmhielh was half the size ot tile sheet Mrs. q
Jenks said the letter was written on. k
She claims that it was ou single 'sheet t1
commnercial letter paper. i
Witness said it was arranged before I
tihe election by Kellogg, Thos. C. Auder- si
son and Packard to secure affidavits of
intimidation inl East and West Feliciana fi
for the purpose of throwing out those it
parishes. He was assured if lie -would tl
use Ilis influence with his brother to- c
wardls having him make a protest, he d
(witness) iwould be returned to the sen- e
ate. lie was defeated for the ste state sn- it
ate by about 12100) votes, and was return- t
ed as elected by 600 nlmjority. Witness t
read a letter from L. A. Sheldon to Mlrs. I
I). A. Weber, dated oew Orleans, May t
26, saying it was important to have her 1
as a witemss belore the Potter conumittee. 5
This letter was handed Mrs. Weber by mn
Mrs. Jenks, who informed Mrs. Weber I
hieldon desired her to go to Washing
ton and testify she diid not know of the I
existence ot'tihe Shemuian letter. Mrs. 1
Weher refused unless called upon by tie I
proper authorities. wlhereupon Mrs. Jenks
threatened to have her arrested anld tak
en to Washing'ton. At this time a broth
er of iMrs. D. A. Weber ca'ue to Donald
sonville, and seeing Mr . Jenks asked
whllat that woman was doing
there again, and whether she was after
the Sherman letter: Mrs. Veber told
her brother not to meddle with her af
fairs; site had thc letter and knew whlt
to do with it. Mr. IE. L Weber had mnott
tihen inttered his sister-in-law he had
destroyed tile (lmellllellnt. Mrs. Jenlks had
told Mrs. Welber tlhe letter was worth
thousuands of tlollars, and she would payd
her a good price for it. Mrs. Jenks never
intimated to Mrs. Weber she had any
thing to, do with the authorshiip of the 1
lettel. Always spoke of it as a letter
written by .olThn Shir-tman, assuring lMess
rs. \'eber and Anderson positions uminder
the adnlmiistration. Witness smubmitted
a letter written by Jhdglo IMarks, inow
Internal lRIevenue Collector at New Or
leans, wlhrein Marks requested witness
to infomrmm hint whether he ilhad received
tihe appointmenutt he had mladmle applicla
t tioe tbr, it not, lie (Marks) would look
I after it foi lhin ; also requested witness
to inform Mrs. Weber lie thoughllt he
could succeed inl securilng her anl appoint
Senllt as postmistress at D)onaldsonville,
for which she had once applied and been
Sunsuiccessfal, Marks being at that time
opposedl to her app..intment. MaIrks,
vprevious to writing t!::s, hIad been to
SiDonaldsomlville, and requested Mrs. Web
; r to imake a statemumet to the oitbet she
c ihad niever known of thie ceistemce of tile
a Sherima:n letter. Dmring this visit Ma:rks
lhadl told wituness and his sistce-ii-law'
Sthat they wele both to be summlonmed as
I w'itnesses before thie investigatinlg comm
- mittio. \Vitness statod as he was iundler
- the imlpression that the aIpproacheIs Itle
- by MIarks were mcrely with a view of in
c flhmucing Ilis tcstiimlony Ibefore thie colm
Slmittee, lie gave himmnmto ecicourI'agenmtl
twhatevir. M;rks lmad stated to cett;tin
a partie's hie could control Mis. Weber's
- testimolly Ielare the eotm'mittee. Wit
e Iless wts rdlcered to report to tile Lollis
o inL1i slb'.io':immlitte oii tile 10tlh illst.,
1. and thie coinimittee adjoiurnid iuntil that
'. latie.
S Ct'vrOu \'oimr~.--\We lcrn taion Crap
m lain lui wlinig LeathLrs, of 't.eramli'r
us Natchez, ilthat the ot.ton aimIwormi] has ip
10 poured ot the lilanttionst neatr Vidalia.
T'ime Nahtheiui'l aper of liitih' i lust, mmmi
mmouufuce the same.-1 'oieLt Commlpee 1' li'uuiu.
THIIE BI3G RACE.
LocIsvILLE, July 4.--Third Race.- 1
Ten Broeck and Mollie McCarthy ; four
mile heats; match for $10,000.
When the drum tapped fer the great
tour mile race, Ten Broeck and Mollic I
McCarthy went by the string like twin
bullets.
Ten Broeck had the outside of the
track, and the mare being on the inside, a
ran to the front from the start. At the S
first quarter they were side by side and "
going gallantly on to victory. The half
mile did not change the position, and
as they moved onward the 30,000 specta- t
tors were held in pefeet silence. I
Between the half and three-quarters
the mare got her nose ahead, alnd a great
cheer went up, and then they came past
the string and she again appeared in
front, another cheer was heard. The c
mare was running easy, and Ten Broeck I
was being driven hard. Ili the second
mil' Mollie McCarthy seemed to be mov
ing with such ease and Ten Broeck labor- I
ed so hard, that Kentuckians wavered
by thousands, and the certainly of Cali
fornia winning produced a (lead silence.
At the half post, in the second mile, Wal
ker urged Ten Brocck quite hard, and
Hanson permitted hin to come up side
by side. A Kentucky yell, such as was
heard for miles, rent the air.
Thus they ran past the three-quarters,
and coming into the stretch Mollie Mic
Carthy biushed ahead again, passing the
grand stand half a length in the lead.
"She will win sure," was heard in all di
rections. Great was the cry as her easy
movement continued, the horse still driv
ing. She passed the quarter in the
third mile still leading, but the horse hung V
on to her close, and made pace so murder- s
ous that many knew his bottom would
have an effect ultimately. At the three
quarter pole of the third mile McCarthy
let up in her running, Ten Broeck taking
tlh track and passing her. at the very 1
moment his "ienmils were giving him i
up, and lie increased rapidly the distance
separating them.
The mare's break down was heard the 1
field over, but she ran on, Walker pull
ing the horse slightly, who was ahead on
the third mile ten lengths, and he in
creased it all the time, and although her
defeat was now certain, few realized how
easily Ten Broeck would win ; the little
more thaanm galloping the remaining nule,
the queen df the Californias being at
the three-quarter pole when the great
Kentuckey horse distanced her. The
time was 8: 191, as follows: First mile,
1:49 ; second mile, 3 :453; third, mile,
5 :10 ; fourth mile, 8:192--moro than a
minute slower than his best record.
Both horses were well used up.
The heat was intense. There was no
heavy betting the Californians andl
Easteri people who backed the mare
being content with small investiments of
$3 to $a.
INSTANT DE: TH.
A LA DY INSTAXTLY KIILLED IY LIGII'TSIN
New London. Coln., July 5.-During
an appalling thunder storm yesterday.
afternoon at Thorne's Grove, Mrs. Bridg
et Maxwell was instantly killed by
lightning. She was attending a picnic
and at half-past 2 o'clock, what resemi
bled a ball of lire, fell from the sky with
a loud report aiml struck a large tree
shattering it to atoms. Beneath the
tree stood Mrs. Maxwell, who was turned
in stauntly into a blackened, burned anld
unrecognizable mass of smokinig flesh.
Her clothing and. hair were entirely
burned off, her arms and legs scorched
to a crisp, and her face and body hor
ribly disfigured and mutilated. The
hlghtning which killed her h'ad also dug
her grave, for when the ball of flire explo
ded that made a hole six feet long and twd
or three deep at her feet. and into this
excavation her remains fell. The shock
was felt by many persons standing with
in range of 500 feet from her; men,
women*und children being thrown down,
s and Mrs. Joseph Harrison and Mrs. Hog
e:s paralyzed in their lower limbs and
unable to walk. The shoes were torn
from the feet of a lad named Rowe.
W1 omen fainted, children screanmed, and
for a time uncontrollable confusion
' reigned amoug the picnic people.
C -
- IMMIGRATION BUREAU AT NEW 01R
[N. O. I'icayunne.J
The Governor of Louisiana has rceeir
od a letter fi'om Memuphis, inqurriug
about the fcasibilityof establishing an
r iummigration depot at Now Orleans on
Sthe plan established at Castle Garden, to
accommodlato immigrants for tile interior
states, as well as thos near ths iathe Gulf.
it Such a depot. would do a vast amount of
t good to the states north of this, and also
to New Orleans, Louisiana and the adl
. joining states. Had it not beenu for the
war this depot would have bei esta:h
lished long since, as imnmigrants foini
SEurope can reach St. Louis aind the West
at a less cost vial Now Orleans than by
New York. The tide haId coimimenced
setting in this direclion previous to ll;3.
:r Call at Muniford's or Brooks' l)rmg
- IStore anil get a trial package of D)r. A. Q.
a. Sinimons' Vegeotalo Liver Mcdlicin'. It
i- costs 'you niothilng and l:my lSal\ 3"'
litk.
Q;EE 31MEIC.IEDES.
TIIr ANTIIE3i AT TIIE CATHERIDRAL ANXf
IFUNERAL CEltRE1ONIEt:
"all, brokoel is the golden boWli
The spirit flown forever,
Let the bell toil, a saintly rotv
Floats down the Stygianuriver."
The death of Queen Mercedes of Spain;
which waanuounc6 I s m:6 days ago, cast
a saddening gloom over the whole world
So young, and defIth taking her away ?
"The lifte till there, within her hairt
The death itponhler eyes,"
Her fan e had reached this confirneuf
through the insight given of her convent
life by one of our American young ladies
who had been with her at school, and
whoso letters were published in a New
York paper.
Mercedes (who was nor yet· a queen of
course) was depicted a model of parity;.
gentleness, amiability and artlessness.
Thlen. came the announcement of her
marriage with King Alfonso the young
and handsome monarch of Spain.
Every body spook of the union as the
most felicitous and best assorted mar
riage that ever happened between youth
nobility and bravery and innocence and
beauty.
Later camel the dire tidings oftheo'
young queen's short illness and death.
She, only ninteen years of age; he, only
twenty-onc. What a cruel and relent
less hand is that of the ceaseless reaper !
lie chooses as his victims the fairest
flower of the land, the beloved Queen
of th." Castilians, the cherished consort
of agallant and loving kinig.
Queen Mercedes is dead! Her beauty,
her gentleness, her noble prestauce, are
gone forever, but the memory of her
sweet presence and of her winning tones
will survive forever. The spanish nation
will never forget her, and the Spanish
residcnts of this city, resolved to give
vent to their sad expressions of condo
lence at the sudden demise of the young
qineen,joined in the sorrow of their trans
Atleatic brethren by having a solemn re
quicm mass sung at the St. Louis Cathe
dral.
Yesterday morning, at 10:30 o'clock,
the doors of the Cathedral were flung
open to admit a large concourse of faith
fill Catholics who had flocked thither
to pay a tribute of prayers to the mem
ory of the lamented queen.
In the middle aisle an imposing sar
cophagus, adorned with banners and
Spalhish colors, stood, guarded by a si
lent and mourning guard of the "Cazado
res de Orleans," fully equipped and with
reversed arms.
The solemn tonlesof the organ mingling
with the booming of cannon outside,
sent a thrill of religious awe through
the very soul of all present, who, consci"
oils of the solemnity of the occasion, bow
ed downi their heads, prayed and wept
in memory of the beauty that 'as lost,
of the queen that was but iuauinmatu
clay, andof the wifi whose fond cares
ses a husband will know no more.-Y. 0.
I),mocrat.
THE PAN-ANGLICAN CONFERENCE.
[Courier-J ournal.];
The conference of prelates of thi'
Church of England and of the Protestalit
Episcopal Church of the United States'
has been opened in London. About thir
ty American bishops have gone to the
cdnference, besides several presbyters.
The subjects proposed for discussion are:
1. The best mode of maintaining union
among the various churches of the An
glican communion. 2. Voluntary boards'
of arbitration for churchus to which suchl
an arrangement may be applicable. S'.
T The relations to each other of missionary
bishops and of missionaries, in various'
branches of the Anglican communion,'
d acting in the same country. 4. The po
sition of Anglican chaplaips and chap
I laincies on the continent of Europe and
Sclsewhere. 5. Modern forms of infideli
, ty and the best means of dealing with
them. 6. The condition, progress and.
creeds of the various churches of the An
a glican communion.
Little Rock Gazette: Why is it that
d we don't see some old Democrats address
Singl greenback meetings? With one or
two exceptionls all the speakers are Re
publicans, who are now and always will
be repulilicans. ''ho tmuth is that the
Greenback party is only the republican
part) under a new name, Democrats
will find this out in time, and before
election will drop out-it will be another
SKnow Nothing tiasco.
. Richlaud Bi(eo, : As we .have before
said, our principal objection to these coln
r suitutional amendmoents is that they do'
not meet at all tLo requirements of good
government. They are patches upon al
o loathsome nbadge of degredation, mi, role
and military oppression. We want no
e such patchwork, but the spotless regalia
- of'freedol and justic--oneo that can be
in htl up to the gazeo oF thel world without
hlaving the blush Of shmue mantle our
F chcks.
¶-. l \ill r you suwtl'r whith a shanking
Chill or :t burning Fever,. doses- of Cu
bin Tiolin, the, anl, \Vest ldies Fever
1 alltl Ag l"' Ienledy. will stop the Chills
aml I.c'r, m hili on' ' ottle will culr
I iii. i lii Ii''!" 3' ,it,. ".t it

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