OCR Interpretation


Louisiana capitolian. (Baton Rouge, La.) 1879-1881, November 15, 1879, Image 6

Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88064592/1879-11-15/ed-1/seq-6/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

4h4 Yoni siama apitoalian.
OFFICIAL JOURNAL or THE PARISH
Why is a woodpecker like a tramp f
Because heo bores for his grub.
It is only the female sex who can rip,
darn and tear without being considered
profane. A man can dam a little, but it
must be a mill-dam.
A young fellow was the other day ral
lying another on having a large month.
"Yes," was the reply, "but the Lord had
to make yours small so as to give plenty
of room for your cheek."
Long John didn't to go the Third ward
on last Saturday. Ilis newly fledged
poIpularity does not extent that far yet.
As soon as the boys are ready to stomach
hinm, he'll go. Barkus is willing.
An unsuccessful vocalist went to the
poor-house and delighted the inmates
with his singing. lie said it was a nat
ural thing for him to do,. as he had been
singing to poor houses ever since he be
gan his career.
A Princeton professor, remonstrating
with a sophomore for creating a disturb
ance in the class-room, laid his hand in
:sinuatingly upon the refractory one's
shoulder with the remark: "My dear
young man, the devil has hold of you."
At the Yorktown celebration a "blars
ted Ilinglishman," after surveying the
situation and surroundings, said: "I
can well understand now why Lord Corn
wallis surrendered Yorktown. IfI owned
such a place I would give it up myself."
"There is something inexpressibly
touching in the fallen leaves," sighs an
esteemed author. There is, there is.
It's when you slip on one of them on a
wet morning, and touch the hard pave
ment with the end of yourself.
The two-bits subscriptions are played
out. Democrats, will rest easy, for the
balance of the campaign. Scott Gordon
hae enlisted in "long John's" combina
tion. No more of those Saturday night
colored Democratic hop. A loss that will
prove a gain.
"The Banner of '79," a beautiful and
excellently well written article which
we published in our last, was from the
pen of the giftet& editor of the Baton
Rouge CAPITOLIAN, and should have
been credited to that journal.-[Alexau
dria Democrat.
"Ma," said an inquisitive little girl,
"will rich and poor folks live together
when they go to heaven I" "'Yes, my
dear, they will be all alike there." "Then,
ma, why don't rich and poor Christians
associate together hero f" The mother
did not answer.
A tutor of a college, leturing a young
man on the irregularities of his conduct,
added with great pathos: "The report
of younrvices will bring your father's gray
hairs with sorrow to the grave." "I beg
your pardon,.sir," replied the pupil, "my
father wears a wig."
An American tourist was visiting Na
ples and sa.w Vesuvius during a erup
tion. "Htve you any thing likahat in
the New World ?" was the questionofan
Italian aspectator. "No," replied Jona
thanI, "but I guess we have a Niagara
that would lint it out in live minutes!"
Until a strong Inoependent-Republi
can platform is erected in the Third ward,
Long John says there is no place for him
to slreadl "that foot" in that noighbor
hood. lIe's prepared to go though, any
time, where tihe boys are ready to hear
Ilis celchrated lecture "on free ballot and
a fair oount at tile polls."
It is hobetter not to ask too many ques
tioms abo,lt tile future. A curious fellow
- -whose wife disliked his wishy-washy
indlepenident political course-asked her,
"My dear, what kind of a stone yo you
think they will give me when I am dead
and gone f" She answered coolly,
"Blrimistone, sir."
We are requested to inform our colored
voters that Scott Gordon and Ebo Blood
ha've not been instructed to join thile In
dependent-Republicans by the Demo
crats fiorthe purlpose of breaking up
thlleir combination. They are there for
thelir coun(try's good only. By special
rcsolution they are forbidden from re
ellistilng inl the Democratic ranks.
A curious experiment was made with
cats recently iuLuttich, Germany. Thir-.
ty-Ysoven of them were put into bags and
takenl several mlilCes into thlb country,
whlere they were released. oWithin three
hours the first cat had found its way
hom1e, land before twenty-four hours had
elapsed, every one of thile others had re
turned.
"I aro,,n at six o'clock this morning
and sce whlat I found in taking a walk
inl tle hIighway," said thle fond father,
displaying a silver dollar, "is that not
proof of thloetadvisability of early rising ?"
"No," repllied thle son. "And why I" asked
thle father, just as people doin fablesand
Snday school stories. "Because the fel
low wio lost it," boldly replied the son,
"g'ot up too blamed early for his own
good."
A youllng woman at Smyrna, N. Y., had
a dream, many years ago, of eight men
stalldinug i row before her, with out
stretcheld handlls. She interpreted this to
meanmk that she would have eight hus
l~n1ds. Her seventhlhusband dlied lately,
anId, altlhoulgh she is now 84, she is confi
dent that tlh drealnm will be fulfilled.
o All tile blushing widow has to do is to
co(nvince the avmirage Cincinnati Radical
that she is rich. *
'The other night at a London club some
Amierlicans were bioasting about their in
velltions, and the wonderful machines to
be founld in thle States; one of themn told
of the wt'll-known mincing umachine
which, a live pig being introduced at
one 'end, tlurnis out the animal in sausage
at the other. An Irishman, who was not
goilng to hIave the Yankees riding rough
shod over every other nation, turned on
them and1 said: "HBedad, we've got the
samne machine in Ireland, only ours is
more perfect, sure, for if you don't like
thle sausages you can put them back into
tle machinle and by reversing the action
they'll conme out a live pig again where
h' went in."
SchlooL-Master's Conquest
Bronson Alcott, of Bostoln once told
Joseph Cook, and Joseph Cook told every
body he met, that he made it a regula
tion in his school that, if a pupil violated
a rule, the master should substituto his
own voluntary sacrificial chastisoment
for that pupil's punlishment; and, this
regulation almost Christianized his
school.
"One day," Mr. Alcott said, I called
up before me a pupil who had violated
an important rule. All the school was
looking on, and know the rule and the
penalty. I put the ruler into the offend
er's hand; I extended my own hand; I
told him to strike. Instantly I saw a
struggle begin in his face. A new light
sprang up in his countenance. A new
set of shuttles seemed to be weaving a
new nature within him. I kept my
hand extended and the school was in
tears. The boe struck once and burst
into tears. He seemed to be in a bath
of fire, which was giving him a nature.
He seemed transformed by the idea that
I should suffer chastisement in place of
his punishment, and ever afteeIvas the
most docile pupil in the schodl, though
lie had boon the rudest."
Now this is very affecting and: reason
able and striking. No one can read the
incident and very readily forget it; and
it contains a lesson that every school
teacher can certainly read with profit.
The incident camno to the knowledge of
Willis K. Stoddard, who for some years
past has been teaching a district school
in Flint river township, in Iowa. Ile
read this extract frim one of Joseph
Coook's lectures, and never forgot the
great moral it.conveyed.
Young Mr. Stoddard had some few
pretty hard boys in school. They were
big and noisy and turbulent. He had
reasoned with them,he hadexpostulated,
he had begged and wept. He had whip
pod them until his arms ached, and the
directors had threatened to dismiss him
for unnecessary severity and absolute
cruelty, and the boys grow worse and
worse every day. But when he was at
his wits' end, and seriously thinking of
running away and losing all his back
salary, rather-than stay at school another
day, he read this incident, and it gave
his troubled mind now lights - lie treas
ured it up, and thought it might help
him.
lie had treasured it up probably half a
day when, one bright June afternoon,
Samuel Johnson, the biggest and strong
est and worst of all the big, bad boys,
violated all the rules of the school, one
after the other, as fast as lie could think
of thenm, and wound up by tearing seven
leaves out of his geography. These he
crammed into his mouth, and, when he
had chewed them into a pulp, lie took the
"wad" into his hand and propelled the
whole mass with great violence into the
cars of Ellis Hlaskell, who alhough also
big and bad-a little bad-was not pos
sessed of suflicie t presence of mind to
look calm and unconscious under this
avalanche, merely because the eye of his
teacher was upon him, and he according
ly signified his very natural dismay and
astonishment by a universal howl.
Mr. Stoddard called Samuel Johnson
up to tVcsk, and, more calmly than was
his custom under such circumstances,
told him to go out and bring a switch.
The pupils noticed there was soniothilg
unusually gentle in the teacher's mianner,
and it struck Samuel Johnson very forci
bly that it was certailnly very mnuch out
of the ordinary nmethod of procedure for
thie culprit to be accorded the privilegoe of
cutting his own switch. Buthe wasnot
the boy who would fail to applreciato
and mnake the best use of his privileges
and opportunities. So he did not idly
waste his time, but presently returned
with a very' peaceful-looking switch in
dleed-a switch apparently far gone iu
the last stages of consumption--the sick
est switch!
"Now," said Mr. Stoddard, with a gen
tle, compassionate intonation, "strike
mc!"
Samuel Johnson, who had already bc
gun to unbutton his own jacket, opeuned
his mnouth wide, and the whole school
stared in speechless amazemenlt. Mr.
8toddard calmly repeated his order. lHe
thbught he could see the "now set of
shutters beginning to work." "Some
one," he said--and a woman could not
have spoken more tenderly-"sopue one
must suffer for the infraction of the rules.
I do not punish and of you for any pleas
ure it gives me to see you suffer. I do
it because justice demands it. Sonime
one must be putished, and I will suf
fer chastisoment in your stead." The
teacher saw "new light sprung up" in
Samuel Johnson's countenanc[. The
boy looked at his teacher and Ithon at
his switch. The teachor could "see a
struggle begin in his face." Presently
the tearp sprang to Samuel1 Johnson's
eyes, and hesaid, in a voice msuflused with
anxiety, "Hadn't I better go out' andget
a bigger switchl"
The teacher softly told him he might
do so if he wished, and Samuel Johnson
went out and was gone ten minites-ten
long, anxious, quiet wondering minutes.
When he returned, the school smiled.
He carried in his hand a switch that
looked like a Russian Peace Comnumis
sioner. lie had cut it out of an Osage
hedge, and, when lie he hold it up where
the sunlight could fall upon it, it looked
wickeder than John Morrissey's fare par
lors. It was about seven feet long, an
inch and three-tluarters thick at the butt,
and was limber and twisted, and had
knots and knobs clear downto the point.
The boy's face shone with a bright glow
of conscientious satisfaction as he bal
ancedl this switch and dreLw it through
his hard, nmnscular hands.
Mr. Stoddard stood up and 'folded his
arms. Then he said, with a had, sweet
look at the culprit, "Now strike me."
The sncl l just sat still and held its
breath.
Samuel Johnson did not act in greedy
and unseemly haste, as though he. were
meanly and wickedly glad to have this
opportunity of hlitting his deair teacher.
He conducted himself like a boy who has
a painful duty to perform, but is com
pelled by conscientious motives to per
form it thoroughly. Hlie pulled off his
jacket; he rolled up his sleeves; he took
a two-handed grasp on the switch. Tu *
hlie changed the position of his feet to
get a better brace. Then he drew a long,
deep breath; rai iled5 hlrt h d si;aif l 6i
switch just shrieked through the air like
a wild, mad, livingthing.
Old Mr. Hargis, the senior director,
who lives only a mile' and a half away
from the school house, says hewasoutin'
the field plowing, nid'when Mr. Stod
dard let off his first yell, the old man's
first impression was that the schoolhouse
had been struck by lightning. The clear
sky, however, disproved the theory; and
the next time the teacher shouted, the
director was convinced that a steamboat
had gone astray and was whistling
for a landing somewherQ up the creek.
While he was trying to hold his terrified
horses, another volley . of sound came
sweeping over the land like a vocal cy
clone, and old Mr. Iosengae, who had
been deaf twenty yoere, came running
over, saying be believed they were fight
ing down at the quarries. By this tizeip
they were joined bythe rest of the neigli
bores, and the excited populace went
thronging on toward the school-horse.
In accepting Mr. Stoddard's resigna
tion, the directors conlsiderately allowed.
him pay for the full term, and in a series
of complimentary resolutions spoke of
his efficiency in the 'highest terms,
although it transpired that thoboard was
privately agreed, after all the facts had
been laid before it, that he was too much
of a "nt'ral born fool" to suit a practi
cal locality. Mr. Stoddardtoldhisland
lady that he needed rest, and that good
hearted old investigating committee was
amazed to discover that Mr. Stoddard
rested, and even went to bed, by leaning
up face-foremost against the mantle
piece in his room.
Meeting a newsboy Whose face was
scarred with scratches, and looked like a
map of some great railroad. center, a
Register reporter asked. the youngster
what the matter was? "Follar spoke
disrespectful of my sister; said he'd bet
she was cross-eyed, and I sailed in." "Is
your sister cross-eyed I" 'asked the re
porter. "lain't got no sister," was the
reply; "it was the principlo of the thing
atI licked for."
The newest definition of black vomit
is the exodus to Kansas.
CHiARTER PERPETUAL
LOUISIANA EQUITABLE
Life In surance
OIMPANY
39......Carondcld t 4F Gravicr Sl ......39
NEW ORLEANS.
E. B. BRIGGS .......... ..... President
JOHN HIENDERSON....Vlce-President
A. PATTON............ ......Secretary
Tihe Policies of the Louisiana Equita
ble Lift Insurance Company are regis
tered and the Reserve thereia deposited
to the credit of the Policy with the Aud
itor and Treasurbr of State in" compli
ance with an Act approved April
2, '77, entitled "An Act to better
secure holders of Life Insurance Poli
cies in this State: to provide a reserve
fund therefor, anid for other purposes."
A CERTIFICATE
Ofthel Auditor of State is Attached to Each
Policy. "The company complied with
the provisi gs of the above Act and made
its SECOND deposit of the Required Re
scrve, January 23, 1879.
ALLEN JUMEL, Auditor.
ACTIVE AGENTS WANTED.
Ap1ply, to
GOURRIER & McNAIR,
General Agents, Baton Rouge.
Medical Exanmiiers-T. J. Buflington,
M. D., I. F. Hereford, M. D. n34y.
Fine Plantation For Sale.
SPLENDIDH - E
That highly
improved plantation, owned by Mr. N.
Wax, situated on the Bayou Sara Road,
within eight miles of this city isforsale.
There are one hindred and fifty acres of
cleared land under fence, of which there
are twenty planted in sugar cane; be
sides one hundred and fifty acres of well
timbered land. A fine residence and pe
cessary outbuildings, with a
SUGAR HOUSE c HORSE-MILL
attachments, are included in this very
desirable and handsome property. There
are two good wells and a large cistern on
the place, and every other needed im
provement. For terms apply to
octl8 tjan NICHOLAS WAX.
I A lE JUST RECEIVED A
I V full and complete
line of Rogers' and Wosteuholm's Pen
Knives, Razors and Scissors, the best
assortment in this city at retail and at
moderate prices.
AI SO A full and complete line
AL of Pipes, Bowls, &c.,from
a 20 pipe to an amber-tipped; the Bock
and Pinafore Brand of Cigars, Havana
Filled and Wrapped. When you want to
smoke a good Cigar, got the New Or
leans hand made and not the machine.
SSA EhE BALLS AND BATS; and
J.L.kJJ. have constantly arriving
Colors dry and in Oil for Painters. Also
Brushes of all descriptions, Linseed Oil
(New. York Made) Insurance Oil, and
T'upentine, &c., &e.
TVAR NIHES KALSO
always on hand, the Southern Compa
ny's .strictly Pure Lead, said to be the
best made, &o., &c.
W, T. CIlU RIll S,
DRUGGIST
[Bogel's Old Stand]
BA TON ROUGE .... , ...LOUISIANA.
Registration Notice.
ASSESSOR'S OFFICE,
PARISH OF EAST BATON ROUGE,
Baton Rouge, Sept. 20, 1879.
NTOTICE TO VOTERS-The Registra
Stion Oflice, for thie pnrlpose of reg
istering voters~, will be opoued at the
Court-lhouse, on Wednesday, October
1st to Saturdayln , the 6th, inclusive.
At CONRAI)'s, Eigmhth Ward, firstprc
cint-T'uesday, October 7th.
At LOPEZ'S, Eighth Ward, second
precinct-Wednesday, October 8th.
At MORTIMORE PRICE'S sixth Ward
-Trhursdav October 9th.
At MASONIC LODGE, seventh Ward,
-Friday, October 10th.
At GRIFFIN'S, ninth ward-Satur
day, October llth.
At STONY POINT, fifth ward-Tucs
day, October 14th.
AKr BETHEL CHURCH, fifth ward
Wednesday and Thursdlay, October 15th
and 16th.
At WOODLAND SCHOOL HOUSE,
tenth ward-Friday, October 17th.
At TIIOEMSEN'S STORE, third ward
-Saturday, October 18th.
At PLAINS, fourth Ward, Monday and
Saturday, October 20th and 25th.
At HEATH'S, fourth ward--Tuesday,
October 21st.
At PORT HUDSON, fourth ward,
Wednesdlay, October 22d.
At BATON BOUGE-October 27th to
November 29th, inclusive.
JOSEPH T. YOUNG,
un34 td. Ascasor and Registrar.
NEW ORLEANkit
COSIIOPOLITAK.''
R ES:T AUR A NT>
ios0. 3 i& 13 ROYAL STREEt
NEW ORLEANS.
Louis CHAPLAIN... .POPRirETOr
Tho FINEST ROOMS for the accom
modatiou of travelers at all times.
EVERY DELICACY
the market affords served in the very
BEST STYLE by polite attendants,.
TERMS MODERATE. aug29
MRS. KNIGHT,
123 .... CARONDELET ST.... 123
BotwOebn: Lafayette. and Poydras,
NEW ORLEANS, 'LA.
HIandsomely. furnished rooms, with or
without boardl, for sucltlength of time as
will suit thi oconvenience of visitore in
the city. Charges moderato., aug9
BATON ROUGE.'
GOURRIN t & M NAIR1,
GENERAL
Insurance Agents
(Fire, Life and Marine Insurance.)
BATON ROUGE, LA.
GEM SALOON,.
Pr. W.AXS, ILOPz zO~O -.
ST. L O01 STREST,
OPPOSITE TICtE MARKET.
The best of LIQUORS constantly on
hand, and at prices to suit the times.
A LUNCH every day at 11 A. M.
FRESH LAGER always on tap. feb15
Collegiate 'Institute
BATON ROUGE, LA.
T HE session ot this school.will begin
on WEDNESDAY, 24th oeptember
prox.
Early applications and prompt attend
ance desirable .and best for all parties.
aug29 W. H. N. MAGRUDER.
WANTED.
10,000 Bales of Cotton,
For which I will pay. the
Highest Market Price,
CAIE.
ANDREW JACKSON,
agi9 Cotton Buyer.
BLUE STORE
Corner Church and Main Streets.
NEWS, LITERARY AND FASHION MAGAZINES
AND PAPERS RECEIVED REGULARLY,
Staple and Fancy Stationery,
Chromos, Engravmils,
Frames, liMoulldings, Etc.
Articles for Fancy Work, Etc.
F. W. HEROMAN, Agent.
The CArITOLIAuN always on hand for
sale. fcbl5
Capitolian Barber Shop,
-IKEPT BY
ED. REIS IAt,
. THIRD STREET,
Shaving, IIair Dressing and Cutting,
Shampooning, Hair Dyeing, Reopairing
and Braiding Ladies' HIair etc., done in
the handsomest style. Customers at
tended to with the gretatost care.
I. LEWINTHIAL
W ILL teach German, Hebrew, and
Violin Lessons. For terms, etc.,
apply to I. L., care of S. Gottlieb.
mar29-tf
Veranilah Hotel
-And-
R E STAURAŽN T,
4' THIRS STREET,. ATON ROUGE, LA.
C. CREMONINI, - Proprietor.
Board by the day, week or month.
Good accommodations for travelers.
A porter will be in attendance at all
boats, night or day. feb8
OEO. H. WILSON,
-Dealer in- .
WESTERN PRODUCE
GROCERIES AND PLANTATION SUPPLIES,
SADDLERY AND HARNESS,
Oorteo Thir4 alhd some ntimn Sis.,
febl5 BATON ROUGE], LA.
To My Friends and Pat
rons.
TAM pleased to dnuounco that all defi
Icionoies caused in my stock are being
rapidly replaced and that until my store
is repaired I shall conduct my business
in the adjoining store, where all orders
and prescriptions will be dispensed with
promptness. To thoose of my friends
who hay so greatly assisted in saving
my stock from the ruins, I am under an
endless obligation. Soliciting your in
dulgence for a few days I am truly yours,
1I. M. BROOKS.
Baton Rouse! Sept. 8, 1878.
NOTICE 1
"TOR 8ALE-Valuable Third St.
y property, Lot No..ll, squaro 2,iil
60 feet front by 120 in depth, with frame
buildings, opposite Pike's Hall. For
particulars, apply to
n251m CHARLES O'CONNOR.
ALDERNEY Milk-Choice goods; sa
Sperior to any. Try it. David &
Glarig.
ORIENTAL Powder Agency..We sell
the above at New Orleans prices.
David & Garig.
AVEXED qucestion' settled-The place
Sto buy fancy and staple goods, is at
David & Garig's.
SPECIAL NOTICE TO DEALERS
I have a full stock of Can and Jar
goods, Crackers, Candles, Starch, Soda,
Lye and Tea-all of which I will offer
at bargains. ' WM. GARIG.
M cMUNN'S Elixir of Opium, Hop
Bitters, Black Draught, Ballard's
Flea Killer, Insect Powder, Parker's
Ginger Tonic, Brodie's Cordial, Cuticura,
etc., etc., at Brooks' Drug Store.
W AGONS--James Roosa and Gra
ham's celebrated Memphis Wagons
and Carts always on hand, which I offer
at prices to compete with any in the
market. WM. GARIG.
FLAVORING EXTRACTS iu bulk,
Handkerchief "
Sachet Powders,
Of the best American makers in.stock, at
je21 BROOKS' DRUG STORE.
COTT O . T e0
AsWILLIAM GA:I l A
, .._.f,..,l }.
, .d .  . .
RMII D FAMILY U P
TH .O. J. ,.OOD,
Wholes'ale and Retail Gre
" --N" D, = .. .! .....
..A"N ST... ER T,,'F 'BR Y I ,-N.G'.,·
M . J. W. , ILL ,
Steam Trains, Strike Pands Boiletrs anTarks,
Daler PIPE WN es, FITTIqu. ors, ELcI.,
MI J, WILIMS
CORER FONT AD MAIO STRETSER TO FR LADIO,
f8b8 BAE.TON :u .,.
Pipr's Furniture, a lltk n, e ie L1isai i ,
PIRER F T BRADINT NORD' OLD RTANDR
-DEALER IN BEDSTEDS RMOIRSBU SS CHAIRS
And various other articles at the loweet market price. Metalic and Imitatloa
Cases, Go0fflns of all kinds with Hearse When required, furnished at any hour.
Also, Wov~en-Wiro Mattresses. These Mattresses are so well known thatit
is not necessaryr to ealarge upon their-merite. Their superiority over
all spring s, they are Elastie, Blgoaeee e D cirale, Cleanly,
Healthful and Economical. Th.e Guj irois an improvement,
consisting of a large wire .put on the fabric, which
makes a stiff edge, and preventa its being pressed
on the rail. No other Mattres pseses thi.
eTxcellent feature. GQarNsed for ilve years. feb8
THOS-. , . O ,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
DEMERl IN Din iOODS, LiqIuo S, E oa II,
C RBOOTS AET S EIOELNDING,
SHats, Caps, Gents' Furnishing Goods,
Nos. 24 and 26 lain and o. 9 Third S.treet. ,
Afeb SRE BATON ROUG,B:A
c. K. DAVID. W GarIG.
DAVID & GARI(G,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL GROCERS
-AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
L MAIN STREET, BIATON ROUGE, LA.,
ADVANo .CESr MADE Oaf 00710f IN weIOR W4 FOR tIhaPLEiT.
ooI,- Blaci"-I M-t.
e bo Wine, A
g ans. _chanoe,
)lofes't. BLao.U ',a, -.
75, 4 T
J. ep's .celebrated
Epir. 1 tb
Bis, ,Aarok Sa loon'
~LAQERU KU8 HOS
C oMi t. Louis apld KOeith HBvd.ir
M c. Streets. ang
Thlle best of Wines LI uors and C gal t
aMas kept on handA. ustomers care
hi eF'y, ~t alebrded to.
Adjacent to hi Saloon
Wi , iybe Nupp iedwoithHORSE
4E P STABLING for animals ob
(Jdo De t LIouri ald tnonfor 8tove,eg
ftlreetis.
Th nabl. Rates as low as the d cheapet.
al ways kept on hand. Customers care
fully ; -tte ded to. ,
' M. J. WILLIAMS,
v LDealer in
PARLOR, OFFICE AND COOKING STOVES,
Ai arg aortent of ThiN WAREoon.
:Rwspas, Malways onwith HO.
EEL) pirii S MAI ANG for animalsobIFT
felS8 BAroN UOUE, LA.
M. CHLLAMBERS,
Dealer in
PARLSCHOOLE AND COKS, STATIONERY,
S rOVANY GPADS,
Newdpaper, Magazines and NStoves,
THIR D STREET, SATON .UE, LA.
bc ofiptis recll eived for any News.
paper or Igazine published, f T sE,
al .on . a w.T.
1CTIOPNEER AND COMMISSION MERCHANT,
. P.O.Box.84,
- feb8 BATON ROUGE, LA.
G. GESSELLY,
anmarl BATON ROUGE.TO ,
LY TL E,
aoor Tgah ind tid a ureltst,
IItotSibmnUs, Ora sN, uass,
CONSTANTLY ON HAND).
i* - ", HIK-.o ,
COPYING O PIATURES A, SPECIALTY.,
- feb 5
reasyothaph&s S.tisoe
IJn'Obaouco ar, 1laars,
tc Utaird , ETi c.,
febl5 BATON ROUGE, LA
CHARLES, WIECK, PROPRIETOR5
.Dar-rooms and families supplied with
.WHITE WINES,
IRISH, BOURBON OLIVE SRANCH,
CHICKEiI COCK,
sad other brands of WHISKY,
WESTERN LAGER BEER ALE, PORTER,
GINGER ALE, ETC.
Best birands ofTIGARS always on hand,
m.rWAE-rd A full linp, at David &
HTOUSEKEEPERS will ind a full as
a1 sortmxent of Queenware, Glassware,
0tc. at David & iarig's,

xml | txt