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The Cairo daily bulletin. (Cairo, Ill.) 1870-1872, May 30, 1872, Image 2

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THE CAIRO DAILY BULLETIN, THURSDAY, MAY 30, 1872
THE BULLETIN.
JOHN H.OHKKLT, Wlhren.t Publisher.
y Tbumbay,
Mat 80 1872,
MMMMMI
Timi or rut Dint Btumi I
ISxbKripHo.
OtM tree, by 'arrler,
year by carrier, la advance..
uae muwtn. nj '"
Three month,...... .
Bt tno toe, ...
,10 00
75
1 Si
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TBI DOLLAR WIIKLY BCLLKTIff.
John II. Oberty Oo. hava redeced "
eeription pne nltlie Wety cairo uueu
Grhlkt hats, tubjoct to tbe approval
of tno Baltimore convention, li the Utest
tbing out.
"'
Thk St. Louli '.Viraw' has been en
Urged and put m new 'droit. Tb
Tlmoi ' ii moil oxcollent paper, edited
with greet ability end ii always full of
news.
ti soaking tt the cheapest pa
pereobllihed In Southern llllnol.
On Dollar ir
Good Enough
DEMOCRATIC TICKET.
I7atll t te alftwa .
km mn the wrl aloa ill tin,
Urceley aa umta lri."
TOR rRUISEHT,
HORACE GREELEY,
of New York;
TOR TICK rKESIDIXT,
B. GRATZ BROWN,
of Missouri.
.V ii i,5 t
Good Enough
DEMOCRATIC PLATFORM.
PBEAXBLK.
We, the Liberal Kcpubllcans of tho
United Slates in Convention assembled at
Cincinnati, proclaim tho following princi
ples as essential to just government:
DEAD INftVEM 1IVRIBB.
1. "Wo recognize tlio equality of all
men before the law, and hold that it is
tho duty of the government in its dealings
with tho people to meto out EQUAL AS D
EXACT JUSTICE TO ALL, OF
"WHATEVE It NATIONALITY", IIACE,
COLOR OR PERSUASION, BELL
GIOUS OK POLITICAL.
2. WE PLEDGE OURSELVES TO
MAINTAIN THE UNION OP THESE
STATES, EMANCIPATION ANDEN
FRANCHISEMENT, AND TO OP
POSE ANT REOPENING OP THE
QUESTIONS SETTLED BY THE
THIRTEENTH, FOURTEENTH AND
FIFTEENTH AMENDMENTS OF
THE CONSTITUTION.
UftlVEKHAL AMMKMTV.
3. Wo domand the immediate and ab
solute removal of all disabilities imposod
on account of tho rebollion which was
finally subdued soven yoars ago, belioving
that UNIVERSAL AMNESTY WILL
RESULT IN THE COMPLETE PAC
IFICATION IN ALL SECTIONS OP
THE COUNTRY
BEMOt'KATIC TO THE COKE.
4. LOCAL SELF-GOVERNMENT
with impartial suffrage, will guard tho
rights of all cltltons more securely than
any centralized power. The people and
the public welfare require the SUPRE
MACY OF THE CIVIL OVER THE
MILITARY AUTHORITY and
FREEDOM OF PERSON UNDER
THE PROTECTION OF THE UA
DEAS CORPUS. Wo demand for the
individual the largest liberty consistent
with public order, for tho state self-gov
ernment, and for tho nation a return to
the methods of peace and tho constitu
tional limitations of power.
"TBDE AH PKEACIIINO."
C. The civil service of tho government
hM become a more instrument of partisan
tyranny and personal ambition, and an
object of selfish greed. It is a scandal
and reproach upon freo institutions, and
breeds a demoralization dangerous to tho
perpetuity of republican government.
TIIEBET0BE A WINK DEMAND.
C. Wo therefore regard a THOROUGH
REFORM OF THE CIVIL SERVICE
as one ot the most pressing necessities of
the hour; that honesty, capacity and fidel
ity constitute the only valid claims to pub
lic employment; that tho offices of tho
government ceaso to bo a matter of arbl
trary favoritism and patronago, and that
public station becomo again tho post of
honor. TO THIS END IT IS IMPER
ATIVELY REQUIRED THAT NO
PRESIDENT SHALL BECOME A
CANDIDATE FOR RE-ELECTION.
TAKIFF QUESTION HIIOVED ABIDE,
7. Wo demand a system of federal tax
ation which shall not unnecessarily inter
fere with tho industry of tho pcoplo, and
which shall provide tho means necessary
to pay too oxponses or tno government,
economically administered tho pensions,
the interest on tho public debt and a mod
erate annual reduction or toe principal
tnereoi, anu recognize mat more are in
our midst honest but Irreconcilable dif
foroncus of opinion with regard to tho re
spective systems of protection and freo
trade. WE REMIT THE DISCUS
SION OF TIIKM TO THE PEOPLE
IN THEIR CONGRESSIONAL DIS
TRIOTH, AND THE DECISION OF
CONGRESS THEREON, WHOLLY
-., t fn l' v I'Mlimiii n
JSNOE AND DICTATION.
He REPUDIATION.
8. The public credit must bo sacredly
maintained, and wo DENOUNCE RE
PUDIATION in every form and guise.
KIMU OP TUB TBUE METAL.
0. A SPEEDY RETURN TO
SPECIE PAYMENTS is demanded
alike by tho highest considerations of com.
morclaf morality and honest government
A WOM roa THE) MOLBIEB BOTB.
10. Wo remember with grattyudo tho
sacrifices of the soldiers and sailors of tho
republic, and no act of ours shall over
detract from their justly earned fame, or
tue run rewards oi tnoir patriotism.
A VAUNT, LAND BOBBEJU I
11. W are opposed to all further grants
of land to railroads or other corporations.
TH PUBLIC DOMAIN SHOULD BE
HELD HACKED TO ACTUAL SET
TLKKS. umu roBBitiir roucr.
12. We bold that it is the duty of tho
governmeot In its intercourse: with foreign
stations to cultivate friendships of peace
by treating with al) on fair and equal
tanas, regarding it alike dishonorable
titer to demand what Is not right or sub-
tiMJromt..t,
K "EVBMYBOBY IBVITED."
f'?tVl..l,r the promotion and success of
iJSnMipieS, AM IB a WBffTt Oi
s nominated ny tois conven
lia and oordlallv welcome the
flM ftttMeTOMmt. with-
previous poiivicai amua-.iva i
Tiuk New York Evening Post says
Greeloy's letter of acceptance is a cunning
letter. It is more. It is the letter of a
big-minded man and a statesman.
Tna Williamson county 1 Progress' is
the most troubled of all tho much troubled
Grant papors Of Illinois, It scorns to tako
to heart tho fact that tho Democrats have
determined to support II. Grooley, and
is now tearine its hair in treat rage. We
should like to adminlstor to it a soothing
'potion. It must be soothed soon, or it
will yiold up the ghost.
Thk 'Sua' threatens us with Linegar
The 'Sun' oucht not to do so. Such a raw
head and bloody bones is enough to frigh
ten anybody. Wo havo ono hopo of cs
capo from David's vonomous shaft and that
is tho fact, that ho must ask Mr. Munn if
he may go for us beforo be will dare, and
as Munn is anxious to reserve us for his
own meat, wo shall likely not suffer from
Lincgar's assaults.
Our neighbor of tho 'Sun ' says wo deny
tho soft impeachmont that wo aro a Lib
oral Bopubllcan. Do wo? Then wo re
tract. Wo arc, whon wo come to think of
it. Or If not, we are educating ourselves
up to that point with tho most romarkablo
rapidity. Wo fool it in our bonos, and see
it, like Roche's rat, floating in tbo nir, nnd
if wo do not nipit inj tho bud call us a
Grant man. Are wo, nolghbor of the
'Sun,' understood?
Judok Brink iKiiorf, the distinguished
frootrado advocate of Ohio, has rocovered
from bis disgust occasioned by the action
of tho Cincinnati convention, and has
written n letter in which ho says, 11 Wo
'havo much to gain and nothing to lose
' by supporting Mr. Greeloy as against
' General Grant. I am'.hungry enough to
'profor tho t half loaf 'of reform which
' Mr. Greeloy can surely give through the
'present campaign, rather than to wait for
' tho whole loaf which floats liko a will-o'-'the-wisp
in the uncertain possibilities of
'tho future"
Vooruxxs, in his Terre Hauto speech.do-
clarcd his belief that tho Baltimore conven
tion would nominate a Democrat, " but,"
ho added, "if it should happon otherwise,
' and I should bo laid away in my politl
' ical grave along sldo of the dear old party
for whom I havo fought a hundred bat-
' ties, and never ono against her, all I atk
'of you, my constituents, whom I have
known and loved so long, is to write on
'my tombstone: 'Ho fought tho fight
' and kept the faith.' " Pathetic cuss, you
shall bo obeyed, if wo havo power to move
the flinty hearts of your constituents.
Jcrrt Black, of Pennsylvania, the
distinguished iawyor and rather weak
brother in a) political way, wishes tho
Greeloy mon to understand that, " we, the
people, the rank and illo, the yeomanry
of the country, cannot bo driven to tho
' polls as negroes aro driven in tho South
by tho carpet-baggers and scalawags.1'
Who authorized Mr. Black to speak for
tho peoplo? He is somewhat insolent
Mon liko Jerry Black tho ablo mon of
tho Democratic party, but with a personal
motivo in every movomont thoy havo over
made, havo, for many years, driven tho
Democatic masses to tho polls and into do
feat ; and now, if tho signs of tho times
speak trnly, tho Democratic masses pro
poso to bo obeyed by their leadors or elso
light with them. Thoy aro for Grcoloy
and cannot bo drivon to tho polls to vote
for anybody olio.
the control of the government, and retain
it. old roeyism won't do in this utilita
rian age of rapid development ; old con
servative men are toe cautious, too timid,
too slow. Thay tnav do well cnouch as
b reeks cheeks mti too rapid movements
but we touit'loek to the tounir men of
the coMtry, of.tAe right kind and stamp,
tor redemption. Let us put mom inironi,
and encourage them to lead In ovorythlnir
upon Amorlcan ideas that will develop all
of our great resources, physically, morally
and Intolloctually, In this wide-spread
country."
KOERNER AND PALMER.
"Mack," the Washington correspondent
of tho Missouri 'Democrat,' undor date
May 24, writes as follows:
In Illinois, the liberal republicans pro
poso to nominato ex-Governor Koorncr
against General Oglesby, with tho expecta
tion that he will carry the Gorman nnd
democratic vote, and help to givo tho stnto
to Greeley. If Koornor Is a Greeley man,
ho has changed his opinions slnco tho 4th
of May, for on that evening he was swear
iiiK by tbo Jumping Johosaphat that ho
would never voto for tho old scoundrol.
no was tho bitterest of all tho prominent
Germans who denounced tho Cundurango
tickot. Poor Palmer is to be left oul in
tho cold ontiroly, with nothing but uo
slim promise of an office from Greeloy.
Tbe attempt mado in this paragraph to
throw suspicion upon tho dovotlon of Gov
ernor Koorncr to tho Liboral cause, can
havo no effect In faco of tho woll-known
fact that ho has publicly dcclarod his in
tention to support Greeloy nnd Brown.
At tbo Liboral conferonco In Springfield
last week, Mr. Koorncr said that tho nom
inations at Cincinnati had been fairly
made, and that, although ho would havo
preferred another man, he, could support
Mr. Groeloy with enthusiasm and zeal.
He is tho favorite of many Liberals and
Democrats for Governor, nnd would re
ceive tho hearty support of Gov. Palmer
for that position.
Wo know this to be a fact. At tho con
feronco, a Democrat had said ho had no
doubt tho Democrats of Illinois would
cheerfully voto for olthor Palmer, Trum
bull or Koornor. Gov. Palmer, fol
lowing this gentioman, said tho Liberals
and Domocrats should select as their nom
inees for Stato offices -tho 'bost men, and
for Governor a man ,who would uphold
the dignity and defend tho indopendenco
of the Stato, "and," said ho, pointing to
wards Govornor Koernor, " thoro is tho
right man for the place." Tho npplauso
which followed, was a compliment to Gov
ernor Koornor of tho most flattering kind.
When Gov. Palmer had concludod his
remarks, Gov. Koerner said thero wcro
many reasons which would constrain him
to refuso to consent to bo a candidate for
tho offtco of governor, tho" insupcrablo
ones being privato, but that ho would not
fail to glvo all the aid be could to whoever
reform and progress.
Both Govornor Palmer and Governor
Koernor have acted in tho most unselfish
manner, and neither will be left out in tho
cold by tbe ''friends of tho Liberal cause.
Thoy aro of the plonoers, nnd .tho pooplo
will not fail to reward them both with
confidence and honors.
ocratlo papers favorable to tho nomination
of Greeley by tho Baltimore convention,
"tho rural Democratic Journalists hob
domadals," " a swoet scentod lot," "auxl
' llary organs of Grant," olo. Uo has, also,
assailed and abused all Democrats
who do not-agroo with him; and now ho
complacently says: "You Greeloy Demo
' crats are striving to porpcluato discord
'and division In tho Dcmocrotlo party.'".
Horowohavo tho stubborn Juror abusing
hfc eloven follows for stubbornncss-tlio
plug-ugly denouncing his victim, on whoso
noso ho has just laid his fist, as a quarrel
some wrotch-tho bull In tho chlnn-sliop
protesting that the crockorywaro should
not bo shattered Into plocos tho garrolor
shouting his doslro to bo lot nlono by tho
ho Is threllling-tjio thief crying,
"Stop thief I" tho iittlo Johnny Horner
of pcaco sitting Innocently in tho corner
meekly eating humblo pio tho black-bottomed
pot calling tho cloan-bottomod hot
tie black, etc. Why, this man is ns impu
dent as ho is ovorboarlng nnd insulting I
Peaco with him must bo purchased at too
high a price
STOREY ON MARSHALL.
THE congressman's lkttkr words of
CIIKKK KATIIIR BINSIBLK WORDS FROM
MR. 8T0RIY.
iPrum the Chicago Timoj, 2Sth May.
Tho lion. S. S. Marshall bus writton a
cool, calm, and timely letter to tho Demo
cratic nowspupcr in Cairo, which in its
mistaken and loolish zeal on behalf of tho
CUappaqua philosopher, had grossly mis
renresented Judeo Murshall, and, directly
or indirectly, overy otlior Illinois Demo
crat who advocated tho nomination or
J iid go Davis to tho Presidency us a lle
nublican who would do what tho Chunpa-
quu saga has utterly fulled to do, namoly,
unito upon himself tho ontiro opposition
to Grant, and therefore defeat tho candi
date of corruption in tho presidential contest.
Judco Marshall's cxplunntion is in
tended only ns a porsonal ono ; yctn ox
plaining tno reasons' and motives of nil
other domocrats who expressed an earnest
desiro for his nomination by tho pathur
imr of republicans at Cincinnati. Never
theless, that tho auxiliary orguns of Grant
tho inconsidorato journals that aro
championing a republican candidate
whoso olociion ot urani is an utter impos
sibility will conllnuoto misrepresent tho
reasons anu motives ot uomocrais wuo are
compelled to differ from them, Is very
probable.
juugo Jiannau says :
"I do not know of any movomont on
foot to bring Judco Davis beforo tho Bal
timore convention. I hopo that no such
Siurposo now oxists, and fool confident thut
ludgo Davis himself would not permit."
This ought to put an end to tho misrep
resentations by the papers that are labor
ing (under a wmte-coat ueiusion; lor
Grant, in that rospect at least.
Judco JIarshall utters somo worus oi
excellent counsel to those democrats who
deludo themselves with tho thought that
it is possible to beat Grant by dividing
and dispersing, instead of uniting and
ftnnpAntriitlnr.- thei nnnoiltlon to him. He
igbt bo selected to bear tbe standard of tayg .
"Thero nover wasaumo wncn a spirit
of harmony, conciliation nnd forbearanco
was more needed than now. it wouiu uo
criminal in us to wasto our strength in a
time liko this by worse than useless con
tentions among ourselves. It is impossi
ble that wo should all seo thing ns our
neighbors seo them, but let us determine to
net together, let our difference be what they
mat, for in Tins is oim only hatkiy.
If Uia our destiny to go as allies to tbo
liberal republicans, let us not yoas a dis
banded, demoralized rabble, rendered 'm-
potent by our own dissensions ; but rather
as an organized and disciplined army oj
freemen."
Tho 'Times desires to comrnond theso
words of wisdom, from ono of tho most
considerato, prudent, and enrnost demo
crats in tho west, to the thoughtful con
sideration of all thoso who aro laboring tor
tho election of Mr. Grant, by striving to
perpotuato discord and division, instead of
to restore unity and harmony in tno aem
ocrattc party.
MB. STOREY ON MR. MARSHALL'S
LETTER.
KERR AND HENDRICKS.
Kerr, of Indiana, is almost as foolish as
Voorbees of the samo State. Hendricks,
too, wo suspoct. Thcso ambitious mon!
who desiro to climb into place, aro slip
pery men, not to bo much rolled upon;
but, in somo way, wo havo acquired" a hopo
that Hendricks is all right on this question
of Greeloy. Uo is a man of more than or
dinary ability a statesman who has tho
ability to forecast tho futuro; bo was In
advance of Mr. Vallandlghara in pro
nouncing for tho now doparturo, which
was tho seed that has grown Into tho treo
of Grooloylsm, and It cannot bo possiblo
can hardly be possiblo at all cvontsi
that ho should now, in tho moment whon
tbe treo of his own planting is about to
bear fruit that will bo wholesome, take
the ax and striko at Its root. Wo
would be, wo admit, somewhat
astonished if Hendricks, whoso ability we
admire, should turn his back on Cincin
nati ; and yet bis ominous silence loads us
to suspect that"1 be is either Voorhocs'
backer or that he Is baiting betwist two
opinions.
In anothor placo in The Bulletin wo
publish the comments of Mr. Storey, who
is tho Chicago 'Times,' upon tho lottor of
Mr. Marshall to tho editor of this papor.
Tue Bulletin has not, as Mr. Storey
charges, misrepresented tho Democrats who
desired the nomination of Judgo Davis by
tho Cincinnati convention. Wo believe
the majority of those Domocrats desired
Judgo Davis' nomination becauso they
mistakenly thought ho would bo tho
strongest man that could bo put In tho
field against Grant, but wo know that Mr.
Storey's advocacy of tho Judgo was for
personal reasons. To this wo had no ob
jection, but when that gentleman,
go rod becauso he could not dictate to tbo
Llborals, turned upon thorn maliciously,
and, after declaring the Democratic party
dead after having drivon tho party in
Illinois into support of tho Liberal move
ment raised his voice in shameful donun
elation of all Democrats who would not
follow him nnd his Iittlo cotorio of mal
contonts into opposition to Groeloy and
Brown, wo concludod that it was high
timo to unito with others in a determined
offort to allow tho musses of tho Domoc
racy to havo their own way in this matter
in desplto of Storey, Bolmont, Voorhocs,
and politicians of their class, who aro for
nothing that will not result to own tholr
porsonal advantage, and aro opposed to
ovorytblng out of which thoy cannot
squeoze money.
Mr. Storey quotes Mr. Marshall's wiso
words concerning tho cultivation of
spirit of harmony in tho Democratic par-
A SAD STORY.
THE SLANDER ON EX-PRESIDENT
JOHNSON AND MRS. HAROLD
HOW IT STARTED AND ITS TERRI
RLE RESULTS.
A SHOCKING TRAGEDY.
Ex-Govbrnor Beriao Maooffin, of
Kentucky, has written a letter strongly in
dorsing tbe liberal platform and nominees.
He concludes bis letter with the follow
ing: "I have another reason I forgot to men
tion: Greeley and Brown have been at
tbe head of every progessive movement
We were once tbe party of progress, and
gathered strength every hour. Let us re
cover thut position, if we expect to get
ty, and calls them "words of excellent
'counsel," and 'commends them to "tho
thoughtful consldoration of all thoso who
' aro laboring for tho election of Mr. Grant
1 by striving to perpetuate discord and di
1 vision, instead of to restore unity and
'harmony in tho Democratic party."
Thon, Mr. Storey commends tho words
of Mr, Marshall to himself. Beforo the
meeting of the Cincinnati convention overy j
editor who uttorod a word against tho pas
sivo policy was denounced by Mr. Storey
as a Bourbon and a fool, and slnco the
convention adjourned his paper has boen
full of the most insulting references to
every Democratic, papor that bas dared to
ssy one word in favor of tbe nominees of
that conrontion. Take tho issue of bis pa
per in which tbo language above quoted
appears, and ire find that hi calls the Dim
Prom the KnoiTille Chronicle (Radical), Wlh.l
About tbe last of April the detailed cir
cumstances or a groat scandal, based on oc
currences said to havo taken placo in
ureonevllle, reached tho 'Chronicle' re
porter, and undor circumstances that indi
catcd that thoy had at least soma foundu
tlon. Desiring to act with proper caro
and judgment beforo giving the rumors
publicity, wo telegraphed to responsible
citizens of Grecnovillu, asking us to tho
truth of tho stories. They promptly an
swered by telegraph thut tho chargos were
fciso. Subsuouantl v tho etorv reuehed u
again with full circumstances, and in or
der to ascertain tho real truth, ono of tho
editors or tho '(Jhronicio wont to ureono-
villo to mako an investigation of the case
the false rumors.
As tho names of tho parties and the
charges in nn exaggerated form havo boen
made public, wo proposo now to givo tho
result of our investigation. Tho card
published in yesterday's Chronicle camo
to us too lata on Thursday night to onablo
us to sond this stulomont forth with it, as
we should havo dono had tho parties In
torcstod In Greenville sent us a copy of tho
card roforred to, In proper timo.
Tho story originally startod was that
Mrs. Harold aiid ex-president Johnson
had had impropor intorcouiso with each
other for somo timo. Tho story ran that
thoso meetings took placo in Mr. John
son's library, which is next uoor to dir.
Harold s liouso, and that tho liason was
discovered by Mr. H. mooting his wife Into
at night coming from tho library with n
blanket shawl ovor her hood, Tho story
run that Air. uaroid had suspoeteu mo in
timacy, and on tho night referred to had
wutchod his wife and caught her on tho
atroet disguised as referred to. Ho was
said to havo halted her, asked her who sbo
was, pulled tbo shawll from her faco, but
that shu bad avoided him and gono around
behind tho house hoping to enter by tho
back door unobservod. Her husband, how
over, anticipated her, went to tbe back
door, and thore found his suspicions con
firmed. Tlio.reiwrt was that they had
hlghwords, and that their quarrel had
been ovorhcard. This was substantially
tho story as it originally came out in
Greonovtilo. Wo may bo miitukon as to
some of the details, but we have given tbo
main facts as wo hoard them. The state
ments woro fii! to in every respect.'
UOW TUB REAL TROUBLE UBOAN.
But the facts that brought about tho
suicide aro substantially as followB:
On ono of tho last Sundays of April,
somo mlschiof-breoder droppod an anony
mous nolo to Mr. Harold, through the
postofllce, intimating to him that nn.im
passer, intimacy existed betwoon bis -Wlfu
aU Mr. Johnson. , Mr. Harold and Mr.
Johnson had been personal and. warm
ftlonds for thirty- years. 'Their- families
hud been intimate for most of that'poriod.
Mr. Harold had lived happily with his
wjfo for nearly forty years. Sno had bis
ontiro confidence nnd deep lovo. For
thirty yoars sho had been an active, ex
emplary nnd most consistent momber of
tho Presbyterian church. As soon as ho
road tho letter ho went promptly to hor,
showed it to hor and assured hor he did
not boliovn n word of it. Mrs. Harold
road tho letter, and was so indignant that
shu could hardly rcstrulti herself. At ono
timo in tho evening sho was found almost
crazy with excitement, with a gun in hor
hand, and declaring she intonded to shoot
hor traduccrs. So excited did alio
becomo that sho almost lost
her reason. She repoatedly assured
hor husband of hor innocence. But tho
idle Gossips who infest Grconovillo and
other places took up tho scandal nnd
talked about it constantly. In a hundred
dilfuront. ways was It presontod. So
positively was it assorted, that somo few,
nlway) ready to bollevo ill of tholr betters,
boliovcd it. Mrs. Harold seemed borno
down by these repetitions of tbo scardal.
A bout .ill is timo her only son, a lieutenant
in tho United States army, a young man
of high character and excellent trails, camo
homo on leave of absence It was thought
bost to keep him ignorant of tho slander,
ns it wbuldonly mako his visit unhappy.
A fow days after his return, word came to
Mrs. Unrold that her mother was danger
ously ill. It was determined that Mrs.
Uaroid should go to tho sick bed in
Rhea county, rather than her sistor living
with hor, ns tho visit would take her from
tho scandal and glvo hor rest. Her son
accompanied hor.
TUB SUICIDE.
Thoy roach od the mothor's honsn after a
short trip, during which Mrs. Harold
seemed very despondont. But hor son,
still ignorant of tho slander, attributed
this to his mothers condition.
Whon thoy reached Mrs. Helskoll's flier
mother's nntno) sho was found to bo somo
belter. On tho second morning after reach
ing thero, Mrs. Harold rose carlior than
usual, went to lier mothor's room to uttend
to hcr, and then was seen to tako from hor
son's satchol his small pistol, llnr mother
supposed sho was getting it for him. Tak
ing tho pislvl, Mrs. Harold went out somo
distance from tho homo into a thicket.
and thero shot herself through tho left
breast, and through tho heart. Threo
shots woro heard, tho alarm was given, and
soon after she was found in n dying condi
tion. It was sunnosod tho first shot was
fatal, ns it set flru to her clothing, which
wcro burning when found. Sho was car
ried to tho house, but died beforo sho
reached it, never uttering a word. Hor
remains were takon homo for intormcnt.
.Tho suicido, following so cloo tho other
excitement, throw Air. Harold, an invalid,
into a dangerous tatc, from which ho is
hardly yet rccovcrod.
WHAT IS THOUailT OF IT.
Mr. Harold, who is a quiet man of few
words, fears now that, though he assured
hermoro than onco of bis confidence in
her, sho had somo fours thut ho and others
did not entirely bollevo her innocent, and
that it weighed so heavily on her ns to
unbalance hor mind. lfur son novor
heard of tho causo of' bis mother's taking
her life until tho Rov. S. V. McCorklo at
her funeral sormon very justly and prop
erly referred in severe languugo to the
terrible lesson tho ovent afforded the idle
slanderers who bad brought about tho
trouble
We found all of the good citizens of
Grecnovillo, irrespective of religion or
politics, denouncing the slander as falso.
ilr. Johnson declared the lady never had
boon in his library. He said sho had been
a friend of Mrs. Johnson for half a life
time, but that ho had not spoken to her
for a woek beforo or at tho timo of tho al
legod visit to his library.
A citizen oi Ureeneville, esteemed lor
his veracity, showed us a pair of pants
Mrs. Harold hud made about tho timo
of tho scandal. She had mado them for
a tailor who occupies Johnson's old shop
next door to tno norary, and soconu irom
Mrs. Harolds. It had been necessary
whilo making these for Mrs Harold to go
several times to tho shop, and thus passing
back and forth by Johnson s library, Is
supposed to havo been used as somo foun
dation lor tno story.
As said before, Mrs. Harold was an ex
emplury christian woman of high charac
tor, universally esteemed lor many noblo
qualities, ardently attached to hor husband
and children, and n lady of great onergy
and warm heart. Sho was literally broken
down by these falso scandals, and in nn
hour or montai derangement, wiin a burn
ing consciousness ot innoennco, and with
out power to rosist tho temptation, she
took her lifo. Tho familvliavo tho doon
ost sympathy of ull tho good pooplo of
ureeuoviuc, anu vno sautiuciion ot know
ing that no one who knows them or whoso
good opinion thoy care for boliovcs tho
scandal.
The author of tho slanders, wo under
stand, has fled. If over found ho and
thoso who have encouraged and aided him
snoiiiu bu punisuou.
Wo navo luus given tho slander and
the facts to tho end thnt the storv miL'ht
bo arrested. A goncral. denial ought to bo'
enough, but a denial in detail, and circum
stances rofutlng tho slanders, can do no
harm. These aro our motives for again
reierring to tno unioriunaio auuir.
THE LAST LAY OP USELESS BEFORE
HE WAS LAID OUT HY II. U.
. AND THE PEOPLE.
Ala-" rut Me In My Little Bed."
O, totttrt,-1 am tired aovr ', !
I ilo.nol cure to linnr Ton stag t
Ynn've anR your nirelentiwoRi all clay.
Bo Mil your lirad brneitth yoiirwlnj.
ion anna no for Orceley ton,
llecnuto you love (tin winning ntdol
What then ulitd l.'poor Unelria do
Whom nil men Imle, or olio ilrthlof
Choreic Come, Forney, come,
Kim mo good nlKhl,
Id Brier 1 imngliiy Inw.hrnwod liCAdl
My friend liar h it lor ChsiiUMiin;
1'utOrmily in his Utile bud I
Tho 1 8un Hint ahtncn for nil true men,
llmtiu mild beam to IipI nn me ;
11 cnrni my stn.l, nnd hull-pups ten,
Jim Buuiua mn uhiibu i iovoh npreo.
I wish I now ni nt l.onir, llrnnrh,
In Muriihy's votlAKo by the fen,
I must Rinoe thn Whltn liouso n
Un!e 1 ht-nd on Horace (I,
uomx, homer, roine,
Kin me j;ood ulght, fcc.
ranch,
Oh I Jot a Iwppy thoiiuht for onco
Hoothox llil dull hem I nnd boiom sore,
Html far Ito Worhtttl Whnt dunce,
I did not think of him before.
I want noma Deinocrntle touW
To clamor lor n ticket straight.
To tnnke their parly hlantoii fool,
And help me run my C'cnch t 'stale.
Come, Forney, cotnu,
Kli mn good nltht,
Then gu mid leave mn with the dead,
My friend re bound for Chipinnua,
Ho nut tn in mv little bit.
New Uavkn, Conn., May 31, Qui vis,
A HYMN THAT WAS NOT SUNG AT
THE DAN VOOUHEES SPEAKING,
fFrom the Chicago InlerOce an, Ornnt organ.
wirni Hreelny tn take tho place of Mrant.-
Oiod (iod! I the country daltf
Hate they awa!loed the "ogi of Clitppanua'i
cam,
And eintarked In that trf.flhrnit
Hea putty good at the pen, tney nay,
Hut h' traitor to me and you ;
lie pindered In rehla that wore the grar,
Aud went back on the "kiWa In l.lna '
Then after the war wuz over,
Aim wo TiMiquiinpti mi, iai or our loci,
And drove ell Jen from hit cavor,
lt!g(Hl upln hit grandmother' clothes,
lie went the hall of the blank-hearted acamp,
And Dated hi neck from the ropn,
Aud homto'l deed in the Ku-Kliu ramp.
Till they railed Mm 'the Houthernera'hope."
Pnrlmpi ho I: hut darn my clolhea,
If hu ever gel my role,
It'll be when ileum ha rocked hi to,
Ana stillcned hi trultorou tnroat.
UNSEEN,
At the spring of an arch in the ereit north tower,
High upon the wall, I mi angct'a head,
And beneath it I rnrven a-lily flower,
will) ueiicate wing ni trie aloe outtpreau.
Thir nay that tho sculptor wrought from the lace
ui 111a younrx loit lore, 01 in promi-el bride,
And when he hvl milled the lot aad grace
to inu :taiurea, rie uroppeu nia clilal anil ille.l.
And tho worshipper throng the nhrine Ulow.
Anu iu iigiii'teera come wiin tneir curious
eve.
Hut deep In tho shadow, where none may kiraV
nn u?miiy, me gem ui 111a earring lies.
Vet at early morn on a mldaummrr'n day.
When tho un la far tu tho nor'h. for the tnace
Ofn few ahort mlnutei, them Ulan rat
irirougii an nuuxrpane uinn aiiger lace.
it wan wrought for the eye nldoil.nnd it eem
inai lie bieaae tie work 01 trie ileail inau'a
hand
Willi, a ray ot the golden light I ha: atream
ud 1110 ion inn aro lounu in tne uratnieaa lanu.
A. J. C. Lotion Smctnttr.
Tho
, Hu
mis
TUB TEURK 1IAUTK OltATIO.V.
(From the Indlanapolia Sentinel.
Mr. VoorhccB was disappointed.
manner of his speech botoknned that
saw at a glance that bo had mado a
take, that tho peoplo were not with him ; nor
could he by tno witchery of his eloquonce
or any or tho arts ot oratory stir them to
applause, ills splendid appeal to tho
working classes mad 9 no lmprcudon. Tho
tub thrown to tho German wbalo failed to
reach its mark, and in all that vast district
oxtcndlng and stretching "two hundred
miles " away answered not a word of ap
proval to 'his eloquent appeals. And
why? Tho solution is plain. It was evi
dent that ho fell It, and wo aro inclined to
think ho will retraco his steps at tho
proper time. In his speech, Mr. Voor
hocs said ho had no favorito candidate to
presont for tho presidency, but that ho
would labor on until tho 'Jth of July to
defeat Mr. Orceley, but he was caroful not
to say ho would not support him It nomi
nated ut Baltimore, but thut if nominated,
ho would simply "wrap tho drapory fo
his couch about him and tin down to
pleasant droams." Goodbye, Daniel.
eit BIN BEAT.
CAIKO CITY BOOK BINDERY
Jonw it; OMCHLY
raoraiiTOts,
Bulletin Building, corner of 12th
street and Washington avenue,
Cairo, Illlinos.
All kind i of binding nnd Ruling dona at the
IVUlL Mr''l'el, who dm hod maoy ,,,
experience) In ona ofl! lllndcrlMof tft. rj,ul"
to uperlntend tnl oiablthment, we eatTeoit!
'''""'""ourpatronawork equal lo tbat
of aar lllndery In tbe west. '
IBSJN WORKS,
l'lIIliADItLPHIA
ORNAMENTAL IRON WORKS I
KOllKKTWOOU, J TH09.B.ROOT.
KOUEUT WOOD CO.
1,130 Illdge Avenue, PhlUdelp'iia, p.,
-FOUNTAINS- FLOATING SWANrJ
VASES FR0I8
STATU ART -WATF.Il LILIE3-
-IJUCKH- -TURTLES, Ac-
Kor Decorating Fountains.
VEItANDAIIH,SUMKn UOIMKa.
UtHOIW, CIIA1IW, HETTJ2EH, Jus., te.
NEW HTYI.E WKOUOIIT.1RON RAlLINfl hr
Front of lloute and Cemeterlon. Never before
KAIMNG9 for
Introduced
uast AND WHOUmiT-IRON
I - - -- - , . -------- BVfl S4S41VJ IU
"I'll" llulldlnga nnd (juuarea, Cemetery Lot.
Hinl Uanleu Kenuea, Halconlce, Roof Cresting! I
clo in great variuty or Pattern.
IKON HTAlltrt, rtplral and atralght, of yarloua
Pattern and ntylei, Hpeclal attention given thla
clai of work.
LAM1' I'CMTH, for Front of PuMlo Buildings,
IloteU, and City Htrveta, el Plain and Elaborate
Deiigna,
8 1 AIILK FITTING-), of Cal and WreueM-Iron.
2f f?1: 'mprored Htyle. uch a Hay Rack,
Nlall Divialon, Mangers, llarneia Urackot. Gut
ter". Trap. Ventilatory, itc.
WIKB WORK of every description.- Win
Ouarda of Crimped Wlre.Ualvaniied or I'alntedX
In Plain or Ornamental Fatten), for Htore DocrtaV
or Window, factory nnd Warehouse Wlndow7
Ita ling for Omcea, Hank, Couuter lulling,
llalconlee, Lawn ami Farm Pence, e., Ac.
OA VKH tot entrance to Cemeteries. Publlo
Hnuare and Gentlemen' Country Beat, of )a
Tubing or Wronghl-lron, both alngle and double.
In elaborate ani aimple deaigna.
DKINKINO KOU.n'tAINH, tor atreet ue. A
very lario aaortment of design exprersly for
till plltlioje.
CAHT-lKON URINAL I10XE3, for public parks
aiidcllv atreoia.
OVAL VAHEri, lateat atyles, centennial pattern.
IUTCIII.NO I'JiTtS, Jockey, Coolie, Uarabo and
plain Ucaign.
RKAI. KMT ATE AUEJVCY.
C. WINSTON & CO.,
REAL ESTATE AGENTS
ana
AUCTIONEERS,
74 (SKCO.fD FLOOR) OHIO LXYXX,
CAIRO, ILLH
Bur and Sell Real Estate,
PAY EAXES,
FUKNISU ABSTRACTS OP TIELE
And pcepare Conveyance of Kinds!
MllCELLABfEOUN.
Kemarkaiu.k Scene. A remarkablo
sceno occurred In the Ilritish liouso of
Lords two or thrco weeks ago. In tho
Ilritish Parliament, a member of tho House
of Commons who becomes bankrupt
thereby loses his eottt if ho does not pay up
within a twelvemonth: and n bankrupt
peer is utterly disqunliflod from sitting,
votinir, or spcaKinc in too liouso oi iorus.
Oh dischargi'ip; his indebtedness, however,
a bankrupt peer becomes rehabilitated.
Theso provisions are of recent introduc
tion. Formerly, Parliament was a favor
ite refugo for impecunious aristocrats who
wished lo avoid tho unpleasant attentions
of the bnlllHs. A victim to tho now rules
of tho liouso of Lords, Do Maulay, who
had been compelled to vacuto his seat,
having paid his creditors, und produced a
cortitlcato from tho Court of Bankruptcy
to that effect, on motion of tho ird Chan
cellor, has bcon reinstated in Ills privilege
us a peor, with all tho formalities duo to so
important un ovent. This was tho Urst
occurrence of such a scene in that body.
SALES l'Elt DAY AT STEWART'S,
Mil. HTF.WAItT'H EARLY IIKI'UO.VANCK TO
1IUHINKHS HIS EMPLOYED.
From theHnratoglan.l
Speaking of his adaptability for business.
tho groat morchant prlnco said that for
many years ho had tho utmost distasto for
business, so much so that ho disliked the
task oven of purchasing articles for his
own personal uso; thut hohatod to go and
buy a pair of gloves. Thut Mr. Stewart
has managed to overcome this ropugnanco
to trado was exhibited In tho statement, in
reply to a question, that ho now omplovcd
twenty-flvo hundred persons, had crossod
tho ocean thlrty-flvo tlmos, and had sold
upward of $70,000 worth of goods at retail
in ono day. Mr. Stewart statod that his
ambition was to mako tho sales at his up
town storo reach ? 100.000 per day, lie
keens busy about Uvo hundred nortors
and has dollvered from his retail Btoro as
many ns iivu thousand packagos in one
day. At this establishment ho has eleven
hundred employes. Mr. Stowart appears
to carry tho responsibility of his onormous
business with porfect ease, comprehend
ing much of its vast details und mlnutim
in a most remarkablo manner. Uo is a
hearty, well-prosorvod man of about
soventy years, and looks as though ho
might onloy tho blessings of Hfo for a
good many seasons yet to como.
Si'XAXiNO of Miss Nolllo Grant's intro
duction to Quoon Victoria, tho London
1 Times ' says that " tho lady of highest
placo in Ainorica has thus commenced
her acquaintance with Eugland and tho
English." Tho young ladles of our nation
who havo not tho good fortuno to bo re
lated to the Administration must learn to
rospect tho lino of distinction thus marked
out by the London 'Times', whoso pro
prietor, by, tbo way, has reooptly boon
elovated to tho poorago and must thoreforo
bo rognrded us good authority on questions
otnnk.-N.r.Sun. '
Hot in tbe knowledge of things without,
but In the'perfocttdn of the soul within,
lies the true empire of man. Jiulwtr.
liolow is a puzzle which wo clipped from
a nowspapcr several years airo. but to which
wo navo novor yet discovered n solution.
remaps somo ot our imrenlous rcadors
can solve It:
"There is a placo on tho surfiico of the
onrth, where, if two mon moot, ono shall
Und it so hot that ho will Immediately
throw off his clothes; and tho other shall
And it so cold that hu will immediately
put on thoso which tho other bus thrown
oil. What is the placo.
THE "KING OF SMOKERS."
A HOLLAND HUTOI1MAN HMOKKR HIMSELF
TO DEATH HI8 UNTIMELY END XT THK
AQK OF NINETY-EIGHT.
Not long slnco nn individual died at
Kotturdam, In Holland, who was known
as tho "King of Smokers." This person
by namo Van Junes, was perhaps tho
groatostuoordrinkornnd smoker on record
lie possessed un immense fortune, acquired
in tho manufucturo ot linon, and ho
roslded near Kottordam in a magnificent
palnco which ho built of tho profits of his
muiiuiuciuriug pursuits, this palace con
talncd n curious collection, which all
strnngors of distinction passing through
iiouuruiiiu, uinuu ii n point or visiting
In this museum wcro collected accord,
Ing to nationality and their chronological
order all tho models of pipes, tho heads
of carlcaturos of mon, animals, flowers,
vogotablcs, nnd ovory other possiblo hVuro
known to tho plpo-makors. Tho excellent
Van Klaos had passod his lifo and snen
fabulous sums making this curious collec
tlon. Among the provisions of bis will
f woie somo curioui directions, which showi
how truly his ruling passion minifested
itself in death. Ho left instructions that
all tho smokors of tbo country should b-i
invited to his funoral, whoro pipes and
tobacco should bo presontod to them.
which thoy woro to smoke on tho way to
tho cemotery. Ho further requested that
aiior tno sorviccs eacn smoKor snouiu uo
posit tho nshes of his moo tinnn his coflln
Other equally eccentric instructions woro
loft in regard to his burial, one of which
win that thn Intiirlne nf hi coffin Should
be lined with tho pieces of his old Havana
cigar boxes. Thia singular aovu
boor and tobacco died at tho age of ninety
eight iycars.
WILLIAM EIILERS,
FaahloaabU
SOOT AND SHOE MAKER,
TWENTIETH BTRKCT,
netween Washington avenue and.PopUr atr
CAIRO, ILL. "
NEW YORK STORE,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
LARGEST VARIETY STOCK IN THE CITY
GOODS SOLD VERY CLOSE.
Corner of Nineteenth afreet austl Com
mercial A venae,
-30tl.
CAIRO, ILLINOIS.
CO. PATIER.
3
P
53
PHIL SAUP,
(SuccetMir to P. Bsap.)
WHOLESALE & RETAIL
istia ir
CONFECTIONS.
FIRE WORKS, TOYS,
FLAGS, ETC.
102 Commercial Avenue.
CAIRO, ILLINOIS.
FURNITURE SALE.
I will sell at Public Auction, to the hlhet
bidder, FOR CASH, without rttt'Jf, at
the Factor'' DulIdiuK of
EICIIOFF & BROS.,
On Washington Avenue, In the City ef Cairo,
Illinois, cotnmencinK on
Tuesday, May 28th, 1872,
At 10 o'clock A. M., and continuing from day to
day until all the property la sold; A large lot
of r inlslied and Unfinished
&TJtt 1ST 1 0? TT IR EI ,
Such as nedstcod. Kitchen Bafet, Wardrobes,
lAUnsea, waanblanaa.-iatuea, unaira, uurcauj,
Mattraaaei, Ao, Also about 60,000 feet or
WALNUT AND OTHER LUMBER,
Dressed and Undressed. A Urge lot of Hard
ware 0!as. Putty, Varnlhe, Window Boeh,
Ulluds, Machinery. Ao. The Property, to
old being all of the articles contained In the
Largest Furniture Manufacturing Katabliahuietii
InHouthern lllir.ol. which wu, at the time IS
lined into the hands ol the undersUard, in
uccelul operation. Particular attention o
deuleram furniture is called, a thl
het ol opportunities jjji"' HARMAN
6-7td Receiver of ElchofJ Bnbt
BOAT UT0BW
8AM WILSON
BOAT j
OUOOXB1KS, 0
rnoviaioNs -itc.
Ohh Lkyu i t Caim, lit,
p i i
uautai mtuuv tiuu.

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