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The Cairo daily bulletin. (Cairo, Ill.) 1870-1872, May 31, 1872, Image 2

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THE CAIRO DAILY BULLETIN, FRIDAY, MAY 31, 1872
THE BULLETIN.
JOftM OBERLT, KJIlMnd PnWIsasr.
VStDAT,
Mat 81, 1872,
XiM er tut Dalit Ilrustia i
Out Mk, by curler, rrr;""
Ua year try rwrtw,1ndfn?"
Oa atoatli. ky raell,.... -
Tfcrae
it hi oaihe, ......
.tooo
.11 M
4 S3
00
' tSU WXAM WUKLT BULLETIN.
Joka H. Obarif A Co. aave reduced lb eob
acrlesioa pn of the Weekly Cairo Bulletin to
OMDtOtrf turn. Snakiest It III chfepett I
pereabllebed In Soetbem Ilflaois.
Good Enough
DEMOCRATIC TICKET.
-fun where yaw ee ikiit whit hat
Bin. . .
Aacl ska wars! alaaa; tise Itssa,
Ureal? arstta ass-owse."
rom president,
HORACE GREELEY,
of New York ;
rom TICK PRESIDENT,
B. GRATZ BROWN,
of Missouri.
Every Democratic member of Con
gress from Illinois is In favor of the Bl-
tlmore convention endorsing Greeley and
Brown. f,
We do not receive the Shawneetown
Oawtte' 6flcncr than twice a week on
the average. "Who Is to blame? We
can't get on very well without tho ' Oa
teltc,' and are bound to have it or blood.
Moxoan is making his Shawneelown
Osteite' musical In the Greoloy interest,
and, let us say aside, an exceedingly read
able little paper one that tho Shawnee
ites should appreciate and support.
Hon. James S. Rollins, ono of tho
leading as ho is ono of the ablest Demo
crats of Missouri, has written a letter in
which ho protests against the folly of nom
inatlng a straight tickot at Baltimore, and
declares for Orecloy and Brown.
Looax is becomtntr liberal. lie has
secured a reduction ol tho tariff in print
ing paper to twenty per cent, ad valoremJT rate from and forever lose about 33 per
instead of the ten per cent, reduction from
the present rates, as reportod by the com'
mitteo.
Good Enough
DEMOCRATIC PLATFORM
FJIEAMBLE.
We, the Liberal Republicans of the
United States in Convention assembled at
Cincinnati, proclaim tbo following prlnci
plos as essential to Just government:
BEAD IMVH Bra IB D.
1. We roci'gtitze tbo equality of all
men beforo Hie law, and hold that it is
the duty of the government in its dealings
with the people to melo out LQUAL AMD
EXACT JUSTICE TO ALL, OF
WHATEVEH NATIONALITY, RACE,
COLOR OR PERSUASION, RELI
GIOUS OR POLITICAL.
2. WE PLEDGE OURSELVES TO
MAINTAIN THE UNION OP THESE
STATES, EMANCIPATION AND EN
FRANCHISEMENT, AND TO OP
POSE ANY REOPENING OP THE
QUESTIONS SETTLED BY THE
THIRTEENTH, FOURTEENTH AND
FIFTEENTH AMENDMENTS OP
THE CONSTITUTION.
UfllYEItSAL ABIM SCHTT.
3. We demand the immediate and ab
solute removal of all disabilities imposed
on account of tho rebellion which was
finally subdued seven year ago, believing
that UNIVERSAL AMNESTY WILL
RESULT IN THE COMPLETE PAC
IFICATION IN ALL SECTIONS OF
THE COUNTRY-
DEMOCRATIC TO THE CO BE.
1 LOCAL SELF-GOVERNMENT
with impartial suffrage, will guard the
rights of all citisons more securely than
any centralised power. The people and
the public welfare require the SUPRE
MACY OF THE CIVIL OVER THE
MILITARY AUTHORITY and
FREEDOM OF PERSON UNDER
THE PROTECTION OF THE HA
BEAS CORPUS. We demand for the
individual tho largest liberty consistent
with public order, for the state self-government,
and for tho nation a return to
the methods of poace and tho constitu
tional limitations of power.
"TRUE AS PREACHING."
C. The civil servico of the government
hii become a mero instrument of partisan
tyranny and personal ambition, and an
object of selfish greed. It is a scandal
and reproach upon freo Institutions, and
breeds a demoralization dangerous to tbo
perpetuity of republican government.
THEREFORE A WIRE DEMAND.
6. We therefore regard a THOROUGH
REFORM OF THE CIVIL SERVICE
as one oi the most pressing necessities of
the hour; that honesty, capacity and fide!
Ity constitute the only valid claims to pub
lic employment; that the offices of the
government cease to bo a matter of arbl
trary favoritism and patronage, and that
public station become again the post' of
honor. TO THIS END IT IS IMPER
ATIVELY REQUIRED THAT NO
PRESIDENT SHALL BECOME A
CANDIDATE FOR RE-ELECTION.
TAX Iff-4CKNTION SHOVED ABIDE.
7. We demand a system of federal tax
ation which shall not unnecessarily inter
fere with the industry of the people, and
wbicb shall provide the means necessary
to pay tne expenses or trie government,
economically administered the pensions.
the interest on the public dobt and a mod
erate annual reduction ot tne principal
thereof, and recogniro that there are in
our midst honest but irreconcilable dif
ferences of opinion with regnrd to the re
spective systems of protection and freo
trade. WE REMIT THE DISCUS
SION OF THEM TO THE PEOPLE
IN THEIR CONGRESSIONAL DIS
TRICTS, AND THE DECISION OF
CONGRESS THEREON, WHOLLY
PREE OF EXECUTIVE INTERFER
ENCE AND DICTATION.
HO REPUDIATION.
8. The public credit must be sacredly
maintained, and we DENOUNCE UE
PUDIATION in every form and guise.
BIIIO Or TUB TRUE METAL.
9. A SPEEDY RETURN TO
SPECIE PAYMENTS is demand
alike by the highest considerations of com
mercial morality ana nonest government
A WORD. FOR THE SMJLDIER BOTH.
10. We remomber with gratitude the
sacrifices of the soldiers and sailors of the
republic, and no act of ours shall ever
detract from their Justly earned fame, or
the full rewards of their patriotism.
AVATJBT, LAMB BOBBERS I
11. We are opposed to all further grants
of land to railroads or other corporations
THE PUBLIC DOMAIN SHOULD BE
HELD SACRED TO ACTUAL SET
TLERS. LIBERAL. FOREIGN" POLICT.
12. We bold that it is the duty of tbe
government In in intercourse with foreign
nations to cultivate friendships of peace
by treating with all on fair and equal
IXF "FMdlnJS It alike dishonorable
sft &riaji u not right r ,ub-
This fram the Evansville 'Courier' Is
good very good:
Synopsis of Voorbees' Speech " I I
roe my mine you love me I I
you do love mo my I I I me pnr-
tv uv party Mr irruvo your affection
for mi ur tombstone O I my I. Am
not rigutr'
A. Comi.vqo. a Democratic mombor of
Congress from Missouri, in alotterto the
St. Louis ' Republican,'! says he regrets to
say that ho believes the Democratic party
has boon driven into a necessity which
requires it to support Greeley and Brown.
Poor fellow, he is to be pitied! He
should cling to tho gentle Voorhecs for
consolation, orseck tho sheltering protec
tion of the man of tbe Chicago 'Times.'
lathis speech in the British Parliament
on the occasion of the Ministerial expla
nations in relation to the treaty negotia
tions with our government, Earl Russell
aid "it ought not to bo disguised that the
case of tho American government was
concoived in terms of the most offensive
character to the ministers of this country.
No swindler, no pick-pocket at tbe Old
Bailey could havo been worso treated
than were tbo British ministers by the
American government."
The anti-Greeley Democrats havo de
termined to put into the field a third can
didate. They will not abido by tbo action
of the Baltimore convention ; and, since
they cannot havo their own way, havo
concluded to "smash things" by securing
the re-election of Gen. Grant. They may
do so, but this fear should not deter tbe
Liberal Democrats from pressing right on
in the path they are now following. This
issuo must be mot, and now is tho propi
tious time. The Bcltapnt-Storey Demo
crats must yield to tho wishes of the ma
jority of the party or tho majority must
separate from thorn. The matter has come
to this crisis.
there but tho issuance of an address to
the democracy advising them to support
Greeley and Brown. We cannot of course
say tbaf that should be tbe action of the
convention without reference to any de
velopment that may intervene at the Phil
adelphia convention, Ac, but as every
thing now looks and promises to be, I see
no hope for the country nor for tho demo
cratic party save in Cincinnati.
" Greeloy's tariff notions are no objec
tion whon tho platform is considered and
his pledges. But even asido from his
pledges and bis platform, I am for a man
who is for a protective tariff instead of a
man who is for protecting carpet-baggers
and custom-house thioves.
" I need not give you my reasons at
length. You have oxprcssnd them, and
better than I could myself. I am for
Greeley, not that I lovo democracy less
but my country more.
" Ono or two considerations, looking at
tho matter from a purely party stand
point, seem to mo to be entitled to weight
with our " leaders, " so called. First, those
loaders must of necessity go with their
followers Into the Greoloy camp or sepa
cent, of the democratic voto roR those
VOTES ARE THERE NOW AND INTEND TO
STAY THERE, BALTIMORE TO THE CON
TRARY notwithstanding. In that view
it is death to tho party not to go en masse
with the liberals. Again, if these self
same loaders raise a straight ticket war
cry they must wear tbo brand of bad faith
to men like Scburz, Trumbull and Oreo
ley, and may not every plain man in tho
land fitly ask, if Hendricks, Pendleton
and Seymour will deceivo United States
senators, will they not docoivo us ? If for
months thoy havo boon only coquetting
with tbo liberal leaders, if thov havo been
only encouraging to deceive, if an almost
unanimous democratic press havo only
been a party to' a plan to entrap honest
republicans into a party split and then
desert them, can our leaders or our press
ask the people's confidence? Can the
south trust them 7 Can you and I trust
thorn 7 It is a question of good faith, and
as one democrat I invoke political damna
tion upon every ' loader ' of ours who ig
nores that principle in this crisis particu
larly, or at any timo generally.
"Let tho 'young democracy' of Illi
nois go in force to our state convention
and let us seo that Illinois democracy is
properly represented at Baltimoro. Un
less material and unlooked-for changes
transpire between now and thon, I urn In
favor of instructing against nominating at
Baltimoro. Youra truly,
" Geo. R. Wkndlino."
Moroan, of the Shawneetown 'Gazette,'
replies in this vigorous manner to the as
sertion of tbe Chicago 'Times' that half
the Democrats in Southorn Illinois would
not voto for Greeley in case ho should bo
the candidate against Grant. In a letter
to the 'Times' ho says:
Permit mo to inform you that your ad
vices from Southorn Illinois stutlni? that
the democracy are hostile to Greeley and
mown, are laiso; taiso in every respect.
There is but one newspaper south of tho
tuo unto ana Mississippi railroad hostile
to Greeley, and I assert, and trutlitullv.
too, mat lucre is not a aemocrat ot inuu.
enco in favor or a nomination at JJaltlmoro,
except it be the endorsement of Greeley
ana mown, in ooumern Illinois, xou
have not only been untruthfully informed
regarding tuo ueuiocracy, but also tlm
hardly a republican fuvors him. The
truth is, Greeley and Brown will receive
at least 75 moro votes in Gallatin countv
than any democrat that cau be nominated
at Baltimore. In conclusion, permit mo to
say mat lor every uomocrat you will Una
in aoutucrn Illinois Hostile to Ureeloy, 1
will furnish you tbe names of 25 mpubll
cans who are his supporters. I Kin conll
dent that you would net Intentionally
misrepresent this section of the state.
you know of ono prominent democrat I
Egypt opposed to Ureeloy, please publls
nis name.
HOW I WAS WOX.
GOV. PALMER'S GREAT SPEECH
Gov. Palmer has benrded tho lion in his
den, tbe Oglesby in his hall. At Decatur
the othor day bo made n speech, that for
power and crushing eloquonce has boon
equalled by no stump speech delivered in
Illinois since tbo conclusion of the late
war. It was, indoed, a crusher. Tho
Governor began at the beginning and
went through to the end clear through.
He loft no stone unturned. And close to
the end of bis speoch, in discussing tbe
corruptions of tbo legislature, ho mado a
few remarks in reference to the celebrated
lake front steal, that may bo of interest to
Mr. Munn. If we are not greatly mis
taken, that gentleman will understand the
delicate remarks there made by tbe Gov
ernor. At all events we commond them
to our iriend's prayerful consideration,
sound!
In a private letter to Mr. W. W. Thorn
ton, of this city, Hon. Geo. R. Wendllng,
one of the "rising" young men of Illi
nois, and a Democrat heretofore classed
with tbe hardest-shelled of the party, ex
presses himself, as we have heretofore said,
in favor of the Cincinnati tlcktt. He
aayi:
" I am utterly opposed to any nomina
tion at Baltimore. I want nothing done
WHERE ARE TnE LEADERS 7"
A correspondent of the Shawneetown
Gazette,' 20th May, is anxious to know
whero tho leaders of the Democratic party
n Southern Illinois are. Ho says :
As a close observer of tho signs of the
times in our political world, I have, since
tho adjournment of tho Cincinnati conven-
on, particularly watched and waited for
some indication of the course that would
bo pursued by those who in tbe yore days
were called party leaders by the democ
racy of Egypt, bo far wo have watched
in vain for any expression on tbe part of
thoso to whom the pnrty havo been wont
i iook lor advice in a crisis like that
hi cli is now upon us. The voices of our
Marahallt, Crebs, Aliens, Robinsons and
thers, are as silent as the grave, while Is
sues uro thrust upon the conservative
masses which underlie the perpetuity of
tree institutions, now uo meso nv.-n ex
pect to appease their followers for all this
vacillation and delay? Have we indeed
ordered a halt lor tbo discussion of doubt
ful questions of expediency, whon tbe
enemy, actively alert, is at our very thresh-
hold to uisputu anu retake, il possible.
every inch or ground which the grand
forward movement of the first of May
brought to us in mo presngo oi curtain
victory?
The "lenders in Egypt" are in this ex
igency with tho masses of tho party, and
bollevo that sound policy requires tho nom
ination of Mr. Greeley at Baltimoro.
That theso leaders led the Democratic peo
ple to this advanced position wo know is
not true, but thoy did not hesitate long to
walk up'after the advancing army and to
got In front of it again. Hon. W J. Al
len was tho first prominent Democrat ot
Southern Illinois to publicly declaro be
foro his fellow-citizens that he was In fa'
vor of Greoloy and Brown. That bo hosl
tatod for somo time after tho Cincinnati
convention to como to this conclusion we
do not doubt, but whon ho did conclude
that the best interests of tho country re
quired this course on tho part of tbo Dcni
ocrats, he lost no tlmo to mako public pro
clamation of tho fact, and did it in n man'
nor that was both frank and forcible. Mr
Marshall and Col. Crebs have, through
The Bulletin, glvon in their adhesion to
Cincinnati, and Mr. J. 0. Robinson has
dono moro, we venturo to say, to lead the
Democratic congressional mind into the
Liberal rut than any other man in Wash'
ington.
From this statement of facts, tho 'Ga
xetto' correspondent will seo, that ho bas
done tho gontlcmen named injustico by
charging them with vacillation. Thoy
may havo hesitated, but when they did
roovo in tbo right direction neither of
them turned back or hesitated on tho way,
Commenting upon tho communication
referred to above, the 'Gazotto' says :
Wo publish this morning, a communi
cation concerning our so-callod leadun
si ex presses the reelings and sentiments of
our people. o are not prepared to ex
press our preference at present for any
certain individual for congress. Yet, wo
are Ireeto say that we sincerely trust that
tho people will lay asido for some purpose,
those who are too cowardly to avow their
true sentiments. That windy blatherskite
Dan. Voorhecs. purchased body and
breeches In the interest of Grant, declares
In and out of coneress hli vlnw. unH .
poses. Tbe time has come when tbe peo
ple must abandon cowardly time-servers
and assume tho leadership of party. Now,
is the time to act.
From journals published in Ireland, It
appears that on May 6tb over 100 emi
grants from tbe counties of Meatb and
Cavan left the port of Drogbeda for Liv
erpool en routa for America.
by ruuy Mortimer..
My name Is' Emily-Emily Woodford,
and I live over thoro In that big brown
houso with mothor and pretty sister Mary.
I bave a wonderful liking for music,
books, and such things; and at ono time
had great ambition to bo a teacher, but,
you see, wo aro thoso gentool folks, somo
proplo call poor but proud, and can't nf
lord help, so I am the "maid of nil work"
qulto an unrornantic level to my high
flown ideas and ambitious dreams, and it
was mortifying, I tell you, but it couldn't
bo helped.
You think my sister might holp? So do
I but sho bas such beautiful hands that
she is afraid of soiling them, so sho sits in
tho parlor and embroldors and plays on
tho piano, wbllo mother and I drudgo in
tho kitchen. But you could not help lov
ing my sister, If you know her, for sho is
so pretty has great nuzoi eyes, urown
curly hair, and tbo sweetest littlu mouth
Imaginable; ana then sno is so gooa
natured that I am compelled to like her if
she docs call me awkward Em and Smiley
(that is because I laugh so much;) and
thero is no uso of me trying to deny my
awkwardness, for ever sinco I could walk
I havo bad tho greatest racuity lor step
ping on trailing dresses, running against
pooplo in the street, stumping my toes,
and a host of other untutored maladies.
Oh dear I no wonder I shock my sister
and my aristocratic muiumn.
But I forgot. I was going to toll what
a grand party tbo Hainsons "wore going to
givo You sec, their daughter, Miss Clara,
was coming out, and all the olito of tho
city wero to bo there. Oh, bless mo don't
I romnmbor Clara llalnson used to hate
mo when we wero schoolmates down at
the old academy, because I was always
above bor In the classes I But now she
had finished her education, and was ready
to como out in socloty, and I oh denr I
was nothing better than a kitchen girl,
with no learning to speak of.
My sister wus invited, and of courso 1
thought sho would be delighted, and went
up to the house to hear what a marvelous
toilet she was going to mako for tho occa
sion ; but thoro sho sat, with a face as
twisted up as tho note she held In her
bands.
" Why, what is tho matter, May 7" I
uskod.
"Matter enough. I ain't go to tho
party. I've nothing to wviir."
" My dear Miss Flora McPlimrey, whore
is your blue silk, your white mull, mid
"Do you supposo I would dlsgraco the
Hainsons by wearing a dress I had ever
worn beforo? No indeed I" and tho
pretty nose turned up contemptuously.
" Well. I am suro I don't know what
you will do. Couldn't you get her some
thing new, mother 7"
" lou silly child, vou know as well as I
what our incomo is, and I.could'nt think
of such a thing while coal and flour Is so
nign.
1 don't caro ; tbo Hainsons will think
you aro too poor to get me anything new,
that is all, " said Mory.
now tins stung my mother s pride, Tor
sho tried to keep up appearances, no mat
ter bow loan bor purse was.
"Could'nt you let bor bave thot pink
silk your aunt gavo you ? You know you
will no"ver havo any use for it. '' said "mv
mother to mo.
" I don't care If I won't havo any uso
for it, " said I, angrily ; " May has got no
right to take what belongs tome."
"Oh, yes, Em. do let mo havo it."
said Muy. "It will look splendidly,
trimmed in white lace, and bo the very
thing to wear with my pearls. Oh, ar'nt
you a going to let mo bave it? ' said she,
as sho looked at my sullen face. "I will
givo you my blue silk if you will."
"I don't want your old bluo silk," I ox
claimed; "but if you want my dress, tako It.
I might know I wouldn't havo any peace
until you did get il; evory ono in tho
- r " i' - j " "
Woll, tho night tor tho party came, and
very beautlful.did Muy look in tho pink
silk, with Its folds of misty lace. I laughed
as 1 thought of my great big hands and
foot, and I wondered how thoy would look
in such a dress as that.
"You aro a doar good cirl," said May.
as 1 fastened tho pearls around her throat
anu twined tne rosebuds in her iiulr, "and
you may practice on tho piano to-night us
long as you please."
"Oh, thank you," I oxclalmod, lor it
was a raro thing for May to let mo touch
her piano.
Never did timo pass so pleasantly, for I
had a perloct.passion for music, and Woro
tho evening waa over I had mastered "In
di Fern," u piece my sistor had tried for
days and days.
'You can't guess who was at the party,'
said May that night, as I was tuking down
tier nair.
"Vroll, who? lou know 1 Could nover
guots."
"Why, isu. Clarence r
"Ed. Clarence I I tboucbt he was in
Australia."
"So he was'; and they say he has come
back as rich as u Jew. But'tho fun of it is,
he is going to call to-morrow. Don't that
surprise you, after knowing what a lottor
1 received when ho went away, saying ho
never wanted to look on my fair, false faco
again? Oh, how ridiculous;" uml May
lHid back in tho chair, and laughed long
and merrily.
Now, I didn't think it looked quite fair.
for Ed. Clarence wus her lover once, and
a genorous one, too; for bo bnro with hor
caprices bettor tlmn many n man would
havo dono. But sho jilted him at lost, for
n dreum-oyed author, something of tho
kind, who in turn jilted her. d. went
away uftor thot, and I felt so sorry for
him that I wrote him a noto, telling him
how I sympathized with him. It was so
silly in mo to do so, but I was young and
didn't know any better, and as ho novor
answorcd it I supposed ho had forgotten all
about it, so it was no uso for mo to fool
ashamed.
"How did bo look, May? I asked at
last.
" Oh I moro cold and proud than ever.'
" I supposo you intend to win him."
" I think tho prospects look bright. But
do hush and go to bed, I want to go to
sleep boforo morninc."
Hor word was low, and tho remainder
or tho night was left in peace.
Tho noxt morning found my sister, In a
bettor humor. Kd. Clarcnco was coming,
you know and hor tomnor was perfect
wnon a oeau was oxpcciou.
" Will Ed. call this morning?" I asked
as May entered tho breakfast room.
"Yes."
"How do I look?" askod Mav an hour
lauor, coming uown tno stairs dressed in
a flno white morning dress, linv bluo slin
pers, and the fair curls bound back with
ribbon ana a knot or blue at hor throat.
" Oh, beautiful I" I oxclaimod ; " if Ed.
Claranco Isn't captivated it won't bo your
fault."
Sho shrugged her shoulders, as sho al
ways did when I said anvthincr unpleasant.
and inarched off into tho parlor to watch
and wait, while I went out under tho ap
plo treo to read and dream. Ob, what air
castles I built I What creat plans I laid
out for the future. But I laughed when I
thought of what llttlo, hope I had of any
oi mom over being roaiizeo. Then i be
gan to be discontented. Was it always to
be drudgo from morning till night in a
kitchen, while my wholo soul cried out for
all that was true and beautiful ? Was my
girlhood to be passed without knowing any
? tho Joys peculiar to it? It seemed so.
"But I must not feel torry about it, must
h Ojrlo?'' said I, as the great shaggy
Newfoundland rubbed his lead against
my band. " Do you want me to play with
Won 7 noil," ana i started up ror a race
round tho house for I was a big romp,
was seventeen but just aa. I nearod
If I
the kitchen door I tripped and fell, upset
ting a bucket of water and bringing down
a largo tin pan that was hanging near. I
was both stunned and frightened, and lay
still a mlnuti before attempting to get up.
Somo ono raised mo so tenderly and qui
etly that I opened my eyes in astonish
ment. Oh my I there was Ed. Clarence's
handsomo face bending ovor mc, wbllo his
mouth was quivering with suppressed
sorrow or laughter, I know not which.
"Aro you much hurt ?'' ho askod
at length.
I lookod around to seo if any ono olso
was near beforo venlurinz a reply, and
caught a rellectlon of my torn, limp dress
and disordered hnlr in tho glass opposite
tho door. Ed. Clarunce could retain his
gravity no lunger, and burst out Into a
hearty laugh. It was too much and I
sprang from his arms and rushed away,
novor slopping until I reacbod my own
room. Thon I throw myself on tho floor,
sobbing like a very child.
Tho next day, uiarcnco called again,
and this timo asked for mo, but I would
not see him, and ran nway and hid myself
in a little arbor nt tho foot of the garden.
I suppose I fell asleep, for it seemed as if
in n dream 1 heard Ed. Clarence say,
" Will you forgive me, llttlo Emily, for
laughing at you yestorday 7"
I tried to rush past him, but he held me
fast.
" Don't go Emily, for I lovo you," he
satd.
"No, you don't," I exclaimed," you
love May."
" No. I lovo vou: have loved you ever
slnco I received thai little noto of yours,
three years since. 1 havo longed so often
for this meeting. Now I ask ydu to bo
my wife."
" Oh, Ed.," I said, " I am not worthy to
bo your wife, for 1 am neither educated
nor rouncd. Jwery one would laugu at
you for selecting such a wife."
"You suit mv, llttlo one; is not that
enough 7"
ur courso you would ime to Know wnai
I answered him. but I will only tell you
that when we went to tho houso 1 was his
promised wifo. 1 wish you could havo
seen May's fuco when wo told her, hut she
had the good sense not to show her disap
pointment ; and congratulated us beauti
fully. I take music lessons now, go to
parties, nnd hear myself called pretty and
sweet. I havo just been looking at my
lover's L'enerous ulft, and elegant white
bilk dress and pointed lucu veil. I am to
lie married next Thursday. Uunio to the
wedding. Goodbye.
M, HUSTON.
NOT AS BLACK AS PAINTED,
A CRXCIILM STORY ABOUT JIM, FUE BT
A WOMAX.
Eleanor Kirk tells a bMutiful little lael
dent of the late Col. Flsk, which she
vouches for as true In every particular.
In passing out of his opera house last win
tor, Col. Flsk was accosted by a very
beautiful young girl, apparently about
seventeen. She was plainly, but tastefully
dressed, and appeared very earnest Is her
desire to be allowed a few minutes' -versation.
Her story was qulstly told:
" I have failed in everything I bava un
dertaken In earning my own living. My
i alhor is a pa'aly tic, and is perfectly help
less. I must take car of him. To do
thls,I must bave money. I am beautiful
that I know as woll as you do." "Well,"
volunteered tho colonel, "and you wish to
speculate upon those personal charms f "
" I want money, Mr. Fisk. for my father;"
replied she. "Tell me," continued this
strange man, "and tell me the truth are
you a good girl 7" ' Yes, sir," sobbed the
child. " And would you rather continue
ono 7" he asked again. "Ob, Ml, flsk I ol
courso I would I" she replied, burstiar Into
tears. "Well, then," said be kindly,
and with strong feeling, "for God's sake
keep so. Jim Fisk is a pretty rough boy.
but he neier hurt a hair of a woman's ktad
yet, and he never will ; and mora than
that, little girl, It shall never be said of
him, when be bas passed in his checks and
stands before the judgment seat, that ha
bas ever so much as winked at tbe ruin oi
any girl. I will help your father, If you
will promiso mo that vou will navar tr
this dodi;o again with aavbodv: and I
want you to be solemn about it as If vou
stood in tho presonceof your God." The
promise was given, the father was taken
care of until his death, and tbe girl was
educated for a musio teacher, and is now
successfully employed.
THE ALLKUED SEDUCTION OF MISS MARY
DKI8COLL.
Baltimore, May 24. There has been
much more interest manifested to-day in
the trial of Rev. Dr. L. D. Huston for al
leged improper and licentious conduct
with tho lady members of his congrega
tion in this city than heretofore, and the
entire day's proceedings have been draped
with a dramatic utfeel that has nover bo
foro attached to them. Tbu little parlor
of tho quondam pursunago on Biddlo street
waa this morning, and in fact all day,
filled with lady friends of Mary Drlscoll,
the llttlo schoolgirl whose charge of seduc
tion against Dr. Huston was to form the
grand work of tho day's inquiry.
At 'J o'clock tbo court was callod to or
der, and tho usual prayer offered. After
which Miss Driscoil wus ordered to tbo
stand. Sho entered tho room in which the
committee mot without hesitation, and was
handed to a seat. She was neatly dressed
in a suit of black, and woro a pretty sailor
hat, and when seated for the examination,
lookod like a school girl neatly attirod for
tho day's studies. Sho has a ploasant, in
telligent face, dark hair and eyes, and in
dress, and build and manners looked the
well developjd school girl of fifteen.
When sho became seated sho looked
around tho room until hor eyes restod
upon Dr. Huston, upon whom sho bes
towed a glaring gazo for several seconds.
Sho did notsoem at all duturbod during
tho giving in of bor evidence, but ans
wored all questions in a clear and calm
tone of voice.
It was rumored boforo sho was callod
that a written statement, prepared by her,
had been placed in tho hands of the pros
ocuting counsel, Rov. Dr. Gardner, and
would bo read us bar tostimony, but tbls
proved untrue, as sho was examined as
wero the other witnesses. Sho testified
that sho hud, by previous arrangement
with him, gone to Dr. Huston's house, in
September, 1870, and met him ia tbo par
lor, tho very room beneath them, and that
wnen sne ion nis om braces in that parlor,
her virtuo was eono. She detailed tbo cir
cumstances ot tho seduction, but said sho
was not aware oi what was going on. As
the chargo ot almost constant illicit inter
course with her from that timo until tbe
chargo was mado public is to form the
ground ror another chargo, upon which
investigation will bo had, sbo was not al
lowed to go farthor with her tostimony to
day than to assort tho seduction.
Her mother succeeded her upon tho wit
ness stand, and her coming was tho begin
ning of a storm that made things lively
iur a tuw moments in mo ecclesiastical
court-room. No sooner bad she entered
tho room than sho began a tirade against
win uL-uuauu roverenu, wnom sno cnorged
as tho author of her trouble and sorrow,
that it was almost impossible for tbe
presiding eldor to stop hor. Aftor several
attompts, howover, tho lady was calmed
down, and repeated tho story of hor
daughter's wrongs to tho committeo with
considerable emotion. Sho was attired In
a suit of black silk, and lookod a lady of
intelligence arm goou brccuing. neither
iiersou nor uaugtor wero examined or
cross-examined moro than was positively
necessary, both tho prosecution and d-
fense avoiding as much as poisibio any
thing that would add to their embarrass
ment and sorrow.
Thoro will bosovoral moro witnessos ox
amlnod by tbo prosecution upon this
chargo of seduction, and after tho defense
has nnisnca upon It, which will probably
not bo this week, tbo other chargo of fre
quent mien intercourso with tho samo
girl will bo proceeded with, and from
present Indications it seems probable that
all next wook will bo occupied in taking
testimony.
During tho first three days of tho trial
mero was consiuerauio dtssatlsractlon on
tho part of Dr. Huston's accusers on an.
count of tho legal air that surrounded the
mannor of giving evidence, and to do
away with all cause for complaint, Rev.
F. U. Ritchie, of Martlnsburg, West Vir
ginia, was suustituieu ror jur. jnonroo, as
counsel for Dr. Huston, and I hear noth.
Ing from friend or foo of tho accusod but
commendation ot the fair and impartial
mannor in wnicn too trial is beinc con
ducted. Evory one seems to be satisfied
that the verdict will bo a just one, If an
earnost desire to got at the truth on tbe
part of all concerned can avail. Evory
day the trial will become moro interesting
and important, and tho defense of the
charges to-day beforo tho ecclesiastical
court wilt bo of great interest. There
seems to bo a healthier tone of public sen
timent here this evening than heretoforo
noted, and a general determination to
await the rosult of tho trial before pro
nouncing judgment.
Dr. Huston's quarters at the Eutaw
House aro still the resort of his friends,
who call in numbers to offer their consola
tion and assistance.
A MEMPHIS MYSTERY,
EIOI1T HUMAN SKELETONS ALREADY EX
HUMEb HOW DID THEY QET TStBRI?
In the 'Avalanche' of Wednesday last
appoared an account of tbe finding of four
flesbless, blackened skeletons in an old
privy vault In the rear of what was once
known as tho Shelby House, on Shelby
street, near Gayoso. Tbe skeletons were
found by some workmen engaged in
excavating a cellar on the corner of the
streets abovo mentioned. Slnoa then
THIRTEEN SKELETONS MORE
Havo been found, making seventeen in all
tbat have been takon from this reeking,
unchristened tomb for murdered snenTi
bones. That the bones found are those of
murdered men there can be no doubt, as
the Shelby House, in former years, waa the
abode of tbe lowest and most vicious of
the human race. The number of dark
deeds of blood tbat have been consum
mated in this house and adjoining quar
ters no man can tell. All of tbe bones as
vet discovered present the same hideous
blackened sight, tbe effect of the acids and
gases by which tbey were surrounded.
Tho fact that all the skeletons discovered
were contiguous to the same spot precludes
tbe idea that tbey were ever deposited
there by tbe rites of christian burial.
Memphis Aftalanehe, 26M.
Our Home AdvertiMminti.
AN INVALUABLE REMEDY TOR A BReKEX
HEART.
(Kiom the St. Louli Tfmts, Mar Slh.J
Peter Moore, a former resident af St.
Louis, was brought to the city on Monday
night by a citizen of Joneeboro. Illinois.
charged with attempting to commit sui
cide in that place on Saturday last. The
appearance of the man fully bears out the
statement, as bis throat bas boon gashed
in a frightful manner. His domestic
affairs, it seems, did not exactly meet his
vmwi, iwi no couia not be made to M
lievo that 'twas belter to bear the ill ha
had than fly to others that ho knew not or,
he bad recourse to that desperate ressssdy
tbo razor. This case is a common una.
He was sent to tbe city hospital, where
his wounds will be properly cared for.
A RrniKflf Piiiwauihiiw TV..
- , -- . i .w m ,
Mn., 'Whig' states tbls singular circum
stance: A strange freak of nature hai re
cently occurred In Elk Neck, near Whit
IlfcnWl. hv thn tnlrln nf.ii, wn -am-
land on tbe mountain side. The scans af
tuts phenomenon is about 400 yards from
tha river. An ara nf Ida .Imn
tioned, covered with large forest trees, has
una. vu win uvpin OI me ircS-lOpS. a DO
Sink has left walU ilmnal vartloat
tbe sides of a house. Mr. Alexander Wil
son, wno examined the ground, states that
no traces of water dliturhanraa at thaknt-
tom are perceptible, and tbe strange occur-
loins ib anugcwier unaccouotaoie. it is
believed the nh
the commencement of fishing, the rupture
in the earth showing signs of very recent
disturbance
Mr. John H. Hauirlxin, editor of
sue siansas rree rress,' bas resigned his
position as delegate to the Philadelphia
convention, and announced his intention
to support tbo Liberal ticket. He is said
to bo a very Influential man, especially
among the Germans.
lEtOM WOBKN.
Go to the Thalia for the
beer in town.
best Weiss
S-aidtf
PHILADELPHIA
ORNAMENTAL IRON WORKS!
HOBKHT WOOD, TH09. 8- ROOT.
ROBERT WOOD & CO.
1,134 Ridga Avenue, Philadelphia, p.
FOUNTAINS FLOATING BWANS
VAfiES -PBOOS-
STATUARY WATER LlLIBa
DUCKS TURTLES, ac.
For Decorating Fotintalas.
VERANDAHS, 8UMMKU HOUSES, i
UtBOItS, CHAIRS, BETTER'S, o Ac.
NEW STYLE WROUOHT-IRON BAILING ft
lmrSflu0ce"0UC "d 0m,,"l- svsr b..r
CAST AND WROUQHT'IRON HAILING!! far
Public Hulldlng. ud Hnui".,, C.rn.lry Lot.
ana Garden Fence. 11 eicoQli;, rJo Crest!?!
eto., in greet variety of Palterne. v"3s,
IKON STAIRS, Spiral aad straight, tt tarleue
PMlcrne and etjlee. Special atleution Vive? tkll
clme of work. se
LAMP POSTS, for Froati ef Public Buildln.e
Dm" n'e. ' 01 VMa " aKSe
BTAHLE FITTINOS.ofCastand Wrooght.Ir.il.
of New Improved Hlylee, auch ae Ilav ttuk.'
SIMt DivielSne, Mangirsjuarntti Rriot.U
ter. Trp. VentllHtore. Ae. raMMi
WIRE WORK of every description Wira
O'larile of Crimped Wlr.,0.lv.all.5 .?P.lnteu!
in Wain or Orn.ineni.l Paturne, for Store uJori
or Wlndovre, factory and Warenome Wlad.wi
Its lings for Offlcee, Dank, Counter RilliniV
UArtd for entrance t0 OemeWee. public
Hquaree and rjentleniea'i Country Selli, if Ose
Tubing or Wrougbt-lron, both elcgUsad douwl!
Ill SlslhnPSlfal iniralmi.la .1.1 SSVHWIVi
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tfm7puTrpo.e"0r,,n,n, ofdMlM "Prer.!,,.,
.ndAcl?v.tirej'..V,,,NAL 0X puW1"
OVAL VASES', IsUet etvlee, centennial aalUrn.
HITCHING pbsTS, Jockey, cioll.ruiMa
SJSAAA.
CAIRO CITY COAL
Is prepared to "PcosSemsr .Ilk Ike best
PITTSBURG AND ILLINOIS
COAL.
aide sttamsrs si aav hear. eeJMt"
SAINT NICHOLAS
BILLIARD HALL,
Him WALKIit & CO, Fltf ft'8
lata aovaa m kewiy imu vr with
iwa MXQBUMX
IFSmXiA.IET
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