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The Cairo daily bulletin. (Cairo, Ill.) 1870-1872, June 05, 1872, Image 2

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THE CAIRO DAILY BULLETIN, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5, 1872
THE BULLETIN.
Z JOHN II "oBKKl'T, Editor are! ruhlUner.
Ti orTriuiiT imi
luoKripfM.1
.nontfi by Mail
Th:c months - " J
H , months - - J 5,
Mi veer, - "
TUB DOLLAR WKKKLY 1IULLKTIK.
John It. Olx-tly Co. have reduced the sub
serous "price, of the Weekly Cairo llulletln to
''rkmfptrwnm.mM!K it the cheapest pa
republished in Southern Illinois.
Good KnoiiRliJ
DEMOCRAWO TICKET.
"rr wkfrrjon nrr thnt while hut
aIS ih '" liar,
FOR VREMDtNT,
HORACE GREELEY,
of Now York ;
FOR VICK ritr.SlDENT,
B. GRATZ BROWN,
of Missouri.
Good Enough
DEMOCRATIOPLATFORM.
PRKAHBIX
We, tho Llbnrul Republicans of the
United State In Convention assembled t
Cincinnati, proclaim tho following princi
ples lis essential to jul govornmunt:
dead inmtes iii'kikd.
We recognize Hie equality of nil
The Philadelphia pulrlotsnro beglftlng
to worry a llttlu nbout tho plntform of tlio
great nnd Indivlslblo Republican party,
nnd suggestion pour In from nil sides.
Henry Ward Heeclicr y, In his review
of Mr. UroolayV letter of neoeptttneo :
" Mr. Orcoloy begins with tho declara
tion that nil tho political rights nnd fran
chises secured by tho Into war should bo
maintained Inviolate, and thnt thoso
rights which wcro lost through tho war
should be promptly re-cstnbllslicd. This
seems tons a liniipy statement of tho doc
trine of ' imnartlnl sutrrngo nnd universal
nninosty, ' winch Mr. Greeley, In c:ommon
with n Inrgo ccctlon nf tho republican
... 1...... n.l..rtnH(n.l It t. ..vn..1l..tit
fiiti., nun iiiii tt. . Ln. 11 1 1: u Ik n i:alviivii.
doctrine, nnd ought to pruvall. Wo hold
tho Philadelphia convention bound, in
patriotism nnd in widom, to tuuo tho
samo ground. If it shall culpably fail to
do so. tho opposition will havu hero mo
genuine ndvnntngo In point of principle."
CiKSAlUSM.
HE VIEW
OK GRANT'S
TRATION.
GREAT
SPEECH IIV
.SU.MNER.
AD.MI.NIi
CHARLES
men before the law, nnd hold thnt It is
tho duty of tho government in lt dealings
with the people to mote out EQUAL AN I)
EXACT JUSTICE TO ALL, OF
W II A T E V E U N A T 1 0 N A L I T V, RACE,
COLOR OR PERSUASION, RELI
GIOUS OR-POLITICAL.
2. TVE PLEDGE OURSELVES TO
MAINTAIN THE UNION OF THESE
STATES, EMANCIPATION AND EN
FRANCHISEMENT, AND TO OP
TOSE ANY REOPENING OF THE
QUESTIONS SETTLED BY THE
THIRTEENTH, FOURTEENTH AND
FIFThENTH AMENDMENTS OF
THE CONSTITUTION.
VXIVEKHAI. ASINKHTY.
3, AVe demand the immediate and ab
solute removal of all disabilities impoied
on account of the rebellion which was
finally subdued seven yean ugo, believing
that UNIVERSAL AMNESTY WILL
RESULT IN THE COMPLETE PAC
IFICATION IN ALL SECTIONS OF
THE COUNTRY-
IIBMOl'KATIV TO THE COKE.
4. LOCAL SELF-GOVERNMENT
with impartial suffrage, will guard tho
rights of nil citizens more securely than
any centralized power. The people and
the public welfare require tho SUPRE
MACY OF THE CIVIL OVER THE
MILITARY AUTHORITY and
FREEDOM OF PERSON UN DEI
THE PROTECTION OF THE HA
BEAS CORPUS. Vto demand for tbe
individual the largest liberty consistent
with public order, for tho statn folf-gov
ernmcnt, and for tho nation a return to
the methods nf peace nnd tho constitu
tional limitations of power,
"TKITK AN ritEAflll.X.
5. Tho civil servico of tho government
has become a mere instrument of partisan
tyranny nnd personal ambition, and an
object of selfish greed. It is a ficnndal
and reproach upon free Institutions, and
breeds a demoralization dangerous to the
porpotuity of republican government.
TIIEKEFOKE A WISE DEMAND.
6. We therefore regard a THOROUGH
REFORM OF THE CIVIL SERVICE
as one ol the ino-t pressing necessities of
the hour; that hontsty, capacity and fidel
ity constitute the only valid claims to pub
He employment ; that the offices of the
government cease to be n matter of nrbi
trary favorititm and patronage, nnd that
public station become again the post of
honor. TO THIS END IT IS IMl'Kli-'
ATIVELY REQUIRED THAT NO
PRESIDENT SHALL BECOME A
CANDIDATE FOR RE-ELECTION.
TAKItT QUESTION HIIOVEO A8II1E.
7. We demand a system of fudcral tax
ation which shall not unnccesaarily inter
fere with the industry of the people, and
which shall provide thu means necessary
to pay the expenses of tlm government,
economically udinihinturod th
the interest on tho public debt and a mod-
erme. annual reduction of the principal
thereof, Mnd recognize that there are in
our midit nonet but Irreconcilable dif-
mences 01 opinion with regard to the re
pecuve systems of protection and free
c,,vx. "EMIT THE D.SCUS-
Ir.lClS. A.N11 Tin- ifn ......
1-UnGKEbS THKUFOV vt-imi i v
K HEia'MIATKSN,
8.- The public c. edit tllusV ,c d
maintained, and we DENOUNCE UK.
rum,viiu.N in every form and guise.!
" 'S IIKTHI'U METAL
9. A SPEEDY RETURN 'i n
SPECIE PAYMENTS Li?
alike by the highest consider
merclal morality and hotust government"
A WUHU FWK THE NOLIIIKIl IIUVN.
10. Wo remember with gratUm the
incrillces of the soldiers und suilor. of tlu
republic, and no act of curs shad ever
detract from their Justly earned fame, or
the full rewurds of their patriotism.
AVAV.IT.EAXls ItUIIMEIIN I
11. We arc opposed to all further grants
of Und to railroads or other corporation.
THE PUBLIC DOMAIN SHOuTlj MP
SACRED TO ACTUAL SET
LIBERAL 1'OHEIUK l-OI.ICY.
12. We hold that It is the duty of tho
ROrermnent in Its intercourse with fortlirn
nations U cultivate friendships of peace
-1 ..hi.k wim an on lair and
HWto demand what is
nlt to what is wrnnc.
13 Fo,rV!L"VMO"V VITED."
tbeVe Jlui1"'' ' -uccess of
Mr. Sumner opened his speech with tho
announcement that ho was a member of
tho Republican party, and one of the
straltclt of tho sect j had never fulled to
sustain Its candidates nnd advance Its
principles. Not without regret could he
see it suffer, ,ior without pang could he see
it changed from Its oricinnl character, for
such change is death. Therefore ho asked,
with no common feeling, that the peril
which menaces it may pafs nway. He
had stood by its cradle! nnd was not wil
ling to follow its hearse.
Mr. Sumner then proceeded to detail
tho rise and procicss ot tho rmrtv and his
connection with it ns a party necessary
nnd permanent and always on tho ascend
ing plane, but, nla, how (-Hanged ! unco
Iirinciple wus inscribed on tho victorious
tanner1, not n naino only. It i not diffi
cult to indicate when the disastrous change,
exalting tho will of ono man above all
else, became manifest. Already it had be
gun to show itself in personal pretensions,
hen the president, elected In- the re
publican party, precipitated upon tho
country an illAioneidered and ill-omened
scliemu for the annexation of a portion of
san Domingo, in pursuance 01 n tieaty
ecotiated by one of his own household.
It was pressed for months by -verv means
and appliance of power. Reluctant Sena
tors were solicited foi sup(Kirt, while
treading under foot the Constitution, in
one of its most distinctive republican
principles. Tho president seized tho wnr
powers ot thu nation, instituted lorcign
intervention, nnu capped tue climax 01
usurpation by menace 01 violence, to the
black republic of Hnyti, thus adding
manifest oulrutrj of international law to
manifest outrage of the constitution.
.Mr. Sumner would gladly leave tills
matter to the judgment already recorded,
were it not put in Issue again by extrnordi
nary efforts, radiating on every lino of
office, to place its author for a second term
of the presidency, and since silence givci
consent, all these efforts uro his ctlurts.
They become more noteworthy, when It is
considered that the name ol the candidate
thus pressed, has become u sign of discord,
nnd not conci.rd, dividing instead of uni
ting tho republican puny, so that thve
exiruordiiiarv ellort- lend directly to the
disruption of tho party, all of which ho
witnesses, and again by his silence ratltle-.
Let tho tmrtv snlit. s'nvs the nresldeiil.
" 1 will not renounce my chance of 11 sec
ond term." The extent of this pereonal
pressure and (ubordlnallon of the party
to tnu win 01 tin individual com.
poU tu to uon-tdur 1U pretension Thooc,
too, aro in i'suc. On what meet doth this
our CaMur feed, that ho should nsstimo o
much. An honor or victory lu tho world
can justify disobedience to the comtitution
and to law, nor cun it alloru the least
apology for any personal immunity, privi
lege or Iicenso 111 the preMUentluI ullice.
A Jire.-ident must turn into a king before
it cun be said of him that ho can do no
wrong. Ho is responsible nlwajs. As
president hois tho foremost scrvuiit of the
law, and is bound to obov Its slitrtitcst
111 11 ml iite. As tho elect o! the peoplo he
owes not only tho example of willing
obedience, but also of fidelity nnd industry
in tho discharge of his conspicuous otlice,
with nn abrogation of all self-seeking.
Nothing for hut all for tho country.
mid now, as wo regard the career 01 this
candidate, wo llnd to our amazement how
litllu it accords with this simple require
ment. Bring it to tho touchstone und
it falls. Not only nro the constitution
and law disreuurded, but tho presidential
.illico itself Is treated as little more than it
pluythlng und u perquisite when not tho
former then the hitter. Mere details are
umple, showing how, from tho beginning,
this exalted trust has dropped to be a per
sonal indulgence; where palace cars, fust
horses, unu seaside loitering llguro more
than duties : how purmnnl alms and ob
jects have been more prominent than pub
lic 1 lucrum; now too pres'dcnilul olllcu
has been ued to ndvimce his own famllv
on a scale of nepotism dwarfing every
thing -of the kind in our history, and
hardly equaled in corrupt governments
where this abuse bus most prevailed ; how
In thu mine spirit, ollice has been confer
red upon tho-e from whom ho haU received
gifts or benefits thus making thu country
repay his personal obligations; how per
sonal devotion to hinn-olf rathor than tho
public or party service Inn been madu tho
standard of favor ; how tho vast appoint
Ing power conferred by tho constitution
for the general welfare has been employed
at his will to prornoto his Mhomes, lo 're
ward his friends, to punish his opponents
und to advance his election m tlm t 1 mm 11I
term ; how nil these assumptions have ma
tured in pcrsonul covornment, semi-military
lu diameter, und breathing a military
spirit, being a species of CVsaruiii, oV
pursonallsm, ubhorrent to republican In
stitutions, when subserviency to the presi
dent is tho supreme law ; llow, in niuin
tuning this Mibservience, he has operuted
jiuiii 01 combinations, having
their orbits about him, so that, like the
planet Saturn, ho is surrounded bv riric.
do tie,lmilitudo end here,' for his
. " of Planets, uro held in
u ire nublican Cn-urmn has mastered the
I h. n U'",,irt-V "ml '-ltl the presi-
G1 , :,M r'Khl lufiurrel with any
od, in. Uts upon quarreling until ho bin
become tiy great p;utid,,,tqv ele , J
more quarieh than ull otl.or 11 do mi
tB' r.na.llles.nttnd con at d W
Snerd to piijftg;
Miniet;ii. jiuw mil hf.r.,,.,,.i i . -
Wm in quarrel, iHTK.X
"rid tl't" not departing from hU V Tlrl
out with Shakspenr, - We will hnvu ilnS
and th ngs and flue array." ud , W
how tl.e chosen head of tl 0 republic ?s
irnu tc, Wu,. rruita riSe,::
n lair and equal 1 derix.,.r, h. i .i ",ulu ehurncter,
like dishonorable ,E . 'I ,i(""'lry and full of evil
not right or sub- marv ml. V 1, "?.'"!? W ".. lr-
presL,;ce S
and 'the1 1'ltl1lub"n In-Utillom ! stUlb
""' tho people learn wrong.
uu,m uihi uiese thing could be lor
gotten, but since through officious friends
the I resident Insists upon a second term
they must be considered. Nobody will In
dicate them. It It easy to see that
Cieinrism oven In Europe 1 nt n discount;
that pnrsonnl government has been beaten
in that ancient ilcld, and thnt CViar, with
a Senate at his hcols, l not n fit tnodol
for our Republic. King George the Third
of England, 10 peculiar for obstinacy nnd
narrowness, had retainers in Parliament
who went under tho name of tho King's
friends. Nothlnir cun bo allowed hero to
justify thu Inquiry, Hnvo wo a King
Ueorgo among tu I Or that other question,
Have wo n pnrty In tho Senate of tho
King's friends?
Personal government Is autocratic, and
In direct conflict with republican goyorn
ment. A government of laws and not of
men Is tho object of republican govern
ment. Nay, more, it is tho distinctive es
senco without which It become tyranny.
Therefore, personal government, In all
its forms, and especially when it scok to
sway the action of any other br.inch or
overturn the constitutional negative, Is
hostile to tho llrst principles of republican
institutions and an unquestionable outrage.
That our president has offended in this
way Is, unhappily, too apparent.
The president Is n civilian. To compre
hend the personal government that has
been installed over us, wo must know it
author his picture is 11 necessary frontis
piece, not ns a soldier, let It be "borne In
mind, but as n civilian. To appreciate hU
peculiar character as a civilian It is im
portant to know his triumph as u soldier,
for one i the natural complement of the
other. The successful soldier is rarely
changed to n successful civilian. There
seem's to bo incompatibility between thu
two, mollified by the extent to which the
one has been allowed to exclude tho other.
One always a soldier cuunot late in life
become u statesman; one always 11 civilian
cannot late in life become a soldier.
In modern Europe few soldiers have
been more conspicuous tbnn Gustavus
Adolpnt.s and Frederick, sometimes
called The Great; but we learn thai both
fulled ignominously in their domestic pol
icy nnd showed themselves as short-sighted
In" the arts of peace as they were sagacious
in the arts of war. Tho judgment of
Marlborough is painted while portraying
him a the greatest conqueror ot tho age
hero of a hundred fights, victor of Blen
heim and Romulus. The same phil
osophical writer describes him as a man
not only of most idle and frivolous pur
suitSj but to miserably ignorant that his
deficiencies made him tho ridicule of his
contemporaries; while his politics were
compounded of selfishness and treachery.
Nor was Wellington an exception.
Though shining in the field without a ri
val, und remarkable for integrity ot pur
pose, unflinching honesty and high moral
feelinir, tho conqueror of Waterloo Is de
scribed as, nevertheless, utterly unequal to
me voiiipucuieu exigencies 01 political
life.
Such nro the examples of historv. each
with Its warning. It would be hard to
find anything in the native endowments
or in thu training of ourchieftuin to make
him nn illustrious exception; at least
nothing of this kind was recorded. Was
nature mora generous with him than with
Murlborouuh, or olluicton, Gustavus.
called The Great, or was his experience of
life a ueiter preparation than theirs
And yet they failed, except in war. It is
not known thut our chieftain bad an expe
rience us civilian until he became presi
dent, nor does any partisan attribute to
him that double culture which in anti
quity made tho same man soldier nnd
statesman. It has been often said that he
took no note of public affairs, never votlnc
1 ... 1.1 1! A. I .1' e 1 "
011 l uneu 111 1110 me, nnu men lor .1 nines
Buchanan. After leaving West Point ho
became a captain in the army, but soon
uoanuoneu me service to re-appear at a
later day us a successful generul. Thero
is no reason to believe that he employed
the intermediate period in any way cal
ciliated to improve him as a'statesman
tiu was earning n lew nunured dollar a
ear by tanning hides in Gulena. By
war he pascd to be president, and such
was his preparation to govern tho great
rupuuue, niuhin- 11 an c.vmnpio 10 man
kind.
(Tt.VTO.V'.- OI'I.VIO.V Or OKAST.
Something must also bo attributed to
individual character, und here I exnress
no opinion of mv own. I ahull allow nn.
other to speak in solemn word, echoed
from the tomb. On reaching Washington
ut tho opening of congress in December,
icvi', 1 was pauicu 10 near mat Stanton,
iiueiy secreiury 01 war. was in la nir
health. Full of irralitude for his unsur.
passed services, und with a sentiment of
IrlenUbhip, quickened bv common political
sympathy, 1 lost no timo in seeing him,
und repeated my visits till his death, to
ward tho eloio of the same month. My
lust visit was murked by a communication
never to bo forgotten. As I entered his
bed-room, where I found him reclinim? on
a sofa, propped by a pillow, ho reached
out his hand, already clammy and cold,
and in reply to my inquiry, "How aro
you?" ho answered, "Wnitlug for my fur-
ougli. ' Then ut once, with cingular hol-
emiilty, lie sulci, " I have something to my
to you." When I was seated ho proceeded
without ono word or introduction : "I
know Generul Grant better than any other
person In the country can know him. It
was my duty to-day when I saw him, and
when I did nut ma him, and now I tell
you what 1 know: He can not govern this
country. Tho intensity of hU manner
and tho posiiiveness of his judgment sur
prised me, for, though I win aware that
the lute secretary of war did not place tho
president very high in general capacity, I
wus not prepared lor a luuiiinent so
trongly couched. At lust, uf'ter soino de
lay, in meditating 011 his remarkuble state
ment, I observed i " What you suy is very
broad." " It I us trim as it ts broad," ho
replied promptly. I added. " You aro
turdy; why did you not say it before thu
nominuiion - Jio answered that tie was
not consulted about thu nomination, and
had 110 opportunity of expressing hi
opinion upon it, besides being very much
occupied at the timo with his duties as
secretary of war, und h! contest with tho
prt sidunt. I followed by saying, "but you
look part in tho presidential election, and
made a succession of speeches for him in
Ohio and Pennsylvania," " I spoke," suid
he, " bul I never introduced the nume of
General Grunt. 1 spoke for the republi
can party and the republican cause.
insisting upon re-election tho president
hallenges inquiry and puts himself upon
the country. But even if his pressure for
re-election did not menace the trauouilltv
of the country, it is important that tho
personal pretensions he has sit up should
be exposed, und thut 110 president hereaf
ter may venture upon such ways, nnd no
senator presume lu defend them.
Tho case is clear us noon. In opening
this cutuloguo I select two tvpicul in
stances. .Nepotism and gift-tukini;, offi
cially compensated, each absolutely inde
fensible in tho head ot the republic, most
pernicious in example, and showing be
yond question thu surpassing egotism
which changed the presidential office Into
u personal instrumentality not unlike tho
trunk of an elephant, for all things, small
things us well as greut, from provision for
a relative to pressing u treaty on a reluct
ant senate, or lurcing relative on a re
luctant people. Between thoso two typi
cal Instances I hesitate which to nlaco
foremost, hut since the nepotism of the
president is tho ruling pus, ion, revouling
tho primary instincts of his nuture, since
it 1 maintained by him in utter uncen
selousness nf its oltciislvu character, since
instead 01 tmisuing lor 11, us an uuhuppy
mUtuko, ho continues to uphold it, since It
has been openly defended by senators on
this lloor, und sluco no true patriot, anx
ious for republican institutions, can doubt
that It ought to be driven with hisses und
scorn from ull probability nf repetition, I
begin with thit undoubted abuse.
Thero has been no call of congress for
a report of relations holding oflico or sti
pend, or money making opportunity un
der tho president. It I evident that nny
resolution calling for It, moved by a sena
tor not known to bo for l.ls re-election,
would meet with opposition, and nn effort
to vindicato republican Institution would
bo denounced ns an assault on tho presi
dent. But ncwspapor.s have placed
enough beyond question for judgment on
this extraordinary case, although thus fur
there has boon no attempt to appreciate it
in tho light of history. One list make
tho number of bcncHcinrics ns many as
forty-two. It will not bo questioned thnt
there is nt least a baker' dozen In
thts category, thirteen relations of tho
president billeted on tho country, not ono
of whom, but for this relationship, would
hnvo been brought forward. The whole
constituting :i case of nepotism not un
worthy of the worst government whoso
oflico U family possession. Beyond the
list of thirteen nro other revelations
showing that this strnnga abuse did not
stop with tho president' relatives, but
that hi relations obtained appointments
for other in their circle, so that every re
lation became the center of influence,
while the presidential family extended
Indefinitely. Mr. Sumner here quoted
from American authorities on nepo
tism, nnd said thnt but ono President
(Adams) had ever appointed relatives to
office, and that public sentiment condemn,
cd these appointments.
Mr. Sumner then nnswered tho apolo
gists of tho Presldont, and continued, as
suming that In 11 cii'o of posltivo merit,
designating acilizen for a particular post
the president might appoint a relation, It
would only bo where merit was so shin
ing, that Wis absence would bo noticed. At
least it must Ik such as to make a -ilIzen
a candidate without regard to famllv. But
no such merit ts attributed tu thu Iielietl
claries jof nur President, some of whom
have dono little but bring scandal upon
the public service. At least one is tainted
with traud, and another, Willi a commis
sion of the Republic abroad, has been
guilty of indiscretions inconsistent with
his trust. Appoinloil originally in open
defiance of Republican princfple', they
have been retained in office alter their un
fitness became painfully conspicuous. By
testimony before a Congressional commit
te oneo'f these, a brother-in-law, was Im
plicated in bribery and corruption. It is
said that nl lat, "alter considerable delay,
tbe president has consenfed to bi' removal.
(IIKT-TAKINO.
Here I leave for thf present thi enor
mous pretension of nepotim, swollen to
flrphantiati), which nobody can defend.
I ps to gift-taking, which, with our
president, ha assumed an unprecedented
form. Sometime public men, even of
our country, have taken gifts, but it is
not known "that any president has before
repaid tbe patron with office. For n pub
lic man to take gift is reprehensible. For
a President to select a cabinet of coun
sellors and other officers among thoe
from whom he has taken gifts, is an an
amoly in republican annals. An ancient
patriarch feared the Greeks bringing gifts,
und these words have become a proverb.
But there are Greeks bearing gifts else
where than at Troy.
A publle in un "can traffic with such
only at his peril. The prayer should
be s'aid : " Lead us not into temptation
Tho president notoriously has taken gifts
while in tho public service some nt lean
after ho had been elected president; until
the Galena tanner of a few hundred dollars
a year, to borrow tho word of my col
league, one of his supporters, is now rich
in nouses, lands and stock, above his salary,
being probably the richest president since
Georgo Washington. Ho has appointed to
his cabinet "ureeks bearing Kilts with
out seeming to sec the indecorum, if not
the indecency of tho transaction. At least
two, if not three of these "Greeks,'' having
no Known position in the republican party
or influence In tlm muntry, huvo bocn so
lected as counsellors in tho national affair
und heads of greut departments of the
government. Nor docs tho case of the
first secretary of state, nppointed as
compliment, differ in character from tho
other throe. Tho president, feeling under
personal obligation to Mr. Wnshburne for
importunt support, gave him n compli
mentary nominotion, with tho understand
ing thut niter confirmation he should
forthwith resign. I can not foria-t the in
dignant comment of the late Mr. Fesscn-
don as wo passed out of theseuatechamber
immedi'itely after the confirmation
"Who," said he, "ever heard belore of u
mnn nominated secretary or state merely
ns n compliment?"
But this is only another case of the
public subordinated to personal considera
tion;. Not only in the cabinet, but In
other ofllcea, thoro is reason to believe thut
the president has been under tho influence
of patrons. Why wus hoso blind us toplaco
Thomas Murphy In tho custom house of
Now York, which with all its capacity as
a political engine, wa handed over to this
ugent, whoso wunt of recognition In the
republican party wa uulbaluuccd by the
presidential favor, and whoso gifts have
become notorious, Anc', when thcdcmur.d
fur hla rcmovul was irresistible, the presi
dent accepted his resignation with an ef
fusion ot sentiment natural toward n
patron, but without Justification in the
character of tho retiring otliccr.
I have now completed tho survov of two
typical instances of nepotism and gift
taking, ofllclally compensated, in which
we uro compelled to see tho president. In
these things ho shows himself. There is
no portrait drawn by either critic or ene
my. It is tho original, who stands forth
saying: " Behold tregoneroslty I practice
to my relation at tho expense of tho publle
service." In tho open exhibition wo seo
how the presidency, instead of a trust, has
become a perquisite. That tho president
that can do such things nnd not recognize
ut unco tho error he has committed, shows
the super-eminence of egotism under
which tho constitution, international law,
and municipal law, to say nothing of re
publican government, in its primary
principles, uro nil subordinated to the
presidential will and this Is porsonal gov
ernment. Add an Insensibility to the
honost convictions of other, nnd you have
a characteristic Incident of this preten
sion. Lawyers cite what aro culled leading
cases. A few of these show the presiden
tial will In constint oporution, with little
regard to precedent or reason, so as to bo
n caprice, if it were not pretension, initia
ting hopes in nepotism. Tho president
has initiated them 111 ostentatious assump
tion of Infallibility.
Other presidents have entered upon tho
oflico witli a certain modesty and distrust,
but our soldier, absolutely untried in civil
life, entirely 11 now man entering upon
the subllmest duties, before which Wash
ington and Jefferson shrunk, said In his
inaugural: "The responsibilities of tho
position I feel, but accept them without
fear "
The noxt stepaftor tho inutigural address
was the selection of a cabinet; and in his
selection of a cabinet the general disap
pointment was only equaled by tho
guncrnl wonder. All tradition, usage and
propriety wore discarded. Tho just ex
pectations of tho party that had uloctod
lilm wore set at naught, and tho safe
guards of constitutional government woro
subordinated lo the personul protonsions
of one mnn. Mnrkod among thospeetaclos
which followed, and kindred In eharaotor
with the appropriation of tho cabinet as
individual propoity, was tho appropriation
of tho offices of tho country.
Mr. Sumner hero repeated tho charges
of nepotism, appointing relatives to offlco,
c. Mr. Sumnoruritlclsod In severe terms
tho conduct of tho president In sending a
message to congress March 0 1K, usklng 1
thorn to sot aside tho fundamental law. in
order that Stewart might enter upon the
duties of tho secretary of tho treasury, ho
loiowanj ucing ono or those rroin whom
the president hud received gifts.
THE MILITARY IttNO.
Ho next spoko of tho military ring nt
the white house, and said the executive
mansion assumed tho character of a
military headquarters. To the dishonor
of tho civil service, and In total disregard
of precedent, the president surrounded
himself with olllccrs of tho iiriny, nnd sub
stituted military forms for tho'so of civil
life, detailing for till servico member of
his late staff', although congress ha shown
a purpose to limit the employment of
military otllcers in tho civil servico by
three different statutes.
Mr. Sumner condemned the preddenl
for the taking away from their proper du
tios officer of the army, to make them
presidential secretaries, in defiance of law;
tho subordination of tho war department
to the gcnural-ln-cblef; tho nttempt to dc
volvo tho dutle of tho navy department
upon n deputy, so that order were lo bo
signed "A. K. Borle, secretary of the
navy, per 1). D. Porter, admiral;" the ef
fort lo nbsorb tbe Indian bureau Into the
war department; military interference at
elections ; tho efforts to secure the repeal
of tho teiiure-of-offleo act, which limited
tho president s power of appointment, nnd
presidential Interference with political
questions nnd movements In distant states,
from Louisiana to Now York.
Mr. Sumner also rcforrel again nt
length to the San Domingo question, In
terms of condemnation, and said the wholo
contrivance, besides being wrong to tho
black republicans of Hayti, was an Insult
to the colored race not only abroad, but
hero nt home. How a chic'f magistrate
with four millions of colored fellow-cltl-
zens could have done this thing pafes
comprehension.
The colored orator, Frederick Douglas,
was selected by tho president as one of the
commissioners to visit Sun Domingo, and
yet on his return, at most within sight of
the executive mansion, he was repelled
from the common table of a mall steamer
011 the Potomac when the other commis
sioner were already seated, and through
him was tho African race insulted, and
then equal rights denied. But the presi
dent, whoso "commission ho had borne,
neither did nor said nnythini; lo right the
wrong, and few days'later, uheti enter
taining the commissioners at the execu
tive mansion, actually forgot the colored
orator, who-o services he had sought. But
this indignity i in union with the jest.
After in-ultini; the black republic, it is
cay to see ho natural It was to treat
with insensibility the representative of
the African race" here.
r.. .. .1. t. -s.t ! ... . .1
I 1 stay tins painiui pieseiiuiiiem uuuer
1 its various head-, beginning with nepotism
I and gift-taking, official compensated, and
' ending in a' contrivance against San
, Domingo, with the indignity to the Afri
! can race, not because it is romple, but
because It is enough. JWith sorrow
unspeakable 1 hnvo made ibis exposure of
pretensions, which, for the "ako of
epublican institutions, every good citizen
should wish expunged from history. But
1 had no alternative. Tho president
I himself insists upon putting them in Issue.
1 He will not allow them to b. forgotten.
s a cunuiuaie lor re-eieciion no inv.ies
judgment, and now the question of duty is
presented to the republican party. I like
that work. It is at tho mandate of duty
thut wo must act. Do his presidential
pretensionsmcrit tho sanction of the party?
Can republicans, without depurtlug from
nil obligations, whether of party or patriot
ism, recognize our ambitious Cn-sur ns tho
proper representative? Can wo take the
fearful responsibility of his prolonged
empire? I put these questions solemnly,
as a member of tho republican party, with
all the earnestness of a life devoted" to the
triumph of this party. With me, party
was country and mankind; but with the
adoption of all these presidential preten
sions, patty loses it character and drops
from Its sphere; its creed ceases to be
republicanism and becomo Grnntism
men. It Is no longer a political party,
but a personal party. For myself, I say
openly, I am no man's nor do I belong to
any personnl party.
Mr. Sumner spo'ke at length on the one
term principle. The attempt to charge
tho character of the republican part.y
said Mr. Sumner, begins by an assault on
tho principle of tho "one term for
rresidetit. The Influenco of thre president
has increased, is incrcaintr, nnd might be
diminished, but in this excellent work well
worth tho best efforts of all. Nothing is
more important than is the limitation to
one term. There is a demand for reform
In the civil service, und the president
formally adopts this demand, but ho neg
lects the first step which depends on him
self. From this wo may judge his llttlo
earnestness in the cause. Bovond all
question civil servico reform must begin
by the limitation of tho presidency to one-
term, so that tho temptation to use tho
appointing power for p-irsonal ends may
disappear' from our system, and this grea't
disturbing force ccaso to exist. If tho
President is sincere for reform, it will bo
eai-y for him to set the example by declaring
ins aunesion to thu one-term principle.
But even if ho fails we must do our duty.
In alluding to our foreign relation's,
Mr. Sumner said ho felt bound to say thut
never before lias their mnnngement been
so wnnting In ability nnd so absolutely
without character. In every direction is
muddle, muddlo. With Spain, muddle;
with Cuba, muddlo ; with tho black repub
lic, muddlo; with distant Corcn, muddle -,
with Venezuela, muddlo; with Russia,
muddle; with England; on nil sides ono
diversified muddlo. Laughter. To this
condition nro wo reduced. When before
In our history have wo reached nny such
pinK u thut to which wo have been car
ried in nur nuestlons with England. Arn
these laurels for tho presidential candidate?
TI1K PIltt.APKM-IllA rONVKSriO.V.
Mr. Sumner concluded I wait thu de
termination of the nutlonal convention,
whero nro delegates from my own much
honcred commonwealth, with whom I re-
joico to act. Not without anxiety do 1
wait, hut with tho eurnost hope thnt tho
convention vill bring the republican
party into nnciont harmony, saving It, es
pecially, from tho suicidal follv of an Is
sue on tho porsonal prctonsions of one
l'KOFESSOIt MOUSE.
A HTOHY OK Ull AIIVKIIS1TY.
Wo happened to meet Colonel Strothor,
the famous Purtu Crayon, und tho talk
turning us usual upon Morse, tho Colonel
suid;
"I know him well, I took lessons
under him in drawing nnd painting. I
first saw him when he wus a competitor
for the remaining panel in the rotundas of
tho capitol. I thought then he ought to
have hud it. I think so yet. Ho was not
n grand artist, but he was enough one to
save us from ridicule. Tho job was given
to Mr, Powell, General Suhenek did that.
The generul probably did not know ono
picture from another, nut Mr. rowuu was
Ii constituent, und he believed, ns did
Schonck. that something in tho way of
art should bo done for the Miami bottoms,
so ho worked at it till ho got the commission."
"And ono day," said wo, "congres will
L-ivo Gen. Scheuck permission to remove
that torriblo product from thu Miami bot
toms. But about Morse."
"Woll. I ongngod to becomo his pupil,
and subsequently wont to New York und
found mm in u room In university naco.
He hud throe other nunll. nnd I soon
found that our professor had very llttlo
palronnge. I paid my fifty dollar. Tlm
settled for ono quarter's Instruction.
Morse was a faithful teacher, and took as
much Intorest In our progress, more,
in
deed, than wo did ouisclvcs. But he was
very poor. I romembor that when my
second quarlor's pay wn duo him, and it
did not come ns soon ns expected, one day
tho professor camoln nnd said courteously:
" Well, Strothor, my boy, how nro wo
off lor money ?"
" Why, Professor." I answered, " 1 nm
sorry to say I have been disappointed ; bul
I nxpoct a remittance next week."
" Noxt wcok,1' ho repeated sadly ; " I
shall be dead bv that time.''
" Dead, Ir?'r
" Yes, dead by starvation."
1 was ditrosod und astonished. 1 said
hurriedly, " Would ten dollars bo of any
servico ?"
"Ten dollar would save my life; that
I nil it would do."
" I paid tho money, ull thnt I had, nnd
we dined together. It was a modest meal,
but good, nnd after we had finished, he
said";
"This Is my llrst meal In twenty-four
vours; Strotlitr, don't bo an artist. It
means beggary. Your life depend upon
people who know nothing of your urt, and
caro nothing for you. A houo dog lives
belter: nnd tlm'vcry sensitiveness thai
stimulates him to work keeps him nlivo to
suffering.
" 1 remained with Professor Morso three
year, nnd then we separated. Some years
afterward I met liim on Broadway one
day. Ho was about the samo ns before, n
trinV older, nnd somewhat ruddier. I
asked him how ho was getting along with
his painting, anil he told mo that lie had
abandoned it. und told about his) proposed
telegraph. 1 accompanied him to hi
room, and thero found several miles nf
wire twisted nbout, and the battory which
ho explained to fie. His pictures lluished,
were lying about covered with dut.
Shortly after thl, congress made an ap
propriation, and Morse was on the high
road to wealth and'immortnlitv. '
iiuroN.
SIGN OF TIIH
O-OLIDIEJnsr LTOIST.
BARCLAY BROTHERS.
71 OHIO, LEV EE,
CAIRO.
Wholesale and detail
IDIETTGrGKEST S
AND
PAINT & OIL DEALERS.
We ke-p a full stock of I'ur limits and
MBDICI1TES
PAINTS,
OILS,
AND COLORS
r or llio eaon i alo a full Mm-of
PAINT, L
VARNISH,
AND ARTISTS
BRUSHES,
And I'jilnt'rs Material" generally
, Do )ou viisli 10 recflTt- all the benenMiU of
) thr celebrated
MEDICINAL WATERS
-or-
IwjrSARATOOA, N. Y.,
and
tiST BLUE LICK, Kv.
Without the ixpen-H of a trip to tho-e renort.
If so. npfiljr to us. We reeelte thf-e waters 'tl
reel frm the sprinc, an I aro prepared to fur
nih ttiern pure, ICK rol.l), fresh nml Llxly
from our counter. Person llvtnz at a ill'tnme,
or who wish to hire the water in their hontrK,
ran 1 supplied uritlittaratOK In tattle, anil nine
I.lck 111 I.011I1-, kK ami barrels. Oil ami vet
circular In rejnnl to Ui medicinal virtues nt
lhee note'l water-.
6-'J.f
AIo a complete ln o loilel articles, Im
ported ami Amentansoaps,
COLOGNES,
POMADES,
EXTRACTS,
HAIR,
TOOTH
AND NAIL
BRUSHES,
roKflher with a larRO assortment of t)ruexlta
Suiellles lunl
PA1TOZ" GOODS.
Our Homo Advertisers.
INftUHANCK.
('AKW)LI(J ACID
DISINFECTING POWDER.
An elleotuni preventive ol Cholera, Typhoid
hever, MiihII-1'ox, Scurlet Fever, Jleasela, Cut
Ho Ihiense, a, ,,11 pexilenlial ami enntKloiis
ilinmeii. II i put up ri pasttaanl enrion, tho
lopi of which oontalu perforations, Irnrn which
II ran he sprinkleil a from u pepper hox. rioM
yn . ., iiutci.tr into-1.
The retail price is 25 cents per package,
(I'roeeeilinRH of the Hoard of Heallh-Olllcinl.)
Oihce Uimuii or IlrsLTii, Kr I.ot is. V2d May,
l7l. The resident physii'inni state that ho riai
used, in (he city hospital, tho catholic acid
powder and rindx it the hen disinfectant and
destroyer of I.uk, ants, cockroaches .to, ol
which he has knowledge, ronr committee re
commend Ihe purchase of this powder for use
In tho hospitals.
(Signed, n. II. O'WtlllN,
Clerk Hoard ol 11 tall Ii.
Wo Hie now in receipt if n freih stock of
MEN WANTED !
E X T R A I DUOEMENTSI
Tho Curo 4 St. Louis It. It. Co. want WW men
at once, to work on tho line or their road In
Alexander county, from 5 lo 15 mllcn north ol
Cairo, Illinois.
IMtlCKS. Kor Htallon work, llctit fill, twenty
conts (liuo.) psr yi rd. Choppers, (2 M) two do.
Inrs nml nTIt' unntj nn. .I.n fi..u .......
(U SMtwu dollars and twenty-five, cents per day.
........... ",-, i riiiuiii imvMicills in Cllsll
Kiutrnnieeii iiy the Company.
Apply to JOHN MUtiVKV, Hup't on Hie work.
s-ai-u&wtf.
SUTTKU & MHUWIHTII,
GLASS STAINERS,
708 WASHINGTON AVENUE,
ST. I.OUIH, MO,
Stained, Enameled, Kmbossod and around oiasa
of fiery description.
I'AIITICULAK ATTKNTlnN 1'AID TO CHUIICII
WOKK. Oar Orders from all parta of tho country
promptly attended to. l-.il din Mm
WOOD I WOOD I I WOOD 1 1
The unJersixned will furnish
HARD AND DRY WOOD
Aa C'hrH,ll nut Caeaper
thD any wood dealer in Cairo. LeaTe ordtal
011 1 ho slates at the Fostoftioe ni at KoV tod
vard, ou Commercial avenue, between Tenth an
twelfth lreet. Ca'ro. Illinois. I glra oor
measure and will cord the wood un f.r.l""'r""
tiiirlli.t! liKNNlf IIAl.hr.
-
TKUTONIA Ii I V K INSUltANCB
co3vii.3sr-2r.
OK CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.
ASSETS, $600,000.
JOHN A. HUOK. - - Preildent.
C. KNOBELSDORFF, - - - HcoroUry.
DIRKCTORK.
Ciiah. Rkitz, Hknky WKIIKIt,
A. 0. Kksi.no, A. Mikcii,
Ciiah. Wkntiik, Ciiah. Vkwiiia,
I'iiancih LAcK.NKn, Ciiah. Dakom.vo,
C. HiitKi-ii, Wm. Bkiniiakdt,
John Fki.dkami-.
The 1.01 orxsnired and aecnreit company in
the northwest. Tde only company which Biiar
anteem cash surrender valuo.
CARL L. THOMAS, Gkm. Ao't,
i-'JMlv for Cairo Bd tlclnlly
FIRE AND MARINE
I IN S TJ 1R, 1ST O E
COMPANIES).
NIAflAMA, N. T.,
Ael9 11,4)0,210 25
OF.RMAK1A, .V. T.,
- l,"C,7Jl TO
IIANOVKR, .V. rM
Atet - 720 MVsl
itKi-uiiLic, .v. r.,
Aet 7ll,'J2i )
Comprising the Underw filers' Afccncy.
VONKKIIO, .V. r.,
Asts 78 404 51
ALIl.t.NY CITY,
- 171,191 21
Asset .
hkkmknV i'u.nii, n. v.,
HKCimtTr, N. T. MAKIN'K,
Asset . 1,432,811
Stores, iMellinK, Kurnllnre, Italia and Car
Kors, Insured nt rates a fan-rahlea sound, per
manent security will wsrranU
I respectfully a of His- cltlfn ol Ca'ro,
slureof their patronage.
C. IV. IM'tilllfft.
W.II. MOHltlS
Notary I'uMic.
II.
.No. I'uli. and ('. H. Com
FIRE, HULL, CARGO, LIVESTOCK
ACCIDENT, LIFE,
I1TSTJ-KA1TCE.
.t.T.VA,H.tRTKOKH,
Assets . ..... .fi,MJ,M! 7
.NOflTII AMKKICA, I' A.,
Assets .2,73,0X) 00
HAItTFOIty, CONN.,
Assets . f2,SM,:10 72
I'llCENIX, IIAKTKOKH,
Ase .. ..! 1.7S 1.141 ii
I NTEItNATIONA h, N. Y.,
Aset ..... .ll,Vj,3s. j
I'UT.-NAM.ItAItTFOKO,
Assets 7t;3J7 00
CI.EVKI.INI), CI,KVK!.t.SD.
A. el 51.'.,C7J
IIOME,COI.UMUL'S,
Ascl 1115,278 43
AMKUHJAN OKNTIt.U., MO.,
Assets 'm,l'V u
CONNKCTICLT MUTUAL. LIKE,
Assets .. f),Cs.j,fm on
TlttVELEia", HAIlTKOItL), LIFE AND
ACCIDENT,
Assets ,W(n 00
Kill. A'A Y PASSENGERS A-HUItANCE
CO, IIAKTFURD,
Aisels fVnsm (s)
INUKFKNOKNT, IIOSTO.V,
Asset C)),s2 00
SAITOHD, MOliTlISA UANDKK,
71 Ohio vrr,
CI17 National riant, CAIRO, ILL.
Railroad Advertisements.
ILLINOIS OKNTUAL KAILHOAD
100 Mile Itir Nhorlcul Itontc
TO CHICAGO,
KlKhlytMllm (hp Hlinrtt Route-
TO ST-LOUIS
NO CHANGE OF CAR.S
FROM CAIRO TO i
ST. LOUIS OR CHICAGO.
ON LY ONE CHANGE OF 0A1W
FROM CAIRO TO
Cincinnati, Indianapolis, Toledo,
Detroit, Clerelsnd, Niagara Falls,
lliillslo, I'iiisIiiiir, Wtshlnxton,
Iinltirnnre, Philadelphia, New York,
Hostou and ull points eiist.
Mllwaukie, Jnneanjlle, Madison.
LaCrosse, 8t. I'aul and all ; oluts. uortu.
Ihit is also lh only direct route to
Decatur, llloomlnton, Nnr
l'torlu, Oulner,
xock isunii,
lii.on. . Proprietor
llurliniilnii,
Mendnla.
(,'alena, I'
Omaha a
Elenunt Draf ee & Skcond St.,
O11I
Fortlelie..a?ILLINIS
depot! nirrf
tweeil ColurrJf
rnllrnmtic!.'
W. I'.JJ
A. Mittiiryed to and from the Depot free
1 dtcg-lf.
BPRINGBTUATOII'S SALK.
.SO Hue of an order and decree of
'Alexander county, Illinois,
On nnd nftur' lb; underaigoed, lniln--,
'"Of the estate of Ctiar(e
trains IO sell the real estate
tprll term, A. V. 1872, of
.NOItTllMi etey of June, A. D.
rat.s.of-n..l
JV he eily of
Leave Vlri-lnln :clMrol1,!w.,nt
" Springfield n.2012!X H.alro,
,' Taylorville lu fri Tfoje. to-wlt:
Arrive at l-ana 11.40 " 'SJ et
TKilSS OOIKO N0TUWtJJJ
i-.xpreis,
Leave I'ana .r.. 4.1NI n.
Tavlorville 4.40 " .; iuil'Lkk.
Arrive at Hprmgtield...e.ia ' " 000
beave npriniueia ,.ii,i a 1,1 ,7 '
Arrive at Virginia 8. ."Zm"5.5 u
hODTIl EHK DIVISION.
TRAINS OOINU SOUTH.. t
Leave Edswnod .in. ' .
" Flora - a .as i. '.'.'-'"P
Arrive At Hhawueet'n 2.M
its fly1

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