OCR Interpretation


The Eaton Democrat. (Eaton, Ohio) 1875-1903, August 12, 1875, Image 2

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88077272/1875-08-12/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

ht democrat.
L, G. GOULD, Editor.
Thursday
Aug. 12. 1S75.
Democratic State Ticket.
FOR GOVERNOR,
WILLIAM ALLEN, of Boss.
LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR,
SAMUEL F. CARY, of Hamilton
FOR SUPREME JUDGE,
TIIOS. Q. ASHBUUN, of Clermont.
FOB AUDITOR OF STATE,
E. M. GREEXE, of Shelby.
FOR TREASURER OF STATE,
JOHN SCIIRELNER, of Meigs.
FOR ATTORNEY-GENERAL,
TIIOS. B. rOWELL, of Delaware.
11E11BER BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS.
II. E. 0' HAG AN, of Erie.
The man who votes a Republican
ticket this fall certifies that Grant's
administration has been a "distin
gaished success."
Tha Democratic LcriBlatnr of
Ohio reduced the fees of County of
ficers $240,000 a vear. When did
Republican Legislature or Congress
ever reduce salaries?
Somcrs township couldn't come in
at the Ringmasters Convention.
Neither could Dixon, Jackson or
Jcffeson, which have been snubbed
for years! Great is the power of
the Eaton Ringmasters !
"Hoop 'em up," Colonel, we think
that all our -'honest and consistent"
Democrats will be under your kind
nd nrotectinsr wintr. ere the ides of
i CJ ... .
October! How sad!
In the" next General Assembly of
Ohio the Senate will be composed of
thirty-seven members, and the House
of one hundred and eleven, an in
crease .of one Senator and six Rep
resentatives ever the 31st General
Assembly.
"Rag money F' Ah! the Demo
cratic editor, who would have had
the temerity to write these two
words about the greenbacks during
the war, would soon have viewed his
printing office scattered in the street,
while hanging to a lamp-post gasp
ing for breath.
If Gov. Hayes did not give $500,
or any other sum of money, to .the
crusaders, let him say so, and he will
be believed, but ' the statements
Republican editors, in the absence
his denial will not acquit him
the charge made by a paper publish
ed afc his home.
J. II. Foos, Esq., is referred to ex
tensively in the last Eaton Register.
We have a slight recolection that
one year ago, the Cincinnati Gazette
and the Hamilton Telegraph, two
unscrupulous Radical sheets,referred
to the same individual ' to substanti
ate some of their malignant and ly
ing charges against one of our Dem
ocratic State candidates! Singular
coincidences,aint they?
Four farmers came into our of
fice the other clay and subscribed for.
the Democrat. Two or these were
Republicans, and they remarked
that, a3 "they had been ignored
the late Ringmasters Convention
they expected to ignore that party,
because when they put their hands
down into their pockets, they found
that more money was needed
Hundreds of others in this county
will come to the same conclusion.
The crisis of 1873 was the direct
' result of the corrupt and suicidal
policy of the republican party;
j-et through their greed for gain
power they do not stop and take
lesson from the ruin they produced,
but they go on regardless of the pro
tests of unemployed labor, stagnant
business and suffering. The repub
lican party are pledged to carry
this policy in the future, and
stands the people in hand to rebuke
the leaders of this policy, regardless
of party considerations.
The Republican leaders would
like to rnn this campaign by a dark
lantern, midnight cabals, as in 1854.
Anj'thing of a political character
which will not bear the light of open
day is dangerons to the welfare
the people, and should be discount
enanced by every honest man. Those
who plot politics in secret conclave
under the obligation of oaths,
within locked doors, are dangerous
men, however honest they may
to be in their purposes.
true and sensible Democrat will
his party feality to be weakened
by the popycock contrivances of
societies.
In 1865 the wages the day laborer
received for three days work would
buy him a barrel of flour; now,
1875, he must work nearly seven
days for a barrel of flour. In
one day's work paid for eight pounds
of coffee, now it only pay 3 for
pounds; then it would pay for seven
teen pounds of sugar, now only
pounds; then it would pay for twelve
pounds of batter, now only
pounds; then it would pay for
and a half bushels of potatoes,
for one bushel and a half; then
would pay for fifteen dozens of
now for eight dozens.
For the Eaton Democrat.
EATON Aug. 2 1875
Edtr Democrat,
of
of
by
For more than a year past, I have
noticed in your paper numerous
'sumbbs directed against me, in
which you endeavor in various ways,
to brui2 me into disrespect, and to
disparage my standing as a citizen
in this community, but more par
ticularly so, bv attacking my opin
ions on the subject of temperance.
bo long as -on con lined your at
tacks simply to my opinions.. Itock
no notice or them whatever being en
tirely willing that, the people of Pre
ble County who knew you, and, who
know me, might judge tor themselves
on that subject. Although I must
confess, I was not aware, that the
opinions of a private citizen were the
subject of censure and ridicule in a
public journal.
Latterally however yon have pre
suined to go further than strictures
on op uious merely, and have as
sumed to eharsre mc with the com
mission of certain acts, which in
your opinion are very fatal to my re
putation as a citizen. Now this is
very different thing, and as I con
ceive demands notice at my hands.
In the last number of your paper
you charge in respect to myself that,
"One vear ago, he put himself at the
head of a mob, which interfered with
the risrhts of our citizens to earn on
their business under our laws and to
cat and drink what they desired.
Now Sir sir I deny the above
charge as a whole, I deny that Iliad
anything to do, cither in getting up
or sustaining, wliat was commouiy
known as the "crusade (and that is
what I understand j-ou to mean in
vour eharsre, ). I deny that 1 ever
met with the crusaders at any oi
their meetings, or ever made or heard
any one make a temperance speech.
either before, during the time of, or
after the crusade, And I aver that my
whole connection with the atiair was.
that of a public officer only, I bein
at that time mayor of the town of
Eaton, and I further aver, that the
official course pursued by me in ref
erence to the crusade, was auviseu
and approved, by one of the ablest
attys at the Ohio Bar, (and he was
not a crusader bv any means, I. Ana
unon the above charge and denials.
I demand vour proot.
You next, clianre tuat, "tie aiso
furnished the Cincinnati Gazette,
one of the most unscrupulous Kadi
cals papers in the State, with most
abusive personal articles, against
one of our candidates, for a high of
fice on the State ticket, last year,
Now this is a most singular charge,
you do not either affirm or deny the
truth of the facts contained in the
communication, you do not set
the words of the communication
that your readers could determine!
whether or no the communication
was abusive. For I presume that
upon the truth or falsehood of the
facts, asserted, would, depend the
abusive character of the article
question,
iou simply eharsre that 1 wrota
communication to the Cincinnati Ga
zette, last fall, and then, without giv
ing or attempting to give a word
the communication itself, charge
that it was abusive, "of one of our
candidates for a high office on our
State ticket last year"
Now just how, a charge like this,
can amount to anything is not quite
clear. But I presume you refer,
you do not seem to possess
sufficient nerve to say so, to tne com
munications published last fall
the Cincinnati Gazette in reference
to Judee Gilmore. purporting
come from this county, and signed,
"Preble County Democrat
Now Sir. I deny that I was
author of those communications,
of any one of them, I deny that
had anything to do. with the jur
nishing of said communications
the Cincinnati Gazette or to any
else, in any way or manner whatever,
either directly or indirectly. Ana
now demand your proof, when
have introduced your testimony
am ready to introduce mine, i
trial shall not be delayed,
Respectfully
Edtr Democrat, J. H. FOOS.
!"
and
a
out
it
of
and
No
al
low se
cret in
1SG5
ten
five
two
now
it
The above is the verbatim card
our ex-Bro. J. H. Foos, Esq.,
which to us sounds very much
the lament of the "whang-doodle
that mourned for its first born !"
is not our purpose now to afflict
readers of the Democrat with a
hearsal of what has contributed
make Bro. Foos so "wormy" here
late the reasons are too well known
besides, we have larger game
shoot at, and more important
ters demanding our time and space.
No doubt it was the unhappy condi
tion of Bro. Foos' bowels, that,
him to imagine that the Democrat
was "squibbing" at his opinions
private citizen. The Lord Mayor
the city of Eaton and architect
our "showy Hall," is certainly
than a "private citizen," and his
ficial declarations public property,
besides, we were not aware before
that he had any "private opinions"
on temperance and the Crusade,
when not issuing official orders
the Marshal of Eaton to compel
iness men to remove salt barrels
boxes, in order that the crusade
could have room on the side-walks
to interfere and annoy thpsc citizens.
he was sitting around prominent
business houses, making public
private opinions, (and an ass
himself too,) vindictively beratin
and denouncing all who opposed
Crusade predicting who would
drunkards graves and declarin
that the Democrat ought to be
pressed, "because it was an advocate
of whisky and saloons!" He
tributed his mite toward this
reform, transferring his patronage
from the Democrat to the Register
simply because we warmly recom
mended our old and respected
zen, j uuge iaines, lor the vacancy
of Common Pleas Judge! That
nothing more.
We expected the Lord Mayor
architect of our "showy Hall," to
back on his crusade record in
we predicted it more will do it.
Many of the candidates on the Ring
masters ticket will now do it, and
make affidavit that they knew noth
ing of it! But it is "too thin" 'yet,
Bro.' Foos. It is too fresh how you
labored, consulted and decided with
the sisters in what they no "doubt
honestly believed the work of Christ
and how they prayed in the M. E.
Church on election day, that you
might be endowed with wisdom and
"back bone" to "stick" with them in
the good cause! We now advise you
to still "stick !" The unprecedented
success of the' Democrat, is sufficient
evdience that our position of allow
ing every man to be the judge of
what he shall eat and drink, was cor
rect, and as one year of the time al
lotted us to fill a drunkard s grave
has elapsed, and wo have not yet
been led home intoxicated, there is
some hope !
As to the second complaint of cx-
Bro. Foos, in regard to the items
furnished the unscrupulous radical
Cincinnati Gazette, we have no more
disposition to do him an injustice or
place him in a false position in this,
than in the Crusade. Both these
matters are dead and in the past
the people have rendered their ver
dict upon them, and they arc not very
material now but wc do know that
a Reporter for the Cincinnati Ga
zettc, called on the Lord Mayor of
Eaton, when he came here to look up
the record of the Democratic candi
date on the State Ticket, but did not
come to see us and we further know,
thnt some of the items which ap
pcared in the Gazette against ou
democratic candidate, were in the
possession of no other persons but
the Lord Mayor and ourself. With
this statement of the fact, we leave
the question of how they got into
that journal, for the reader to de
cide. As to the authorship of the
articles in the Democrat, which Bro.
Foos is so exorcised about, we assume
them in whole and detail, and here
end it, with the following quotation
from Burns, for the- benefit of our
ex-Bro:
Oh wad fcomepow'r the giftie gie us,
To see ourselves as others Bee us,
It wad frae monie a blonder free us,
And foolish notion."
LABORING MEN.
in
a
ot
al
though in
to
the
or
I
to
one
l
ne
of
and
like
You remember a year ago when
money was more abundant you had
good times in comparison to what
they are now. Did you then think
yon had too much money? Well, in
order that the Government, might
take care of the RICH and the rich
take care of the POOR, the Repub
lican leaders called in, or took out
the circulation, millions of dollars
paper currency, and that is the rea
son money is so scarce, times
hard, prices so low and you are
hard pressed to get bread for your
selves and your families.
WILL YOU VOTE
for a continuance of these party lea
ders in office? Vote for a clean sweep
this fall. Vote for more money.
Vote for YOUR OWN INTERESTS
poor men, and let partyism go to the
dogs. Vote for the men who will
make laws to protect all alike, and
not for the RICH only, as the Re
publican leaders have been doing and
will continue to do, if you continue
them in office.
The iron manufacturers want more
money, the farmers want more money
business men want more money
laboring men want more money ev
erybody wants more money, except
the rich bondholders who pay
taxes on their wealth. VOTE FOR
MORE MONEY.
It
the
re
to
of
to
mat
led
as a
of
of
more
of
lor
to
bus
and
mob
his
of
the
fill
sup
con
latter
citi
and
and
go
fact
The Democracy made the Consti
tution of Ohio. Their Votes adopt
ed it They made the School laws,
They are both good. Now, under
the false plea of friendship the Re
publicans propose to change them
back to the old Puritanical, blue
blaze, psalm singing humbugs of
years ago to the days when dea
cons and preachers opposed all edu
cation without a heavy sprinkling
their religion. That is the game
the Radical preachers and politi
cians. Stand by the solid column
Democracy. Stand by the party
that has given Ohio the first name
in the Union for her excellent
Schools. Watch the enemy closely,
rue cry aoout tne uatnoiics is
humbug, and is only intended
work upon the prejudice of a weak
mind. The Catholics are not inter
fering with our schools. There is
large Catholic population in Preble
county, and who, with the truth
his mouth, dare say they interfere
in any way whatever?
The editor of the Register is
dull or is particularly anxious
some sympathy. Because we
he would find it more difficult
"whoop up" fanners and laboring
men to support a party that
pronounced by that paper as
corrupt," than to "hoop
up" whisky barrels, he undertakes
get the impression out that wo
making fun of him, because he
once a laboring man! Poor fellow!
We've been a laborer all our life,
expect to die in tho harness.
something else, Colonel.
. Have the Sayler family a lease
the office of Representative? From
precedent it seems it has, and
it is better to be born with a lucky
name than with qualifications.
AN ITEM WORTH MENTIONING.
It i3 claimed that R. B. Hayes is a
very respectable man and made a
respectable liovernor. Ail oi tnis
we are willing to accede; but Mr.
Hayes belongs to a party of wrong
principles, a party that gives the
people a too expensive government.
As an evidence oi the Kepuuncan
idea of administering public affairs,
and the Democratic practices, we
call to mind a fact worth remember
ing at this time: as shown by the
Auditor of State's Annual Report it
will be seen that Governor Hayes,
during the four years he served as
Governor, drew lrom tne Mate
Treasury for contingent expenses, as
follows:
In 1868 $5,027 27
In 18(59 2.79-1 22
In 1870 3,881 03
In 1871 3,1G0 91
Making a total of $14,803 43
Or an average per year of $3,590 75.
Now let us see what Governor Al
len's contingent expenses were for
the two years he has been Governor,
which are as follows:
Forl874 $1,309 79
For 1875 1,300 00
Making a total of $2,609 79
Or an average per year of $1,334 90.
In this one particular the saving
to the tax payers of tho State per
vear in the contingent expense un
der liovernor Alien, is $2,220 yt,
as compared with the contingent ex
penses of Governor Hayes.
Now this is one item worth nam
ing. It will not do to say that Mr.
Hayes was necessitated to greater
expenses. We have already pub
lished from the Wayne County Dem
ocrat a comparative statement of the
contingent expenditures petween
Governor Allen and Governor Noyes,
which shows favorable to Governor
Allen. The fact is that Republi
cans nave a iacuiw oi speuumg
more money in administering the
government than-Democrats; and if
Haves is elected for Governor, an
increase of taxes will be made to
meet the increase of expenditures
these Republicans will make.
of
of
so
so
no
United States Senator Sergeant,
who keeps the country from tipping
up by staying on the Pacific coast and
waving the "bloody shirt ' for the
Administration, has been making a
remarkable speech, which the Ad
ministration organs quote approving
ly. Here is an extract:
"Have you ever thought, fellow
citizens, that the reduction of the
National debt has been $120 a min
ute since you have sat here and I
have commenced talking? Taking
the average of the whole time, the
reduction of the debt has gone on at
that rate. Why, take your watch
and look at it See the second hand
as it flies; at each tick of the second
hand two dollars has been payed du
ring the whole time siuce Grant's
inauguration, by day ana by nigns,
upon week day and Sunday two
dollars per day in gold has gone on
the National debt"
Have you ever thought, fellow cit
izens, that you are being taxed at
the rate of $2,993 a minute? Tak
ing the average of the whole time
and comparing it with the National
and local taxation the levying
taxes is going on at that rate. See
the second hand as it flies; at each
tick of that second hand since the
beginning of the year 1875, by day
and by night Sundays and week
days, $34 50 per second has gone out
of the people's pockets. And while
that $34 50 was being taken put
the people's pockets only $2 per sec
ond was being taken out of the pub
lic debt
50
of
of
of
a
a
in
very
for
said
to
was
"un
precedently to
were
was
and
Try
"Honest and consistent" Demo
crats, who have "borne the burdens
and expenses of former campaigns,"
are still requested to call on the edi
tor of the Eaton Register. He
ready, he is willing. ' Let us all pray
The editor of the Register should
hunt up the ropes that were about
be used a few years ago to strangle
his "honest and consistent" demo
crats, and present them to these
beau ideals, to prove the cords
love his manly bosom now swells
them. How lovely it is?
How kind and considerate is
editor of the Eaton Register for
"honest and consistent" democrats
in Preble county, who have "borne
the burdens and expenses" of former
campaigns? But we suppose Romu
lus can c neip it, ne s naturally
generous toward "consistent demo
crats, it s a family failing of
"capable and judicious statesman's"
office holders and ' we feel like
couraging it.
Those who wish to tighten
grip of the Bank Monopoly, Railroad
Monopoly, Eastern Factory Monop
oly, Grant Monopoly, and every
curse of the country resulting
the bad administration of th e gov
ernment in all its branches by
Republican party, must support
party this fall. Tho Democratic
party is pledged to reform these
and to give the producing
classes a chance.
on
that
Gov. Allen stands upon the
of the People as against the Bond
holding, National Banking aristocra
cy. He is opposed to the contrac
tion of the currency, but favors
volume of currency being made
kept equal to the wants of trade,
believes that legal-tenders cannot
brought to a par with gold by
the industries of the people,
but rather by promoting them.
short, he stands squarely upon
platform adobted by the Democratic
Convention of June 17th, and by
forcible arraignment of the adminis
tration and its toadies and rings,
carries cousternation aiid dismay
the ranks of the cnemv.
THE ELECTION.
There can be no possible doubt of
the result of the State election. Even
at this early stage of the canvass,
the indications are pronounced and
decided. Governor William Allen
and the whole Democratic State tick
et will be elected by an overwhelm
ing majority. The financial issue,
like Aaron's rod, swallows up every
thing else. When the people are
out of employmcut and are begging
and starving, they are in no disposi
tion or humor to listen to any thing
that "does not promise to alleviate
their condition. The attempt of the
Republican managers to smuggle
themselves into power by the asser
tion thnt it was necessary for every
body who did not believe in the Pope
to vote their tic-Ket, in order to pre
serve the liberties of the country,
has been a humiliating failure. It
has been received with popular con
tempt. The Republican party" of
Ohio was doomed to overwhelming
defeat when it adopted the Wall
street. National Bank, gold specula
tins and usurpers' platform. That
platform docs not suit the farmers.
the manufacturers or the men ot
commerce, and wherever a fight is
made against it, it is certain to win.
As the issue now stands Wall street
is the Republican party. The farm,
the factory, the machine shop, and
the store are the Democratic. The
untaxed bondholder,- the National
Banker who declares dividends at
from twenty-five to forty per cent.,
and the usurer who is living by his
robbery of labor, may be strong in
the newspapers which they have
bought up, but they are weak with
the people.
The money that was good in an
issue of trouble is just the money we
want now, because we are exactly in
that peculiar condition. We don't
distrust the masses of the .Republi
can party. As they understand the
question and they will be made to
understand it they will be all right,
A Kepublican tarmer, manutaeturer
or laborer is not going to be a tail to
the Wall street kite. That kite will
not float above Ohio with his assent.
What a splendid tribute to Ameri
can institutions is the campaign
now progressing in Ohio! There is
srreat suffering and destitution, great
want of employment The people
will take no other revenge upon the
authors of their wrongs than simply
to vote asrainst them and for a policy
that will bring, in its results, good
times. Their forbearance can not be
Kenton
Democrat.
Newark Advocate: Tln financial
resolutions of the Ohio Democratic
Convention have given fresh hope to
the toiling and indebted classes all
over the Union. Many had begun to
fear that' the Money Power had si
lenced all opposiion to its gradual
absorbtion and control of the wealth
of the country. Now there is hope
for the masses and the tools of the
Money King9spit out the rage of
their masters at the possibility that
their blood-sucking career may ha
checked by a general uprising si mi-
lar to that which flooded the
Convention with the resistless
of a tidal wave.
Ohio
force
COUNCIL PROCEEDINGS.
EATON, O., Aug. 9th, 1875.
of
Council met in regular session, all
is
!
to
of
for
the
the
members present except Jas. Gabcl,
Mayor Foos in the chair. Minutes of
the previous meeting read and op
proved. The following claims were
presented, found correct and orders
directed to be issued for the various
amounts:
E; Weiss, 20 nights strv. as
St. lamp lighter, $
D. Ktontz, 1 day's serv. as
Deput' Marshal Barhuin
Show day,
J..E. Ortt, do do
1st Nat'l Bank. Eaton. O.. 4
coupons, due Aug. 1st, '7o, 116,26
W. Lu Shaw, 1 coupon, due
Aug. 1st, 1875,
Case sisters, 1 coupon, due
Aug. 1st, 1875,
M. S. Morton, 2 coupons, duo
Aug. 1st, 1875,
American Express Co., 5
Botvls, each $107, series
"E." No's. 14, 15, 19, 20 &
29, due Aug. 1st, 1875,
Jos. Ncal, 6 days labor 011 sts.
1 nn Kelly, 8 do do
W. H. Stephen, 6 do
Jno. Klemmer, 6 do
Fred. Miller, 6 do
On motion, two hundred
40,00
2,00
2,00
25,16
3,56
80,00
535,00
. 0,00
12,00
9,00
9,00
9,00
dollars
was temporarily transferred from the
Sanitary Fund to the Light Fund.
No further business, on motion ad
journed to Monday evening, Aug.
16th, at 7 o'clock.
W. H. ORTT, Clerk.
so
the
Farmers must step tip and vote
the Ring-masters ticket. Offices
were not made for them.
en
the
from
the
that
a
buses, side
the
and
and
be
de
stroying In
the
his
he
in
to Partition Sale
Case No. 3712.
John Ott & wife, )
vs. Order of Sale In
Susan Lyons, et al.) Partition.
PURSUAXT to an order of sale issued
from the Court of Common Picas,
of Preble county, Ohio in the above
state ) case, and to the Sheriff of said
county directed, I will offer for sale
public auction, at the door of the Court
House, in haton,
On Saturday, Sept. 11, 1S75,
between the hours ofl and 4 o'clock,
111., the following premises, situate
Preble county, Ohio, to-wit:
Being a part of the north-cast quarter
ot Section 18, Township 7, Kunge
onst nnrl hmiiwlptl mill ilpsprilind ns fill-
lows : Beginning at a point oh the east
north-east corner thereof, and running
thence south 87J4 degrees, west 109.78
poles to a stake; thence south GO de
grees 8 min, cast 9.78 poles to a stake
witness a hickory, south 83j degrees,
west 00 links and an ash, south uO de
crees, west 72Jg' links; thence south
degrees 13 min., east 45 poles to a stake
111 the castsulcot the channel of Twin
creek witness an elm, north 25 degrees,
east 97 links and a sycamore, south
degrees, east 40 links; thence north
87 degrees, east 70.30 poles to a stone
on the east line of the section ; thence
north 3 degrees 3 min., west 41.72 poles
to the place of beginning, containing
213 08 :1U0 acres. Appraised at f 40 per
acre.
TERMS One-third cash, one-third
in ono year and one-third in two years
from day of sale; deferred payments
bear 6 per cent, interest, ami to be se
cured by mortgage on the premises.
JOUX TOWXSEXD, Sheriff.
CaMI-BELL V tjILMOllE. Att'ys.
Aug. 12, 1875-tds prf $0,40
SHERIFF'S SALE.
Sheriff's Sale.
, SOU.
is 'Elliott, )
vs. J- Order of sale
liwn, et al. ) Mortgage.
Case Xo,
James Llliott,
Ja?. All
T)URSUAXT toan order of sale issued
JL from Hie Court of Common Picas,
of Preble county, Ohio, in the above sta
ted case, anil to the si cnlt of said coun
ty directed, I will offer for sale at pib
lie auction, at the door of tho Court
House, in Eaton,
On Saturday, August 14, 1875,
between the hours of 1 anil 4 o'clock, p.
in., the folk wing premises, situate in
Dixon township) Preble erunty, Ohio,
ami described ns follows, to-wit:
Being a tart of the south- west cinar-
ter of Section 28, Township 7, Range 1,
oast, ami beginning at a corner 58 poles,
south 4'. west from the north-east cor
ner of the Quarter also is 11 poles anil
'20 links south of the north line of the
quarter; thence south y, degrees, enst
78 poles anil 13 links to a" stone corner,
which is David Morrow's north-east
corner; thence south 8Gj degrees,
west 26 poles and 10 links to a point
in Fourmile creek witness a boulder,
north 8G.'4 degrees, east 31 links; the nee
north 6 degrees, west 00 poles to a cor
ner; thence nor:h 77,' .j degrees, east 23
pr.les ami 20 links to a corner in ceiitie
of Fournjile creek, witness a boulder
north 86.1.4 degrees, east .SI links; thence
north 6 degrees, west CO poles to a cor
ner; thence north 77 degrees, east 23
poles and 20 links toa corner in the cen
tre oflourmile creek; thence north
y, degrees, east 10 poles and 1 links
to tho place of beginning, containing
10?4 acres of land, more or less. Ap
praised at $2,800 .Termscash.
JOHN TOWXSEXD, Sheriff.
Miller & Harris, Att'ys.
July 15, 1875-tds prf $9,40
Partition Sale.
Case No. 3713.
Elijah Pease, ) Order of
vs. I Sale in Par-
Xoah Schlosser, et nl. ) tition.
BY virtue of an order of sale Issued
from the Court of Common P ens.
of Preble county, Ohio, in the above
L.oullty dire'ered, I will offer for sale at
public auction, tt the door of the Court
House, in baton,
On Saturday, Sept. 11, 1875,
between the hou: s ofl and 4 o'clock, p.
m., the following premises, situate in
Preble county, Ohio, and beina the
north part of tho north-east quarter of
oi ction la, iowntiip j, Kango 3, east;
DOS' n in"? at a stake at the north-west
corner of the said quarter, and running
thence south 2 degrees 27 min.. east
:84 poles to a point iu the channel ot
l win creek: t Hence sou; h G3 di-irrees
miu., eat 10:51 poles to a stake ; thence
north 87J-4 degrees, east 146:07 poles to
a point on the. east line of the section;
thence north 3 degrees 3 miu., west
poles to the north-east comer of the
section; thence south 87fei desrees.
wetlG0:Cl rods to the place of begin
ning, containing 39 83 :100 acres of laud.
Appraised at $50 per acre.
'Itlt.Mb One-thud cash, one-third
in ono year and one-third in two years
from day of sale; deferred payments to
bear 6 per cent intercut and to' be secur
ed by mortgage on the premises.
JUlliN TUWasiSND, Sheriff.
Cami-heli. & Gilmoue, Att'ys.
Aug. 12, 1875-tds prf $8,00
of treble county, Ohio, in the above
Partition Sale.
Case Xo. 3711.
Frederick Lyons & wife,)
vs. J. Order of sale
Margaret Loop, ct al. ) iu Partition.
TJURSUAXT to an order of sale issued
A. from the Court of Common Pleac.
county directed, I wil; offer for sale
public auction, at the door of the Coi.rt
House, lu Eaton,
On Saturday, Sept. 11, 1S75,
between the hours of 1 and 4 o'clock,
the tollowiiiir premises, situate
l'l'ohln f'nillltl' Olli.l nttrl Kitiiwv o i-..r
of the north-east quarter of SeJTiou
Township 7, Kaiie 3, east, and bouiid
cd anil described as follows, to wit :
.Beginning at a point 011 the cast lino
of the section 40 poles south of the north
cast corner thereof, and running thence
soulh 87,' degrees, west 140.07 poles
a stake; thence south 03 degrees 8 min,
easi ai.y; poies to a siaKe; tnencesouili
00 degrees 8 min., east 10.27 poles to
stake ; thence north 87!-i decrees,
iira.is poles to the east line of the sec
tion; thence north 3 decrees 3 min..
west 20 poles to the place of besriiininr.
containing 1G 09:100 acres. Appraised
at $45 per acre. .
Ui.ltJlS One-third cash, one-third
in one year and one-third in two years
from day of sale; deferred payments
bear G per cent, interest and to be
by mortgage on the premises.
JUiiJN low askmj, Sheriff.
Campbell & Gilmoke, Att'ys.
Aug. 12, 1875-tds prf
$20 000 W0ETH OF
Ready-Made Clothing!
FOR
MEN. YOUTH AND BOYS.
SOW OX II ASD AT TnB
CLOTHING HOUSE
at
p.
in
3,
The Largest Stock Ever In Satoa
M. 'STUBI
And offeicd at prices that will suit
purchasers.
rphtcj ci'RMieimiri nnnne?
1 MblV I W VillllWIIIIVW VI WWW
Trunks, Hats, Caps, &c,
30
7!)
to
1
And w ill be
sold down to
figures.
tho
THE GOODS MUST Bt SOLD
And the only way to do it these
times is to make them
CHEAP EJYOUGIi
for everyone
to buy.
time.
Xow is
CALL AND SEE
My stock before purchasing elsewhere
Opposite Jail. Mcphens' Jilork,
ton, Ui.10. Isl.STURM,
E aton. July 1, l.ST.VIy
Mill
8
it
Tins
JOSEPH WOERNER
Offers the Greatest Bargains in
G003 CLOTH, HATS, CAPS, AND
GENT'S FURNISHING GOODS !
In order to close out my Spring and Summer Clothing and make room
for my immense stock of Fall Goods, now in course of manufacture, I offer
and guarantee to give "
THS GEEilTSST' VALUE .
DRUGS, MEDICINES, CHEMICALS.
FOR
THE 11,13 A.SIT
Eaton, July 29, 1875.
SIDNEY !
JOSEPH WOERNER.
Barren Street, Eaton, O.
ijjSfP It fc
wmmmmmmmmm
,113 Bfc-.
SsSSSSU 8k336
8
Spcial attention given to the'Jillins oi Frescria
lions and Private Iletipes.
SCHOOL AND .MISCELLANEOUS BOOKS.
Chromo & Picture Frames cf all Styles made to-order
Painters Supplied at Wholesale Prices.
WINDOW O-Jl.,.
MICHAEL & SON; '
Eaton, April 22, 1875-ly .
at
p.
in
18,
to
a
east
to
se
cured all
I
IQIE LER
PELOUBET, PELT0I k Go's, STANDARD GfflS!
DECKER & BARNSiSTBKW AY i& MATHUSHEL'S PIANOS I
Is prepared to furnish them oh as reasonable terms as they can bo
bought anywhere else, as he is buying them directly from the manufac
turers. Eaton, March 18, 1875
IB-A-TCHtr, OHIO.
Just H ecsiu-edji and for Sale,
ALL KINDS OF PINE LUMBER,
Eough and Dressed;
Timber, Joists and Scantling;
ITU
.III
Cedar, Oak and Locust Fence Posts.
Doors, Sash, Lath and Shingles.
J
ASH" k POPLAR TLOORIKG;
kinds or Finishing
kinds of Building
Ijumbcr cut to Order.
Jjttmhcr cut to Order.
Jill
BssHaiigtagkiy, GanpH's and Casssl
Agents for the Studybaker, MiTborn, and Mitohell
Farm Wagon.
Highest price paid for Walnut, Ash Lumber, and Timber.
Depot, Eaton, Onio.
Office and Yard Opposite the
Eaton, Ohio, May 6, 187")-(iin
V.
!
hard
your
Ea
FAMILY GROCERIES
PRODUCEEMPORIUM.
FT. C HILL
INVITES especfel attention to his
Ftocknf FAMILY fJKOCKKI KS ,fc
l'KUDL'C'Ii, of which lie keeps a full
and complete stock at his old stand on
Baron Street Eaton, 0.,
He flatters himself that he can sell
as low as any other lioiwc in town, and
willkccpahvayson hand the besthrands
of
PllOVIHIOXS, VIXKTAELKS, ALMONDS
FlTl'KS, TK.V1.
S BL'UARS. bY KLTS.
COKFKK. IS.MSIVM.
HIT I IMS, L ll l-.r.-r.,
II A MM, SIIOL I.TIKKS.
AMiLT FLOCK, COItv MICA!., ikJil
A I.SO
"
.1
"U .4-1-. . T3..vnl
kSiiii.
The natroiinsrc of the puMio 13 snitched
.r.m 11. i-:.--yi.
Lumber ! Lumber !
To The Public.
B0BI2TS0N CHADLESS & CO.
KEEP fur sale ntW)VEKT MARKET 1'BICM
I'IXE, iMruI.AH anil ASH FloirinK, Dreiwwl
Pine ami Pop'iUrPU!(HnK. Dresw-tl AshPlae&ud
POPLAR FINISHIS I.VMBKR,
MOVMINOS,SHliLES. LATH,
STAIllllAI.Ll'STEBS, KEWKL PCT8,
Are also prepared to furnish
Factory Doors for $2,00 11 lid 2,50.
IMKIRS, WINDOW FRAMES, SASH PAKET.
and fi:itn-ii Honrs ail'l lo SAW up, MOULD Oil
Tl'UN LirMllEP. tonnk r. We Inti nil tomakr li
to the Intt-iv! of those needing anything in out
line to ilt-Hl with us.
HIGHEST MAItKFT PRICE PAID FOR DEY
POPLAll AXBAKII I.rVltKK.
ItOKIXSOX, C11A3IBHS&CO
Etton, Aliril 1.1872. tf
Michael & Sons,
Druggists & Booksellers
I DO
MINOR'S BLOCK,
' o,1twsue-r-rt Hnr.ir, eaton
' vu. . i : . u

xml | txt