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The labor advocate. (Cincinnati, Ohio) 1912-1937, June 30, 1917, Image 7

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88077379/1917-06-30/ed-1/seq-7/

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THE LABOR ADVOCATE
Gigantic Protest Made by Organized Labor
Against Prohibition of the Manufacture and Sale of Beer as a War Measure
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Following is a draft of the RESOLUTION, as presented to the President of the United States, the Senate of the
United States, and the House of Representatives :
A PETITION
To the President of the United States, 'to Congress, to the United States Senate, and to the Council of National De
fense, asking for the preservation of our country's institutions, including the liherties of its people:
At this grave juncture, when the undivided and unswerving "support of every citizen is due to the Government of the
United States, we, the members of , L. U representing of
loyal American Workingmen, whose devotion to their country can not be questioned, call attention to the following facts :
A fanatical and bigoted element of the population is bending every effort and making use of every misrepresenta
tion to force the Government into the adoption of National Prohibition on the pretext that such a measure is necessary
for the conservation of food. Only ONE PER CENT of the country's grain is consumed in the production of beer, that
has become the habitual beverage of hosts of American Workingmen as well as millions of other citizens. MORE
THAN ONE-HALF of the original amount of this grain is returned in the form of milk-producing feed.
We urge you to consider the fact that none of the European nations, whose situation is much more acute than ours,
has adopted Prohibition; but that, on the contrary, they serve beer or light wine as rations to their soldiers.
We protest with all our power against any measure, urged by the forces of intolerance and hypocrisy, which would
deprive us of the use of a beverage which we have come to know as refreshing and beneficial, and we demand that the
voice of the people who toil and upon whom the greater part of the burden of this war will be placed shall be heard
against the adoption of arbitrary and tyrannical legislation curtailing their liberties.
The foregoing has been adopted by a meeting of
which has a membership of this.
, 1917.
.dav of
,''
(Seal)
.President.
.Secretary.
LIST
of Protests Received,
Representing
Membership by States
California 16,501
Connecticut 23,598
Dist. of Columbia... 567
Florida 5,000
Illinois 415,296
Indiana 31,771
Kentucky 2,360
Louisiana 24,000
Maryland 132,473
Massachusetts 244,944
Michigan 54,500
Minnesota 22,000
Missouri 208,300
Montana 10,135
Nebraska 15,053
New Jersey 18,765
New Mexico 1,500
New York 505,382
Ohio 132,512
Pennsylvania 282,541
Rhode Island 700
Texas 17,375
Washington 13,705
Wisconsin 34,197
Wyoming 1,200
TOTAL OF MEMBERSHIP BY STATES ., 2,214,375
International Union of United Brewery Workmen, exclusive of Canadian Members, approximately 45,000
Hotel and Restaurant Employes' International Alliance and Bartenders' International League, exclusive of Canadian members, approximately 55,000
GRAND TOTAL 2,314,375
This petition is the work of only three weeks and many hundreds of organizations could not be reached in this time.
THE INTERNATIONAL UNION OF UNITED BREWERY WORKMEN OF AMERICA
A Call To the Workers
From the National Labor Defense Council, to Establish a
National Bureau of Publicity to Investigate
Strikes or Lockouts.
Greeting:
For some time there lias been ill the
minds of thousands of men and women
friendly to labor the urgent need of a
national council for the defense of la
hor which shall function voluntarily to
serve the best interests of such men and
women and local unions who may be in
legal difficulties as the rcstdt of the tre
mendous economic pressure brought to
bear on them in the eternal conllict be
tween labor and capital.
In practically every contest between the
workers and exploiters the courts, as
well as the police and other officials, are
resorted to as a means of repression.
B. FLAMM'S
CAFE and HALL
ELDER AND McMICKEN AVE.
Phone Canal 4617-Y
STRICTLY UNION GOODS
Advocates of True Temperance
Buy their Wines and Liquors from
336 West Sixth Street
Cincinnati, Ohio
GEO. STEIN
TAILOR
1231 Main St., Bet. 12th and 13th Sis.
Telephone Canal 482S Cincinnati, Olio
livery large strike is marked by efforts,
too often successful, to use the courts
and the legal agencies of the country to
(ictc.it tne ends aim purposes ot the men
and women seeking to aid themselves
and bring about more just and decent
conditions -for those who toil. Flagrant
abuse of the injunctive processes, false
charges of crime, frequently of a most
serious character, imprisonment for al
leged violations of city ordinances, are
among the well-known assaults upon the
natural and legal rights of the workers.
Recent industrial history illustrates
this particular form of violence exer
cised through the courts and other legal
and legislative machinery in the cases of
the strikers and their leaders at Law
rence, Mass.; Youngstown, Ohio; the
Mcsaba Iron Range, in the coal fields of
Colorado and West Virginia, and at
Everett, Washington, and the latest ex
posed conspiracy against justice in San
Francisco. In all of these cases, men
and women hayc been put upon trial for
their lives by weak and corrupt officials
influenced and driven on by conscience
less masters of industry.
The National Labor Defense Council
has been organised with a legal staff of
attorneys, whose names arc appended
to this call, they having agreed to give
their services to the workers without fee
in an advisory capacity. This does not
mean that these attorneys will take ac
tive charge of cases in court, but that
they will give such advice in the selec
tion of counsel and the obtaining of
such counsel for a reasonable fee, and
aid in vindicating the rights of labor and
throwing all legal safeguards about the
men and women engaged in struggles
for justice.
The Council has also obtained the
services of Mr. Fremont Older, editor
of the San Francisco Bulletin ; Lincoln
S'tefTens, journalist of international re
pute; Dante Harton, John Reed, George
P. West, Basil M. Manly, Carl Sanberg,
and other widely known writers on eco
nomic subjects who have proved their
sympathy and devotion to the cause of
labor.
It is purposed that the Council shall
establish a national bureau of publicity
to investigate important strikes or lock
outs and gather the physical facts and
especially the conduct of the courts and
administrative officers in dealing with
the legal phases of such contests, for
the purpose of transmitting the same to
the workers and their friends and the
labor tiress throughout the country and
preventing abuses through the instru
mentalities of the law.
It is a lamentable fact that the metro
politan press functions very largely in
the interest ot Hie lutsiness. in all
strikes and industrial disturbances the
alleged sins of labor have been visual
ized, while its virtues have been sup
pressed. This council proposes to com
pel, by insistent and intelligent effort, a
just enforcement of the law, and equal
protection of the law, as guaranteed by
the constitution of our country, to the
humblest citizen. It will ascertain the
facts in any serious conflict between la
bor and capital which may arise in this
country, in order that the great public
may be able to draw fair conclusions,
which the council believes will be help
ful in the crystallization of public omn
ion favorable to the social needs of all
the people.
The services of this council can be
obtained bv the workers upon applica
tion to Frank P. Walsh, chairman of the
council. Such applications should be ac
companied by a full statement of the
facts and especially the interposition of
courts and officials in the situation, set
ting forth clearly the nature of the in
dustrial fight, the economic back-ground
wherever possible, and the particular
service required of the council. The ap
plicant will then be advised as to the
conditions under which the National La
bor Defense Council can render aid and
the character of the assistance which
may be afforded.
The Council has selected as its field
representative Mr. Anton Johannsen of
San Francisco, Cal., general organizer
for the United Brotherhood of Carpen
ters the last three years, and state or
ganizer for the California Building
Trades Council for several years. He
will set fortli the aims and purposes of
the council and furnish local assistance
to any organization which may require
his services.
Mav we renuest your body to volun
tarily subscribe an annual donation to
help finance the printing, postage anu
publicity work of the Defense Council.
Please transmit a copy of this call to
each of your affiliated local unions urg
ing them to make an annual contribu
tion to Help make tne iaiionai uauor
Defense Council most effective in pro
tecting the rights of labor.
All funds should be remitted to Wil
liam P. Harvey, secretary-treasurer, Na
tional Labor Defense Council, HOT Mas
sachusetts Building, Kansas City, Mo.
The undersigned will be strictly re
sponsible for the proper distribution of
all funds received by the council.
Hoping to have your co-operation, we
are, Very sincerely,
Fraxk . W.U.SH,
Chairman.
Helc.v Marot,
Vice-Chairman.
William P. Harvev, '
Secretary-Treasurer.
Teleohone
West 3092-L
Strictly Union
Goods
FRED JOHNSON:: CAFE
Billiards and Pool
MOERLEIN'S BEER
S. E. Cor. ISth and Central Avenue
UNION SHOES ALWAYS ON HAND
B. J. Barlage
Reliable Footwear
REPAIRING
825 West LiHerty Street
Phore, West 1384-L CINCINNATI, O.
SOL ROSENBAVM
MEYER ROSENBAWM
ROSENBAUM IID TnnATC TA flRS
III I U U IB I M I fllLJIlJ
BROTHERS
Suits Made to Your Measure $15.00
Trousers Made to Your Measure $3.00
434 and 436 West Fifth St.
PHONE, CANAL 3846-R
STRICTLY UNION WORK
A. H. PAHLS
N. W. Corner Clark and John Streets
PHONE, WEST 3896-X
The Peerless
Tailor and Cleaner
CINCINNATI, OHIO
From Factory to Home
BUTLER BROS'. AND EBERSOLE'S
PLAYER-PIANOS AND PIANOS
We Sax You the Mlddliman'i Profits. Cash ot Tim
BUTLER BROS. PIANO MFG. CO.
21 to 27 W. McMicken Ave., let. Vine aid Race
Phone Ma'n 3766 High-grade Photography moderate i-nces
SPECIAL THIS WEEK One of our $6.00 Portrait for 50c
A. G. NEWPORT, Photographer 206 gjg,5BSi, fl"6'
Try Our Kodak Finishing KODAKS
J. F. SPANHORST, 1223 Main St. c.i 1624-Y
C. E. GIRTON
...., UU A HETRREN
THE JOHNSTON ARTIFICIAL LIMB CO.
Wheel Chairs, Trusses, Crutches, Arms, Lees and Braces
PHONE MAIN 1884 230 WEST FOURTH STREET
All Styles
of
UNION MADE SI
There are Shoes that have the Style and Fit. but not the Wearing Qualities.
There are Shoes that have tne wear, dui noi umi?- "
WEBER'S SHOES
COMBINE ALL THESE MERITS
' $3.00, $4.00 and $5.00
STYLEl
FIT
WfA tt
Come in and try a pair. You'll find them the best Shoe you eve. wore.
WEBER'S SHOE STORE XV.aI$-

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