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The Marion daily mirror. (Marion, Ohio) 1892-1912, March 06, 1907, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88077573/1907-03-06/ed-1/seq-1/

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The Marion Daily Mirror.
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,f TOLVME XV. NO. 181.
ALARtON. OHIO. WEDNESDAY EVENING. MAHOII G. 1907.
FBIOE TWO OMNTS
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STIRRING SCENES ACCOMPANY
THE OPENING OF THE WMA
eh the First Session
tony inousand Persons, carrying Red
Flags Began a March to Czar's
Winter Palace.
Soldiers and Guards Attacked the Mob With Whips and
Succeed in Dispersing the Crowd and Preventing the
Revolutionaries From Re-assembling An Order to Fire
Would Have Meant a Repetition of the Slaughter of
in
Red Sunday" Premier
Bt. Petersburg, ' March G. The
opening of tho douma or lower house
of the Russian parliament, although
in Itself devoid of Incl'lent," was
Made the occasion of a great revo.
lutlonary' demonstration oy the St.
Petersburg proletariat and the stud
ents of the city, which resulted In
several encounters between the po.
Jlee and the populace and more or
ksa serious Injury to a number of
the latter. The situation was cuch
that the authorities finally won
forced to fill the streets with mili
tary patrols, as In the days of tho
Trepoff regime.
After the adjournment of the ses
sion of the house, a tumultous crowd
estimated to number close to forty
thousand persons with red banners
flying and accompanied by the music
01 revolutionary chants, started like
tho followers of Father Capon on
Jon. 22, 1905, toward the central
quartor of the city, where the win.
te- palace of tho emperor Is locat
ed. Pew eloments of the prelude
or "red Sunday" were lacking and
the command "Are" would have pre
cipitated a almllar massacre.
But the prwent perfect of St. Pet
ersburg, Ckneral, Dracheffskl, fol
lowed another course and dispersed
the Proceajjlpn by charges ofjnounl
r?ftywtnen armed" "wTthwblp3,
tabjyaMttpOfling display of force.
-Wrented the demonstrators from
reforming?'.
Durlnc ihH Inner linnro nt M.
morning and afternoon, tho police,
guarding they Taurlde palace, acted
with great forbearance, giving the
spectators free vent.
When the deputies emerged after
the adjournment of tho session, tho
temper of the crowd was flro by
CLEVELAND OPPOSED TO
PROPOSED LEGISLATION
He Believes That Compelling Life Insurance Companies to
" s Invest in the Various States Where They Do
Business Would Work a Hardship.
New York, March G. Announce,
ment was made today that Driver
Cleveland has submitted a brief to
the Association of Life Insurances
presidents, of which ho is the head,
In referonoe to certain threatened
legislation, which would force them
,to invest their funds In thp various
states In proportion to the volume
0.' business transacted in those
states. In his brlof, Mr. Cleveland
says;
"It seems to bo quite apparent
that If tho best legislative results are
to be reached by safeguarding ull the
interests In any way related to' llfo
Insurance, and by subserving the
people's Interests in tho premises,
thr .passage of wholesales laws, those
v,LJ make our laws should bo freo
frqm all vindictive feeling and mis.
leading ptejudlces and duly guardod
against dangerous disregard of safe
.and conservative business rules.
"In many of tho states, contemplate
v, ng such legislation there Is a nor.
, ,jiiial,t ije'altby demand for all or near.
'(laH "the securities eontempated In
spending bills, which are sq absolute
ly saf,6 and unquestioned as to ex-
' LCJpsjLllfe Ipsurance companies in ac.
' , ce.pin .them as securities for tholr
trust funds. And yet thoy aro forced
to purchase In such a market and
must under severe pains and penal
ties invest in such securities as re.
main afte- investors on the ground
ave made choice, or to pay for
those, more deslraole tho manipulated
advance invited by their legally ere.
atecj neceMltles.
4tP-.'
Adjourned, a Crowd
of
Stolypin Fears Assassination.
speeches from Social Revolutionary
members, a dozen of whom mounted
upon the shoulders of their follow.
ers and harangued those present. up.
ti,n n..oDit Mi.i r.
on tno necessity of oruanlzlntr to
support parliament ngalnst the gov
ernment. The Social Revolutionary motto.
"Through fight, our right." was
adopted as a general slogan, and
slmuitanqously red handkerchiefs
began to flutter abovo the heads of
thfj crowd like niacin. TJin pmwii
singing the Marseillaise and battle
songs of tho Russian revolution then
moved slowlv down tim hrnnd
Fourchtadtskala avenue, stopping nt
irtervals to listen to SDeeches and to
sing.
It demonstrated on tho wav In
front of the house of the chief of tho
secret police, where a small foice of
gendarmes made an attempt to dis
perse the people, but soon fell back
in face of the resolute linnrlnir nf
the manlfestants, who followed them
with cries of "hancmen! blond-
hounds!"
In the meanwhile, the authorities
had hastily concentrated a strong
force of gendarmes, which charred
tho head of the procession, when It
reached the Lltolnv nrosnect. one of
the main business avenues of the
city. The gendarmes, piled "their
whips Vigorously and In nnn' rnsn
used the flats of their sabres.
Tho cendarmes later .em in.
rnrPArl Ku ildtnitlimnntfl . U rtt ..
. jjiiu.uo, iiu tlliuiiuu muter
and thither, clearing the roadway
amid curses of derision from tho
sidewalks. Finally n. larirn fnrnn nr
Cassacks armed with lances, arrived
In sight. Tho spiteful, red pennonod
weapons, which never before had
"It matters not how many states
pass similar statutes (as a number
threaten to do) nor how much of
the resomces to the companies mOy
bo actually impaired under this ag
grpgato operation, nor does it mat.
ter whothor these forced Investments
are good or bad, whether they aro
quickly convertible or not convnrt-
Ible nt all, whether thoy are In tho
custouy or tno companies or officers
of the several states, as is In snmn
cases proposed, in nil contingencies,
policies and premiums must bp pa;
as they acpruo. Nono of us has In
our biblical readlne discovers! nrf
Incident which smacked moro of1
unfalrhefs and onnros3ion thnn ihSt
exaction by the strong that those
m their mercy should makn brinks ,
without straw.'" j
Mr. Cleveland questions that this
legislation is framed In tho lntnr.i
est of tho policyholders. e
"It cannot bo made to appear1
hu says, "that it would in nniJ
Increase the security of thoir nnV
Ides, while on tho other hand, it ls
luf.i iuui ln case of sunh mnnlrt
nient of securities as would reach''
the point of financial inability on
tho
hi i mo uomnanies. thnir
policyholders, of all the mon in tho
Wbrld, WOUld bo thn mnililnaf on-l
most pitiable, and helpless victims
of the disaster. Hn nniin.,knj.
can be benefited or made more secuie
ii.v mmciy rorcing money into their
"late by way of Investnihnin nn ,i.,.
uoalty of explanation can, make, , .p.
jnunr '
A " 4 '
been brought out In street ddmon.
strntlons, took all tho heart ou,t of
the crdwd.
(Another monster demonstration
was tyjld at tho university to cele-
brntn t)in "vlnfnrtr rf l.n r ..!..
tlonary Democracy." Tim wnv
along tho Nova and the streets In
thO neighborhood of the university
Wfrn nanftnlv ttnnt.Ari l.... 41..
C -"- iniuiEll, uui iiiuru WJ3
no. Interference by troops or police.
Premier Solypln In order to dimin
ish hlB chances Of nossible nssnsaln.
ation, snout tho nlcht In tim Tnnr.
lde palace, and lUls understood that
no jias taken a suito of rooms In a
wing of tho nalacc. whlfii im.ni
occupy as long as parliament is in
Kt'ssion.
Several consultations lmvn ii.r.
held by the leaders nr tim n..nnUin.,
In the douma to see whether some
sort of compromise with the govern
ment was DOSSiblp. hut nftor f,.ll
p "mh1 J
Professor Mllukoff
Consideration, it was announced hv
that no nrrange-
mem couiu bo made nn inn., , at
Stolypin remained at tim imn.t nf i,.'.
cabinet. The oncosltlon ,iomn,.,i n..
premier's resignation and do not
expect to do any con3trnptlvn -!,
until It Is received. This ntMt,i
lends to tho belief that the second
douma will follow the steps of the
first.
The leaders or dm nnnnotnn ...i...
believe that what they call "the sa.
cred anger of the neonln" win 'i,
aroused by the dissolution of the sec.
"'in parliament, einim tn i,n,
surances that no further inm n,,,
bc negotiated abroad without i,n
consent of the doumn.
Thore Is great nervous tension
throughout tho city. witte Is very
ppsslmlstic and fears the worst is
pt to come. Ho thinks the masses
have Bhlfted considerably to the op
prsltlon during the last year, but
doubts whether this will lm norm
lent. His view is timt h .!
learned a great deal In practical pol
itics, and that anything like the un.
Iversnl strike of October, 1905, is
now Impossible.
It Js observed that 'many notable
men are refusing to tak'o part In tho
gdvernment work on the ground that
no govornmen official is Hnfo to,in..
In Russia.
The douma. or lower nniiB , ,
Russian parliament, was fnrmorw
opened at noon in tho presence of all
nil1 ministers nnd many hiirh ..
tlonarles.
No momber of the imperial family
was present.
Tho first cciemony was a religious
service. In which a full choir par.
tldpatcd.
M. Goluboff, vice president of tho
council of empire, called th0 lowor
house to order and Invited tho mem
bers to sign the oath of allegiance
to Emporor Nicholas. The Conserv.
atlves cheered the mention of the
namo of the emperor, hut the Op.
pcsltlon mcmbeis remained silent.
Tho Social Democrats did not enter
tho hall until M. Goluboff had fin
ished speaking.
Feodor Golovln, president of tho
.Moscow zemstvo, and Constitutlnal
'Demcratlc mcmlxvr jof parliament
from Moscow province, was elected
president of the he-.'::.
Tho galleries of the nouso, whoso
sontlng capacity had been tripled
since tho last spsston, were packed.
Continued on Page Pour
One
Mywwi i .'"- -wiJ.if.i.TiirjL.iai.- maMGmM'.i .
r i i jmsiMOn ' i .j i n msmr:.'., .-kar MMCmmtfut'mk'msmK bl
STAHDAKX BUNCOED UNCLE
, SAM OUT OF $20,000
Washington, March n Charon
hnve been filed nt tho treasury de
partment that, he Standard Oil com.
Many has bUllcoed Unrln Hnm nut nt
120.000. by- evading the duty on oil
sent to' the Philippines, ',
TROOPS WILL
BE WITHDRAWN
President Plans to. Reestab
lish Cuban Government
Next Jaruary.
.
Wnshlngtbn.lMarch C Plans are
being laid by the president to re.
establish tho Cuban Government hv
January 11( next, when tho United
States expects to withdraw from the
island. A general election will fol
low the provincial clectlona to i.n
held boon.
WHITE TELLS
A
HIS STORY
t
Names' the Men Who Killed
Thomas Fye and Rifled
His Pockets.
Wooster, O.j Mnicli C Harry
White, who is on tiial for the murd
er of Thomas Dyo. was tiinppii nn
the stand ttils'tnornlng In his own
behalf. ' ,9
White told of the shooting the same
IU in the confession lm nnili. in
thr officers. navinE that tim slmt
which killed Dye was fired by Allen
Miller; that -Miller nnd William Ev.
eihart carried' rtthe boJy rrom the
ralway track an'd placed It where it
was found, andt Everhnrt told him
(White) that'Ke. had rifled rive's
pockets and secured ten cents.
White clalmedUlin rnfiiwl In urt
the body from thfijtrack for tho rea.
lkn that he rGltfie llSr Vlnrm nntlilnw
to cause Dye's doathN t
THE READING BECOMES
A HARRIMAN LINE
'Philadelphia, March -C It Is stat.
ed here today thaE: H. Harrlman
has acquired control of tho Read,
ing railway, having ,(tnke'n over the
Nw York Central holding.
STROTHER CASELMOST
READYFOR THE JURY
Culpoplier, Vn., ,MnVch . TIic
ense of Strothcr ,.Brothors who nio
cliniged with flaying their sis
ter's hclinyer, Avill'probably go to
lliu jury by niglitv In lYfcj plc'a
to tlio jury, Jeffries! tiio attornoy
for the (lofcii'.e, said: "It aviis tho
duty of tho boys', not only
thomselvcs but to Cyou nnd
to kill Bywntere."
to
me,
WEALTHY MT. VERNON
'MAN IS DEAD
"nit. Veuioii, 0.. .March 0. John
N. Reed died suddenly this morn,
ing. lie was- 'i.cee"ilingly wealthy
nnd leaves a largo' estate.
again, ''vYJint i you going to do about
i Cnnwrlaht.
du w Ji ,
AGED MOTHER TAKES STAND
IN
She Breaks Down While Endeavoring to Relate
wnai Barry inaw
and Evelyn as
Jerome Concludes His Cross
ana uouna mm Even More Difficult to Handl Than
Was Dr. Evans Dr. Wagner Got in a Parting Shot Just
as He Was Leaving the Stand Jerome and Judge Fitz
gerald Have a Few W ords. '
New Yoik, March C Jerome com.
pletcd his cioss-oxnmination of Dr.
Wagner at noon today, having found
him even more difficult to handlo
than Dr. Evans.
Just before releasing the witness,
Jtrome took nn entirely new tack,
making an effoit to show that Thaw
was Intoxicated when he killed
White. Wagner, however, gave the
district attorney no satisfaction
aiong this line. Jerome naked
Wacner If there was anvtlilntr In tim
description of the killing, In tho by.
potnetlcal questions that Indicated
Insanity or Intoxication. To this
the doitor replied: "There Is noth
ing to Indicate Intoxication nnd a
great deal to Indicate Insanity."
After forcing Wagner to ko into
specific details, .leiomo announced
he had finished with the witness.
Wagner was then excused by both
sides.
Chief pounsal Haiti idee, of the
defense, announced that Mrs. Wil
liam Thaw, mother of the defend
ant, would, In all probability, take
the stand immediately nfter the
noon recess.
Battling Nelson, the nuclllst. sat
with a wrinkled brow durlntr the
session. He had Just returned
from England, where the Thaw trial
was tho main tonic of conversation.
AGED LADY BURNS TO
DEATH WHILE ALONE
Noifclk, Vn., Mm eh O.-Mis.
Jane Sutton lined (K). was burned
to death last evening nt her homo
nc.ir Moiiiocvilla, while sho Ans
alone.
CHANGE OF VENUE ANGERS
ANTI-HARGIS FACTION
Jackson, Ky.i March 0. Tliero
is
gic.it chagiiu
ninousj
tlio conw
monw'calth's nttmneys nnd Anti-
llnris people, because Judgo Cnr
iico today granted a clinngc oE cu
ue to Elliott county which has n
population of a bundled and forty
eitrlit wJth no railroads or telc
graplt and is- democratJc.
STRIKE AT PORTSMOUTE
NEARING A SET1LEMENT
Portsmouth, O., March C Tho
street railway strike will probably
bo settled beforo night. Tho com.
pnny has agreed to a conference with
tho strikers. Cais aio running,
guarded by deputy sheriffs. Thoy aro
unmolested but aro boycotted.
It J"
i
' ' ' - !.
1907. hv Nw VnrU HrlJ Rnmninv,
HER SONS BEHALF
loid iter About White
Long Ago as 1903
- Examination of Dr. Wagner
nnd mado
court room
haste to get into the
Delmas said to Doclo. V.'cjscr.
"Is there anything you would
like to add to your direct tostlmony,
In view of the cross.oxnmlnntlnn
to which you have been subjected?''
coining, except that I would cm
phaslre the fact that this ,Wm,.i
am, wnen lie shot wiilin
did not
Wagner,
for his
know it was wrong," said
getting In a final blow
cause.
"What do you mean liv ivmnr?"
demanded Jerome.
"I mean lust this." Wnm. -.,
piled Imnresshelv. whilo inmn, .o
garded him Intently. "I ..mn., i,
defendant had not sufficient Intoin
gence at the tlmo of the shooting
to know that his act was contrary
to the law- of the fand. and that he
had rendered himself llnble to pun.
Ishment."
Jerome looked dazed as h0 real
ized the ::nirpiHl(in rliU n,,i .i
. ,. .---- w...- .i.ii.i uvu-
intation seemed to hm-n ,.i -..
be Jury, ana Thaw's lawyers.
smiled.
New York. March R at. a .n
Mam Thaw, Harry's mother, took
I IIO Stand aflcvr rnrnco cbn i.-i.
down In relating what Harry told
her of White and Evelyn In 1903.
New Yoik, Mnrch C Tuesday
WALKED FOUR MILES
TO CATCH A TRAIN
Senator LaFollette's Wife Leaves for Washington Under
Circumstances Which Set the People of Madison
to Guessing Upon What it Means.
Madison. Wis.. Maioh n Airs
Robert M. LaFollettc. wife of thn
United States( Senator, walked alone
fiom her home, four miles out of
tewn, nt about 3 o'clock Tuesday
morning, to the lnllway station hero,
and took a train for Washington.
Mrs. LaFollettO left a notn nlnnnH nn
the door of her room. whlcn mnrn
ly stated no moro than she had gono
to Washington. Her action lins
caused a sensational an ay of rumors,
which range from a story that tho
btnator is ratally . to ono snvinn-
that sho bore a messaco to tim Son.
utor In reference to tho sniiniorini
icontest in Wisconsin. This latter is
most probably tho truth.
J'llO first lllOVO 111 tho snnnfnrlnl
fight slnco tho announcement of the
ADAMS MAY LOSE
FEDERAL JUDGESHIP
Peport That He Delivered Delegates to Foraker and Dick
m me iasi &tate convention Seems to Have Turned
t Roosevelt Against the Zanesville Man.
.Waslngton, March C Tho now
souinern unio judgeship may not
go
to Adams, of Zanesville, according in
tho latest information fiom tho
White House but to the Columbus
nan,
A conplo of weeks aco. tho mest.
dent vlitunlly promlbed to name
Adams, but slllCn then Adam's nn.
emles have been talking to thoevomi-
tlve. They told him that Adams hns
the endorsement of Foraker and
Dick because ho delivered to thpm
the twenty.llfth district delegates In
the stato convention, last fall, V
session was made notable by &
clash between 'District Attorney,
Jerome and Jnstico Fitzgerald, at
the climax of, which the prosecuting
officer lefused point blank to
cite (o the court the uutlion'tiw
upon which be was predicating an
argument. 51 r. Jerome was ro
quested by the piesid.'mg judge to
submit to him whatever authorities
he had upon the subject .
"I liavo had such a bigli respccB
for t lie courts of tho jurisdiction,"
ictoited Mr. Jerome, "that I will
not submit nuthoritrcs on a ques
tion of law which is so elemcntul
in elinrnctiM' nnd upon which tho
.minorities nic sa abundant that
must presume tho learned court
knows them. "
W.ith fluMieiT race and a sharp
rap of his gavel Jnstico Fit7ger
nld said if the district attorney
ilul not submit the authorities tho
court would assume that he did
not know of any. Mr. Jerome did
not submit tho authorities and Jus
tice Kitgeinld niled in favor d
I lie defence on the point nt issue,
which, briefly stated, was tho ques
tion as to whether the state, on
(Muss-evnininntion. should be mr
lowi'd lo go further with an cx
im'iI witness than counsel for tho
defense was allowed lo go upon,
d n eel examination.
Histiiet Attorney Jerome was as
defiant in his tone as ho was in
I he words lie uttered. Justico Fitz
geiald lapped soveial times with
Iin gavel, twisted about impatient
ly in his chnil'. nnd it wna ulniiili.
with much effoit that ho retained
his judieul eoniH)suro.
The st mm broke in tho midst ot,
nn exlieinely dull sessiou, when
some of the .speclntois in the
com t mom actually wero nodding
in their elinirs.
The incident began with an ob
jection interposed by Mr. Delmas'
to n question asked Dr. Wagner by
Mr. Jerome. Tho district attorney
wnnled the witness to repeat cer
Cotinued on Page Seven.
candidacy of Isaac Stephenson for
tlio two jcars remaining of thn form
of John S. Spooner, was mado after
tno session of tho Assembly. A sec
ret caucus, attended bv about id
members of the assembly. A secret
cauciiB, intended by about 40 mem
bers of tho Assembly, was hold. It
was stated on what numorted to lm
good authority that tho caucus did
accomplish something In regard to
the senatorial sltuutlon, those pres.
cnt tacitly agreeing to Btund togeth.
o- lor ono man when tho time
comes for decidlnc who that man
shnll he. If that Is true, it Ih a.
most Important and significant
move. Tho truth of the statement
Is absolutely denied, however, hv
several of thoso present.
'number of letters hnnrincr
on the
I - 1 - o
case, passod between the senators
and president. Forakor In one to
tho president said: '
"So far as making a bargain In.
solving patronage is concerned, I
never mado ono in all my llfo and
never expect to, especially not with
rebpect to so sacred an office an a
Judgeship."
Henderson, of Columbus, is thn
man now said to be slated. la a
friend of Taft and If he rats th
place. It will doubtless fttmnvifc...
the secretary's hold on Ohlo'a wta
Hi the next National convention,. "At
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