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The toiler. (Cleveland, Ohio) 1919-1922, March 19, 1920, Image 1

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RAISE IN SUBSCRIPTION
PRICE.
Subscription prico will ad
vance to $1.50 per year April
1st. Renew now and save 50c.
NO. 111.
Published
it Cleveland
CLEVELAND, 0., FRIDAY, MARCH 19th 1920.
Address all mall to
3207 Clark Ave., Cleveland, O.
$1.00 A YEAR
With These Posters, Trotsky recruited the Red Army of 3,000,000 Men, Drove the Reaction
ary Forces of Kolchak. Denikin and Yudenich to Surrender and Saved Russia for Socialism!
, . j
k " X'-j.. -: mam t - ? "A.
SOVIET POSTERS
We have recently received a number of ps
ters from Soviet Russia, which we are reprintig
o.i this and the opposite page. In tone and es-
...U. .1., ,i;ffr .......I. 1.... .u:.
5hV C''i'' of 'he four military posters from the pn
jf Qs turned out Ly artists in other countries
Be. working on similar subjects. It is likey
JPthese military posters are of various date.-,
' they indicate the varying objectives of the
itarv effort of Soviet Russia. Thus, those ou
le opposite page urging men to enlist for
fighting in the Urals (IV and V may be a year
old. for it was in Jaunary, 1919, that Kolchak's
irmies had advanced furthest into Europeai
Russia. No. 1, on this page, is an admonition t
fight for the Donetz coal-fields, in other words, u
help recover southeastern Russia from Denikir
Its top line reads: "The Donetz Coal must be
ours!" At the side are the three sentences: "If
there is no coal, the factories are idle. If there
- nn rnat. thp trains will not Un. Until the Don
I is ours, hunger will be with us." At the bot
! i. .1.. ii inn.. n tut. L.uJ.
lorn is tne line: viciui uvci ucumiu s uuum
means victory over hunger." Just what part
these posters played in raising the spirit of the
Red armies to the point of victory, we do not
know, but their work is done, and all the tasks
they urged the workers to perform have been
fulfilled. Probably No. IV. is the most recent of
the posters: it deals with the defense of Petro
grad, probably against the Yudenich assault of
October, 1919.
But Soviet Russia is interested more in the
arts of peace than those of war, as is once more
suggested by the two posters at the bottom of
this page. In such case, the large words read:
"Organize Reading Huts," while an extensive text
at the bottom, too small to be legible in the re
production, explains the necessity of spreading
aducation and culture in the villages. Evidently
it is intended that the peasants of the New Rus
sia shall have educational opportunities that were
greater than what they enjoyed in the Russia of
old.
'
IV
ree posters on this page, the two upper ones are encouragements to enlist in the armies fighting for the recovery of the
s: "Comrades, all out for the Urals! Death to Kolchak and the oilier lackeys of the Czar and capitalism." V reads:
- .t u it
Of the three
bra s. IV reads: "Comrades, all out for the Urals! Death to Knlrliak and ilip nilit l.irkeva
"Forward, to the defense of the Urals!" VI, below, is a suinmonsto defend the cradle of the Revolution, Petrograd, against the advance
ot Yudenich. It reads: All Our Lives in the Defence of Petrograd!
Pictures from "Soviet Russia'
Cheerful Greetings from Chicago Jail
is being done to have her returned to
fhe jurisdiction of Ohio courts.
Comrade Prevey sends a cheerful
message of "I'm all right, don't
worry about me,'' to all comrades.
But we wish to add that ever comrade
can show his loyalty by helping pay
the costs of comrade Prevey 's defense.
Send all funds to The Toiler.
fiOTcreaaia
The attorneys for Marguerite Prevey,
who was kidnapped from Columbus
jail and taken to Chicago by Illinois
authorities March 3rd, are engaged in a
legal battle for her release on habeas
corpus. Tt is expected that before this
issue of The Toiler reaches its readers,
the courts will have rendered a de
cision on the case. Everything possiblo
The Kansas Court of Idustrial Slavery
By Bill Smith
In a politicnl sense Kansas is the
most picturesque state in the Union.
From tho time Jim Lane, bushy
haired, wild eyed, with an enormous
medal jangling from a ribbon around
bis neck, and a six Rhooter bulging
from his hip pocket, invaded the U. S.
Senate in 1861 as its first senatorial
representative, it has been a sort of
political museum.
It has furnished many amusing and
interesting characters and has euacted
many fantastic and Quixotic law-;
and just as Kansas socms about to
settlo down to a methodical and ru-
tiorable way of living something
busts looc!
This time it is Gov. Henry J. Allen
and his Court of Industrial Relations
Who hns not heard of Hennery Jay
he of the inexhniistable ink pot and
jierpctunl over flow of superhented air?
On every conoievcnble question that
has troubled mankind in tho Inst
twenty years Hennery has been ' 'John
ny on tho Spot" with a solution. Do
vott know "Who struck Hill v Patter
son?" Ask Hennery for you know
Solomon is dead.
After the pnid and corrupt press
had the public well fed up on the in
iquitous and criminal conduct of those
nrch villlnui the striking miners.
Hennery .T it y assembled the sun flower
solons in solemn conclare for the pur
pose of putting a curb of iron on
theso malefactors and he got just
what he wanted, in nn institution thnt
smell. i of the Dark Ages and reeks
with the odor of the Inquisition nnd
it Is called "Tho Court of Industrial
Relations."
t
Formerly legislators were intellingent
human beings who possessed both in
dependence of thought nnd set. m. But
now it seems, far too many sre merely
political m!linn and scanengrrs. Some
have that globular hair matted knob
that shows above the eollir button
carefully treated with a vscnum clean
rr before entering upon their legi
lative duties, and then they have no
more idea than n kangaroo, what
laws they are to make until
the Big Cheese tells them what he
wants. This cringing servility of a
legislative body no matter how stupid
or mediocre is indeed pitiful. There
are vastly too mauy political serfs in
nil our state legislatures to-day, who
lo just as they are ordered to do.
But Hennery got his court. This is
comjiosed of three members, who are
called "judges" and mark you nil
appointed by Hennery Jny! They get
$5,000 yearlv of the people's money
and ttaoy have the power to m
wages, change labor contracts and do
about every thing else under tho
sun thnt Ood Almighty overlooked.
Its principal object is to strangle nnd
hum string labor, and legalize slavery
in the State of Knnsns.
It seems st.ronge when one ponder
over the earlv historv of Kansas and
recalls how bitterly she fought human
slavery to now find it tho first
Mate under the regime of capitalism
to reintroduce it! At one sweep this
new law nullities the l.itu amendment
to the U. S. Constitution, The English
Magna Chartn, the Bill of Rights nnd
even Christ's Sermon on the Mount
itself
Under this enactment n Inborer is
chained to the job! Let him dare to
resort to the usnnl means to better
his condition or wage that Is, to
strike, a $r00 fine and imprisonment
awaits him! And you may bet your
last cent that he will get itt Let us
ask, is there a working man In
America with brain so small and warp
ed, who would think for a moment,
that ho could appear before a conrt
presided over by tho political puppets
of Henry Allen or any other governor
nnd expect justice'' So much for the
trikc but here is where this Kansas
Lsiwi gets on its hind legs nnd paws
nnd snorts nnd boilers; "to order,
call or foment a strike," entitles one
to the nice little gift of a $1,000 fine
and fivo years in the penitentiary!
At the present rate of pay and tho
limited days he is permitted to work
what miner or o her worker could
put up that HOO or 1,000 dollars? He
could only do, as thousands of his
comrades have done from the davs
of Christ down suffer indefinately in
priron. Why could they not have been
more generous and have made that
fine $29,000,000 so the boys could
all feel like Rockcfellort
Boys do you get that word "fo
ment''? When a general round up is
desired that word "foment," means
anything that a judge desires it to
mean that will afford an excuso for
fining nnd sending an innocent man
whom they don't overly love to
(he penitentiary. If one will canvass
the "judical"' decisions of the last
five years, he will note many hor
rible outrages against common sense,
due to this twisting and juggling
of words that only finds its equal in
the blood smeared courts of tho Span
ish Inquisition. Onco it burned n man
because he looked "nsknnco" at the
king who was passing by to witness
the burning of a lot of undesirables.
They wholo question hinged upon what
"askauco" really meart and further
the poor fellow could not help it, ns
he was cross-eved. But that did not
cut any ice with the Court of In
dustrial Relations, of that time for
thoy found him guilty and sent him
to the stake.
This law of Kansas rocognir.es no
geographical limitations, it oozes all
over the U. S. A. like a gob of
buckwheat butter. Now when the rail
way maintenance and shop workers
threatened to strike on the 17th of
Feb. Hennery Jay polished up his
Industrial Court and wns ready for
thcml Word flashod from Topcka that
warrants would be issued for all the
loaders of tho Brothorhood of Main
tenance nnd Shop men no matter when
they should happen to be! Just a worl
here; one year from now all the
mines of Great Britain will bo nation
alized; the miucrs have served notico
that they refuse to further give thcii
labor, lives and blood for the tip
building of colossal fortunes for a
few persons nnd corporations. Whin
the miners of Knnsns and elsewhere
gazo across the waters and see this
new condition, what greater thing
could happen to put them in a "fo
ment"? Did the labor leaders of Great
Britain know of tho yawning prisons
awaiting them in Kansas, they would
surely stop this mad progression
toward human rights. Huh! What did
you say?
But you will find nothing in this
Kansas law nor nny law that has
been passed at tho instigntion of the
sleek nnd paunchy minions of capital
ism where operators arc really subject
to fine or imprisonment. They may
close the works indefinntely they vnny
entail untold suffering on the worl; in;;
classes by non employment to create
artificial shortages, they may pro
fiteer to their hearts content, making
their hundreds nnd thousands per
cent, blood money, nnd who shall say
thcni nay f But let the working mnn
ask for n decent living and resort
to nny method to secure it the
vampires of cnpitnlism get busy and
you hear the creaking of the opening
prison doors!
Hennery Jny loves the laboring mnn;
nnd one may venture, thnt when the
Kansas solons sat in spell bound rnp
turc hypnotized by the torrid blasts
of Ciceronian eloquence thnt Hennery
yodeled forth. their sandy pntches of
alfalfa kently waving to nnd fro
in the sultry breoro of his oratory,
we will venture, that all the time
his star lit eyes wero piercing their
very vitals he was thinking that nt
lost he hnd a scheme whereby he
could furnish Alex. Howett and his
devoted comrades with nice new Milts
of clothes, free of charge, nice, nifty,
tjjorty suits with stripes on them.
Every Pharisee, and ul! the devotees
of Dives, and the worshippers of the
Coldcn Calf are patting Hennery Jny
on the back; and is it any wonder
as he capers over the "country brass
banding this frenk court .of "his fidd
lers three," that he feels as swollen
and important, as a five cent balloon
nt a country fair?
The capital controlled and degen
t rate press, whose every sense of dc
coney and truthfulness has long been
lead, acclaims this Kansas freak
ns something of almost divine origin.
We cannot quote from nil, therefore
shall present as n fnir sample the
comment of the St. Tnul Press, whu-.i
discussing this conrt nnd labor dif
ferences generally, snys: "And there
is no wny to end it this side of etern
ity except with n club from without.
THE INDUSTRIAL COURT IS JUST
SUOH A CLUB." Here yon sec this
diabolical scheme to destroy the rights
nd freedom of the working class
unwittingly exposed in its true
ohn-neter. It is club! It vns not dj
Mgncd to be fnir to lnlu.r nor wns
mv of these so called industrial laws
ever designed to better conditions of
labor. The ulterior nim of nil of them
is to curb and destroy Inbor organ i.-.n-t
ion. No one is decicved concerning
the purpose of these laws but the
very fools who design nnd make them.
Tho flnt has gone forth from tho
maloderons secret chambers of capi
talismthat Labor Must Be Crushed
No Matter at What Cost. In pursuit
of this aim it has perpetrated folly
after folly nnd madness upon mnd
less, to stem the tide that is soon
to overwhelm it. This recalls the an
cient adage, that is "Whom the Oods
would destroy, they first make mad."
These exploiters of the human race,
w;th narrow cowardly picayune souls,
tremble as they see the writing on tho
wall traced by the finger of Destiny
in burning and imperishable letters,
"Labor Shall Conquer!"
WASHINGTON NEWS LETTER
By PAUL HANNA.
Staff Correspondent,
The Federated Press.
WASHINGTON. HouscwivcB that
have no other way of knowing may
learn from the federal reserve
board 's review of Februnry that tho
cost of living climbed higher instead
of falling during that month.
That arm of tho government is
very scientific nnd thorough, it is
said. It extends credit to manufac
turers nnd merchants in every corner
of the iand. Tt knows what the)' are
doing. It receives reports from them
every day on tho demnnd for com
modifies and the run of prices.
And it reports thnt "notwhitstand
ing the decrease in prices of somo
classes of goods" the general cost of
living moved stendily upward during
the month.
Regional directors for the federal
reserve bank system nnito in tho
widespread demand thnt wngo earn
ers produce more and consume less.
So we read that "labor conditions
throughout the country aro fairly
stable, but unfortunately (hero is a
tendency in various districts to re
strict production."
That means the working class still
hankers nfter fewer hours of labor
and more time for themselves r with
their families. It all comes under the
general head of "menaco to our civili
zation." From the Philadelphia region
comes word that "there is a brisk
demnnd for manufacturers of all
hind", but the danger of further
price advances is woll recognized."
Tho demand is so brisk, in a word,
that another little boost in prices
won't do us any harm.
On this general theme of "recog
nition," tho Atlanta regional di
rectors have a word to say, thus
"The need of increased production i
recognised." Just another hint to the
loyal workman that he will not he
popular until he consents to give more
snd take less.
(Continued on page 4.)

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