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The toiler. (Cleveland, Ohio) 1919-1922, November 06, 1920, Image 15

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88078683/1920-11-06/ed-1/seq-15/

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(
-SATURDAY. NOV. 0, 19g0. THE TOILER PAGE 15
Suppress Free Speech In Kansas City
The full story of the arrest of sixteen workers
at an orderly meeting held in Kansas City, Kansas,
on the evening of October 25th, has just come to
light, and reveals the arbitrary manner in which
local officials take advantage of the Kansas
Criminal Syndicalism law.
The meeting took place in the stockyards dis
trict, and was held under the auspices of the
National Defense Committee which undertakes
the defense of those workers accused of political
and industrial offenses who belong to no organiza
tion already providing legal defense.
Ella Reeves Bloor, better known as Mothei
Bloor, was addressing the meeting on the question
of deportations, and was making an appeal for
funds for the benefit of deportees. About twenty
young fellows entered the hall and, when seated,
tried to disturb the meeting with cat-calls. Mother
Bloor succeeded in quieting them.
After the collection was taken up, an individual,
who was afterwards revealed as a detective, ap
proached the speaker and told her she had better
come with him. Fifteen members of the audience
were then arrested. The sixteen were conveyed
in a patrol wagon to the police station. The women
were soon removed to an unlighted, unheated base
ment cell-room and were compelled to pass the
night there without the opportunity of lying
down.
The following morning the whole party was
taken to the police court for a hearing. The pro
ceedings, the defendants state, were of the Star
Chamber variety, none of them being permitted to
say a word in their own behalf, nor telephone for
attorneys or bondsmen. The detective who made
the arrests, when asked the charge, said "Oh,
against the government, and I. W. W. and all that
stuff." The sixteen defendants were then taken
back to the police station where a number of them
were individually investigated by Federal officers.
About the only question asked of Mother Bloor
was uDo you know Kate Richards O'Hare?" to
which she replied in the affirmative.
Then followed another trip in the patrol wagen
to the County Building, in which the county jail
is also situated. Here, the men and women, who
had been without food since their arrest, were
weighed, measured, and subjected to the Bertillon
method. They were then formally arraigned, under
the Kansas State Criminal Syndicalism Law for
having collected funds and held meetings designed
to overthrow the government. Bond was set at
$2,000 each, and they were confined in the county
jail.
They were denied permission to telephone for
bail, the prison officer stating that he would do so.
Not until 3 o'clock in the afternoon did someone
arrive with bonds for Mrs. Bloor. Up to this time
the prisoners had had nothing to eat.
Once Mrs. Bloor was free efforts were made
to secure bond for all the defendants, and by the
evening of the 27th all of them were released on
bail. The preliminary hearing in the case has been
set for November 5th.
The following are those arrested: Ella Reeves
Bloor; Marietta O'Sullivan, Mrs. Grace Pardy;
Miss Clara Lipin; Mrs. Gertrude Harmon; Jim
Rees; C. Harmon; E. Anderson; Felix Thornton;
Matt Panich, Fred Lapin; L. H. Kassen; A. Swan
son; J. R. Rust; A. Buchler and Frank Krasick.
oc
IOBOI
aoBOi
aomo
NICOLA! LENIN
His Life and Work
1
By G. ZINOVIEFF
This is the book which Bob Minor says
every worker in America should read.
D If Minor, who knows Lenin and Russia
and tne revolution, can learn something
from this pamphlet YOU ought to be
able to do so.
Q
0
Also you ought to get others to read it.
25c A COPY, POUR COPIES $1.00
THE TOILER
jj 3207 CLARK AVE. CLEVELAND, OHIO
Qaoaoe loaoi looorr- -i

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