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The Democratic banner. (Mt. Vernon, Ohio) 1898-192?, November 22, 1912, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88078751/1912-11-22/ed-1/seq-1/

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BtmotwAic Banner
PRIOI TWO CENTS
MT. VERNON, 0., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1912 No. 94
ESTABLISHED in.
d'
mm
TURKS PONDER
i ii
Peace Agreement Likely To Be
Reached By Belligerents
Troops Holding Position-Austria Reported To Have. ted
An Ultimatum To Servia Regarding 1 tie Laller's
' Acquiring An Adriatic Port-Quarrel Develops Among
The Balkan States Regarding Disposilioq Of I tie
Spoils
London, Nov. 21, While Turkey Is
reported to iiavo agreed to the pence
terms demnnded by the Balkan allies,
wax Is threatened between Austria
and Servia. Dispatches from Berlin de
clare Austria has forwarded Servia an
ultimatum.
Not only la Austria determined to
prevent Servta's acquiring an Adriatic
port, but oflldalB at Vienna declare
their government has been outraged
by the treatment Sorvia accorded tho
Austrian consul, Prochaska, at Priz
rend. Italy also has demanded nn expla
nation from Servia for the treatment
of Its consuls In Albanian towns cap
tured by tbo Servian troops. It Is be
lieved a reckless military has gained
control at Belgrade, threatening to
upset the government unless It
plunges tho country Into ano'i'cr war.
In .furtherance of peace between
Turkey and tho allies, Nnzlm Pasha
was appointed by the sultan to confer
with the Dulgars. General Savon rep
resented the Bulgarians.
( righting Ceases.
Pending reace negotiations, the
Bulgarian troops at Tchatalja were or
dered to era ho fighting and merely
Bold their positions,
i It Austria tries to prevent Servia
forcibly from securing the Adriatic
"window," which the Servians consid
er they have won honestly from the
Turks, it will not only bavo trouble
first with Servia and then with Russia,
but will prooke a revolt in its own
provinces where Czechs, Servians and
other SlavN predominate.
At Ealonlca, It has been learned, the
Greeks and Bulgarians came close to
an actual tight for possession of the
town. They Anally compromised on
a Joint occupation, but the question of
permanent title remains in dispute.
, Bulgaria thinks it should have Mon
sstlr, because It is situated in a dis
trict where Bulgarians are numerous.
The Greeks claim it on the ground
that their nationality is largely lepre-
WASHINGTON OFFICIALS
FEAR ROW WITH MEXICO
Washington, Nov. 21. So inlense
is tho feeling of hostility botwecn
American i cedents of Texas and Now
Mexico and .Mexicans residing along
the border that officials here fear a
eonor.s lime between this country
and Mexico.
A state department dlsputrh said
that In a brawl in Chihuahua. John J
STRONG CASE
STL
Goshen, N. V., Nov. 21. In tho trial
of Uurton V Olbson, tho lawyer ac
cused of murdering his client for het
estate, the slato's principal witness
mp.dn out a Ktiong caso of circumstan
tial evidence 'against tho accused. "
"Pressure on the pncumogastrlc
uervs controlling the heart and, lungs
will cause death Instantaneously," do
dared Dr. George W. King of Jersey
CHy. "The lungs were flat Nothing
Co-ad at the autopof isdloate- XfaX
AGAIN
AUK TERMS
sented in the population of the town
Itself. The Servians say they cap
tured the town and aro entitled to
keep It
COST OF BALKAN WAR
One of the Shortest, Bloodiest and
Most Decisive In History.
London, Nov. 21. Tho Balkan war.
apparently about to end, has been one
of the shortest, bloodiest and most
decisive In history.
Arrayed on one side wort? Bulgarln,
Sorvia, Montenegro and Greece; on
the other. Turkey.
Montenegro began hostilities. Oct. 4.
Bulgaria Servia and Greece had In
vtultd Turkey within a week.
The Turku -won not a single Impor
tant u.u-'ciucnt, unless their defense
of C'ohftnntlnople may bo considered
one.
Of Kuropeun Turkey every square
foot h:ic fallen Into the allies' hnnds,
except, Constantinople' and a 30-m.llo
square patch adjoining It, and the
tow tin of Adrianople and Scuta1!.
Here's nn estimate of casualties:
Turkev. 20,000 men killed, 100,000
wounded; Bulgaria, 10,000 killed, 40,
000 wounded; Servia, 3,500 killed. 16,
GOO wounded; Montenegro, 00 killed,
5,200 wounded; Greecn, 300 killed, 2,
200 wounded. -
In addition to the cost of maintain
ing their usual military establish
ments, It 1st estimated the warring
states have spent fl 50,000,000. not
counting Injury to' trade, destruction
of property or the lost services of the
killed or maimed.
Turks Did Not Surrender.
Belgrade. Nov, 21. Tho Turks at
Monastlr did not surrender, but fled
in nil directions. The newspapers
heredemand that an Investigation be
made to ascertain who telegraphed
the Incorrect reports to the effect that
fro lii 40,000 to 50,000 prisoners had
Wn taken. Offlrlal detuils of the
capture of Monastlr are still lacking.
Brooks, an American, was killed after
a gun light ivlth tho ex-mayor of Casas
Urnndcs, now a rebel lender,
The war department Is Investigat
ing n riot at Brackelvllle, Tex., be
tween American soldiers from Fori
Stark 'and Mexicans who are Amori
pan cill7enH Soveral soldlors and
MexlertiiB were horlously stabbed and
ou Mexican killed.
the deceased died of drowning. Kvery
thing Indicates. that Rho died of stran
gulation by force npplied from '"Ith
out "
This testimony followed a demon
stration by John Mlnturn. grocer, of
Sterling forest, who told how lip saw
Gibson struggling with the Rabo
woman 'P the boat or. the day the,
woman whs drowned Thh witness
described' In come detnil wliut he saw
'M the day of the woman's deutti.
prr -T.-T
IADE OUT
AWYER GIBSON
BULGARIANS HAVE
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Aeroplanes have been extensively
used In the present Balkan war. Ac
cording to the correspondents, the
Bulgarians have had the most daring
A FLIGHT BY NIGHT .
TO BE MADE BY AVIATORS
Garden City, U I., Nov. 21. An In
novation In acieplnne Hying mIH he
stnrted at the Ilcmrstoad Plains nvin
tlpn Held Sat m day and Sunday even
Iurs, when night aIatlnn Is to be pu
Into commission. In addition to i
perfectly gcoil full moon Jt is Intent'
cd to have bonfires burning in fron
of each hangar, whl'-b In t'" -'
SAVE MONEY
TO STATE
Columbus, O., Nov. 21. State Treasurer-elect
John P. Brennan will ask
the legislature to set aside a fund on
which the state emergency board may
draw. lie figures that the state would
havo saved $15,000 In interest pay
ment to banks had this provision
been in force during the last year and
a half since the adjournment of the
last legislature.
SUGAR
MERWEIGHED
CLAIM OF GOVERNMENT
New York, Nov. 21. Charges that
gratuities amounting to bribes were
paid to tho Federal Sugar Itellnlng
compnny, of which Clnus A. Spreckels
Is president, to government weighers,
wero mnde by the government attor
ney In connection with a suit brought
by tho government to recover 11ii,
08u,!)8 lu dutlcH. Tho government
Bellefontalne, O., Nov. 21. After
eating now buckwheat Hour 30 uor
eouh near Rouudlieiul, thin county, o'e
cuinp seriously ill. t is thought tnoy
wero poisoned by sonio rl-t which
grew In, tho buckwheat nnd had been
ground Into tho Hour. Members of the
fnmlly of John Clovongor have been
unconscious slnco eating cakes made
from tho Hour.
30 PERSONS
SUCCESSFULLY USED
AEROPLANES IN WAR AGAINST TURKEY
ffiWffi
and successful aviators, and the Infor
mation they have gained of the move
ments of the enemy has been of great
value. The aviators have circled high
will make n giant Illumination. In
addition to this there will be tire
works in tho way of torches and col
ored lights out on tho Held, and each
aeroplane is to bn fitted out with In
candescent lights. George Beattic
and his pupil, Julius Kowalczlk, an
Austrian, will bo among the aviators
who will be sure to fly unless It rains.
ASKS FOR
LENIENCY
West Clarkafleld, O., Nov. 21.
Friends of Krnest Welch, 22, convict
ed of assault acd battery at Norwalk
for alleged participation in the tarring
of Minnie La Valley here 'last August,
are circulating a petition, which will
be sent to Judge Gnrver, asking him
to be lenient when he sentences j
Welch.
claims that cargoes of sugnr rqcelvod
at tho- sugar company's plant between
1902 and 1D00 wero so frequently un
donvnlghed that $110,0S0.0S in unties
is still owing. Tho summons and com
plaint wore filed In tho United States
district court and ' tho papers were
served upon Mr. Spreckels at Ills
otU('6.
01ovQland,0., Nov. 21. A Jury In
common pleas court awarded Julia
Knszmarck $10 000 damages In liar
milt for that ntnount for allowed slan
der against F. C. Hoffman and others,
inciphers of St. CaslmJ's church hero.
Bho charged that a hand bill, circulat
ed lu iflll by a, qhurch committee
wliitb sought to oast the pastor, slan
dered her.
h 4
GETS BIG
' . DAIGES
ARIAhT AVIATORS'
over the opposing armies and have not
only learned definite facts about posi
tion and numbers, but have also been
utilized In carrying messages and or
ders. EXPECTING
Washington, Nov. 21. Officials here
admit thoy have been apprehensive
of grave troubles on the Syrian coast,
whore tho religious differences be
tween tho Mohammedans and the
Christians aro more pronounced than
In any other part of the Ottoman em
pire. American interests in that quar
ter are large, not only owing to the
extensive fruit trade, .but because of
tho presence of n Inrge number of
American missionary nnd educational
institutions,
sixWe
u
Bryan, O.. Nov. 21. Only one ot
seven passongeis escaped Injur near
here when a car, driven, by Adams
Smith, nn undertaker of West Unity,
turned turtle and plunged over a 12
foot embankment. The Injured are:
Adams Smith and wlf,e, Injured Inter
nally; Mrs. Clara Will, leg broken;
Mrs. J. IJ. Gesey, arm broken: two
year-old son of Mrs. Gesey, leg bro
ken; Miss Etta Shilling, leg broken.
MARKED FOR DEATH
Miss Mary Dye Is Witness In
Dyna-
mite Conspiracy Case.
Indianapolis, ln"d., Nov. 21. MIbs
Mary p. Dye, n stenographer, who,
witnesses said, was marked for mur
der by James B. McNnninra, tho Ios
Angeles Times dypnnilter, because
she worked for the iron workers'
union om "knew too bfiich," testified
nt the djnnmito conspiracy trial. Sho
'uEsrrtcd she' had been followed by
detectives, and n onu pccaslon an
other of tho McNamnra brothers 'hod
forced an entrance to hor room at a
hotel to search for papers which ho
desired to destroy.
Miss Dye Idn-'Hied liund" ' of
letters lntroduml bv tho goenmont
to sustain its contrition that Frank
M, liyuu, president of the union, nnd
tho ii other defendants conspired to
transport explcslveb Illegally In fur
therance of dynnmltn plots against
nonunion firms, The letters wero
written by John J. McNaniaia, secre
tary of the union.
Tho witness testified she quit the
omrloy of tho Iron workers before tho
I.os Angeles explosion, but she had
written many letters' which, tho gov
ernment charges, were In furtnerance
of earlier explosions.
TROUBLE
NJURE
ARRESTS IN OHIO CITIES
Nation-wide Raid Made on Doctors
' and Drug Concerns.
Columbus, O., Nov. 21, Charles F.
Hatton of the Hatton pharmacy, was
arrested by Deputy United 8tatca Mar
shal Al Bauer on a chargo of sending
unmallable matter through the malls
for an Improper purpotc. Tho specific
offense charged Ib that ho sent to
Woodsficld, O., a device which tho
government does not permit to be
sent through the malls, and Mr. Hat
ton Is only one of 173 druggists, nhysl
clans, manufacturers nnd others who
were taken Into custody on similar
charges. Tho raid covered the entire
country, taking In 72 leadlnK cities,
and Is the largest over planned and
executed by any department of the
federal government.
The raids were made In cities from
New York to San Francisco. In Ohio
arrests were made in Btcubenvllle,
Toledo, Columbus, Springfield, Day
ton, Convoy, Mount Vernon, Cincin
nati and Cleveland.
MR8. HETTY GREEN 18 78;
MAKES NO FUSS ABOUT IT.
New York, Nov. 21. Mrs. Hetty
Green, America's wealthiest worn-
on, is 78 years old. But no one
down in her ofllces nt 111 Broad-
way Is going to make any fuss
about it, least of all Mrs. Green
herself. She says she doesn't be-
lleve blrthd'sys are made for any-
thing better than for attending
6trfctly to business. And that's
the rule she has followed for a
hulf century In the business
world.
CHRISTIANS KILLED
IN PALESTINE
Report of Massacres In Jaffa
Alarms Official Circles.
A then h, Greece, Nov. 21. Reports
of massacres of Christians In Jaffa.
Palestine, caused the commander of
tho Russian cruiser Olsa to weigh an
chor and depart hurriedly for that dls-'
trict. The American cruiser Tennes
see Is now believed to be at Gibraltar
on Its way to the Srlan coast.
Five Christian miKsIdnnry societies
are represented In Jaffa, Palestine.
There Is alfco an American orphanage.
There are supposed to be about IO.oOii
Christians among the Inhabitants, the
total of whom is estimated at about
40,000. There are eight Christian
churches nnd four Jewish synrsogues.
There Is r.n Kngltsh hospital and a
French hospital.
LIVE STOCKJWD GRAIN
"!II('00, NOV 21.
Cnttli -liwHiits, IT.OnO t-.id; tvs.
ii S0jl0 0: Tctnn sKPrn. J4 3W5 60;
VfstiTH stcrnt. ." 4CJ3 10; stwkrs nnd
fceem. tH 1177 25; row nnd liolfrrn,
t '0H "3; calv, JB r0(f 10 23.
, Homi Iterrlpts. S.'.OS) hiMd; tlht. 17 to
(DT 5S; inlXftl, " 0St7 00; lu-.nj, J" 4K
7 92'4; roiisti, J7 4tlJ7 00; plus, $5 00
7 30
Sheep ami Uuntis - Rwlptu, 45.000
W1: natlv- 'ln-ep. 2 "OBI 10; weitoni.
J3 70 fii "' nr'.liiR. 759S i"1! native
ldjnl- J r,0f?7 5; writern. 15 S0f7 SO.
WhPit-No. t red. l"lo(Jl 0J Corn No.
, r.Sfiflc. "Mt No -" lilte. J1';.12'rl
HA8T HH-'I.O. NOV. SI.
CnttlH l:e-clptn, 1" '1, export oat
Up, JS BOffO 10; uhlptilnc ter. J 1BJ
K BO; butcher cattle, C, 657 IS; helfcr,
SI !'04f7 40! fat coivh, Jl ;5f?, 15; hull,
14 40fi 40: inllKi-ri nnd sprliiKeix. $30 00
ioir. no; cnicn, Jto .lOffit 00 -
io;Krclpt. -0 ears: licavlp. J 10;
medium", w "OjfS 1: Ynrlser-, ?S 00;
pl?, JS Wl, nm-lis, J7 1007 15; stags.
$5 Mil' 0.
Sheep nnd limb Receipts, 30 r.ir;
yen rl bun, II P0E B0: -.etlierc. Jt BOiiji
4 7B; mixed chwp, 54 00TJ4 25, owes. J3 CO
&y 00; lambs, 5 01W7 40.
1'ITTHItPItn. PA., NOV. 21
Cattle Supply IlKhtt choice. $! 25M
9 70. prime. S BOHS 10; tidy hutclierH,
Jf 7JW7 0, lielft-r-. II 30tt 7 B0; fat conn,
S3 OOftfi 25; b-llls, SI OiiffC 50; frexli cnwa,
J30 OOhCB 00; vr.il rnlvfs J7 B0flO 75.
Hots Itecetots, 10 mn: heavy hof,
tT Js Oft; lien-' mlxwl, 7 S0fr7 U5;
meOI'in'H aril heivy Yorkers, J7 30; Jlsht
Yorl.'TN 7 7Bff7 SI- p!st. 7 P4)iQ7'60.
Fh ep and tamb'Fupply llsht: prime
ireth Tr, Si 20HJ4 .ir cood mlxi'd. S3 750
4 IV fair mixed, J.t 2'i?.". t5; lambn. 4 BO
ti7 25.
CLVtnNNATl. O., NOV. t
Crttln - Kroolpti, 1.15S lKnd; ti-eix,
4 7rf(T 7.'.; h-lfMW. J3 CSItO 50; om.s,
SS 2r1(5 76, e-ilvx, J4 lOQlfl 50.
IIii-s Iticelpls, 2.7J3 head; packers,
17 BOiii S3; conlnim cown, 5 r5fl7 01,
pise und UslitH, Jl 80ff7 25; mans, Jt. 25
G 75 It
Wfet No. 2 rril, Jl P4l 05. pjr 1
No 3 mixed, MXTffiU Oats Nit. 2 irtJ.i-1.
S3'ft,2K-. Ilye--No 2, WQCJc,
pheep and Ivmls Ilecclpts. 1(0 h.-ud,
Miccp. Jl 2EfiS 73: Hnibs, J4 BOifffi 75
Cl.BVEIND, O.. NOV, U.
Cattle KecilolB. 200 head; -liolee fat
teera J7 75fliS 25, stood to cholco Hleera.
J" 00.1 7 75; helfera, Jl i5(r7 00 fat biilW
II OOflC 00, cows. SI 76e?5 25: inllksn
mil utirlngers, J30 008J65 00; eulvea, I0 00
(10 60
llos IterelptH, 4,000 head; hcavle,
17 S5; medtums, J7 S5, Yoikers, J7 ?5;
jlit Yorktrs, $7 SO; plg-s, J7 75; roushs,
IQ 90; stn?i, SR 25.
t-'hoii and rHmbi Keeelpti. 6.000 licsd;
sliolee prlnir lambs. J7 0007 10.
TOr,KDO, O., NOV. 21.
Wheat. Jl 06: corn, tic, oats, 34fto;
clorcred, 110 87.
AIIII.SHI hlKI.
UNDER HUE
In Cross Examinafii n By
'totn'
Prosecutor Seeks Llglt on Miss
Farley's Past life.
FAILS TO SHATTER O STORY
Tries For Hours to Rend the Thread
of Her Detailed Description of Re
lations With Zollinger 8ucceed.
However, In Getting Her to Admit
She Did Not Greatly Fear the
Advertising Solicitor.
Columbus, 0., Nov. 21. Though
Prosecutor Turner ingeniously tried
for four hours to Tend the threads
of her detailed1 description of rela
tions with Alvin E. Zollinger, for
whose murder she is now on trial,
Cecelia Farley met the cross-questioner
frankly and with answers
which In most Instances seemed to
strengthen her position. Only occa
sionally was tho prosecutor able to
get her to modify parts of the story
sho related tho day before. He suc
ceeded In getting ber to admit that
sho did not greatly" fear Zollinger or
that he would disclose their Intimate
secrets.
Buck and forth from the time of her
first meeting Zollinger In the early
fall of 1002 to tho day preceding the
tragedy in Franklin park. Prosecutor
Turner questioned her la an effort to
ratch hor off bar guard and. If possi
ble, secure admissions from her which
would contradict her former state
ment. To all questions which ml flit
tend to discredit a former statement
she would reply, "It might have been"
or "I ilo not remember."
Turner asked Miss Farley about her
conversation with Mrs. Belden, the de-'
tcctive. In rosard to a ball player.
Turner uiked her If that ball player
was net Rill Nance, and if be was not
a married man.
"He was not a married man!" said
MIkh Farle.
Turner ntit asked the defendant it
Rhe did not give her age as 24 when
nrrested In this case, and it she did
not do it In order to make her age
tally with the time she bad-said Zol
linger led her astray at the age ot 16.
She, dented giving her age as 'U for
that purpose.
Admits Writing Letters.
Tho girl admitted writing letters
ftom Kansas City to Zollinger, In
which she mid she couldn't sleep be
cause he had not been there to caress
her. She also admitted she addressed
him as "Dear Dutch." and that ho
stayed in a room next to hers at her
brother's house while there.
She told of a trip to Cincinnati,
where sho and Zollinger registered at
a hotel as man and wife, and where
they had their meals sent up to tho
room.
Answering a question of Turner, tho
accused girl Eald: "I thought I loved
Zollinger and thct he loved me from
the time wo met in tho rail of lt'C2
up to January, 1JU, when I met Qulg
ley. He was very Jealous of me and at
times I was Jealous of hlrn."
. Turner tried to break down the
stenographer's story that Zollinger
took advantage of her early girlhood,
that he pursued her Insistently for
nearly 10 ears, that he was In a
mood to kill her after hhe became en
gaged last January to Jerome (Julglcy,
nnd slay hf-r and himself as well.
Like lightning bolts he hurled one
carcfully conEidcred question after
another at her, With the purpose of
showing that it ws she who Invited
Zollinger's attentions, wna willing to
wreck the home of u married mnn on
whom u wife" and li'tle children weie
dependent, went so far as to travel
hither "and thlther with Zollinger ns
his wife.
Columbus, O., Nov. 21. David l.
Wlylarch, OS, or JacUeontown, near
Newark, won struck by an Ohio Elec
tric car about four miles cast of this
city, and received injuries which re
sulted in his death before ho could be
brought to a hospital in the city.
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