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The Democratic banner. (Mt. Vernon, Ohio) 1898-192?, January 31, 1913, Image 1

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MT. VIRNON, OHIO, FEIDATf1, JANUARY 31, 1913-No. 9
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BRITISH
Force Of Constables Stave Off
Rush Of London Suffragets
led Pepper Women's Weapon-Annual Meeting Of The
Labor Party In The
The Suffragists, Who
Interruptions-Cost Of
Be Raised
London, Jan. 80. Undismayed by
fall sentences, a number of suffragets
followed, Premier Asqultb to Leven,
In Flfeshire, and continued their mili
tant tactics outside of a hall In which
the premier was addressing his con
stituents, A strong cordon of consta
bles was drawn around the hall, and
against this the militant suffragets
dashed wildly, but In vain. One of
them was prepared against repulse.
8a had paper containing red pepper
which', she blew Into the faces of the
, - officers, who opposed her. She was
wrested.
The situation is so tense that the
"'tafragets are beginning to fall out
' wKfc their friends. They broke up
the annual meetings of the Labor,' par.
,ty, held In London. This organisation
, has been siding with the women, 'and
a flood of' Interruptions, occurred
wlille George Henry RobertsTtnember
, at parliament .from Noiwlch, was ad
dressing the meeting. The women
wanted, to know what the party was
going to do about votes for women
and why the present 'ministry, had not
been turned out fnterrupters were
ejected from the meeting.
The cost of Insurance on plate glass
!lLfe raised, the insurance compa
a4s,,naV;lfth suffragets continue
heir depredations.
-A.-woman threw a hammer through
I
glass window, worth $700, be-
Haglag to the Hamburg-Americaa
nXMBtefelp company's offices.
Threaten Hunger Strike.
Of the .30 sqffragets sentenced, M
continue to declare that they will put
the prison, officials, through, the drill
of handling, a "hunger strike."
Mrs.. Lespard, sister of John French;'
the famous cavalry general, was lined
910 or given hor choice of two weeks
In Jail'.' 'she took the two weeks, but
soma unknown person paid her fine
and the (prison officials thrust her
from the Jail against her protests.
She Is the. only woman arrested Tues
day who Is not serving her time, ex
oept Sylvia Pankhurst, who, dlsre-'
ardlng her statement of the day be
fere 'that the vlotenoe was Just begin-
promised to be good until her
Untried,
.i Mrs. Dniramond, the "general" of"
the rioters, a 'woman of rears and,
talk,' went to Jail with the others
jsresslslng to starve, scornfully refus
ing , to pay a 910 flao.
Mrs. Basmejlao Pankhurst Is report
ad to haye left her Paris rooms, where
aha fled when a warrant for her ar-
GIRL WORE
If S TOOS
Cleveland, O.. Uan; 90.--TakeBi Into
custody while dressed la saan's cloth
ing,' Vloletr Connors, !, o, Akron, U
belaglheld'uhtll the arrival hero froat
Canto of her mother andirom Akrm
ft her sister, Mrs. Tloreaeo McOutre.
VIolet,vuntll recently astenograpaer
in'atiTAkron law office, told the police
"'that' she as awaya had aa amWttoa
f'to" be Vmani ' ,-,
(,. ,..,., . "l -JIr. u.iii "Ynu want aomothing even more or- " "t ,!.
,'t WNelKhbor-Have , you wreVtall, n0IWMUar,nan tnl8r The party will et ford, inA.hh.rdtV
r -v'rr "'V'rvriL. f.iZ.Zmumf ries.l want one so oeatirui ia ,jf 'V7 '. "'.."r" , Y ', "" ""'if 2 will be. Cleveland nd.r,Cplumbu Tho
t .-. T ; 'lv..t.'W-!!TJ!!-"T7 r-7, tiuulvt'tint ar b von dn' LtaUlt Wl" o? , lo sum or lumr vHmi.vu H lAiiti' ih.no. u-lll hnFtbrmirh Inrttnn.
KZMlUWtWWiW&ttt1. W5". ra7.?iiiirto!teook anvthinirtn it-K.' argumehtsf tltrotijb' ayfrultfiil -line xit hVn i nn,V,n"n to Clilcaao".' The ? ?hB
WF ;,llrt ta' wiaft.twaaij years.- - , , - , - .itllU)B 8tlof iho.Hoefcki' 4nd to JoP.- Z:. :-rhi..n - k.. nn. t went ol the
ASSAIL
British Capital Broken tip By
Were There With A Flood Of
Insurance On Plate Glass To
MRS.-E. PANKHURST
Leader ot Suffraoete Who Are
Again Doing Things In London
Photo' by AiWlcan Frs; Asseelatln.
Mr., Pankhurst Is shown on tb "light
talking to u rrUnd over the "votes for
women'' movement. This Is on of in
:Utt pictures ofhr to1 reach thU'ild.
rest was issued In England, for her
militant methods. She is called tha
brains of the present -movement and
it Is thought she, may be biding .In
London, directing the presentactlvl
ties of her co-thlnkera. V
REINSTATE
THE CHIEF
"fV- 3 j',
Canton, O., Jaa. 10. Chief of Police.
H. W'.Bmltb. Democrat, suspended by
Mayor Harry Schilling, Socialist,, on
14 charges, was reinstated upon the
finding of the civil service coaimls
ion. , '
Sly Management. x
"Haven't you n bnndsouier chnflng
dleh tlmn ihntr'askedthe cuutomer.
"You want somothlng even more or-
naiueiunf than thlsT
,,.iVes , want one so beautiful and
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Boston, Jan. 30--The New England
state are to make a concerted effort
to solve the railroad problem. Two
dtlzena of each of the. six atatee are
to be named by the governors, and
this body Is to conduct an Investiga
tion and make recommendations on
transportation matters. This method
wae agreed on at a conference of
PRESIDENT TAFT TALKS
ON M'KINLEY BIRTHDAY
Washington. Jan. 30. "Tne Main
bow Comes Down in Ohio," was ths
toast to which President Taft an
swered at the third annual dinner of
the Ohio Society of Washington, giv
en ,ln his honor here. The' occasion of
the dinner was the anniversary of
the birth 6f the late President McKln
ley, who was eulogized by cach.of the
speakers. The. dinner was, given In
honor of the president as a farewell to
hlr as president and as a cltlien ot
Ohio, Inasmuch as New Haven, Conn.,
will be his home, after, March 4.
The dinner was preceded by a re
ception. The president was Identified
with Ohio on the program party as
dean of the Cincinnati law school,
which chair he held for "several years
before going on . the federal bench.
Speaker Clark and Former Speaker
Cannon bptb spoke as membera of the
alumni of that school, and Senator
Pomerene of Canton, O., also aa
alumnus of the school, spoke of Me
Klnley as a citizen. Senator Burton
spoke, on the achievements ot the
Taft administration.
The president spoke at some length
on the obllfsatlon of the American
government to. continue: as trustee to
the Philippine people 'ua til tbey are
,eady for self-government.
Bueakar, Clark said. M- haa ne aia-
THE CONTINENT
SUFFRAGETS WILL RIDE
New York, Jan. 30.j Woman snf
IraglBts of this city are- to undcrtnkg .
INQUIRY INTO
1
governors In this cltyj Governor
Halnee of Maine was unabls to attend
the meeting. Those present 'were:
Governors Eugene N. Foes of Massa
chusetts, Samuel E. Felker of New
Hampshire, Allen M. Fletcher of Ver
mont, Aram J. Pothelr of Rhode le
land and 8imeon E. Baldwin of Con
necticut. It wae agreed that each gov-
fosftlon to make a Philippine speech.
'I only wlnh we were out of there In
is good a shape as when we got lu,"
laid he. '
Berea, O., Jan. 30. An, explosion
believed to be the result of a feud, de
atroyed William Zacharyasz's genera)
tore here, with a loss of 1 16,000
Eacharyasz and his wife leaned 30
.feet to 7 the ground 1'to escape 'the
fames .that had destroyed the stair
Meet Next at Chllllcoth.
Van' Wert, O., Jan. 80. The annual
convention ot the northwest district
Sf the Ohio Federation of Women's
Clubs closed here. Th,e next convent
lion, will, .be heia n chiiucome in
October. vi
ttatrs Ip celebrating
iUfsis.
In Ohio, the main halting places for
the transcontinental equestrian party
A STORE
IS WRECKED
CONDUCT
RAILROAD BUSINESS
, ernor '"ouio appoint two citizens of
his state aa members of a New Eno-
land railroad conference to consider
and report on the beet mode of de
veloping and operating the New Eng
land railroad ayatem. The membera
of the conference are, to serve without
compensation, but their necessary ex
penses are to be paid by the state ap
pointing- them.
MAN ENDS
HIS LIFE
Ottawa, O., Jan. HO. Otto Lchmnn,
38, son of I.eo Lehman, who lives on
a farm near here, committed suicide
by shooting himself through the
heart.
COUPLE
IDENTIFIED
Tifflu. O, Jan. 30. Positive IdenM
flcation was made of tbo man and
woman found dead In a room at the
Arlington hotel as J. V. Fritz, 25, of
Toledo, a representative of the Good
year Hubber company, and Mrs. Ma
bel Mynard, 20, also of Toledo. The
couple bad registered as man, and
wife aud It la believed tbey were
.overcome by escaping gas.
LOST NAIL;
GETS $85
; at. Clalrsvllle, O., Jan. 30. Anna
Nlckle was glvrn a erdlct for $85
against the Wheeling Traction com
'pany for the Iors of a finger nail. A
'car window falling on the finger, in
jured the nail.
, Lincoln Memorial Bill Passsd.
Washington, Jan. 30. After a pro
l'iged fight .the house passed the bill
providing for the construction In
Washington of an edifice ot Greek de
slgii as a memorial to Abraham JJn
poln. The bill making appropriations
i, maintenance of the govern-
District ot Columbia was
,i-aiitu. . , . MaBTar'-
CARMODY AIRS
SICKLES CASE
SppiMIc Appeals, Hi Says,
Art Misdirected.
DEFICIT MUST BE MADE 6003
New York Attorney Central In Letter
to the Widow of the Famous Con
federal Fighter, Declares Expres
sions of Sympathy Will Not Inter--'
fere With the State's Case Against
the Aged General.
Albany, N. T., Jan. 30. -r Attorney
General Carmody made it plain In a
letter to Mrs. Helen D. Longstreet,
the widow of the famous Confederate
general, that 'the sympathetic appeals
which have been made in behalf ot
General Sickles wll not Interfere with
the state's 'case or the efforts of the
attorney general to prosecute the
aged general, until' the general has
made good the $2.1,476 deficit In the
funds of the state mon .ments com
mission, of which be was chairman.
"New York appreciates her heroes,"
the letter of Attorney General Car
mody said, "and feela humiliated at
the spectacle which this case pre
sents. New York state also respects
her laws and seeks to enforce them
In a spirit of equality to all.
"The act is still less Justifiable be
cause of the unfortunate domestic
complications which have been forced
to public attention because of this
case. A noble wife and loyal son stand
ready to pay the deficit,, condltlonpd
only upon his permitting his wife to
return to his home and to maintain
that home In decency and honor.
"Your sympathetic expressions do
Justice to your heart.-but they do vio
lence to the facts inphls case. Gen
eral Sickles ia beiar prosecuted by
the state of New York for converting
to his own, use' the sum of $23.47
This money came into hla bands as
chairman of the state monuments
commission, to be used among other
purposes tor the erection of monu
ments to mark the resting places on
the field of Gettysburg of the brsve
soldiers who fell in defense ot their
country. '
"General Sickles appropriated this
amount to hla own use. This be baa
not attempted to deny or to defend,
admitting that he took the state's
money for private use without author
ity of law, an act which mean;i steal
ing. He was given his own time to
repair this amount, and that time was
extended at his susgestlon without
any desire to. embarrass him. His
services can not be overestimated,
but even the fame of the soldier must
not be used as a cloak or protection
for the commitment of rrliw."
ILLEGAL KILLIN
13
OF SEALS ALLEGED
Action Urged Aealnst North Ameri
can Commercial Company.
Washington, Jan. 30. Serloui
charges reflecting on the Integrity ot
ofllcers of the North American Com
mercial company, a concern that for
merly had the aeal killing privilege
on the Prlblloff Islands of the Bering
aea under a contract with the govern
ment, are made In a report filed with
the house by. the committee on ex
penditures In the department of com
merce and labor.
The committee recommends that
the attorney general be requested to
Institute civil proceedings against
Isaac Llebse, tbe president, to "re
cover such damages-, as he and his
confederates did to the seat herd of
Alaska from 1190 to 1910."
la tbls connection the charge Is
made that officers of the North Amer
ican Commercial company violated Its
contract with the government 'by kill
ing male seals under three years ot
ago and females, The committee rec
ommends "that the attorney general
bo requested to take such steps' as
may be necessary to collect the bond
of $500,000 from the North American
Commercial ' company and the sure
tits thereon."
Why W Can S Smok.
Smoke a not composed of rohch only,
but' of solid or perhaps, partly liquid
pnrtlcles. which' tiro mixed with the
gases and parried along by tbem. It is
these particles of matter that are visi
ble to the eye mid not tbo gases them-
slyes.-8t. Nicholas.
VARIANCE
OFjIPM
fctwiei Atrtnwy Geierar
Art bvennr Gtx
KfScffcraeCoBrtRittaiOoct
Not Impair Smltli Tu Ltw.
TAX COMMISSION TO (MrW
Attorney General. Claims Absoluto-f
Limitation Would Make the One Per
Cent Law Unconstitutional Judge
Dlttey of the Taxation Board Posi
tive Court Decision Hss Ruined the.
Act What the Governor Said.
Columbus, O,. Jan. 30. There Is ,,
Variance of opinion on the question
whether the Smith 1 per cent tax laW
stands shorn of the purpose for which
It was intended, as the result of th
ruling of the supreme court.
Governor Cox and many others re
gard the court's decision as a death
blow to the Smith law. The govornor
transmitted a message to the .isscnw.
bly In whkh he urged speed? action,
In amending the law so that it wou'Ur
provide what the people have sup
posed tbey hare had, a tax limitation
of IS mlUs. Supporting tha views of.'
the governor are members of then
State tax. commission.
Judge R M. Ditty of the" state tax
commission declared that the su
preme court's ruling completely de
stroyed the Intent of the Smith law
and threw down the bars for any rate
of taxation on the present large dupllr
.catea. . ' -
Hogan's Opinion.
Opposed to the views of Governorr
Cox is Attorney General Hogaa, who
declared that the supreme court's
ruling does not Impair or emasculate
tbe Smith law as to a single one pt
Its Intents. "The fact ot the ease ls
that the decision saves the law," as
oerts the attorney general. In Mr..
ilosan's opfnlon the Smith law staadai
In more danger from attempts by that
legislature to amend or strengthen itsi
provisions than from any decision by
the supreme court.
The attorney general says: "To sus
tain the constitutionality of the Smith
law Itself required the recognition ot
the right on behalf of any taxing dis
trict to take care of lta lawfully cre
ated 'obligations. Were the court to.
limit the taxing districts to the 1&..
mills, the Smith act would undoubt
edly be unconstitutional. In my Judg
ment, the Smith 1 per cent law Is not
only not In danger In the decision of
the supreme court In the Roose cae, n
but when the decision Is looked st ,
rightly the constitutionality of tbe
act and the beneficial effects of the
act, as well as the purposes ot the.t
act, are fully sustained,"
In accordance with the governor's
message, an amendment Is being pre
pared which will have for Its intent .
the j.laclng ot a maximum levy of U
mills for all purposes, including Inter
est and sinking fund. , ,
What Cox Said. "'
In his message to tbo legislature
the governor said:
"Pursuant to the duty Imposed upon
the executive by the constitution with
respect to communicating Information
on 'the condition of the state,' I re
spectfully call your attention to a con
dition developed by a decision of the
supreme court or Ohio, rendered Jsn.
28, 1911. ,.
"It is held by that honorable body'
and there Is widespread opinion that l
the Interpretation Is sound, that Hi.
'ii auu aiuMiug. iuiiu cuaraei no
not come within the prescribed asax--ima,
as the act is drawn. , fl..
"This vitiates the basic principles, ,ot;
the law, creates a breach in the' Jtn,
Itation and trespasses on tbe "fixed:
purpose of the people to establish"".'
base of eeonomy In government.''' '"
"Present .valuations on property"
were mad? with a commoniv.wndeiw
standing of tbe maximum rato ;ef Ujk
atlon, and any action in .departure
from this, although mada possibleby
the decision of the court, mlgnf'tie re
garded as bad faith upon the1 part M
tbe state. ,
"Tbe Smith law way have to, be rei
fined by experience, but ,ther.e. will, re
main nothing to refine if the emascu
lation stands without legislative re-,,
pair. 'v ' '
"The budget commissions meet the
first Monday in June. Whatever ac
tion your honorable body might in its -;
Wisdom take should ensue, by .Jarcjt
1, in order that It become.', (rtraeUve,,,
before the date fixed by. statute tor.-'
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