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The Democratic banner. (Mt. Vernon, Ohio) 1898-192?, April 04, 1913, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88078751/1913-04-04/ed-1/seq-1/

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MT. VERNON, OHIO, FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1913-No. 27
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NOW INSPECTING
FLOOD DISKS
Ohio
Re)
ief Commission Arrives At
Stricken
V-
WBI Visit Afflicted Points Hamilton, Zanesville, Ctiiiiicdthe
And Ohio River Towns Included In The Commission's
Itinerary-Partial Survey Made Of Columbus' Wes;
Side, Where Additional Dead Have Been
Recovered
Columbus, p., April. 3. Partial In
spection of the devastated West .Side
waBmacle by members of the Ohio
flood relief commission, before leav
ing on the special Burvey of the other
flooded districts of the state, to obtain)
tret-hand knowledge of conditions be
lore expenditure of further funds is
Dade. John H. Patterson, the main
stay of tho relief organization at Day-
'ton, said the West Side 'was much J
worse hit than he had 'Supposed.
The commission, Governor Cox,
John H. Patterson, Dayton; Jacob Q.
'ScnmldUp.'.CIncinria'ti; 8'. O' Richard
son, Toledo; Homer N. Johnson,
Clevelnnd; George. W. Lattlmer, Co
lumbus, and Colonel James Ktl
bourne, also" of s Columbus, left here
fcy special Pennsylvania railroad train
arranged .for by Superintendent It. E.
McCarty, Tor Dayton. Inspection also
will be made of Hamilton, 'Cincinnati,
Ironton, Porlmnouth and other Ohio
river potntB, Marietta, Zanesville,
Chlllicothe and probably other cities.
General John C. Speaks was put In
charge of the train. The commission
was accompanied by three Red Cross
officials, E' N.jBicknell, executive di
rector; 3. E. JCingsley and Major
Charles Lynch, medical corps, U. S.
A. Miss Mabel Boardman, general
secretary of (he American Red Cross
society, left for Washington, after ex
plaining in detail to the commission
the Red Cross method of distributing,
relief. Tile Red Cross fund for this
and other states has paijsed the $800,
000 mark.
More Dead at Columbus.
As the lowlands in tho cemetery
'district Blowly yield their dead, the
list of Columbus flood. victims mounts
higher. With tho placing in the
morgues of nine additional bodies
and the finding of another which
could not ho removed from the drift
In which it had lodged, the total
reaches SO.
Members of families, of which some
bodies have been recovered,, still, are
' missing, and they are counted 'by
Hielr friends as .dead. The only ef
fort to And them is by searching in
the flood-swept lowlands and a close
vigil at the. morgues, TheKindlng of
body actually seems to be a satis
faction in that it it a relief; from sus
pense, although, it destroys a faint;
Hope that the one missing aflat be
live.
The section between the two ceme
teries and; the lowlands south, of them,
BtlU continues to; produce the greatest
number, of dead. Water and soft' nod
Impede the search.; Few drifts bars'
been removed. '
With the recovery of the bodies of
Mary BerniceFord and Kllsaheth Gla
dys Ford, daughters of -Charles EL
Ford,' 348 Centner avenue, th last of
the Ford family has beea foansV.The
bodies of Mrs. Ford aid another
daughter, Frankle, had beea -previously
recovered.
C. A. ' Wllklns, ,1697 W4st, Rich
street, suffered bis last heartache'
when he Identified tho body" of his
daughter Dorothy, 12, at tho morgue.
The mother and two children, Maxine
and Donna, 10 and years, previously
had been Identified.
8,200 rlouMS Wrecked.
City Solicitor Bolln told the special
Joint committee 6 the legislature on
remedial flood laws something of the
extent of the water damage in Colum
bus. He said that3,2lr0, houses,. had
"been damaged, sbmeof. them' bavins
had water on the second' floor, and
Jhere were 284) Improved Jots on
Dayton
which there Is now no Improvement,
not even a fence, the houses and
buildings having been swept away.
Somo improved lots are now holes 15
.o 20 feet deep.
Prosecutor Edward C. Turner, at
the request of Judge Dlttey of the
state tax commission and Representa
tive Black of Cincinnati, presented
drafts of enabling acts tq bo used by
tho municipalities and counties. Mr.
Turner thOllCht It sufficient tn nnmnt
relief work for 1913 flood damage
irom the Smith tax law, tho Long
worth debt limit law and other nro.
visions restricting on delaying action.
Mayor Henry, T, Hunt of Cincinnati
Insisted this was a good opportunity
for general amendment of the Smith 1
ver cent law:. Most of the mayors of
Ohio municipalities,, he said, thought
the Internal limitations of the Smith
law should be removed.
Commission at Dayton.
Dayton, O., April S.The Ohio flood
relief commission, with Governor Cox
at its head, arrived here from Colum
bus last night and today. Is making
an inspection of the flooded districts
of this city. It Is likely the commis
sion will proceed to Hamilton from
here.
TYPICAL FLOOD SCENES
House In Twenty Feet of
Water and Tracks Undermined
Photos & by American .Press Airocistlon.
Buch scenes n thteBr common In' the
flooded districts in Ohio und Indians,,
Recedes at Cincinnati, .
Cincinnati. 0 April 3 , After re
maining stutionaryi'.uearjy' ,34 hours,
the Ohio river began '-fa i ling hereWfKl'l
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hesiasnts' of: Dayton,- in the heart
of the Ohio Hood district, are telling
exciting stories of their experiences
when Whelr city was overwhelmed.
Many escaped by boarding f Meant
trains which were loaded with rocks
WILL FALL SHORT
$25,000,000
New Tariff Revision Bill Not a
Revanue Producer.
SITUATION DISTURBS LEADERS
Developments Leading to the Conclu
sion That the Measure Soon To Be
Introduced In the House Will Be
the President's Own BUI Chief Ex
ecutive Standing For Low Rates On
AH Foodstuffs.
Washington, April 3. Democratic
jembera on the ways and means com
mittee were greatly disturbed when
treasury experts reported that the
tariff revision bill which the commit
toe has drawn would fall at least S25,
vOO.000 short of the amount that
would be needed from customs sources
to keep the wheels of government in
motion. The revenue problem thus
presented was made more acute by
the expressed wish or President WD
isqn that many rates of the bill, nota
bly those relating to foodstuffs and
farm products, be reducod below the
figures tentatively agreed upon by the
committee.
. Daly the developments In the tariff
situation are leading to the conclu
sion that the bill to be Introduced In
the house will be President Wilson's
own measure; thus It will conform in
detail to his wishes, sad from the be
ginning he will be called upon to as
sume responsibility for It, The mod
erate revisionists declared that the
president would either have to forego
some of the reductions which he Is
demanding or else tho rate incomes
would rave to be raised. 4
In the bill submitted to the presi
dent several days, ago rates were low
ered in such a manner' as to effect
reduction 'of something 'oyer $J0O,OQ0.
000 In the government receipts. More
than 50,000r000, was knocked att by
putting sugar on iho, fret) list and nri
other $3o;00p,O0Q Jttjr gv!iig4U the.por--poratlon
ta; ' ,
Tn regard to'fpodstuffs President
Wilson. however. "-la not asVtnz '.'
mUC " "WW" '" h m J
much of Ibu -coujmjftpfi h au a
FROM DAYTON'S FLOOD;
LAUNCHING RESCUE BOAT IN STREET
-to Keep. the ears on t
ooded tracks,
as shown In the upper picture. This
vices shows graphically how hundrecs
sought safety. It is worth studying.
t See the aged man climbing the lad
der to the top of the rock filled car
week or o ago. At thai" time the
president appeared to favor putting
all food and farm products on the
free list. Among tho articles that
rontribute to the market basket which
President Wilson believes should
either be admitted free or under tho
lowest possible rates are: All kinds of
meats, cattle, butter, cheese, milk and
eggs, potatoes and other' vegetables,
grain, all forms of bread and biscuit,
flour, sugar and other foods.
The wool schedule is a cause of
great concern among Democrats, and
although President Wilson Inclines
toward free raw wool. it. is likely that
the committee, for revenue, reasons,
will be obliged to recommend a 10 per
cent duty on this product.
Zanesville. Figures Losses.
Zanesville, O., April 3. With 15,000
people homeless nnd depending upon
relief stations for, help, this city has
totalled Its loss from the flood at $.'0,
000,000. In proportion to Its popula
tion, Zanesville is believed to tie the
worst hit of all the flood-swept cities,
for Zanesville has a population of less
than 30,000. Fully 1,000 houses are
now known to have been .swept away.
Still Over High Mark,
Galllpolls, O.. April 3. The govern
ment ..gauge here today showed tho
river had gone down, two feet blow
the 1884 mark of 64.2 feet. The high
water mark this year was 66,'C feet, or
28 Inches above the record made In
1884. The water still Inundates
houses In the flooded section, many
of them submerged to the first floor.
Dayton Will 8esk Loan. .
Dayton, O., April 3. Flans are be
fog drafted by the men of Dayton who
will take the lead In the reconstruc
tion of the city, by which the federal
government will be asked for a loan
of from $20,000,000 to 140,000.000 to
assist 'the flood-stricken city to get
back on its feet.
Massillon Asks Aid.
Masslllon, O., April 3. Massillon
sent i to Governor Cox an appeal for
food supplies and also bedding for 100
beds, The north end of the city was
twice threatened by fire when build
ings undergoing the drying process
caught fire from overheated stoves.
Only One Body Massing.
Delaware, O., April 3.-A shoe ex
tending from the mud beside tho rfver
led to an Investigation which resulted
In the recovery of thej&ody of JlrsV
Gro.ver SJcssen, 22, the. seventeenth Ho
be.'fbi'nft. Only the body'of Miss Ha
zel uuniap has not yet been recov,
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i and the man below him carrvlna the
i baby. The soldier on top of the box
car had his rifle slung over his back,
ready to use in case he saw looters
at work. The lower picture shows
men launching a large motorboat at
Dayton for the purpose of rescue.
SWELL IN MISSISSIPPI
THREATENS TROUBLE
Rich Sugar and Cotton Sections
May Suffer Severely.
New Orleans, La., April 3. The
Mississippi river from Vlcksburg,
Miss., to tho gulf, will go two feet
higher within the next few weeks
than the highest stage registered last
year, according to Hood warnings is
sued by Captain C. 0. Sherrllus, army
engineer, in churgo of the fourth dls
trict of the Mississippi river commis
sion. It Is feared that such a stage may
spell disaster for the richest sugar
und cotton sections of the United
States.
Lust year the maximum of the river
gauge here showed nearly 22 feet. At
that height and even with the tide re
duced by several Immense crevasses,
water slopped over the New Orleans
levee at a number of places, despite
the fact that they were topped with
several rows of sandbags. Captain
Sherrlll Issued orders to have the
levees from Vlcksburg to Fort Jack
eon, on both sides, raised above the
flood stage of 1912, and men and ma
terial are being sent to low points
along the river to take steps to com
bat the expected high water In the
lower Mississippi.
ONLY ONE STATE NEEDED
Direct Election of United States Sen
ators Practically Assured.
Washington, April 3. Senator Bris
tow of Kansas, author of the resolu
tion for a constitutional amendment
providing for direct election of United
States senators, declared the resolu
tion now lacks the ratification of only
one state to make It effective. Senator
Bristow's list shows that 35 states
have ratified the amendment. He ex
pects that Connecticut will be the
tblrty-Bixth state which will make the
long-sought reform a reality.
smith Succeeds Bowers. I
Washington, April 3. George M.
Dowers, federal commissioner of fish
eries; sent his resignation to Presi
dent Wilson to .become effective April
10. Hugh M. Smith, deputy commis
sioner, Is slated to succeed him.
RELIEF EXPERTS
RUSH TO SCENE
Serious Trouble Expected In the
Lower Ohio Valley.
ARMY MEN TO, FIGHT FLOOD
flans Perfected to Ccpe With the Sit
uation as the Crest Nears the Mis
sissippi River Provisions snd
Tents Forwarded to Threatened
Points In Kentucky, Missouri and
Other States.
Washington, April 3. Tho 'Oh'lo
flood having reached Its crest at CIn
rtnnatl and started to recede, Major
Normoyle, in charge of thn relief op
erations at liat post, made further
plans to cope with the situation aa the
crest moves lno the lower Ohio Valley
to the Mississippi. .
"We are looking for troublo In th.i
lower Ohio valley," said Major Nor
moyle, in a repcrt received by Major
General Wood, chief of staff of the
army, who returned with Secretary
Garrison from a trip Into the flood
area.
In order to Isecp relief measures
ahead of the flood. Major Normoyle
said he had ordered provisions, tents
and army flood relief experts Into
Carruthcrsvllle, Charres and New
Madrid,. Mo.; Hickman, Columbus an1
Wlckllffe. Ky.; Dyersburg and Tipton
vllle, Tenn.; Helena, Ark., as well aa
Memphis.
"Major Logan as advance scout,"
Major Normoyle's report added, "will
get all possible Information and "we
will throw officers and noncommis
sioned officers where .they can do the
best work In anticipation of trouble,
which will soon come throughout the
valley."
CHILLICOTHE NEEDS HELP
City's Loss In the Flood Very Heavy.
Three Yet Missing.
Chlllicothe, O., April 3. An apprais
al committee consisting of nine lead
ing citizens completed its work, their
figures showing that the loss to real
estate alone In the city of Chlllicothe
amounted to S250,0u5. The furniture
loss was not estimated, but it will
easily be 150,000 more. The body of
Klsia Carnes was recovered within
100 yards of where her sister was
found. William Baxter, Samuel Van
scoy and David N'olze are missing.
Thirteen bodies have been recovered.
DISTILLERY COLLAPSES1
Five Thousand Barrels of Whisky
Float Down Ohio River.
Louisville. Ky., April 3. . A large
warehouse of the Rugby Distillery
company, In the western end of the
city, weakened by flood w'aters, col'
lapsed, releasing to the river about
5,000 barrels of whisky, valued at a
quarter of a million dollars.
The threatened collapse- of weak
ened buildings was the only source ol
nnxlety ns the crest of the flood
passed Louisville with a staso of
slightly more than 45 feut.
Chicago's Donation to Ohio.
Chicago, April 3. Chicago's relief
fund for the flood sufferers reached
S400.000. The Chicago Association ol
Commerce, at tho request of the
American National Red Cross society,
shipped to Columbus C.000 mattresses,
10,000 blankets, 5,000 pairs of wom
en's shoes, 5,000 pairs of children's
shoes, 20 bolts of cotton cloths, 5,000
mops, 10,000 brooms. 15,000 scrubbing
brushes, 5,000 hoes, 5,000 shovels, 200
rakes; one car of soap, one car of
cleaning powder and 5,000 pairs of
women's rubbers.
Financial Aid Needed.
Columbus. O., April 3. With relief
work Just begun, the general commit
tee has obligations amounting to S27,
000 in excess of receipts, and a mora
urgent appeal for a fund of 1200,000
Is made. Need of women's and chil
dren's clothing, particularly shoes and
stockings, is imperative. Food sup
plies aso are necessary: A committee
was appointed to solicit funds In the
business district.
Benefactors Now Suffering.
Columbus, 0 April 3. Instances
where those who have harbored refu
gees from the flood-stricken districts
are themselves suffering, because of
lack of food, have been brought to the
attention of the registration depart
ment nt the city hall. As fast as pos
sible, these people are being relieved
of the care of the West Side , real
dents who have been given places in
other homes. 'Those charitably In
clined specified tho number they
could care for; and it now seems their
capabilities were overestimated, '
SOCIETY NOTES
4.4,4.4.4.4.4.4..4.4.4.
Missionary
Society Meeting
The Ladles Missionary Society of
tho Brandon M. K. church held an all-
day meeting nt the homo of Mrs. A.
(!. Mllligan in Brandon Wednesday.
Twenty-five members were present
during the day. Dinner was served
at noon. In the afternoon a very
Interesting program was enjoyed.
4
4.4.4.4.4.4.4.4.4.4.4.4.4.
BIBTHS
4.4.4.4.4.4.4.4.4.4,4.4.4.
A daughter was born Tuesday after
noon to Mr. and Mrs. Albert Holtz
of Gambler.
LIVE STOCK AND GRAIN
cnrcAoo. apiul j.
Cattle Tltt-ve. $7 JOffl 9 10: Texa
Meets, M 707 &G; wt-strm ulcers. i Wfp
15; cowx nnd heifer, 13 8& 00; Mock
ers and ferderx, Sv OCifi.S 10, calves, $C 00
j 25.
Hog Usht. t9 099 C5; mixed, II 00
&J 45; heavy. IS Gf?9 27&. rough, 13 75
91; pis, 7 10? 20.
,Sheep and Limbs Native nheep. $5 to
(it J5; wetf-rn, . JOjjJ 85; native lamb.
$C Mf8 70 weiitem, I" 2!fS 70! year
llnrs, G,S0f?7 S5.
Wheat No. 2 red. Jl 01. Corn No. ?
yellow, CRc O.it No. i white, 3j"i27a.
Receipt Cattle, 15,500 head; hoss, 30,
W0; heep nnd lambs, 16.000.
i:ast BurrALO, apiul s.
Hnsr Heavy, 9 7009 80; mixed, 13 86
U f'0; Yorker and r'K. 9 90010 00;
rough. JS 7S&8 8S; stag, 7 00S -JO;
dairies, 9 R0S10 CO.
Hhtep nnd Lamb Yearling's, to JOS?
5 25; wether. ! 7507 25J owes. 13 Mff
6 75: lamb. 50f9 00; mixed sheen,
K OO0C 75.
Receipt Cattle, 350 head, hogs, S,20;
sheep and Iamb, 4,000; calves, 200.
CLEVELAND, Al'RIL 1
Cattle Choice steers 7 75S 15: KixM
to choice steers. JT zSff' 75; heifer. J5 50
Cr7 50; bulls, 35 007 00; cows. S3 75J
I 50; milker and sprlncer. 1(5 00873 00;
75 00; calve. J10 (HirciO 50.
IIo?j llenvle and mediums, 39 65;
Vol kern. Ilsht Yorkers and pigs, 39 "5;
tough. 33 40; stag; 17 50.
Phcep nnd Lamb Wether. IS 00
I 75; ewe. SG OOgfi 25: choice spring
-urn)-. 18 50 ft 8 ..; S, -----'---
Receipts Cattle. 400 head; hog, 2,000;
Ihecp and iambi, 700; calves, 200.
PITTSBURO, APRIL 2.
Cattle Top rattle, 110 00; top calveav
1)1 00.
Ho? Heavies, J10 25; hay YorKer
HO 5'i, light Yorker. 110 50: pigs, 310 25.
Sheep and Limb Clipped shep,
J7 00t wool sheen. J7 50; clipped lambs,
J9 10; wool lamb. 19 25.
Rerclpts-Cattle, 600 head; hogs. 1,001
iheep and Umh. 1,004); calves, 400.
CINCINNATI. APRIL 3.
Cattle Fleers, 13 'jr.flS 73; cow. 13 2S
67 25; heifers, 13 008 25; calves, 37 ft
ill.1 00.
llos P.icker. 39 754J10 00; common,
(ows. 17 0flfl( 60; pigs and lights. 36 00
S3 75; sin;;. 36 00 MS 00.
Sheep and Imbs Sheep, 34 00il 50i
amh. 37 5009 25. .
Receipt Cattle. fOO head: hogs, 1,000;
iheep and lamb. 1W.
jTOLKDO. APRIL 3.
Wheat. Jl 10y; corn. 5licj oats, 3814c;.
eloverseed, 312 15.
JAAC
MAKES ALL THINGS NEW
Gold or Aluminum JAP-A-LAC will
renew the youth and beauty of an old
and tarnished) picture frame, or you
can use Dead Black JAP-A-LAC. It
gives & soft, ebony-like surface that Is
very handsome. JAP-A-LAC is so easy
to use. that it's fascinating to JAP-A-LAC
things and see them grow beau
tiful, almost as If by magic, JAP-A-LAC
has a thousand and one different
uses. Jt comes, in Oak; Dark Oak
.Walnut, Mahogany, Cherry, Malachite
Green, Ox-Blood Red, Blue, Enamel
Green (Pale), Enamel Green (Dark)
Enamel Red, Enamel Pink, Enamel
Blue (Pale), Apple Green Enamel,
Brilliant Black, Dead Black) Natural
(clear varnish), Gloss White, Plat
White, Ground, Gold and Aluminum.
All sizes from 10c to gallons in our
Pallet Department.
Woolson's
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