OCR Interpretation


The Democratic banner. (Mt. Vernon, Ohio) 1898-192?, July 15, 1919, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88078751/1919-07-15/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

r..v
I
JiOf
&&-?i
h..
I V"w
Established 1838
SENA
I
C0N1W1
MITT N
1
Resolutions Would Call Upon President For Information Re
garding The Alleged Secret Treaty Between Japan and
Germany, The Shantung Settlement and Why Costa
Rica Was Not Permitted To Sign the Peace Treaty.
WASHINGTON, July 14 The senate foreign rela
tions committee beginning the consideration of the peace
treaty today reported three minor resolutions bearing on
the Versailles negotiations, but .took no action on the ques
tion of asking the president to enter the discussion.
The resolution would .call upon the president and the
state department for information regarding the alleged
secret treaty between Japan and Germany, regarding the
protest said to have been made by General, Bliss, Secretary
Lansing and Henry White against the Shantung settle
ment and why Costa Kica was not permitted to sign the
peace treaty.
Membprs of the foreign
practically all of the two hours meeting had been taken up
witr discussion of these resolutions and that there was no
discussion as to inviting the president to meet with the
committee, or of the proposal to separately consider the
peace terms and the League of Nation's covenant. Detailed
discussion of the treaty is expected to be held tomorrow.
Immediately after the committed ad-.
journcd, debato on the actual ratifica
tion began In the. senate. Senator
Wasson, Democrat, of Virginia, op
ened tho debato with a speech prais
ing tho covenant as tho only possible
plan for preserving world tranquility.
While tho committeo was in ses
sion, President Wilson discussed var
ious phrases ot the peace treaty ca
TRIP OVER SEA
R-34 Averages 75 Miles Per
Hour On Her Return Flight
From The United States.
tBv Associated Prcsr to Tlio nanner)
PULLHAM, Norfolk, England. Ju?T
14 Groat Britain's mammoth trans
atlantic air ploneor, tho dlrigiblo R
34, arrived at tho nir station hero at
6:56 a. m., Greenwich mean tlmo,
today, completing her round trip from
the British Isles to tho United States
and return.
Tho R-34 poked her noso out of tho
clouds northeast of ho village, and,
nfter circling tho flying field threo
times, glided gontly to tho ground and
10 minutes later was 'housed In tho
dirigible shed. .Tho yoyogo from' Long
Island was without particular incident
and was completed in approximately
7G hours.
Declares Germany Can Re
gain Lost Prestige by Play
ing Fair With U. S.
f IJv Asonclntert Truss to Tho Banner!
BERLIN. July 14 Count von Hern
storff, former German "ambassador at
.Washington, writing in tho wcokly
Democratic Germany, advocates a
pro-American policy and points out
that a revision of tho treaty ot peaco
can como only through, tho league of
nations.
"Whon Gormany is received into
the league," ho says, "she can hope
for a bettor world order checking im
perialism by individual powers and
bringing utfout a system 'binding poo-
ples together across the frontiers ot
statos. I hardly need to , point out
that such a policy woujd load us to
tho sldo or tho United States. There
the dangers of a "league of nations
living. There alono are funds to be
found, .and there t,he principal cham
pion or l!io lensuo idea will bo at tho.
lielm for another 20 months.
BIG HI
COMPLETES THE
BERNSTIFF
AS
NEW POLICY
THE ONLY
mm
OF TREATY
relations committee said that
pcclally the Shantung Bottlomont with
tenate members, who called at the
White House.
On this point tho president said
with lofcrenco to tho Shantung settle
niont, American pcaco commissioners
could not Impose their completo will
on tho peace conference and wore
corujiollod to accopt somo things In
the treaty which they personally dis
approved of.1'
OHIO BRIEFS
YOUNGSTOWN, O., July 14 Beat
en', stabbed and with rovolvor wounds
in his forehead, Patrick Pancollo, 30,
was found dead in his homo this
morning.
o
SIDNEY, O., July 11 A stock barn
on tho- farm of Henry IJoraing was
struck by lightning and destroyed by
firo during a storm last night at 10:00
o'clock.
o
COLUMBUS, O., July 14 With im
piesslvo religious servicos, tho Meth
odist centenary, which has been in
session here since Juno 20, closed last
night.
ITS ARE
The Action Against Cunard
Steamship Company Term
inated By Judge Mayer.
By Associated Press to Tlio nanner
NEW YORK, July 14 A ilnal decroo
dismissing all damage suits against
tho Cunard Steamship company as tho
result of torpedoing tho 'Lusitanla
was handed down today by Judgo
Julius Mayer In tho Unitod Statos Dis
trict court.
A tntnl nf kIvIv four claims totaling
Mi
K
DAMAGE SU
DISMISSED TODAY
more than ?5,000000 havo been I City lawyor.iw minister to Bolivia,
brought against tho company. In his I Tho president suggested to tho sen
decision Judgo Mayer intimated thatU' tllilt ho tnko tno mttcr u wlth
nlnlmnntH mlcht 1m rnimbnrsod hv tho
government jMirough ydomiijitles re
ceived from Gormany.
F
f By Associated press to T(o Banner!
WASHINGTON, July 14 Tho cost
of construction of army cantonments
during tho war was not excessive,
the liouso investigating committeo
wa.s told today by Brig. Genoral Mar
shal, chief of the construction divis
ion. '
He said that tho cost plus system
used by the government got as noar
a jdollnrs worth for every dollar spent,
ns It we wcro to begin construction
today.
CONST OOTID
CAMPS NOT COSTLY
NEWSPAPER IN MT. VERNON RECEIVING THE
W0tM&
w
MT. VERNON,
CAPITOL
i
MBHMMiEllWff r ii'ii'l ' 4 i iWmWHItw i filinM Wi VIMPPpII iiL in "Ml ' vv
ltllip
mM-ai
aBHSQlWtwW '. a ! . tm&Z&alilxw! " t nrTirnrTrTMFi tmmm rfiri T (T 1 1 T iini i i T iTMB
Alrplnne view of Capitol Hill, Washington, showing, tho capltol nt left center, the house office building In tlm hiiino
i Inte foreground, lhi library of congress on the right;, the senate ofilco building beyond that, and the Union fetation In
tho upper right. Beyond tho cnpitol nnd the Bonatc-wlllee building arc the government dormitories for women.
DAYLIiTLI
TO CONTINUE
I N OPERATION
House Fails Today To Pass
The Repeal Bill Over The
President's Veto.
IBv Associated Press to The Bnnncr?
WASHINGTON, July 14 Repeal of
the daylight savings law became' a
dead issue for the present at least,
'by'the''fallure of the "house 'today to
pass the agricultural appropriation bill
over the president's veto. The vote
was 247 to 135, with those in favor of
the repeal unable to muster the nec
essary two-thirds vote.
The agricultural bill will be passed
with the repeal eliminated and it was
said that there will be no further ef
fort to have the repeal bill passed as
a separate measure as the president
would undoubtedly veto it again.
Shantung Situation Discussed
And Other Matters of In
tercst Taken Up.
frjy Associated Tress to Tho Banner
WASHINGTON, July 14 1'roildent
Wilson discussed tho pcaco treaty at
somo length this morning with Sena
tors King of Utah and MeClough, Dem
ocrat, of Tennesseo, who wore among
half a dozen callers at tho White
House.
It was understood that particular
attention was gtvop to tho Shantung
sltluation and after tho confdronco
Senator King said ho was convinced
that this question would oventually
clear iUolt up.
Senator King called at the White
House primal Uy to urge tho appoint
ment of Abbott McGinnis, a Salt Lako
i tho stato uoparunoni.
T
AT M10K FIELD
Airplane Crashes To Earth
And Two Men Arc Killed
Instantly.
TBy AisoplatPrt Vrw tn The Bannr)
DAYTON, O. July 14 Two more
fatalities were listed at the McCook
flying field today when Captain Will.
S. Jones, 25, of New Richmond, Ind.,
and George Durane 30 Chicago died
as the result of injuries received
when a new type of Curtlss byplane
In which they were riding crashed to
the earth shcrtly before noon.
SENATORS
on
wi
ES
1
1HLLED
0., TUESDAY, .JULY 15,
HILL AS SEEN fROM AN
SENATOR MEDILL W'CORMICK'
- J5
A snapshot of Sen-itor Mcdill Mc
Cormlck of Illinois leaving the capltol
after n heated day's session. Both Mr.
and Mrs. McCormlcU have been taking
tin nctlvo part In tho affairs of tho
Republican party.
Woman's Prerooatlve.
Tho Dearleys had been married n
vear and Mrs. D. hud cast from her nil.
the little pretenses and subterfuges
that usually precede the wedding day.,
"Tomorrow will bo my twenty-sixth
birthday," she said unguardedly.
"Why, Just before our wedding you
told me you were 21." gasped hubby. ,
"Yes," said his wife, smiling cheer-,
fully, "but wo women ago rapidly after
marriage." Pittsburgh Chronlcle-Tele-j
graph. '
ATTEMPT
E
VOTETAILED TODAY
Wartime Prohibition Up In
The House On A Point of
Order.
TBv Aosr.clnteil Ficsh to Tho Banner
WASHINGTON; July 14 An at
tempt to forco a voto on tlio repeal ot
wartlmo prohibition failed today in
tho houso on a point of order raised
by Chairman Volstead of tho Judiciary
committeo.
An amendmont to the ponding pro
hibition onfoi cement bill, as proposed
liy Representative Igoo, Democrat, of
Missouri, was ruled out ot order.
Another amendment to tho bill giv
ing tho president the authority to re
peal war time prohlbithTn whenever
ho decided the necessity for its con
tinuation had ceased was offered by
Representative GIraid, Democrat, of
Ohio, was ruled out of order. -
A motion to permit tho sale of beer
containing 2?i percent alcohol, under
war tlmo prohibition enforcement, was
offered by Representative Dyer, Re
publican, of Missouri, and it-started a
whirlwind light lato in the afternoon.
When it was apparent that all of, the
members uniited to 1m heard, it was
finally ngrood to limit tho debato on
the motion to one hour.
Bii Mm
ORG
ASSOCIATED PRESS
1919 No. 56
AIRPLANE
Two Women And One Man
Seriously Injured; Strikers
And Guards Clash.
By Assoclatea Press to The Banncrl
CHICAGO, July 14 Two women
and one man were seriously injured
when Btrllters at the Argo llHnoU,
plant of tho Corn Products Refining
company, stopped street cars carrying
non-union men to tho plant and clash
ed with armed guards who' wore
aboard the cars. A number of shots
were fired.
Strikers and guards also clashed
near tho Argo hospital and ten por -
sons were slightly injured. Until this
morning tho villago had been quiet,
since tho rioting Tuesday night in
which threo men were killed and
many wounded.
N OHIO LAST YEAR
Figures Of State Registrar
Show Number of Fatalities
Steadily Increasing.
COLUMBUS, OHIO, July 11 Tho
number of. persons killed annually in
Ohio from automobile accidents Is
steadily increasing. There were G68
deaths from this cause In 1918. This
is shown by records In the oilico of
Dr. J. E. Monger, state registrar of
vital statistics.
In 1015, 191C and 3917 there wero
S04, 112 and G17 deaths from automo
lillo accidents. On the basis of 412,
578 licensed gas cats, the number in
operation last year, there Is one death
to every (117 cars.
Of the CCS deaths in 1918, 509 wero
males and 159 females. Forty-six
wero under flvo years of age. The
highest death rate was between tho
ages of flvo and nine, with 102 deaths.
Tho noxt highest ago period was)
from 33 to I!9, with 53 deaths. Ten j
people over 90 years of ago wore kill
ed. August with 83 deaths was tho!
most fatal month. Tho number of
deaths from injuries received from,
other vehicles was 154.
TAKES STATE JOB
fBv As-wlotrd F-rfis i Th Banner)
COMI.MDUS OHIO July 14
George T. Ulnko, for years a political
writer o:i the Columbus' Evening Dis
patch and well known throughout the
PtatP, today resigned to accept a po
sition with the state banking depart
luent.
RIOTS RESUMED
AT LARGE PLANT
TRISIRNHG!
660
POLITICAL WRITER
DISPATCHES
wxutt
'VICTORY DAYMSO BSERVED IN
PISTOiflNIICRIEn
SOLDIERS TIE IMPORTANT PART
Marshal Foch and General Pershing, In Company With Oth
er American Generals, Were Enthusiastically Receiv
ed; Crowds Gather on Roofs and one Gave Away In
juring Eighteen Persons; Congestion As Great As on
Armistice Day.
PA 11IS, July 14 With
lies in line, Paris today, had its
celebration. People irom all over the country arrived in
Paris for the" fete and throngs of people filled the streets
all night. The congestion was as great as that on armistice
day.
An empty casket at the Arc De Triumphe was decor
ated with wreathes in honor of the dead, as the parade
passed by led by about 3,000 wounded soldiers.
Marshal Foch and General Pershing, in company with
other American generals, were enthusiastically received
everywhere. A composite unit, rprsnting all organiza
tions fo the A.E.F. and marching with wonderful precision,
was greeted with Avaving flags, handkerchiefs and cheers.
Every available window along the line of march had
been rented at unusual prices and crowds even gathered
on the roofs.
One ropf gave way and eighteen persons were injured.
POLICE SEH1
Mt. Vernon Boy Escapes From
- State Hospital Columbus, -
Monday Morning
IBs Associates tress 10 Th Bai.neu
COLUMBUS, O., July 14 The au
thorities at the state hospital have
asked the police to apprehend Paul
stoke8' 17 a privileged character at
the Institution, who walked away from
there yesterday. When he left he wore
blue trousers, a brown shirt and brown
cap.
His home Is at Mt. Vernon, O.
Stokes is the son of P. S. Stokes of
JCanesville, formerly of Mt. Verjion.
He was In trouble in juvenile court
several times and at last was turned
oyer to tho state board of administra
tion by the officials of Knox county.
He has been at several of the state in
stitutions under the direction of the
board of administration.
15,
E
Officers Criticise Port Offi
cials Because They Had
To Return In Steerage.
NEW YORK, July 14 Four trans
ports arrived here today from Brest
with 15.C0O troops, the Cap-Finisterre.
bringnig 2976, the cruiser Pueblo 16-
S9, the cruiser St. ouis 1 SS3 and the
lmperator 9452.
Troops aboard the Cap Finlsterre
included units of the Eight Hundred
and Thirteenth Service 'Pioneer In
fantry, the majority of whoso men
bail from Illinois, Pennsylvania, Vir
ginia and Tonnesee, commanded by
Major W. J. White ot Parkersburg,
W. Vu.; units of tho Threo Hundred
and Forty-first Service Rattalion, In
cluding men from Virginia, Texas, Al
abama and Now York, and a contin
gent of causals, among whom was Ma
jor Genoral William H. Hay. T,he
Cap Finibtcrre also brought 167 "war
bridos."
T
IBy Associated Press to The Bannepl
MT. CLEMENS, July 14 Henry
Ford took the stand as a witness to
day In his libel suit against the Chi-
icago Dally Trjbunc.
PAUL STOKES
1
I SUN
FORD
KES
T
INTHELBELSOIT
$1.50 PER YEAS
representatives of! all the al
"Victory Day" parade and
F. B. BERGOON DIES
AT DELAWARE, OHIO
TBy Assoclatea Press to The Banner
DEAWARE, July 14 Frederick P.
Bergon, aged 89, one of the best known
orchardists in the United States, died
here today of old age.
Mr. Bergon camo to Delaware from
Franete'-wheirhe was" 4 years 'old." Ho"
has lived in the same location for the
past 85 years. His orchard near Green
wood Lake was one of tho prominent
spots near Delaware.
WASHINGTON, July 14 Acting
under specific authority granted in the
ne- naval appropriation bill, tho
navy department soon will start con
struction on two of the largest dirig
ible hangars in the world. Rear Ad
mirals Taylor and Parks, heads of the
bureaus ot construtlon and repairs
and yards and docks, respectively,
have instructions to speed up the
preparation of the -working plans, as
an 'expenditure ot about 53,500,000
for two hangars to house flying ma
chines of the Zeppelin type has been
authorized. They will be located on
the seaboard, probably n New Jersey,
and possibly on the same site.
Ground area necessary for the con
struction ot n double hangar will be
about one square mile. Each hangar
will be about 800 feet long, 250 feet
wide and from 150 to 200 feet high.
It Is probable that all steel construc
tion w ill be used and officials estimate
that, from six to eight months will bo
needed for their erection.
Provision for the purchase abroad
of a Zeppelin type airship at a cost
not to exceed ?2,500,000 is made" in
the naval bill, and the construction
in thte country of a similar machine
at a cost of $1,500,000. It is probable
that tho machine purchased abroad
will be of the British R-34 model al
though larger. It probably will bo
flown, to this country by an Ameri
can crew, tho only other alternative
being to attempt to tow it by cables
made fast to a ship. Negotiations
looking to the purchase have already
beon entered into with foreign na
tions. After experiments with tho foreign
craft the construction ot an improved
American built machine will be start
ed. Secretary Daniels said tonight that
jhe had no further statement to make
regarding the rumored trans-Pacific
flight. Nayal officers believe, bow
over, that such a flight will be. at
tempted shortly after tho navy comes
Into possession ot its first cruising
dirigible.
WESTERVILLE, O.. July 14 J. F.
Davis cranked his automobile, while
It wn in gear today and was run
over and killed.
SPEED WORK ON TWO
DIRIGIBLE
HANG
,
:
V
m
k
iCl
"iS
'iS
T
4
'-?
v -
fcVL

xml | txt