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El Paso herald. (El Paso, Tex.) 1901-1931, March 26, 1910, Image 20

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HERALD
20
Saturday, March 26, 1910.
FRANK G-. CARPENTER'S LETTER.
$3.50 Recipe Cares
Weak Men FREE
EL
)
Send Name and Address Today j
You Can Have It Free and
Be Strong and Vigorous.
I have in niy possession a precsrlp
tion for nervous debility, lack of vigor,
weakened man hood, failing memory
and lame back, brought on by sxcessrz,
unnatural dra-it. or the follies of
vouth, that has cured so many worn
and nervous men right in their own
homes without any additional help or
medicine that I think every man who
wishes to regain his manly power -and
vlrilitv. quickly and quietly, should
iiSSyotlSSSJiai&otilAfe in the Cells and Workshops Our Correspondent
charge, in a piain. uruiua.iv seaiea en
velope to any man who will -write me
for it-
This prescription comes from a phy
sician who has made a special study of
men and I am convinced it is the surest
acting combination for the cure of de-
ficient manhood and vigor failure ever '
put together.
I think I oweIt to my fellow man
to send them a 'copy in confidence so
that any man anywhere who is weak
and discouraged with repeated failures
may stop drugging himself with harm
ful patent medicines, secure what I
believe is the quickest acting restora
tive, upDiiilding, SPOT TOUCHING
remedy ever devised, and so cure him
eelf at home quietly and quickly. Just
ldrop me s. line like this: Dr. A. E.
Kobinson, 4049 Luck Building. Detroit.
Slick., and I will send yqu a copy of
this splendid recipe in a plain ordi
nary envelope free of charge. A great i
rr.n'P- HnfMro -wniilrt Tii-rf S2nn tn I
55.00 for merely writing out a prescrip- j walls are 20 feet high and they in
tion like this but I send it entirely close many acres. Upon their corners
wu
B Directory ill
Herald Building
BASEMENT
Palace Cafe, H. B. Thoaopsoc,
Prop.
FIRST FLOOR.
El Paso Herald Offices.
A. H. Richards, Jeweler.
International Book Co.
"Wm. Xloeller, Real Estate.
Herald Lobby Cigar Stand.
SECOND FLOOR
H. Jj. Howell, Real, Estate,
agent Herald Bids.
T. "W. C. A. Lunch and Rest
Rooms.
John Brunner. Tailor.
J. F. Milner. C. E. E. M., repre
senting the White Sands Co.
Miss Pauline Hilpert, Dress
making Parlors.
Standard Home Co.
THIRD FLOOR.
R. L. Nichols, Attorney at Law.
J. E. Dutcher, Attorney at Law.
Colorado Rational Life Assur
aBce Co., E." McMillan, Gen. Agent.
Southwestern Portland Cement
Co.
The Public Stenographers Co
Mrs. Jessie 33. M. Howe and Miss
Ruth "Williams. Proprietors.
The Wm. Jesnlnrs Co- Engi
neers and Machinery merchants.
First Church of Christ, Scien
tist, Reading Rooms.
Mrs. A. P. Thompson, Mrs. "Wm.
Noble, Chipa Decorations.
Drs! Satterlee &. Satteflee. Os
teopaths. Dr. Flora Satterleo and
Dr. .Nettie Satterlee.
Carter & Robertson, Mill, Mine
and Smelter Supplies.
Public Stenographers Co.- Ruth
"Williams, Mngr.
Mrs. J. B. Cass and Miss Garra,
Dressmaking.
xne Ludlow-Saylor Wire Co.
J. E. Robertson. Mngr.
.p.oyal Jackman, Upper Valley
Investments.
A. Courchesne.
Lee & Woodyard, contracting
engineers.
R. E. Huthsteiner, .Mechanical,
Electrical Engineer.
El Paso Printing Co., Herald
taullding, facing G. H. & S. A.
tracks and Main street.
Sar,PntessMthod
He Pay UNTIL CURED
KaFraad. Ho X Say.
Any Tumor, Lump or
Sore on the lip, face
or body dx months is
Cancer. THEY NEVER
PAtN until last st&ee.
BOOK sent free frith
Testimonials. Hundreds
-trill -rote yon that WD
SATED THEIR LIVES.
WHITE TO SOME
ANY LUMP IH WOMAN'S BREAST
is certain death if neglected. It poisons
ieep into the armpit and KILLS QUICKLY.
"We send you $ fer every patient
we treat whose name you send, first.
Describe your o&se and set curSIOOO offer
Address Dr. S. R. CHAM LEY, gSsK i
(j afM ? ma til h?c luo fmucLto, unu
MAIL THiS'TO SOME ONE WITH CANCER
TRY DR. CHE HOlC'S VEGETABLE
COMPOUND.
M-wmCESfES for
Hereditary debil
ity or weakness
of men, women
and children.
Chronic Blood
Poison, Eruptions
all Skin Diseases.
Eheumatism, Ca
tarrh, Heart Dis
ease, Lung Trou
ble, Liver Com
plaint and Con
stipation. Female internal
trouble, inflama
tion ' or acute
pains INSTANT
LY CURED. Of-
Bell Phone 2910.
fice 105 X. Campbell.
Cancer Cure
Mir
aHHpf-MH
Your Account
in a strong, conservative bank will act as a safeguard to you
in any period of depression, which may come to your business.
The American National Bank is strong-r-it has been made
bo by being conservative.
Tour account invited
Capital and Surplus $240,000.00
a
IT
IS ALL RANGOON, AND IT HAS 2500 TATTOOED
CONVICTS.
Takes the Punishment of the Crank How the Pris
oners Are Fed The Treadmill Abolished, But Flog
ging Permitted Exercising With Cannon Balls
Convict Cheap Labor in Burma The Police and the
Courts In Jail for Debt. ,
(Copyright, 1910, by
ANGOON. India, March 16. The
biggest jail in the world is here
at Rangoon. It has a capacity
of more than 4000 convicts, and there
are 2500 incarcerated in it. The jail
is situated right in the heart of this
City OI ZUU.UUU.
Its lilac colored brick
are watch towers in which dark
bearded, brown faced East Indian sol-
j diers, with great yellow turbans on
their black heads, stand day ana night
ready to shoot down the prisoner who
attempts to escape. There are other
I ro-.V liAneu mirlwav TlPtWfifTl and
! others scattered throughout the vast
Inclosure, keeping prisoners under sur
veilance both day and night. A squad
of soldiers was drilling in front of the
entrance when I drove up to it this
morning, and inside the jail I found
f guards everywhere.
I was able to visit the institution
through a note of introduction from
the lieutenant governor of Burma, and
Capt. Knapp, the superintendent, gave
orders that I was to be shown every
part of it and allowed to maiie such
photographs as I wished.
I was accompanied by one of r tie
Burmese clerks of the main office, a
bright young fellow with yellow face,
brown eyes ahd black hair about walch
a pink turban, was tied. He wore a
khaki jacket and below this a silk t
skirt, wound tightly about the legs
irom waist to ankles. He was known
to all the officials, and, at his word
all doors were opened and all cells
unlocked. "We walked together through
ward after ward and visited the work
shops, where more than 2000 criminals
labor from 6 in the morning until 4
in the afternoon, as they serve out the
sentences.
Among the jHcoTrigibles.
The first division we -entered was the
one devoted to the incorrlglbles. The
most of the prisoners, as I shall show
later, labor in companies, side by side, ,
in great shops of various kinds. In
this ward every man forked alone In .
his cell, shut in by thick walls. He j
could not see nor hear anything hut j
the sorrowful shriek of the machinery
which -jhimself and his fellows were
operating, and these noises sounded to
me HK-e uie nana i ." uai"utu "" I
agine a long hall 15 feet wide, upon
which perhaps three score cells
opened. Each cell is about the size
of a hall bedroom, lighted by a grated
window up undjer the TOof, so high
that the man cannot see out. The cell
is walled and floored with cement, and
its only furniture is a low bench about
two feet wide and eight inches high, j
with a coarse blanket upon It- This is
Not any Milk TfUSt
any
Tht Original and Genuini
HORLICK'S
MALTED MILK
Tht Food-drink for All Agfs.
More healthful than Tea or Coffee.
Agrees with the weakest digestion.
Delicious, invigorating and nutritious.
Rich milk, malted grab, powder form.
A quick lunch prepared in a minute.
TakeHosuhstitute. AskforHGRLICK'S,
Others are imitations.
Eczema
It makes no
difference how
innr vou have 0
,
suffered, what you have
tried, even if every part of
vour body is an itching, burn
ing sore, a permanent cure awaits
you.
"IMPSEIAL BEMEBY
The Instant "Imperial Remedy" is
applied you feel relieved. It is a
nice, clean liquid -which penetrates
the pores, and purifies the diseased
parts.
Ask your druggist for a bottle of
Imnerial Eczema Remedy. A full
dollar size bottle sent on receipt of I
1.00 if your druggist does not sup
ply yo u,
I3IPER.LAI 3IEDICIXE CO.,
Houston, Texas.
g&xjiren
vnCmfE;
V3kdti
Frank G. Carpenter.)
the prisoner's bed. His pillow Is a log
of wood of about the size of a 5 cent
loaf of bread.
Did I say the only furniture? I am
wrong. There is also a great crank
in the cell, attached to a bar which ex
tends through the walls, and which, by
an arrangement of cog wheels turns a
mill in the hall outride. This mill con
tains raw peanuts, "and the prisoner
within must grind them to oil. The
crank is such that it exercises the
whole upper part of the body. 'It is
turned with both hands, and the man
keeps it moving throughout the day.
The mill I first inspected was that
of Po Sa, a Burmese, who had been
convicted of an assault with intent to
kill. He -was bare to the waist, ex
cepting a light iron collar about his
neck, on which was a metal tag giv
ing his number. From waist down
ward he wore only a breech cloth, and
I could see his muscles rise and all as
"he strained at the crank. He acted so
I thought he was shamming, and I
asked the guards to let me try it my
pelfl. Thereupon the door was un
locked and I took his place. The crank
moved easily at first, but after a hun-
,dred revolutions every cord In my arms
and chest was sore, and at two hun
dred I was readsr to drop. Neverthe
less, this man was condemned to hard
labor for three months, and that to'nrnrk. Whn T wns hpre last. I saw
the screeching of' the 60 other mills I 15 0 men clad only in waist cloths, hold
connected with the cells in this -ward, j ing on to that bar, and walking up, up,
Twenty -Thousand Com lets. UP. turning the wheel as they did so.
-rr.., fu 1 j r .,.i, ..i, ana so b" their weight running the
With the other kinds of work carried , machine shops and the planing mills,
on in such cells in the making of coir. The men SQ punlshed were mostly In
In this the prisoners sit flat on cQrri ibl ho had committed terrible
the floor and pound upon cocoanut fiber t crhnes. They all had chains on their legs,
to reduce it to the consistency nrffeded j chains tied to tnelr aist
for rope. They keep up their pounding . hJ relieve their ankles several of
hour after hour and day after day, and , he convicts had tneir h3inils fastened to
if they stop are urged on by the bar OTerhead and an -re forced
guards. Such punishments are for men k tradin& to the unmusical jingle
sentenced to hard labor and solitary, f irQn bQund j
coniinement ui hiiihii iueie aie i-rci-i
haps 1000 In all Burma each year. I
have before me a report of the jails It ,
snows inaxi iiieie are uuw umemiuB
like 13,000 convicts in the various
prisons, and that 20.000 have been oft
their rolls this year. Of these 16,000
w.ere sentenced to rigorous imprison
ment and 37S were whipped in addition.
I asked
my guide whether flogging was j
. He replied. "io, but it is done
common.
n0w and then to keep the convicts in
u'u- I
Convicts Kneel to Our Correspondent. J
Leaving the solitary cells. I walked
on through inclosure after Inclosure, j
containing workshops of various kinds. 1
The doors were opened by black skinned j
iailers and the guards presented arms .
as we passed. The prisoners we met
saluted us by dropping on their bare ? reached the ground. There was a- mo
knees or squatting on their heels and J tion for each tap of the gong, and the
folding their hands like the "little work went on for hours at a time. I am
Vherubs who look up aloft." At first I
tl'ought thejr were praying to me. put
I afterward learned that they are re
quired to '"do this on the grounds of
good order. No one can jump at you
with a knife or knock you over if he
keeps his hands folded, and while on
the ground you have him nt a disad
vantage. It looked odd, this squatting
down of hundreds of men as we passed.
In some cases they took tubs of water
from their heads, and in others laid
down their tools that they anight clasp
their hands before us.
Prison Iabor.
During any stav I spent much -time in
the workshops. They include almost ev
ery Industry known to the Burman and
are a living example of the skill of these
people. There is a large printing office ,
with about 500 presses, and there are
fnlly that many convicts at Tvork there
and in the type foundries ana engraing i
establishments nearby. Each printer has
an iron collar on his neck and iron rings
on his ankles, and this is the casa
throughout the whole Jail.
Making Convict Goods.
Next to the printing establishment is
a large carpenter and cabinet making
shop, and farther on are rooms where
the criminals carve wood and weave
wicker furniture. This work is very ar
tistic. TVe next went by groups of tailors
and coir rope makers, who work out
In the open. All these dropped their
work and folded their hands as we
passed.
I asked a? to the earnings of the pris
oners. They are considerable. Most of
the criminals are sentenced to hard la
bor, and the expenses of the jails are
largely paid by the sales of their work.
They manufacture all sorts of things for
the government departments, do much
of the government printing and binding
and make the -weapons and Chains used
in the jails. I saw scores of prisoners
in theblacksmith shop forging swords
and dirks, to be used by the men who
guard them, and also shaping iron col-
Better Than Spanking,
Spanking does not cure children of
bedwetting. There Is a constitutional
cause for this trouble. Mrs. M. Sum
mers, Box 1v, Notre Dame, Ind., wilt
send free to any mother her successful
home treatment, will full instructions.
Send- no money, but write ler today
if your children trouble you in this
way. Don't bla" the child the
chances are it can t help It. This
treatment also cures adults and aged
people troubled with urine uifficulties
by day or night.'
DAKD
iTc.uSe, -,"W,rt""tIn ad2!ti0n' lhe ar' ChGSt Md
Daaderitie. All Dru;rs:I::. 25c, 5c h
it, or ead thin Ad with 10c fwtswpe r
liver) for larce fre mraple.
KKOIVJLTON DAXDCIUMi CO, .
Ckiearu- I111hI- '
CHICHESTERS PILLS
Hr.irv TIIE W1AJIOND BRAND. A
ut
ChUekes.ter8&taBdBraai
l'lll. in ? ad Gold metallic
boxes, sealed with Bluo Ribbon.
years known as Best, Safest. Always Relubl
-JL501O BY DRUGGISTS EVERYWHERE
4 S
lars similar to these they had on their
necks.
All Done by Hand.
Machinery has a small part in the
work of this prison. Human muscle
takes its place. The flour used in the
kitchens is ground between anillstpnes
turned by men who sweat as they drag
them around. I saw a gang at such j
work, and was told that each was ex
pected to make and clean about 50
pounds of flour daily. The sweat stood
on their brown skins as they worked,
and they tolled hard at the grinding.
On my way through, the yards I saw
the pumps working. The water of the
jail is raised by great barrel like wheels
so hung that as hey turn they dip
down into the water. To the rims of
the wheels buckets are attached. , These
fill as the wheels enter the "water, rise
to the top as it goes onward, and empty
out into a trough when it is turned
E u."v g1. iU1 "ifQ T A4.000. The military police has Euro
these wheels is a half dozen convicts, v ' . . " 0t, ,-
who, holding on to a bar overhead,
stepped ever upward, their weight turn
ing the wheel.
The Treadmill Abolished.
This work was in the open, and it
did not seem especially hard. It is the
only treadmill that is now at work in
the jail. The great saw and planing mill
treading arrangement Is still in exist
ence, but it Is Idle, having been displaced
by a boiler and steam. It was actively
working when I visited this Rangoen
jail 20 years ago, and in the eye of my
mind I can still see the picture of the
convicts then toiling. This treading ar
rangement was running a large planing
mill with all its accompaniment, as well
as other shops containing machinery.
It operated a tyuzz saw and scores of
machines run by pulleys and wheels do
ing the work of a modern steam engine.
Imagine a long narrow room about 30
feet wide. In which six great cogwheels
12 feet In diameter are so fitted to
gether that they make a continuous
wheel 100 feet long, running from one
end of the room to the other. Let the
cogs of this wheel be boards half an
Inch thick, so made that they form a
set of steps upon which men standing
can by their weight, miake the wheel
move. There Is a bar above to which the
men can hold, and to which they can,
if necessary, be chained to keep tnem at
,. rrT, Tir.il Tirill.
, j...... vuu.. uu..
As far as I can learn, the prisoners
are n(m. .eU treated, z gaTV no flogging.
and there is no cruelty worth mention
ing. One of the severest punishments
I saw was a gang of fonr men exercis
ing with cannon balls. This is Imposed
upon men who cannot be controled in
.r. !. itt..c? "170 , man "har? n fT1T10n
elghns 32 pounds In nis hands,
. . . . " . . m. i-u
certain monSm The four men worked
in unJcnn A thi criiftrrl nounde tne
g-Gng they lifted the shot from the
ground. Another tap and they held it
-close to their waists, another and they
raised it to their shoulders, and then it
went as high up into the air as their two
hands could reach. Other signals cauei
them to lower it slowly, until it again j
told that the fatlerue soon become ter
rible, and tjiat the men w'ill welcome any
other punishment to escape this.
A Well aianagcd Prison.
The Rangoon prison is excellentlS
planned and well managed. The build
ings are great sheds of one and two
stories, running out like the spokes of
a wheel from a circle, In which the
guards stand, so that they can inspect
a half dozen or more shops at one
time. The dormitories are arranged the
same was'. Evqrs'thing is clean and
sanitary, the prison death rate being
only 16 per thousand. Among "the jail
institutions is a large garden, where
anti-scorbutic vegetables are raised for
the prisoners, nearly all such food be-
jng produced inside the jail.
The prisoners have enough to eat
to keep them in perfect condition, and
tjjejr sieev fat forms are in striking
contrast to the lean coolies from India,
who are to be seen everywhere upon
the streets. .The convicts eat three
meals a day. Between 5 and 6 a. m
before going to work, they have rice
and vegetables, and a similar meal is
given t'hem between 9 and 10. They
-have their last meal about 4 oclock,
when they quit for the day. Their
meals are served simply Tey squat
out or doors in lopg rows, each having
a tin wash basin before him. Into this
the guards ladle the food, and the men
use their fingers to convey the stuff to
their mouths. According to the govern
ment reports the average, cost of.fee'd
ing each man is about 2 cents per day,
or two-thirds of 1 cent per meal. The
cost here in Rangoon is $S per year
for each convict. The total charges for
clothing are likewise small, the aver
age per head being about ?1 of our
money. The prisoners I saw were clad
in little more than breech cloths, al
though a few wore calico jackets as
well. , q
Tattooed Convicts.
In this description, however, L have
omitted a suit which nearly every
criminal has and which he wears all
his life. I refer to his suit of tattoo
ing. This runs from his knees to- his
waist. It consists of a pair "of breech
es made up of the figures of tigers,
monkeys, and other animals which have
been pricked into the skin with blue
and black Ink. Each animal is sur
rounded by a tracery of letters from
the Burmese alphabet, and diamonds,
squares and triangles of various sizes
nil up the vacant spaces. This Jias
been the custom wiWi the Burmese men
and boys from time immemorial. It is
not confined to criminals, but Is com
mon tn mon a-nA Kt-r. nP nil nkecac
a.i.c uiicu miiooea wiin cnarms, iso
lated figures done in red ink. Love
charms in red are sometimes tattooed
around the eyes, and a quail tattooed
on the jaw means love.
The ink used for the breeches is usu
ally a solution of lamp black obtained
from the smoke of sessamen oil. I
understand that the boys of the cities
are more or less giving up the tattoo
ing of their legs, but those of the lower
classes, to which most of the crim
inals belong, still practice the custom.
The Burmese ns Convicts.
I am told that the Burmese make
j fairly good prisoners
strung and proud and will tight at the
drop of a hat. They are not backward
about getting into trouble, but once in
jail are amenable to the laws. The
mimher of convicts Is large in com
parison with the population of the
country. The jail population is now
more than one to the thousand of the
actual number of citizens. This in
cludes what are known as the civil j
prisoners men who have been incar- J
cerated for debt. There is a special j
department oi tne .rcangoon juu iui
such offenders. They are allowed a
certain amount of money for rations,
each man doing his own cooking.
Pol'ce and Crimes.
It takes something like 16,000 mili
tary policemen to keep the Burmese
people In ordr, and In addition there
is a civil police which numbers about
1 recall Ulliucxo ill. uviuiuaiiu va. &ch4& -
fl talion, and the men "are largely East
Indians. v The native Burmans do not
ma"ke good policemen, although some
of the natives of the hill tribes have
proved fairly good.
As to the civil police, every district
has its own force, made up of the na
tives. Training schools for such men
have tieen established in many locali
ties, and the British are endeavoring
to have the -natives police themselves.
As it is, crimes of violence are de
creasing,, although thefts of cattle and
other things are still common. A close
watch is kept upon all vagrants, and
villages are fined if they harbor crim
inals or Jo not mainta.a a good police
force. The system of keeping track
of bad characters by photographs and
finger prints Is well known here, and
manyvof the natives have been detected
thereby.
The Courts of Farther India.
The British have established good
courts all over Burma- The laws in
force are modeled upon those of India
and upon the statutes of England, as
well as upon the laws of the Hindoos
and Mohammedans. In every case the
judges take into consideration the na
tive customs and rules 6f the tribe
or caste to which the criminal belongs,
and through these and equity, jusiice
is fairly well administered. The ."osts
of the courts are, now more than a
million dollars a year, and -litigation s
said to be decreasing.
Frank G. Carpenter.
POISON
BaePaia, Can-
cer, scaiy am,
' xsmsL
E. Ccic. ADove Troubles. Alas
Eczema and lllicumatism.
For 25 years Botanic Blood Balm (R
B. B.) has been curing yearly thou
sands of sufferers fdpm Primary, Sec
ondary or Tertiary Blood Poison, and
all forms of Blood and Skin Disease.
Cancer, Rheumatism and Eczema. We
solicit the most obstinate cases, because
B. B. B. cures where all else fails. If
you have aches and pains " In Bones
Back or Joints. Mucous Patches In
mouth, Sore Throat, Pimp'oa. Copper
Colored Spots, Ulcers on any part of
the body, Hair or Eyebrows falling oul
Itching. Watery Blisters or Open Hu
mors, Risings or Pimples of Eczema.
Boils, Swellings, Eating Sores, take b!
3. B. It killls the poison, purifies the
blood, stops all aches, pains and Itch
ing, curing the worst case ots Blood
Poison, Rheumatism or Eczema.
SOTANIC BLOOD BALM (B. B. B ) li
pleasant and safe to take; composed of
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and enriches the blood. DPUROTtq
$1 PER LARGE BOTTLE, "lTS
SAMPLE SENT FREE by vrrltSaa-
BLOOD BALM CO.. Atlanta. Ga.
ern Pacific
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Luxurious Accommodations
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USE
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V
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EXPERT PRINTERS
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SHftiNERS
Attention!
xow ixobles! ye faith
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arouse ye!!
NOW NOBLES! YE FAITH- W 1
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ACCOUNT
ANNUAL SESSION, IMPERIAL COUNCIL,
MYSTIC
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From Ei Paso
Tickets on sale April 7, 8, 9 and 10. Limit Aril 2o7
with privilege of extension to May 10 on payment 'of
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ARRANGE YOUR -PULLMAN RESERVATION
NOW
FOR FULL INFORMATION, ETC., CALL ON OR ADDRESS
W .C. McCormick, G-. A. J. E. Monroe, C. T. A.
City Ticket Office St. Regis Hotel
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liSKitiioigii
JA
Via the Santa Fe, Direct Route
in connection -with the D. & R. G., the Colorado tXfidland or Union Pacific,
account Semi-Annual Conference of the Mormon Church, April 3-6-.
Tickets on sale March. 26, 27, and 28, 'final return limit 6Q days from
date of sale. Stopovers permitted on return trip ivithin limit of ticket.
Passengers can be routed through Pueblo and&D. & R. Q.? Colorado
Springs and Colorado Midland, or Denver and D& R. G. or Union Pacific
For further information -write or call on
W. R. BROWN, J. S. MORRISON,
D. F. A., A. T. & S. F. R. C P. A., A. T. & S. F. Ry.
EL PASO, TEXAS. XL PASO, TEXAS.
Mills Building
l 1 LOCOWTTVES 1 j
C
Account
Hotel Men's Oomrtniion, Lis Angles
Tickets on Sale April 4th, 5th, ffihj 7th and 8th.
Limit Three Months Erom Date of Sale.
STOPOVERS ALLOWED within limit on either
going or return trip.
Honolulu and Return $175,00
CITY TICKET OFFICE ST. REGIS EOTEL.
w. c. Mccormick, g. a.; j. e. monroe, a t. a.
Mexico Norfhwesftrn Rail
way Csmpaiiy
The Rio GraHile, Sierra Xatre &
Pacific Railroad Co.
XEW MANAGEMENT!
NEW TIME CARDl
NEW STATION!
Ih Fact
EVERYTHING- NEW!
NOV. 14th 1909.
Effective this date Passenger!
trains -will leave our NEW STA
TION. Corner Calles COMERCIO
and FERROCAKRID.
CIT,DAD JTAREZ AT 1 P. M. '
Arrives
NUEVA CAS AS GRANDES 7 P. 31.
Returning? Leaves
NUEVA CASAS GRANDES 12:13 P.M.
Arrives
CITJDAD JUAREZ 6 P. M.
Thus briirging Nueva. Casas
Grandes and intermediate points
several hours nearer El Paso and
vice versa, and allowing1 patrons
opportunity to transact their busi
ness and be home next day.
HUNTING and FISHING such as
found nowhere else on North Amer
ican continent.
Write for ul! particulars.
H. C. FERRIS, T. R. RYAN,
General Mgr. Traffic Mgr,
Apartado 46.
v Chihuahua, Mexico.
Easter Gifts
What is more appropriate than a dainty
water-color neatly framed in narrow gilt,
or a hand illumined Easter motto ? When
you think of gifts, think of the Feldman
Shop.
Fred J. Feldman,
- . JK9WSkWA
SHRUSil
tdaJiS
Oil I AC EI Paso to
9I4I.99 Salt Lake
' Cltv and Rtiurn
LOS ANGELES AND RE
TURN $30.00
SAN FRANCISCO AND
RETURN ., $40.00
PORTLAND, ORE., AND
RETURN .' .$82.50
Every
DaV
OtLBMANWia
, LOCOMHITKJ
THB
Sunset Route
OPERATES THE
SUNSET EXPRESS
BETWEEN
EL PASO AND
NEW ORLEANS
The Most Up-toDate Train Out of
El Paso.
First and Second Class SleewHg 1
Cars, Dining and Liarary Observa
tion Cars, Free EecliaiBg Chair
Cars,.
ELECTRIC LIGHTED
City Ticket Office
St. Regis Hotel
308 San Antonio
j 1 1
linu
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