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El Paso herald. (El Paso, Tex.) 1901-1931, August 06, 1912, Herald's Sporting Page, Image 8

Image and text provided by University of North Texas; Denton, TX

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88084272/1912-08-06/ed-1/seq-8/

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HEH&LB
8
Tuesday, 'August 6, 1912
Baseball, Prize Fighting,
uoit, tsowung, onouLing,
and all Sorts of Sport
P"'l' F1 lrTrrTTpMBIpTnTn.m l MPWlnylrnrTMrwMrM OM
TVo Matter What It Is, Or Where
It Happens, It It's Sport the
Herald Gives Yon the Details
Ad Tells Why He Won't
Box For Small Purses
Lightweight. Champion Declares Every Time He Goes
After Short Coin He Is Injured Claims He Only
"Weighed 125 Pounds When He Fought .Rivers.
AD WOLGAST, the Dusy light
weight champion. In answering
the promoters. Who alleged he Is
a "wolf for the coin," advances one
funny reason in defense of his stand
for bis guarantees. It is this. That
eTery time he fights for less than ?10,--000
he gets hurt. Can you beat that?
Afighter wanting big money to keep
from leaving the ring -without an In
jury. Wolgast is sincere in his con
versation along this line, too, being a
superstiyous little champion. He pro
duced figures to bear out his conten
tion. Here are some of the Injuries ne
has suffered when fighting "cheap," as
he calls It:
Xioss of one tooth, sustained in one
of his 'first figbts in a small Michi
gan arena. Remuneration. $2.50.
broken nose, sustained in a tenround
battle. Remuneration, $20.
A broken ose, sustained In a ten
round fight with Jack Redmond at Mil
waukee. Remuneration, $4000.
A fracture of the same arm in the
same place, sustained in a tenround
fight with Tommy McFarland at Fort
Du Lac Remuneration, $1250.
Two black eyes and a cut lip which
necessitated two stiches. sustained in
his recent four-round fight with "Willie
Ritchie at San Francisco. Remunera
tion. $2500.
"And to think," remarked Ad, after
SCOOP
THE CUB REPORTER
t's the Right Team, Scoop-But the Wrong Uniform
ramBnKHHBBavaniBnnBaKinB
..--..--.--
7H)p'
he had looked over these figures, "that
I got $21,000 for knocking out Joe
Riyers in thirteen rounds, made $17,000
betting on myself, and -left the ring
without a mark. Doesn't that prove
my claim?"
We were forced to admit that his
argument seemed sound.
"Wolgast is not a bit backward in ad- '
mining that he was far from right in j
his fight with Rivers at Los Los An
geles, July i, though he steadfastly
insists that it was a clean, winning
struggle for him and .that he would
have won inside of two rounds on a
knockout, had the fight gone any fur
ther. "Do you know that I only weighed
125 pounds when I got in the ring with
Rivers, and that Joe. "Little Joe," as
Tom McCarey calls him, scaled every
ounce of 133?
"I only trained hard three days for
Rivers. I could not stand the grind so
soon after my operation. If I did road
work In the morning I was too fa
tigued to box in the afternoon. On the
Sunday before the fight I boxed fif
teen rounds and every muscle was sore
the next day.
'I am convinced now that the effects
I 1
I
f MY SUIT CASg SHHHI mamqecp vmnS YV-.15 SUIT WAS SmXS WA-KOirT 8 j tupun.
El Paso's Black Hope Will Give
Gay Paree A Few Spasms of Delight
Harry Wills, Big and Sprightly, Is In Line to Whip Johnson, but Seeks
McVey First
By NORMAN M. WALKER.
There is a black man comin" with a
bundle for the gay Paree people. He
is El Paso's own little black brother.
Harry Wills. Wills has been training
over a booze bazaar on Oregon street
durlnrr thf hratprt snMl nnrl nnw hot
of the operation will not wear off suf- he is fit and fine he will sail from
ficlently to permit me to take a chance f New Orleans about the time the warm
In a Ionsr fight until December or Jan
uary. But ten rounds I'm ready for
McFarland or anybody else over the
route any time. The soonor the better.
And I'll be as good or better than ever
next year."
The Finale For Ed Mayer
Little Stories About Baseball
By W. A. Phelon
weather breaks, and will go to Paris.
which is in France. Once there, he
is expected to show the more or less
gay Paris greens just what a Louisiana
dock walloper can do when a pair of
pillows are attached to his mitts and
he is enclosed within a squared circle.
Accompanying "Wills will be one Da
vid Mills, who fought a good fight In
itching for a scrap, but does not care
to confine it to the Herrick family.
Jack and his brother journeyed up
Cloudcroft way Sunday to view the
beauties of nature and pronounced the
KI Paso resort the place with a punch,
whieh, in the language of the fight
game, is the official stamp of ap
proval. Herrick will stay here a few
days and if nothing develops in his
special line be will go to New Orleans,
where fights are held weekly for the
10 aritl 20 distances.
Another Knock Set Aside.
When one G. Washington died it was
warbled from the roof trees that there
would, nay could not be another pres-
6
'M
' AST oldtlme fans," snys judj?e 3Ia'rphy, the racing judge, who under
different name, and In the long ago, iron a great pitcher, "have
have often wondered how, when, and why Ed Slayer left the game.
Ed Mayer, one of the youngsters who hutted Into the fnst company during
the Brotherhood disturbance of 1SO0, was one of the rao.it nrmntlonal figures
of tie year. He was a third basemnn, and a wonder. There were few of
the 1SOO crop who hnd anything njon this Mayer, either as a batter or an
Inflelder. A fine hitter, a heady man on bases, and an artist at covering third,
he seemed to- have a great career lef ore him. And yet, after playing a few
games during thctslIoTSing scalps, this fine young player vanished from the
baseball map. He dropped out of sight as if he had been jailed for life. For
years the magnates wondered what had become of him, anil, to this day, the
oldtlme fans, ask, now and then, what took him from the scene.
"Mayer's passing was an Incident which goes to show the strange nature
of this old game, and the cnrlons manner In which impossible things occur.
After a most successful season with Philadelphia, Majer developed some
trouble In his arm, and took a layoff. By the time his arm wan fully right,
the season of 3S01 was near a finish, and Mayer decided to make his vacation
last till the spring of ISO
"Before going back to the fast companj, Majer decided to try himself
oat by a few games with lighter clubs, just to get himself npon his proper
stride. Accordingly, he agreed to play third base for a team in the Chicago
City league, a powerful organization, from which graduated such men as
Herman Long, Charlie Gctxeln, Bugs Raymond, Chick Frazer, Jack Powell
and a host of others. Naturally, these clubs were glad to have Maj er on their
roster, and the news that he would open the season In Chicago drew a big
crowd to the initlnl game.
"Mayer seemed better than ever In the preliminary practice, nnd the way
he snapped them up round third was something marvelous. Presently, as Is
the rule -with most clubs, one fellow begnn batting to the infield, while an
other swatted long files to the outfielders. The Infield batsmen sent a liner
oer third. Mnyer gaged it, leaped high, and came down with the ball. At
Identically the same minute, the fellow who was batting to the outfield hit
one that went lower than he had intended, and traveled like a bullet. As Mayer,
his mind wholly Intent on the high one he was catching, came down to earth,
the second ball smashed Into his body Tilth an Impact that was heard all
through the stands. 3Iayer fell In a heap, and was so badly hurt that he had
to" give up the game for several months to come. When he finally recovered
he found thnt his love for the game had gone all his baseball ambition hifd
been knocked out of him by that fearful blow. He never even tried to plnj
the game again.
"Mayer's Injury will seem strange I ndecd vihen you reflect on the size of
a ballfleld, the comparatively small dimensions if a man's body, the small
diameter of a ball, and the fact that there were two balls In use for practice.
"What would be the mathematical chances of two balls, hit by two different
men, arriving at the same Instant, and both striking the same mail! Figure
ft out, and you can see that Mayer's misfortune was a freak of baseball, such
a might not happen again In 0 years. Yet it actually did happen, and that's
now rne last company lost one of Its best yonng players.
Juarez curing ine reign or urozco 111. ident George had made that imnos
k." xo wn,V e man. wno raUe(i to I sible by his perfection. Yet the coun
fIJ?nt,.fa,ru?n&.?",.er be. the negro, had ' try ha! been having presidents regu-
r Vi i rV.Y.J . "ionue ooy s . iarly evcr since an( some pretty good
ei- ,?"!? ,a?d ??,,1,s. EOU5ds like a ones at that Same in baseball. When
iauucuuc pirn j win. &ne auu lane ac
cording to the rules laid down by the
late Marquis of Gooseberry for the en
tertainment of the Parisian fight
bloods, and for the enrichment of their
own kahl account by several thousand
francs. The two coffee coolers will
leave here some time this week, go
to New Orleans, which Is In Wills' own
black belt, and will give exhibitions
on both sides of the river before sail
ing on the Prince of India, bound for
I-'rance, with a cargo of cotton and
dingles.
ers has its merits and demerits, as
witness the roof and cellar positions
of the Boston teams in the American
and National leagues. The Boston
Americans are leading their league
and look to finish strong. The Nation
al club from the Back Bay district is
in the cellar division and has little
chance of getting out before the world
series.
Good Despite L'npopulnrity.
Knocked, a victim of hard luck and
appendicitis. Ad Wolgast stands at the
top of the lightweight division of the
fighters. There was many a fan who
hoped that the Mexican Rivers would
whip Wolgast on the fourth. He has
never been entirely popular. He did
not catch on even when first pro
claimed champion over poor little B-t-tlmg
Nelson. In Los Angeles the Riv
ers boy has two friendt. to Wolgast's
none. He is matched with Willie
Richie, who has made good showing
against him In the past. But the truth
remains that Wolgast Is the best in his
class and he will lick Richie if his old
internal trouble does not come back.
'
Send Them In.
This is the open season for doves in
New Mexico and amateur baseball
teams in El Paso. Send In your results
to The El Paso Herald and read it in
the big papor.
Facts and Fancies For Fans
E
j Is the Coming Fight Boy.
' "Wills and Mills, or vice versa, work
' out each afternoon, weather and ther
i mometer not Interfering, in the South
, Oregon street club rooms. To see
. this Wills person In action is to see
the coming champion of heavyweights,
I according to his trainer, who is not far
! wrong in his initial tout of the black
i boy. Wills has everything speed, foot
! work, a wicked wallop, a certain
t a mniinf ef fiotnrll onloniiB vxrli I K it
I being developed rapidly under skillful f
j ai:d expert handling. It Is the physi- i
t cal man that attracts attention to this I
chocolate colored Ethi plaji. He is
physically perfect. Standing six feet
two and a quarter Inches, with a reach
of 84 and a fraction inches, weights
218 plU3, and a chest like a barrel.
Wills has everything needed by an am
bitious boy who would be king of the
pugs. Add to this clean living and
early hours, and this Louisiana negro
will be heard from before he Is an
other year older than 22, his present
age.
Sam McVey Is Wills" especial quest
in Prance. Sam is another negro who
lives on the Rue something or other
over there and who fights all comers
before the French athletic clubs. What
Wills will do to McVey will take an
hour to telL He has an assorted va
riety of wicked punches which he can
put over at will. There Is enough
steam in one of his blows to slay an
ox and he backs It up with a speed that
1 carries him to the? firing line every
j minute of the time.
Mills, who fights at 190, will go
along as sparring partner. He was a
member of "the Johnson champion
camp several seasons and has the ben
i efit of the clever black's ability as a
I boxer. He will take on some of the
lesser lights In France and will train
and condition Wills in the meantime.
I Herrick "Would Fight.
1 Jack Herrick wants a fight. Fight
I ing is his daily task and the fight
game is no good around here since
governor McDoijali claiT.pPd th- lid
on the Bohemia lights lnatct out be
lond the smelter. Herrick has a Hke-
I ly looking brother here who is also
the Cactus league defunked for want
of funds and because of an abundance
of cigarets and late hours, it was said
that there would be no more baseball
in El Paso. At least none until the
minor league inaded west Texas. Yet
the city league continues ta produce
a baseball product which Is entertain
ing several hundred fans weekly and Is
giving better satisfaction each, day.
Such is the stability of that whole
som iramp that it will hnh lin linilpr
conditions which are most adverse and
produce good ball and better players.
The present city league success is
due largely to the support given it by
the men who are backing the teams to
win, plus the assistance Art Woods,
the president ot the league. Is giving,
and the support of the local fandom.
The season will continue until No
vember, with the teams playing better
ball all the -time.
The Cruces Scrap.
Two lightweights are preparing to
go against each other up Las Cruces
way Thursday night. They are
"Young Jeffries" and "Kid Ketchell."
As Ketchell, the original. Is dead, and
the lirst or the Jeifrles line of fighters
Is as coort as dead, puglllstically speak
ing, the handles jthese two boys have
assumed does not promise any too
eli for the fight fans around the
Mesilla valley country. Tbey will be
limited by, the governor, who has de
clared hlmrelf against anv more fin
ish fights and says he will arrest the
iin-' .igntcr who creeds the speed
limit, and the governor will make
good in his intention.
Xo Fight Unless Law Is Passed.
Speaking of New Mexico's new gov
ernor, he has put it squarely up to
the people that if they want pr e
fighting in the new state, they will
have to demand it at the next session
of the- legislature, as he will refuse to
be sponsor for any more such fakes
as the recent unlamented butting
match between Johnson and a fire
man from up Pueblo way whose ncme
was Flynn, and who was lost to fame
on the fourth day of the last Inst. It
was directly due to this fake fight that
the one across the river was not per
mitted by the governor. The Herrick
Mitchell fight, which was to have been
staged Saturday, would have been a
good go with the odds all for Her
rick, and it would have been clean
from end to end. But the governor got
tangled up in that Las "Vegas fiasco
and does not intend to take any more
chances, at least not until the legis
lature has legalized the game.
"Watch the Bean Eaters Climb.
Beans as a brain food for ball play-
JOE MANDOT GOES
TO PACIFIC COAST
Lightweight Fighter Will
Pass Through El Paso
This Week.
Joe Mandot, the New Orleans light
weight, will pass through El Paso this
week en route to the Pacific coast,
where he tackles Joe Rivers on Labor
Day at Los Angeles.
-In Memphis, just befoi starting,
coastward, he boxed two boys ifour
rounds each. Leo Roux. a cross- be
tween a feather and a lightweight, was
Mandofs first opponent, and Bobby
Robideau, a St. Louis featherweight,
went the last four rounds.
Mandot, though a trifle heavy and
slow from a month's Idleness, toyed
with his tiny opponents the entire
distance. The little fellows offered
the best they had in spurts, hut Man
dot would holt them off with his left
and tease them with his right.
The New Orleans fighter left Mem
nhls last Thursday night for Los An
geles, accompanied by his manager,
i-iurry Coieman, and his cousin, Bllly
Bronson.
Mandot is elated over the healing
of his little finger, which he accident
ally chopped a piece off while fooling
with a patent cigar cutter Monday
night. Physicians no longer entertain
fear of blood poisoning. Efforts of
Mandot to obtain the services of "Ho
bo" Dougherty, Wolgast's old spar
ring partner, are likely to end in
Mandot's getting this valuable human
punching bag for his match with
Rivers, according to Coleman, his man
ager. Final agreement as to Mandot's end
of the purse will be made when the
New Orleans fighter reaches Los Angeles.
PJP CARSOX HEARD FHOSl!
STOPS OVER TO SEE .VXDERSO.Y
"Pip" Carson has been heard from.
'Chief Campbell, who Is chalking up
the score boards in his absence, re
ctlved a letter from hlrn, saying that
he had arrived safely In Texarkana.
and was stopping over to see WIngo
Anderson, pitcher for Longvlew, Texas,
in the South Central league. Ander
son pitched for El Paso two years ago
in the Cactus league) and is popular
here.
VERY member of the Indianapolis
team of the American association
has a detective following him
night and day, as a result of a recent
order from Sol Meyer, the new owner
of the club, on mis account O'Leary,
the former Detroit infielder, has re
signed the management of the. team,
and Charley O'Day, of Springfield, has
been appointed in his place. O'Leary
declined to be a party to the innova
tion, but Meyer insisted upon having
his own way. The detectives are es
pecially ordered to report any player
who remains out of bed after the usu
al training hours, or who indulges to
any great extent in "the amber nuld.
Meyer has had to get a few new play
ers, some of the regular men absolute
ly refusing the play under the new
conditions.
There is a story afloat in Ameri
can association circles to the effect
that Ty Cobb is looking over the In
dianapolis club with an eye ' to be
coming a part owner at least in the
Indiana franchise. The Georgian
knows that he will start slipping after
a time and wants to keep in baseball.
It is tha Cobb wish, according to the
report, that he might acquire at least
u half interest in the Hooelers. so that
when ha is through as a major
leaguer he might retire from the play
ing field and become a magnate.
Charley Carr is named as the other
man in the deal. Carr is said to have
interested Yawkey, the Detroit capital
ist, in his behalf and it will not be
strange, they say, to see the Indian
apolis club pass over to Cobb and Carr
some of these times.
Larry Doyle celebrated his 26th
birthday with two hits and a pair of
steais. He also neiued some Dad
bqunders with neatness and despatch.
Manager McGraw has a letter from
Charley Faust, who is back on tha
farm at Marlon, Kan. Somebody told
Faust to go home and make the club
send for him. as Hub Perdue did -"-ith
the Boston club. Charley went home
10 days ago and now "writes McGraw
to inquire why the summons has not
been sent. Perdue, by the way, has
again quit the Boston club.
The Chattanooga club has bought
outfielder White of the Youngstown
club in the Central league. The club
turned the veteran outfielder, George
Browne, bought a few days ago, back
to the Philadelphia Nationals.
The Detroit club' announces the pur
chase of third baseman McDermott of
the Providence club in the Internation
al league. He reports at once.
Jack Lellvelt, once a star on the
Washington team, probably will be
signed by the Yanks, along -with Tom
my McMillan. Jack is slow, but use
ful. Claude Hendrix, of the Pirates, is out
to capture the strikeout record for
the National league and has a good
chance to accomplish his purpose. He
has fanned 113 men In 23 games.
Matt McGrath, of the New York A. C
and a member of the Olympics games,
established a new record at Dublin.
Ireland, for throwing the 56 pound
weight from a nine foot circle, 41 feet
7 1-2 inches.
President Farrell. of the New York
American league team,, has sold pitcher
Jack Quinn to the Rochester club of
the International league, Quinn. who is
a spltball pitcher, has been with the
Highlanders sine th snr?nir nf IQflQ
Another collegian has been added to
Connie Mack's aggregation. Connie is
strong for the college lads. The lat
est find 13 Peter Bigler, a catcher, from
Juniata college.
I Connie Mack, manager of the Phila
delphia Athletics, In a letter to Phila
delphia friends, said that unless the
Athletics win 12 out of 16vgames they
will be out of the American league
pennant race. "I will not give up
hope until the last ray has disap
peared," he continued. "The general
run of American league teams this
year is twice, if not three times, as
strong as last year, and while this
alone has not kept the Athletics from
the lead, it is one pt the principal
causes."
The Dubuque, la., club has disposed
of two players, the Yanks buying both.
Del Paddock, whom Jimmy Callahan
turned loose last spring, brought man
ager Rowland $2,500.
The rich Ohio stakes of $5000. the
classic of the North. Randall track,
Cleveland, was won by Baden, black
son of Bingara, In three straight "heats.
The Jersey City horse was driven by
Rodney. While he easily defeated hi3
field, the best time he showed, 2:07 1-4,
did not approach the mark for the
classic. It is said more than 510,000
was bet on the race.
In the elapsed time of 18 hours 2?
minutes and 5 seconds the yacht Dream
raced from Philadelphia to Hamilton.
Bermuda. The run. covered 719 nau
tical miles. The Dream had a rough
trip. The race was for a. challenge cun
and cash prize.
The case against Jack Johnson, in
which he is charged with smuggling
a diamond necklace into this country
will be beard in Chicago on Aug. 10
by United States commissioner Foote.
The heavyweight champion, wnen he
appeared for a preliminary hearing, and
he was happier than he had been for
some time. Tm glad I've quit the
fighting game," he said. "Now I csur
eat, drink, and be merry. There are
no restrictions on my conduct now -and
I'm going to enjoy life."
Fred Nelson, who promised to set
the- baseball world aflame when he
first Joined the St. Louis Browns, has
been given his unconditional release
by manager Stovell. He was turned
over to the Sioux City club a. short
time ago, but was sent back. As no
body seemed to want him, Stovall made
him a free agent. Red has a bad knee,
but says his arm is all right.
Clark Griffith, manager of the
Washington. D. C.. team, declares he
will work Walter Johnson every other
day against the Giants in the worlds
series if the Nationals win the pen
nant.
-
Frank Dillon, manager of the Los
Angeles club, is in St. Louis for the
purpose of arranging a few deals w
the Browns. It is said that Hedges
will get Pete Daly and a few other
stars from the Angels.
The fact that Jack Quinn has been
turned over to the Rochester club
lends color to the report that short
stop McMillan and outfielder Jack Le
llvelt will go to the Brooklyn Yankees.
The deal has been pending for some
time but Ganzel was holding out for
a pitcher. He wanted George McCon
neil, but may be satisfied with Quinn.
-
ADDITIONAL SPORT
ON NEXT PAGE -
Us Boys
You Never Can Tell What Will Happen
Registered United States Patent Office.
By Tom McNamara
'M.SORRV VAN BUT WRAT CAN I
DOnWATGANG DOWN Bf THE
GAS WOKrvS IS THE TOUGHEST
(N IOVNN AND SCAPSUDS IS
THE BOSS F I.eROOGHrYOU
- VNJHT LISTEN VAN, IF THEY SEE A STRAN6E GUY DOWN THERE THE? WORR.YTHGM
-3CLicT Tsu-rk. nu. itii wurHc:iN IHEHOSPUAL SHiS FEU.fcK. SCAPSUDS WHAT 'S THE
J&SPJl.Ti45 66-Hjft ?,G;Hr BK- BROTHERS TrlATAjNT WORKING AND THEY KM UCK
OUR GANG WITHOUT" STANPfNG UP. THE ONLY WAY WE GEF ALONG DOWN THERE IS BY
KfcEHINfe OUR. MOUIHS SHUl AND O0N& AMYTWNr,
SOAPSUDS SAYS IF WE DONG HIS BfeQTHERSWlUi
u ! inr-im rjii lit. nftin arm &ir.fr rvi.
a " !j uivuiiuiniyu ncu-iicMUl UPOJW rf
UK . -"I
BUT USTEM lNOr OfJMAT BIT STUFF I SAY II60LLY I WISH THERE WAS SOME '
Soapsuds that that four, eyed gov WAy to get around that guy
V CANT BlOW AROOMOpUBL, SOAPSUDS HAYES AND UK GANd,
x uaw. rxr TuarQ an im . - . . . .-. v
N V a"t.Y,V. . aVVa: SOSItOULD OKINfa VAN DOWAI " V
Js ckuZZir LP ..A3B3iiB5 bywe oh im -,
22? DINKS THE BESr TEAM V tgSr-J-,.'x-J "?! I flOJ t&lVZiZL'l ro&
unri .. . . . .. -i iy ...j ii vul: lie- i anrvMiiTrK' n w r-," "--- -" i i LiiLt r - n mi ' - i . . z?-jw -v
tgSggg IN flE LtAfcUfe OAIS . 'V.bT.v, J Winwjs; l S LLlJrl (J-) SSSSv
2sfesssa v nE k wn rvF a my arp ssss irLfMi y sc,?- a' KS5S5g rss" y asss$s&
1 .
OH BONJ0UR MASTER.
SOAPSUDS. VJE WE Re
JUST SPEAKIN6 OF
YOU!
LlPH 1MPP PTNFMCP
WW tNllRELY UNCALLED
t-QR. MY DEAR YOUNb r
YQU CALL ME
THAT A6AN AND
5EE WHAT YOU
GET, I'M A TOUGH
GUY I AM. LOOK
our:
1 (AW (SAWAAJ. save-UP. V I! f
i !- ' z . : i
ANOGEF AHAr D0Nr
BE SHOQWN NO LOSE I
S V aft AT l J t - A 1 AAAk 9 .S '
-0 ' ifiMHA rv cr IVl A J V -umm . I 1
M . 'O06H GUY I AM! Ili K
k "i ) nw ;' v '
SHHM VAM, LEF
HIM GO DON
. NOTICE HM !r
VAN ME OR 00 COULD
WITHOUT THNKIN BUT
WE CQULDNT UCK HIS BROTHERS
30 THF BEST WAY IS TO KEEPON
THE RIGHT SIDE OF HIM. NEED
HIS TEAM IN MY LEAGUE SO I GUSr,
KID HIM AlONfc WHATELSE KN I
rv , . ,
" 1 I ( t-uvruc-i ciu-u
AN ANNOYMfe
CHAP
SHHH VAM, LEF X MtER"5E
HIM GO DON'T ... (UCkHM
VUIIC.IE HlW r- 1 Hwwnvi.
-T..."... 1 I WV tmm ' ' ' (..-riir-, mt-a.t 1
ii.X i V. . X sf? . s -" BUI "ci aun (
PROGRAM
MOME GROUND
HMKY DINKS
OLEANDERS
ON THS NORTH
SIDE DOWN 3V
THE GAS WORKS
Society fide
H.H.H.C.VAN VALENTINE.
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WAS SHRIMP FLYNN WHO
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