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El Paso herald. (El Paso, Tex.) 1901-1931, October 02, 1912, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of North Texas; Denton, TX

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88084272/1912-10-02/ed-1/seq-2/

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PLAN TO ARBITRATE
UTAH MINE STRIKE
HERE is hardly a woman in El
f:
m
millinery specials that were sold last spring. We
sf?om
time to time will give
On Friday morning we
the small toque styles.
ribbon. All the hats in
J less than $5.00. They go
As there is naturally choice
in this offer, we advise cus
tomers to be on hand early
Friday morning.
The Two-Republics Life Insurance Company
EL PASO, TEXAS
A. KRAKAUER, President.
Good men wanted to sell policies that guarantee
protection.
a r. bussktjt;
Supi. of Agents.
Ill PROOF; THE
PHI FREED
Continued fiom previous page).
ico the consul was asking-, alleging
that Juarez had committed murder in
Juarez, was released "Wednesday morn
ing. His 40 days of imprisonment re
quired by the treaty with Mexico in
extradition cases had expired. The
complaint had been filed by the Mexi
can consul but he apparently made no
attempt to bring forth any proofs to
the court to have the man tried.
Last week a similar case came up
when David de la Fuente, for whom the
Mexican consul had asked extradition
on a charge of murder, was released
because no proof was given to the
court
In the case of Gonzalo Enrile, also,
the case was not tried. There are two
remaining extradition cases now in the
county jail which have been filed
against rebels by the Mexican consul.
They are against CoL Pascual Orozco,
sr., and Jose Cordova.
SMUGGLED IIORSES SEIZED;
ARMS FOR 503TOKA RECRUITS.
Naco, Ariz., Oct. 2. Sheeny and
Overlook, of the customs office, have
caught five horses smuggled over by
escaping rebels the past week.
Two hundred "Winchester carbines
and 25.000 rounds of ammunition
which have been held here for some
time, were forwarded on to Catianea
ASSAYERS & CHEMISTS
Custom Assay Office
CRITCHETT & FERGUSON
Assayers Chemists Metallurgists
AGENTS FOR ORE SHIPPERS
210 San Francisco St
Bell Phone 334. Anto Phone 1334.
fntfepenclen? Assay Offica
ESTABLISHED 1808.
D. W. BscsHArr. EJi, Proprietor,
Agent for Ore Skippers Asians eat
Chemical Analysts. Hints ExcnrJnti
and Reported Upon. Bullion Yerk a
Spetttdts. - .
Office and Laboratory:
Csr. Sea Fnxdaco&CLSisakiaSfc.
EL PASO. TEXAS.
PRICES OF ATJ1 J TIRES
SMASHED
IMPERIAL FULLY GUARANTEED
2Sx3 J1L45 32x3 $19.25
30x3 J12.25 34x4 $29.80
20x3 $18.05
Celebrated Red Xnnertubes.
ALLEN ARMS & CYCLE CO.
404 N. Oregon St.
YOUR TEETH
in a great measure determines your
health. Let us examine and put
them in order. All work guaranteed
first class. Prices reasonable.
DR'S. BYERS
203 Trust Bldg.
iMS'
i ctfw ft
hKW I
COEPA HY
WEDNESDAY SPECIAL
If you want Hie come get me
FOR CASH " .
9 Bars White Star Soap taK,-. - .'. .25c
Larcest Retail and Wholesale Grocers in SI Paso.
f
millinery values that are really marvelous.
Regular $5. 00 Tailored Hats at $1. 79
will place on sale 200 stylish tailored hats. Most of. these hats are
They are hand blocked shapes and are trimmed in messaline silk
the offer are most desirable and it will be hard to duplicate them for
on. sale next Friday morning
Millinery
LOUIS ST. J. THOMAS,
Secty. and Genl Mgr.
this week under a heavy guard of sol
diers. They were billed to the gov
ernor of Sonora and destined for re
cruits to be made among the Yaquls
on the Sonora river. The prefect
left Cananea today to- do the recruit
ing. '
! - ' - "
lUZUVU STIIK-TH IS
GAIXIXG IX 3IEX3CO.
Mexico City, Mexico, Oct. 2.
A. band of rebels, believed to be
a part of Gen. Aguilar's force,
sacked the station of Boca del
Monte, an English property on
the Mexican railroad, 17 miles
east of Esperanza, Puebla.
Aguilar's uprising is reported
to be gaininer strength. Zanatls-
a.
a-
tas are reported concentrating
about Tenacingo, the surrender
of which has been demanded.
No news has been received
-i from the north to indicate active
operations by Orozco, but appar
ently ne is gaining recruits.
. 4- -J-
CARSON NOT UNDER
ARREST IN MEXICO.
Austin. Tex., Oct. 2. J. N.
Carson, of Kingsland, Tex., re
ported as under sentence of
death in Tampico, Mexico, is not
even under arrest, according to
a message received late yester
day by governor Colquitt from
governor Matias Guerrero, of the
state of Tamaulipas, Mexico.
Carson, however, according to
the same message, is being
cared for In a hospital in Tam
pico. 4- 'I" !
KANSAS MAX IS KILLED
BY REBELS IN MEXICO
Wichita, Kans., Oct. 2. Hubert Rus
sell, son of T. A. Russell, of Kingman,
Kans., was assassinated by Mexican
rebels, 75 miles west of Durango, Sun
day, according to a telegram received
here. Hubert Russell had been manager
of a Mexican ranch since 1907. A widow
and two children are now at Kingman,
having fled from Mexico at the out
break of the revolution.
EMULE GOES TO PARIS
TO ASK DIAZ TO RETURN"
Where Is Gonzalo Enrile, Orozco's
get new life aad vigor by
taking Scott's Emulsion
after every meal.
It revitalizes the watery
blood and fomisiies ia-tare
with newnourishmenttomake
red, actios, JtedthybloodcmdfeedsA
the nerve centers. Scott S
Emalsion strengthens the
bones and clothes them withy
healthy flesh.
Scott's Emalsion assimi
lates so quickly it conserves g
energy and compels health, c
Scott&Bowne.JHoomfield.ir.J. 12-74 O
t
UNDERSELL
ALL
OTHERS
Paso who does not
propose to carry out this same
at, choice for J.'.
Department
right bower during the early days of
the revolution, who was a prisoner in
the county jail here on an extradition
charge?
The Los Angeles Times recently
printed a cablegram from Paris saying
that Ernesto Enrile had arrived there
as an ambassador to Diaz from Orozco
in an effort to persuade "the grand old
man of Mexico" to return and take up
the fight against Madero. Gonzalo En
rile left here when he was released on
the extradition warrant and went east
to Chicago and New York. Nothing has
been heard from him since. It is proba
ble that he is the same "Ernesto" En
rile who is reported to be in Paris.
GEN. AUBERT IS IN
COMMAND OF JUAREZ
Reaches Juarez By Way of El Pa no and
aiaria Ucpalrlnjr the Railroads
Oat of Juarez.
Gen. Trucy Aubert, whq was In
charge of federal, troops reinforcing
OJinaga and driving the rebels to the
west into Coahuila, arrived Wednesday
L in Culdad Juarez. He made the trip
, from OJinaga to Juarez by way of
Marfa and .El Paso. He came on a u.
H. train in citizen's clothes and was
only accompanied by Lieut. Manuel
Flores, a military aid.
Gen. Aubert takes charge of the 600
federal troops in Juarez by virtue of his
superior rank over CoL Mansano, left in
charge by Gen. Tellez on his departure
for the city of Chihuahua. It is said
that Aubert's forces will move to the
state capital overland by train from
Ojinaga, and perhaps be transferred to
Juarez over the Mexico North "Western
railway. A review of the troops in
Juarez in Gen. Aubert's honor Is being
planned.
It Is expected to resume traffic on the
first of the week on the Mexico North
"Western, destroyed by washouts during
the heavy rains. Work Is In progress
on those portions of the railroad
destroyed by water, and on the tele
graph lines, also damaged. All Is re
ported quiet at the various American
settlements along the railway.
EL TIGRE BULLION
HAS BEEN RECOVERED
In Shipped to San Franclso to the Mint;
Band of Rebel! Cross Through
Vnss Near El Tlgre Camp.
Douglas. Ariz., Oct. 2. Twenty-six
bars of bullion, consigned to the San
Francisco refinery, passed through
Douglas today, including several bars
of bullion stolen during the recent
raid of Salazar on El Tigre mining camp.
All has been recovered now. It was
found within a radius of a few miles
of the camp.
A report has been received from El
TIgre that 500 rebels crossed Monday
through Paso Chiminas. southeast of
there, from Chihuahua. Their leader
ship is "unknown. They are said to be1
heading southeast.
MEXICO ASKING
ZAPATA TO QUIT
Washington, D. C, Oct 2. The Mexican
government is apparently making no
secret of the fact it is negotiating with
Zapata for peace, according to reports
to the state department. The strong
representations made to the Mexican
government by ambassador Calero at
the Instance of president Taft are said
to be having a powerful effect on the
Madero government. It Is believed that
if pending peace negotiations are not
speedily successful, the government
will renew the war on the rebels on
a scale far more formidable and ex
tensive. i SENATOR SMITH FAILS TO
I " ARRIVE WHEN EXPECTED
Senator William Alden Smith did not
arrive Wednesday afternoon from Los
Angeles. He was expected to come
here for a conference "with senator A.
B. Fall and to resume the hearing of
Mexican revolutionary affairs. Senator
Fall telegraphed to senator Smith
Tuesday and the hotel Sheldon was no
tified that senator Smith's party would
reach here on the Golden State Limited
Wednesday, but he didn't come.
Senator Fall received a message from
senator Smith Wednesday afternoon
saying that it would be impossible for
him to come to El Paso before Friday.
He will leave Los Angeles Thursday
and reach here in tlmeyto resume the
Mexican investigation Friday afternoon,
he wired.
THE AGUA PRIETA POLICE
CHIEF DANGEROUSLY STABBED
. Douglas, Ariz., Oct. 2. Francisco
Arvizu, chief of police at Agua Prieta,
was dangerously, and Juan Garcia, a
citizen, probably fatally stabbed last
night In a saloon in Agua Prieta by an
unidentified man. Garcia was first
stabbed. Arvizu was called in to ar
rest his assailant. In a struggle for
the-knife a deep wound was inflicted
in the chiefs neck. The assailant was
arrested and Is now held incommuni
cado. Perfect cleaning, quick service. Wright. I
Scheduled for
Next Friday
remember the big
programme this Fall and
- .. - . .t
The present Arcade dis
play of the hats to be sold
at $1 .79 is most interesting.
Be sure and see it.
t -f 7Q
LLEGED DYNAMITE GO
PLACED 01 TRIAL I
Work of Selecting Jury Is
Now .Going Forward Dif
ficulty in Getting Men.
Indianapolis, Ind., Oct 2. Questions
whether they feared for their -oersonal
safety if they served -as jurors were
asKea veniremen today In the selection
of a jury for the trial of the accused
"dynamite plotters."
These questions developed a dispute
between district attorney Charles W.
Miller -and United States senator John
W. Kern, counsel for the defence.
"Well, it has been shown Bere that
one man didn't want to go on, the jury
, because he "feared for his personal
safety," said Mr. Miller.
Bert F. Haynes owner of a store at
Linton. IntL, said he did not care to
serve on the jury.
"Are you afraid it would hurt your
business V asked Mr. Miller.
"Yes."
"If he I? such a coward as that, he
may step aside." said Mr. Miller.
The Labor Union (locution.
In one instance Mr. Miller said: "La
bor unions are not on trial here."
"Labor unions are not on trial, but
Individuals are," said judge Anderson.
"It is competent to question a pros
pective juror as to his relations with
unions, because the relation of the de
fendants with labor unions is likely to
cut a big figure In this case."
"Have you any prejudice against
union labor?" was the chief question
asked today.
J. M. Hatfield, a farmer and country
school teacher, was excused because
he said he had an opinion that the
defendants were guilty.
As a former banker. John Burgess, of
Newcastle, Ind., was asked whether
William J. Burns, who arrested McMani
gal and the McNamaras, was at present
employed by the American Bankers'
association. Burgess said he did not
know.
One man was excused because he
had sons who were members of labor
unions.
Already Convinced of Gnllt.
"Did you ever read McManigal's
confession In which he Implicates these
defendants as associated with him in
carrying dynamllte and nitroglycerine
about the country?" Charles W. John
son, a farmer, was asked.
"Yes, I read it. and together with
the fact that the grand jury found in
dictments here convinced me these
men are guilty," he answered.
James H. Hurst, another farmer,
said: "The government would not have
to introduce any evidence to convince
me tnese men are guilty. I am con
vinced already."
Neither side had indicated its accep
tance as a Juror any of the first ten
men examined.
Hunting the Witnesses.
A staff of government agents scat
tered from Boston to Los Angeles, it
was learned today, already is at work
seeking the witnesses who are- to ap
pear for the prosecution, in the trial of
the men accused of complicity in the
"dynamite conspiracy."
One by one, when once the trial be
gins, a multifarious crowd is to be
u "ie witness oox. Train con-1
uuuiurs ana station checkmen. who
were reported to have handled baggage
containing explosives; boarding house
keepers In various localities who rent
ed rooms in which plots were said to
have been laid for blowing up bridges,
viaducts and buildings; renters of barns
and empty houses where nitroglycerin
and dynamite were hidden: stone quar
rymen who sold fuses and explosives:
jewelers who sold alarm clocks, and
others in higher and lower stations are
to be drawn into a great body of wit
nesses by whom the government ex
pects 10 prove a conspiracy in which at
least 46 men other than the McNamaras
equally were guilty.
The fragmentary evidence of all
these people, the government con
tends, will fit in a complete story.
Fifty-One Arc On Trlnl.
Whoever participated with the Mc
Namara brothers in the series of dyna
mite and nitroglycerin explosions
which preceded and followed the
wrecking of the Los Angeles Times
building October 1, 1010, when 21 per
sons were killed, the government hopes
to disclose in the trial which Is now
in progress. .
At the head of the list of defendants,
who are brought Into court exactly two
years after the Los Angeles disaster,
are:
Frank M. Ryan, president of the In
ternational Association of Bridge and
Structural Ironworkers.
Ortle K. McManlgal, once known as
"J- W. McGraw" on the Pacific coast,
a confessed dynamiter and accomplice
of the McNamara brothers, who has
been kept in custody as a witness for
the prosecution ever since his arrest
In Detroit a year ago last April.
Herbert a Hockln, successor of John i
Bingham Business Men Will Ask Salt
Lake Commercial Club to Help
Settle Trouble.
Bingham. Utah. Oct. 2. Local offi
cials of the Western Federation of
Miners expressed satisfaction this morn
ing over the response to the strike order
at Ely, Nev., which occurred this morn
ing. Business men of Bingham expect to
crct together today to consider the ap
pointment of a committee from the
Bingham Commercial club to wait upon
the Commercial club of Salt Lake City
with a view to arbitrating the labor
rouble here.
Tnaci Terzich. member of the execu
tive board of the federation, who re
turned to Bingham this morning, said:
"It will have the effect of forcing the
"tah Copper company to comply with
the demands of the union. The future
wil tell."
R. C. Gemmell, assistant general man
ager of the Utah Copper company, who
spent the night at Bingham, said he
did not know what effect the Ely strike
would have on conditions here.
MINERS AT ELY
ORDERED TO STRIKE
Ely, Nev., Oct 2. A strike of all
miners employed in the copper mines
in this district was ordered last night
by the Lane union of the "Western Fed
eration of Miners. The strike order
called for the men to leave their work
at 7 oclock this moraine. There are
about 3500 miners affected by the
walkout. .
The principal company affected by
the strike Is the Nevada Consolidated
Mining- company, "which Js controled
and operated under the same manage
ment as the Utah Coper company at
Bingham, Utah. The Glroux Consoli
dated Mining company Is favorable to
the anion, but will be forced to close
down, as their ore is handled by the
Nevada Consolidated smelters at. arc
Gill. COURT TO APPOINT
ATTORNEYS FOR MANY
Jose Mesa, E. L. Charpentier, Robert
McDonald. D. J. Mahoney, Floyd Sitler,
John D. Dickson and a number of Mexi
can prisoners, charged with violating
the neutrality laws, were brought into
federal court Wednesday afternoon.
Jose Mesa made a tentative plea of
guilty, but because he and the others
had no attorneys, they were all told
to appear Thursday morning, when at
torneys would be supplied.
J. McNamara as secretary-treasurer of
the union, whom McManlgal accuses of
being the organizer of the "dynamiting
crew," and one of the originators of
the alarm clock scheme by which ex
plosions were set oft several hours
after the mine was placed.
Most of the other defendants are
present or former union officials whom
the government charges were linked
together in a conspiracy by an exten
sive correspondence from 1905 to 1911,
during which time more than 100 ex
plosions in states scattered from Mass
achusetts to California occurred in
works under construction by employ
ers of non-union labor.
Fifty-four men were Indicted last
February, but John J. McCray, Wheel
ing, W. Va., never has been located and
the McNamara brothers are in prison
in California.
The investigation that led to the
arrest of the men now before federal
Judge A. B. Anderson was begun shortly
after the capture of the McNamara
brothers and Ortle McManlgal. charged
-with blowing up the Los Angeles Times.
McMnnlga! Accuses High Officials.
McManigal's confession Involved the
officers of the International Association
of Bridge and Structural Iron Workers.
He charged that president Ryan of the
association, Herbert S. Hockin, of De
troit, second vice president and acting
secretary treasurer, and John T. Butler,
of 'Buffalo, first vice president, knew
of the campaign against the open shop
which resulted In a long chain of
dvnnjnlte outrages.
An investigation was at once begun!
Dv ieaorai aistnct attorney i-uas. .
MUler to substantiate these charges.
The officers of the association were put
under surveillance, dictagraphs, those
mechanical eavesdroppers of modern
science, were placed in the homes of
the suspected men and secret service
agents In all parts of the country be
gan to trace tho movements of Mc
Manlgal and McNamara with a view of
ascertaining with whom they conferred
in their travels.
In the September 1911 raid upon the
offices of the International Association
of bridge and structural iron workers
in Indianapolis over 40,1)00 letters were
obtained. 'These papers together with
McManigal's testimony were submitted
to the October federal grand jury which
was chosen to conduct the Investigation
in Indianapolis. The papers were said
to have shown under what circum
stances McManlgal was induced to start
into the 'dynamiting business against
open shop contractors, and also to
throw light upon the $1000 a month
allowed McNamara for organizing pur
poses. After a six weeks' session the grand
jury adjourned until January, when the
case was again taken up by the grand
jurors. By this time secret service
agents had compiled a mass of evidence
which Involved 54 prominent labor men
in almost every city of size in the
United States. Indictments were hand
ed down during the early part of Feb
ruary of this year and on the 15th of
tho month wholesale arrests were made.
The men were arraigned before judge
A. B. Anderson in the federal court of
Indianapolis on March 12th, where they
pleaded "not guilty" to the indictments,
and were released on bail aggregating
$340,000. The leaders were held in
$10,000 bail each and the minor
officials of the union in $5000 ball each.
COTTON REPORT SAYS
CROP 69.6 PERCENT
Washington, D. C, Oct. 2. The con
dition of cotton September 25 was 69.6
per cent of a normal the department of
agriculture announced today.
Condition by states follows:
Virginia. 70; South Carolina, 68; Flor.
Ida, 65; Mississippi. 63; Texas. 75; Ten
nessee. 68: Oklahoma. 60; North Caro
lina. 70; Georgia, 65; Alabama. 68;
Louisiana, C3 Arkansas, 6S; Missouri,
72; California, 90.
Report on Ginning.
The conaus announced today that
3.015,033 bales of cotton had been
ginned prior to September 25.
Round bales Included 19,450; sea
island. 3026.
Glnninr by states:
Alabama. 194.334; Arkansas. 40,447;
Florida. 9575; Georgia, 273.086: Louis
iana. 73.657: Mississippi. 59,226; North
Carolina, 52.292: Oklahoma. 59,173;
Tennessee, 792; Texas, 2,001,697.
All other states, 2450. Sea Island by
states
Florida, 1665; Georgia. 1258; South
Carolina,-103.
"Mff"CJ"Kr Kidney trouble preys
MijjXH upon the mlnd diSC0Ur.
AKD ages and lessens ambl-
WOME1T t,on; ueauty. visor and
" -'A" cheerfulness soon disap
pear when the kidneys are out of order
or diseased. For good results use Dr.
Kilmer's Swamp-Root the great kidney
remedy. At druggists. Sample bottle
by mall free, also pamphlet
Address, Dr. Kilmer & Co., Blngham
ton. N. X.
KIWIIIKi
1 IIDIUIPOLB
X, A Pair
Now that the price of shoes is going up The Guaran
tee more than ever demonstrates its selling power
by giving its customers the best shoe for $4.00 that
it is possible to buy anywhere. This is only made
possible through their large purchasing power and
ability to carry an immense and well assorted stock,,
and giving. people the quality and variety of styles..
Tan Calf Button Boots
Gun Metal Button Boots.
Patent Gray Cloth Top
Boots
Patent, Kid or Black
Cloth Top Boots
Kid with Cloth or Kid Top
Boots
Black "Suede Boots, with
doth Tops
Efficient Mail Order Service.
Write for Our New Catalog.
w . S) GREATER EL PASO'S
ffflfrgJGREATEST SHOE STORES
203
Our Prices Are Lowest
Compare Them With Others
18 lbs. Best Granulmted
Sugar
EMPRESS BEST KANSAS GERMAN" MILKED FEOUR HARD WHEAT.
24 lb. sack Qg 48 lb. sack fr f J-
for OOC for PAQO
DIAMOND M., BEST COLORADO HARD WHEAT
Flour, 48 lb. sack $j j 24 lb sack 7?
Strictly Fresh Guaranteed
Eggs, per doz
Kansas Eggs, good value,
35c
30c
per doz
H. C. Best Kansas d f(
Creamery Butter, 3 lbs.pAUU
Parrot Brand Standard
25c
Tomatoes, 3 cans for,.
MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED.
LION GROCERY COMPANY
Phones 2424 and 2405.
PUI WINS VANDEIBITL CUP BACE-,
TETZLflFF FOBBED TO 01 OP LEAD
ITilwaukee, Wis., Oct. 2. Ralph De
Palma, driving a Mercedes car, won the
race for the Vanderbilt cup on the Wau
watosa track todav. He covered the
299 miles, 2,764 feet in four hours, 20
minutes and 31.14 seconds.
At 230 miles De Palma led Hughie
Hughes by only one minute, 30 seconds.
V.'ishart was in third place, two minutes
back of Hughes. De Palma's average
speed for that distance was 6a miles an
hour.
At 250 miles De Palma led Hughes
by 4S seconds, with 49 miles yet to go
to finish the race.
Do Palma continued to lead Hughes
at the end of 285 miles with only 14
miles to go. Hughes was 38 seconds
behind De Palma.
Tetzlaff Forced to Quit
Teddv Tetzlaff, after leading for more
than 20"0 miles in the race for the Van
derbilt cup, burned out the engines in
his big Fiat car in the 26th lap and was
forced to withdraw from the race. De
Palma then took the lead, closely
pressed by Hughes.
Elsht Enter Contest.
Eight drivers with their mechanicians
and cars lined up on the new Wau
watosa road race course today for the
start at 11 oclock.
The drivers were scheduled to race
approximately 299 miles, or 3S times
around the 7.88 mile course, for fame
acostly trophy and $6500 In cash prizes
The field of drivers included Ralph
Mulford, winner of last year's Vander
bilt event at Savannah; Teddy Tetzlaff.
the Callfornian, who set new road rec
ords over the Santa Monica course, and
Ralph de Palma, winner of this year's
Flgln National ind fnj fcr all rices.
Mulford was at the wheel of a Knox
car, Tetzlaff drove a Fiat and De
Palma a Mercedes. The killing of Da
vid Bruce-Brown, of New York during
yesterday's tuning up trials, has re---wed
hostilities toward the course ex
hibited some days ago when the raco
program was postponed.
Several of the drivers insisted that
the track was too narrow, that the
roadbed was not sufficiently 'matured"
and that it held unexpected soft spots.
De Palma First Off.
Ralph de Palma, with a Mercedes,
was the first driver sent away when
starter "Wagner started the Vanderbilt
race at 11 oclock. De Palma -was fol
lowed closely by Hughie Hughes, Mer
cer Special. Then Ralph Mulford. Har
ry Nelson, Spencer "WIshart, Gil An
derson. George Clark and Teddy Tetz
laff were sent away at 30 second inter
vals in the order named.
De Palma made the first lap, 7.8S
miles, from a standing start in six min
utes 57 seconds!.
Tetzlaff drove the first lap In six
minutes. 27 "seeoni and thereupon be
gan setting a killing pace.
Tetzlaff was in the lead at the end
6f SS miles, driving at an average of
37 miles an hour. He was two minutes.
A Pair
Mesa
12 lbs. Colorado Potatoes
25c
25 c
65c
for ........ ......
10 lbs. "valley Sweet
Potatoes for
Pure California Claret
per gallon
Pure California Sweet Wines,
et Wines, r
4 DC
per gallon
109-11 So. Stanton St.
36 seconds ahead of De Palma. Spencer
Wishart was third.
At the end of 100 miles or a little
more than a third of the entire dis
tance. Tetzlaff was leading De Palma
by five minutes. 11 seconds. Tetzlaff
had driven the 100 miles at an average
speed of 57 2-5 miles an hour. Wishart
had dropped back to third place
through tire trouble.
For ihc young man vho wears
a derby the
f
is the derby venouild suggest.
It has a 4 1-2 inch croxvn and
2 1-8 brim.
The
Bob Moore Co.
Moore & Creenberg
"Things for Men'3
The post office is opposite us.
$1.00
"70M3SpRHk
1

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