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El Paso herald. (El Paso, Tex.) 1901-1931, October 03, 1912, Sport and Society Section, Image 7

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88084272/1912-10-03/ed-1/seq-7/

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EI
PASO
HERALD
Sport and Society Section
Sport and Society Section
"A,
Oh, Say, He's A Generous Guy.
He's the Gink What
Put the Free In Frijoles.
Oh, Look At the New Bonnet.
Looks Like the Neck Of .
A Shetland Pony, All Fizz!
Sporting
Heralds
I
Jack Eritton, Of Chicago, Is
Making Good As A Lightweight
"Kid" Williams Not Missing Any Chances to Add to His Record and Really
Seems Like a Candidate for Johnny Coulon's Honors Jack
Lester a Failure as "a White Hope."
By T. S. ANDREWS. :
JACK BRITTOX, the Chicago lad who
Bill Phelon first chased into a. ring1,
has been making- rapid progress as
a lightweight star of late and there is
no reason why he should not be glren
a chance at the crown worn by1 Ad
WoJgast. Britton left the coast last
summer and made for New York where
he looked the ground OTer and decided
that he had better make for Australia!
Jack signed a contract to go to the
Antipodes under the care of Hugh Mc
intosh and was ready to sail in Sep
tember, but there came a chance fora
bout in Boston, which he won, and this
was followed with more offers; in fact,
so many offers appeared that he forgot
about the land of the Kangaroo and
remained in the east. Whether Jack
intends to fulfill his contract with Mc
intosh remains to be seen, but it is a
good bet that he will not leave while
the 10 round bouts come so frequently.
And with a match in sight for the
championship it will be doubly hard
for the young man to think of leaving.
Jack wants to get a match withTack
ey HcFarland first and then, if he can
win, go after Wolgast. His win over
Jack Redmond, of Milwaukee, in New
York this week showed that he is get
ting what everyone said he lacked
a punch for he put Jack down for the
count of nine and Jack is a pretty
tough nut to put down for that length
of time.
"Kid" Williams, who I have tipped
many timeB of late as a likely candi
date for Johnny Coulon's title, is not
missing any chances of late to add to
his record. He has been fighting regu
farly and has not been picking easy
fnarks, either. The Kid bumped up
against a tough youngster in Young
Diggins at Philadelphia, but the Balti
more boy won all the way and had
plenty to spare at the end of the bout.
Williams is training hard for his com
ing match with Coulon, which is billed
for New York, October 18, and It prom
ises to be a treat for Billy Gibson's
patrons. Williams has what nearly ev
ery other opponent of Coulon's lacked
the knockout punch. Johnny Is train
ing harder than ever, for he Is taking
no chances, having been warned by
eastern friends to get in the best
shape for the match. The little Chi
cago wonder has been taking life easy
all summer and doing plenty of rough-
work outside, so that he will be In bet
ter physical condition than when he
fought Frankie Burns and" Harry
Forbes last winter. Johnny will be
kept busy with high class opponents
If he accepts all the challenges, for
there are several after him, including
the Frenchman, Charlie Lredoux, John
ny Hughes, Eddie Morgan and Digger
Stanley, all high class boys of Eng
land, and Frankle'-Burns hankering for
another chance.
a
Jack Lester, who was sent over to
Australia by Tommy Burns as the Teal
"white hope," has proved a frost in
Kangarooland. Jack was beaten by
several heavyweights and also whipped
by Cyclone Johnny Thompson, but his
latest defeat is at the hands of Bill
Turner, an Australian heavyweight,
who has only a fair reputation. Turner
knocked out Lester in eight rounds
after a hard battle, Lester showing lit
tle Inclination to fight when he had a
chance to clinch. The Lester patry lost
heavily by backings their man. Turner
rushed continuously and It the eighth
put over a right cross to the jaw which
put the American dpwn for 15 seconds.
The fight took place at Hobart, in Tas
mania, and was scheduled to go 20
rounds. Turner is now after a match
-with- Bill Lang, the Australian, who
fought Al Kaufman in Philadelphia
over a year ago, as Bill Is back in the
game again.
"The Dixie Kid." who used to fight
around Memphis and Boston, before
going to England and France, has got
himself "In bad" on the other side by
alleged attempts to fake matches. He
has been under a cloud for some time
and has found it hard to get matches,
even In Paris, where he was quite afa
Torite at one time when Charlie Galvin
had him in tow. He claimed the wel
terweight title, but no one ever gavo
him credit for it, as Jimmy Clabby had
beaten his head off in the states before
he went away and Clabby was the real
holder of the crown at that time. Dixie
has discovered that the straight path
is the best and now he offers to fight
any welterweight in Europe at 142 or
147 pounds, that being the English
weight, and if the fight Is not on the
square he does not -want a penny. At
the present time the two boys entitled
to the most credit for the welterweight
championship at 142 pounds are Ray
Bronson, the Indianapolis boy, and
Clarence Ferns, of Kansas City, known
as the Kansas Wildcat. Bronson has
fought Ferns and the result was a
draw, and as the Hoosier was the first
to claim the title and also defend it,
he is certainly entitled to the crown
as much as any one. Therefore let
Bronson and Ferns fight It out as to
who is the real possessor of the title.
A 20 round contest between them
would be a match worth a lot of money
to any club.
Petitions have been circulated
through the state of Wisconsin on the
boxing question. The fans are clam
oring for boxing and the promoters
have got out petitions with the ob
ject in view of voicing the sentiment
of the people regarding the same. It is
expected that in this way over 50.000
names will be .attached to the petitions
so that when the legislature convenes
and a bill is presented for considera
tion the members of the legislative
bodies will have something to guide
them. "Three "years ago a bill passed
the Wisconsin legislature," in both
houses, but was held up by the govern
or at that time, Mr. Davidson, after he
had promised to sign it.
Og
OAT fiOflR &AYS-"IT SCflSy ErtOU&H
TO FIND A SEAT N A CT20WOET5 Ofl72
33UT IT 15 ALWPjVS OCOUPIBD
DINNER MATCH WILL
BE PLAYED SUNDAY
Golf players at the Country club are
planning another dinner Sunday night,
the postponed dinner match to , start
at 9 oclock Sunday morning. The play
ers have been paired as follows:
Sumner, Vance.
Houck, Edwards.
Davis. Wright.
Hart, Tooley. -
Flaheigh, Marshall.
Wines, Race.
Wade, W. F. Payne.
Usher.jLedwidge.
Sheiton, Eetticolas.
Judd, Clary.
Trost, Safford. '
Christie, Sutton.
Wilmarth captain, Newman captain.
TENNIS PLAYERS WILL
MEET SATURDAY
Play in the city tennis tournament.
which was delayed last Saturday on
account of rain, will start promptly at
2 oclock Saturday afternoon on the
Country club courts. The singles
finals, best three out of five sets, will
be between F. M. Barger and Hal
Christie.
In the semi finals in doubles,
O'Brien and Bailey will meet Wilkin
son and Bateman. The winners of
this match will go into the finals,
meeting Christie and Williams for the
best three out of five sets for the cup.
PAPKE FAILS TO KEEP
COXTRACTi IS SDSPEXDED
New York. N. Y., Oct 3. For failing
to keep his contract to box 10 rounds
with Frank Mantell, of Providence be
fore the New York Athletic club in this
city, Billy Papke, of Kewanee, I1L, was
suspended for an indefinite period by
the New York state athletic commis
sion. This means that Papke will not be
permitted to box in New York state un
till reinstated. Also it may have the
effect of cancelling his match with the
French chamnion. as the following ca
blegram -was sent by the commission
yesterday:
"Paul Rosseau, French Federation of
Boxing clubs. La Temps, Paris, France:
Papke suspended. We feel suspension
should be sustained in France, as we
sustain suspensions by your federa
tion.' Papke has sailed for France.
IT CAME PROM SOOTH AMERICA
CCNCEfiLE-D JN A BO OF THE
BEST SARDINES FORfWHU-E"
THE CREW COULDNT Mft:e
IT OOT BUTL7Y7E? T5EO IOG
THE OLD TRfc WHO COULD
fcE-AD IN n XUFFBREHT
LANGUAGES "PjCkreiUJP THE
SCfcAP OF PARCHMENT AND
$EftD ALOUD
' JF YOU CALL A BfCYCLE
Bike w8lu you call.
AN ICICLE IKE
TMRGw HIM THE ANCH07?!
HE& ALL JN
THE SENTRY WftS DOING HIS
VVTV HE HADNT EVEN SEEN
A MOUSE IIs EIGHT HOURS
kPlSH-kRlSWU TWEREWASA
NOISE IN THE THICKET "WHO I
GOESTMEJ2E 7 BARKED OUfZ
GUARDSMAN." ME" PIPED
A VOICE "CON YOU TELL ME
SOMETHING- HE ADDED 'SHOOT
"RETURNED THE SENTRY THE
tfAN LOOKED AEOOND TO
MAkfE SURE THAT THEY
WERE ALONE AND THEN
ASKED "IF A BUTTERFLY
WAD BEEN A CATERPILLAR
WHAT WOULD A ttONE,Y-SEEn
nHM5 HA1?SH WORDSNELL
HELLO "DAVE-I GOTTA
JOB IN A TAILORS HOvd
I RUSH AROUND TO THE
JDIFFERENT &HO5
IN THE MORNING AND
GETTHf CLOTHES -
Ad.
THEN I SITDOWN OUT
THEM OUT AND FIX.
THEM UP-TRY THEM
ON THE CUSTOMERS
MRKE ALTERfiTlOWS
HUNT FOR BUTTONS
THAT WILL FIT THE
1
JLd.
ft-r
GENTLEMEN BE SEATED
TA-RA-RA-Rfl
0NES-MIS7AH ECADY,XD YOU
EVRH HEAH DAT YOUMG LADY OF
MINESI&G7
INTERLOCUTOR-NO BONES I NEVflH
had that "pleasure oe&shp
sing well.7
Bones - yes suh,- she g-ota
magnificent falsetto voice
tambo-jdont YOU BELIEVE
IT MISTAHTOHNSON
BONES-WHAT YOU TALKIN'
ABOUT
TAMBO-DAryoUVGLADV.pP
HIS AINT GOT NO FALSETTO -VOlCf
MlSTAHTOHNSON ITS ?
ONLV F FALSETTO TEETH
LETiUPHESALLCUTi
BUTTON HOLES SWEEP
VB.OIL THE MACHINES
AND COVER THEM UR
AND AT NIGHT I GO
AROUND TRYING TO
DRUM OPTRADE-i'm
iLWAYB IN BED BY3AW
vouP-E
A HAPPY
GUV
YEP-
NOTHIN'
TO DO TIU
TO-MORROW
7
Ebbetts, Of Brooklyn, Plans
New System For Drafting
Owner of National League Team Believes .the Weaker
Clubs Should Have First Choice of Material Be
lieves Owners and Players Would Be Bet
ter Satisfied Under Proposed Plan.
t ODDS ABOUT EVEN
J
ON WORLD SERIES
GIAJfTS WIU OPEX ADVANCE
SALE OF SEATS MONDAY
JJe- York, X. Y., Oct 3. The ad
vance sale, of reserved seats for the
world's series baseball games In this
city 'will be held at the Polo grounds
on Monday, October 7, at 10 a. m., it Is
announced by secretary Heydler, of the
National league.
Ifour thousand upper grandstand
seats for each of the three games at $3
each will be ready for first comers,
those representing the balance of the
S500 seats in the grandstand not-taken
by preferred' patrons. No more than
two tickets will be sold to any one per
See exhibit 33 at Home Products Ex
position. Scott "WTiIte & Co.
NEW YORK, N. Y., Oct 3. Charles
Ebbetts, of -the Brooklyn base
ball club, will suggest to the
National commission a new plan for
drafting players from the class AA
league. Ebbetts says the present plan
is unfair to club owners who are In
need of raw material. Speaking of his
new proposition, he said:
"I have given the matter much care
ful thought lately and I believe I've
hit upon a scheme that will meet with
general favor. There are 16 major
league clubs. Let the, American
league, for instance, take the odd num
bers, 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13 and 15 for each
club, while the National league clubs
are numbered 2, i, 6, S, 10, 12, 14 and
16. Assign these numbers in accord
ance with the order in which the teams
in each league finish at the end of each
playing season.
Give No. 15 and No." 14, the tailend
clubs, first chance at all the players
subject to draft If No. 15 needs a
shortston and a first baseman, the
entire field Is open to choice. If No. 16
wants a catcher, second baseman and
a lett fielder, the same privilege Is ex
tended. ,
The second drawing I3 allotted to
No. 13 and No. .14, and so on up to the
top., In that way each team will have
an excellent chance to secure desirable
talent and will not be compelled to
take players that really are not needed.
To use a few illustrations with names
the Boston Nationals, tailenders, need
a first baseman, a shortstop, a pitcher,
and perhaps a catcher. "Under my plan
president Gaffney at the recent draft
ing session might have landed catcher
Schang, of Buffalo, a prize; shortstop
Derrick, of Baltimore; pitcher Powell,
of Kansas City, and third baseman
Dolan, of Rochester, all of whom would
have strengthened this team. The
Highlanders, too, could have picked up
players of more value to them than to
the other big clubs that got them. I
maintain' that clubs like the Giants.
Red Sox, Cubs, Pirates, Athletics and
"White Sox should stand aside while the
weaker teams have first crack at de
sirable playing talent
"The player end of It Is Illustrated
by many cases. Take the case of
catcher Wells, of Jersey City, for in
stance. Wells came near being sold
to the White Sox for $6000; also "to
the Clevelands for less. He was men
tioned several times in the list of ten
tative drafts, but when the names
came out of the hat catcher Rondeau
of the same team got into the major
league class, while Wells was lost in
the shuffle. Wells is a fine catcher,
capable enough to play in fast com
pany, but under existing conditions
his ambition cannot be realized. If he
is disgruntled he cannot be blamed.
I intend to make a suggestion on
these lines to the commission and the
major leagues in December, and I be
lieve I will" receive much encouragement"
FOOTBALL RESULTS.
.- "Wednesday's Games.
Pennsylvania, 53; Franklin and Mar
shall, 0.
Brown, 1; Colby, 0.
Princeton. 4; Rutgers, 6.
Carlisle. 63; Villova, 0.
Dartmouth, 41; Norwich, 9.
v v v v v v v v v ; v ;
SOME DONTS FOR
FOOTBALL AMATEURS
Whether player or spectator,
keep your temper.
Learn the rules and stick to
them.
If you arg a player: '
Learn to charge, block, handle
the ball, and lastly, learn, sig
nals and formations.
If you do not master the
first four, the others will be
useless.
Don't "Slug." The game is
rough enough within the rules.
Slugging in football Is like
spikingn .baseball.
If you are a spectator:
Keep off the playing field.
Give officials the benefit of
doubt for honesty and skill
their jobs are hard enough. ;
And again players, specta
tors and officials, learn the
rules and stick to them.
: .!. !
Some Enthusiastic Ronton Fans Are Of
f lerins 10 to Seven on the Home
Team, However,
j New York. N Y.. Oct 3. Authentic
. information as to the extent of betting
on th& approaching world champion
ship -ball games Is Impossible. It Is
'known, however, that many Boston
supporters have given New York en
thusiasts odds as good as 10 to 7 on
wagers that the Red Sox will 'defeat
the the Giants in the series.
Such odds, however, are an excep
tion rather than a rule. Most wagers
are even, with some New York en
thusiasts undoubtedly giving odds to
Boston men. Both clubs are finishing
their league races with practically the
same percentage of winning games.
Detailed comparisons of individual
work and team play show little advan
tage one way or another. The facts
and the uncertainty which naturally
surrounds a contest between two teams
which have not been matched before,
all lead to an evening up of the bet
ting business.
Tendency of the Boston "fans" to
indulge in the greater odds may be
traced to confidence in Joe Wood's
pitching. Speaker's and Gardner's bat
ting and all round team work. Also
perhaps to the fact that during the lat
ter half of the season the Giants
showed a great falling off from their
earlier play.
Almost everyone known in baseball
has volunteered to pick the winners.
Beginning with the opposing managers
themselves. Jake Stahl says that he
believes he - will beat the Giants, and
John J. McGraw says he expects to turn
the trick, expecting much of his new
pitcher. Tesreau.
Connie ilack, who knows the Giants
well from having led the Philadelphia
Athletics against them to victory in the
world championship last year. Is cer
tain that the Giants are doomed again.
He is quoted as calling the Boston
club, the best balanced organization he
has'seen in 20 years. But Mack is an
American League man.
Frank Chance and his Chicago Cubs
i were beaten by the Giants for the Na-
manager thinks that a sufficient guar
antee that they will beat Boston. A
1 parallel of similar guesses might be
j continued almost Indefinitely with
AUWUfc- Cluat S11UW1I1& (Jl. sui'ijuii.
World's Series In the Past Have
Exploded Baseball Theories
Modest Player of a Season's Race Sometimes Becomes a Hero When a Hit
and Run Are Needed to Win a World's Series Game.
By TED SULLIVAN.
THE coming world's baseball series
between Boston and New York
is bringing up discussions of the
merits of both leagues and teams and
what they will do in the coming race.
What a team and players will cVd in a
six months' race and what they will
do in a seven games' race no one
knows, but possibly a clairvoyant
Every new world's series has ex
ploded the theories and sophistry of
the past The batting hero and a
pitching hero of a long schedule some
times utterly falls in a crucial series
of seven games where the friction of
the game is intense and the tension
high. The modest player of the sea
son's race sometimes becomes the hero
In those world's series contests. Ba
ker's batting of the Athletics demon
strated this assertion last year. You
cannot weigh the quality of a diamond,
any more than you can weigh the nerve
and gameness of a player when it is
put up to him in a short world's series.
It makes quite a difference when a
player has six months to make a base
hit and to make one that counts in one
of those games when it means either
the winning or the losing of the game.
First World Series.
The first world's series In 1884 be
tween the champion Providence club
of the National league and the Metro
politans, of New York, champions of
the American association, when the
series was set at five games, showed
pitching skill on the part Of Rad
bourne, pitcher of the Providence club,
that-had no parallel before. He pitched
the first three consecutive games,
which took three consecutive days, and
in each of those games did the Met
ropolitan team make less base hits,
and the record states that In those
three games, not one of the Metropoli
tan players got a base on balls.
Harper, pitcher of fair ability of the
Pittsburg club, became the pitching
hero of the world's series between De
troit and Pittsburg fn 1909. The great
world's series of 18S6, between the
great Chicago club under Anson and
the St Louis Browns under Charles
Comiskey where the entire gate re
ceipts went to the winners exploded
other theories of supposed baseball su
periority In those contests of seven
games. In that great battle between
those clubs the Browns did not match
with the great Chicago club In me
chanical baseball speed, yet they de
feated the Anson club by the baseball
genius of Comiskey and the gameness
of those fleet footed Browns.
The Chicago Cubs defeated the De
alnrost consecutive games. In the first
game of the first series between De
troit and Chicago, the lack of temerity
on the part of the Detroit catcher In
the first game where the Detroit club
had the Chicago team beaten in the
ninth inning with two out and two
strikes on the batter, lost that game
trolt team in every world's series in
to Detroit which seemed ever after
ward to have a "hoo-doo" effect on
the great Detroit team in playing
against the Cubs. It can be most log
ically said that the longer a man is in
the practical machinery of baseball,
the les3 he" knows about it for the
reason that the uncertainty of the
game in general and particularly in a.
world's series makes a wise man un
wise on the outcome of-some of those
world's series contests.
Contests Straight.
I want to state to the " American
baseball public, and I say it from the
position of a man who has been one of
the builders of the game, that those
world's series contests from '84 down
have been honest and straight The
outcome of these great world's con
tetss have shattered the theories of
those skeptics of honest baseball in as
many pieces as Buffalo Bill does the
glass balls with his rifle and I want
to pay a further tribute to the expo
nents of the national game that there
is no class of men in any profession
where" temptations and laudations are
heaped upon them that compares with
them in sobriety and thrift I say
this In the face of what I hear about
drinking of men in the baseball profes
sion. If the Chicago Cubs, as out
siders claim, are indulging in alcoholic
spirits, then their "winning of pennants
and world's pennants for the last five
or six years Is the worst recommen
dation for the temperance ball player
ever known and a great boost for the
players who Indulge in spiritous beverages.
We have some bargains In heavy tim
bers. Lander Lumber Co.
New York Loses Last Home Game
AMERICAN LHAGTTE.
Won. Lost
Boston 103
Washington 89
Philadelphia 89
Chicago .... ......... 74
Cleveland .... ....... 73
Detroit ...;' 69
St Louis 52
New York 50
46
60
60
77
77
81
37
99
TW T
.691
.597
.597
A9Ql
S87
.460
'.33Q
Gaines Friday.
Boston at Philadelphia.
Washington at New York.
AMERICAN LEAGUE. '
At Detroit R. H. E.
Detroit 5 12 1
Chicago S 14 3
Batteries:. Detroit. Jensen. Boehler
and Onslow, Kocher; Chicago, Cicotte,
Walsh a-l Sullivar
Hot drinks. Elite Confectionery.
BADEN'S WINNINGS FOR 9
YEAR NOW TOTAL S&O.IOO
Columbus, 0- Oct. 3. By winning
the Buckeye stake. Baden, beaten last
week in the Hosier-Columbus stake,
defeated the same trotters that were
ahead of him in the richer stake.
He trotted the first and third heats
in 2:05 1-4, half a second better than
his own record. The performance gave
the stake a new record and ranks as
the best of the grand circuit year for
trotters of Baden's class. His win
nings for the season have reached
$29,100.
At St Louls R. H. E.
St Louis. 2 8 2
Cleveland. . . ...... ....4 8 2
Batteries: i-'t Louis. Hamilton. Allison
and Alexander; Cleveland. Blanding
and O'Neil.
PACIFIC COAST LEAGUE.
Resnlts Thursday.
At Los Angeles R. H. E.
Sacramento 4 12 5
Vernon -.. 5 S 1
Batteries: Los Angeles, Albert and
Kreltz: Vernon. Castleton and Brown.
At San Francisco R. H. E.
Los Angeles 4 10 1
San Franolsco 6 10 3
Batteries: Los Angeles, Perrltt and
Brooks: San Francisco, Fanning and
Schmidt
At Portland
Portland
Oakland
Batteries: Portland,
Fisher
R. H. E.
..590
.0 4
Klawitter and
Oakland. Abies and Mitze. r
HORG.VN OUTPLAYS RITTER.
San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 3. John G.
Horgan, the champion three cushion
billiard player, defeated W. N. RItter,
of St Louis, in a one game match here.
4o to 23. Horgan's high run was 6
and Rater's 3.
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
Won. Lost Pet
New York 101 47 .6S2
Pittsburg 92 58 .613
Chicago 90 . 59 .644
Cincinnati ,...-..... 7,4 v 77f .490
Philadelphia "72 77 .484
St Louis . 61 SS .417
Brooklyn 57 92 .3S0
Boston &u 10Q, .533
Games Friday.
New York at Brooklyn.
Philadelphia at Boston.
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
At Boston First game R. H. E.
Boston....... .........3 9 1
Brooklyn. 2 5 1
Batteries: Boston. Tayler and Rart
den; Brooklyn. Alien-, Stack and Mil
ler. . .
At Boston Second game R. Ts, E.
Boston. ...7 it 2
Brooklyn. 6 9 3
Batteries: Boston. Perdue. McTlgue
and Ttarfden; Brooklyn, Knetzer' and
Erwin.
At New York R. H. E.
New York. 1 6 0
Philadelphia. 2 6 1
Batteries: - New York. Ames. Wiltse
and Hartley; Philadelphia. Seaton and
Killifer.
At Chicago R.H.E.
Chicago. . . .. 6 11 0
Pittsburg. 5 12 2
Batteries: Chicago. Lavender. Smith
and Archer, Cotter; Pittsburg. Camnitz.
Robinson and Gibson.
BUY THE BEST.
We Do.
Geo. A. Mansfield & Coi
Mills Bldg.
Us Boys
President Shrimp Flynn Is a Great General
Registered United States Patent Office.
By Tom McNamara
-1 1 -- e
is
HOWARD HEWITT HAROLD CtrL VAN VAL-
ENTfNS WHOSE FATHER- WILL GIVE
A I-IVE DOLLAR. (SOLD PIECE AS A
PRI2.E TO THE TAM WINNING THE
PENNANT IH OUR. LEA6UE- HE TOLD
PRESIDENT SHRIMP FLYNN ABOUT IT A DAY
OR SO A60 AND THE PRESIDENT BORROWED
A DME FROM HIM TO BUY THE OL6AN-
PERTHE CLUB WHICH HAS THE
P EN NANr CINCHED.
.-.. -;. iK
-r. .-- 5i."i: .''
r. - : --
i .. ' T
A KID BY THE A1AME OF
PERKINS WHO LEO THE
OLEANDERS INTO FIRST PLACE
AND THEN SOLD UlS INTEREST
IN THEM
' ( HE HAD TO)
'-'-iyv-tSJi s
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71
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.
Hvl TAB ABOVE SPACE vYE WO'jt-D
DASH OFF A LIKENESS OF A FWE
DOLLAR. GOLD PIECE SIMILAR. TO
THE ONE SHRIMP IS ABOUT TO
GATHER. BDT FOR. TWO REASONS
FIRSTLY. VME Ml 6HT GET ARRESTED
FOR COUNTERFEITING "SECOMDLY
WE HAVE NEVER. HAD ONE CONG. '
ENOUGH TO KNOW vMHATTHEY
LOOK LIKE
eoiT"oR
8IC
t
1 9iu 1
Wt
jr-a"
HOOKELFLEB AVENUE WHERE THE
FORMER- CAPTAIN OF THE OLEANDERS
9HQT THE PROCEEDS OF THE SALE.
FERD5NAND ALOYSIUS FL.YNA. ALIAS SHRfMP FLYNW
WHO PROVED HIMSELF THE GREATEST BASEBALL MANAGER.
COFHISA&E) SINCE ADAM NAS A KID BY SUPPORT1M6 A
SECOND RATE TEAM THE WHANG0IN6ERS ALL SEASON AND
AT THE LAST MNOTE GUYING THE OL6ANDERS THE PeNNANT
COPPERS, FOR. TEN CENTS -HE HAS GIVEN UP CONTROL OF
THE WHAN60INGERS AND AS CAPTAIN AND MANAGER OFTHE
OLEANDERS WILL COLLECT A CASH PRJ2E OF FIVE DOLLARS
rv
TUf PFmwanT riPciiAirx AMn
EXECUTED BYMK;EMliYMnp'RiM
WHICH THE OLEANDERS WIN ALONG
WITH TH FiiP DLUMk-c DeccinrwT-
SHRlMP FLYWN WILL GIVE iTTOTHE
MEMBERS OF THE VICTORIOUS
TEAM TO DIVIDE AMONG THEMSELVES
HE WILL KEEP THE" FIVE
TO READ IT.
HERE'S A BR-'EF
H;STQRf OF THE
OLEDRS
TWEY WERE OrANIZE
&i VAN BUT MADE S0CM
A PG0R SHOWING THAT
PRESIDENT FLYNN TOOK
THEiR. CHARTER. AUjAY
AND SOLD IT TO A KID
NAMED PERKINS FOR.
FIVE CENTS. THEY STARTED
R16HT AWAY WINNING
GAMES PRESIDENT FefNM
TRIED TO AUCTION THEM
BACK. TO VAN. THE AUC
TION NEVJER. TOOK
PLACE. VAN COULD NOT
ATTEND ON THE DAY
SET ASIDE FOR. IT
HOWEVER. THAT DID NOT
PREUEMT PRESIDENT
TLYNM FR.0M MAKING
FWE DOLLARS OUT OF
VAN ALL ..' TIME, UNDcR
THE GUIDANCE OF THE KIO
NAMED PERKINS THEY
UjERE WINNING GAMES.
THEY NOW HAVE THE
PENNANT CINCHED
euTTHE KID NAMED
PERKINS IS OUT-
Tb-DA RESULTS
OlBWOERS BEATRINKVONKS
STARFISH GIANTS
QEAT
uJHANGDWfeERS

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