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El Paso herald. (El Paso, Tex.) 1901-1931, November 20, 1912, Image 1

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EL PASO, TEXAS,
Wednesday Evening,
November 20, 1912 IS Pages
TWO SECTIONS TODAY.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Leased Wire
tlK.WHC1t FORECAST.
Fair tonight and Thursday.
Colder Thursday.
EL PASO HERALD
HUB SHIED
TO RUN FOR
MAYOR
The Powers in the Ring Or
ganisation Want County
Judge to Succeed Kelly.
CLAYTON SAID TO
BE ON SIDETRACK
County judge A. S. J. Eylar is the
chosen one to make the race for mayor
next spring, if the hop smoke from the
city hall is good. Judge Eylar has
declined the honor a number of times.
giving as his excuse the difference In
salary betw een his present position
and the mayor's job, with the In
creased amount of extras and tips to
ihe faithful. Alderman Walter S.
Clayton was originally groomed for the
place, but it is said the ruling faction
of "the ring" has picked Eylar.
The antis are already lining up for
the place and the Wilson men, the
andful of original Wilson men and
not the eleventh hour followers of
the Princetonian. are taking the lead
in the preliminaries . before the race
for maj or starts. The organization
which fought the "ring" to a stand
still last summer in the primary elec
tion, will be on the job again with
a few revisions and abridgements,
cue to certain flopping which has been
oo-ie since t".ie "election from the anti
to the 'TinT' camp by the less faith
iu' Federal politics are losing interest.
It is generally conceded that Zach
Cobb can hae the collectorshlp of
ritoms if he cares to ask for it and
can have it anyway if bis friends at
' curt and he has some big ones
there learn that he would care for
the job. The collectorship appeals to
Zach from many angles because he
f'ould remain at home and attend to
Ims interests in the valley ai.d in El
Paso and stay close to the political
headquarters in these parts. How
ever, if a better appointment than the
position of collector is offered Cobb,
he will be in position to resign as col
lector and accept the prreater respon
sibility, as Zach and Wilson would say.
Just what this increased responsibility
would be is not known although it
has been reported that Cobb might be
appointed ambassador to Mexico or
made an assistant attorney general at
w ashington.
In the meantime he aad his friends
i c lining up to beat Kelly and the
'ring" in the spring and as this is
considered a man's sized job, there will
' e no words wasted about tile national
affairs until that is disposed of by
the antis.
COBB LOSES LAUD
SUIT OK APPEAL
Austin, Tex.. Mot. 20. The supreme
court today reversed and remanded the
case of August Bees et al against
Zach Lamar Cobb from El Paso county,
which, means that the case was decided
apainst Cobb
This case involved the title to S12
rcres of land situated in the grant to
the ancient town of San Elizario, El
IVso county, to which title had been
obtained under an old Spanish land
-rant The court held that the land is
situated outside the limits of the pres-
nt corporation of that town, conse
quently Cobb could derive no title
thereto
The case of Antoinette W. Davis vs.
Lewis Vidal from El Paso county, was
toIay submitted 'n the supreme court.
COLL1XS CYSE REACHES
CRIMINAL APPEALS COURT
Austin. Texas, Nov. 29. The case of
Dr Ira W Collins from El Paso county
was today submitted in the court of
criminal appeals. Dr. Collins, who is
in osteopath, is charged with practicing
medicine wtihout having obtained a
license from the state medical board.
WOl'LD BE DYNAMITER IS
STRVPFED TO HOSPITAL COT
MK& Wbo Terrorised Los Angeles Police
Awfrti He Sid Net Want to
Hart Any One.
Los Angeles, Calif., Nov. 20 Strapped
to a cot in the receiving hospital, a
man known as Carl Warr, the German
pattern maker who terrored the cen
fal police yesterday by threatening to
destroy the building with an infernal
machine unless Paul Shoup, president
of the Pacific Electric company, was
brought to h'm, told a wierd tale to
aa :
"I didn't want to hurt any one about
the police station," declared Warr. "All
I was after was the head of the Pacific
Electric I did not even know his
name was Paul Shoup until after 1 was
arrested. I did not even want to hurt
him. I vas merely going to show
him my machine and tell him I Was
croing to blow him up unless he raised
he wages of his workmen and other
wise improved their conditions."
The wou id-he dynamiter Is believed
to hae suffered a basal fracture of the
skull as the result of blows dealt him
on the hepd bv detective James Hosick.
who prevented the explosion
Under renewed "sweating" shortly be
fore noon the would-be dynamiter said
his true nam was Carl Reidelbach. He
said he was born in Neurenberg, Ger
man? "What's in a name?" he said. "I
have used two or three in my time."
ROOSEVELT'S LEAD OVER WILSON
IV C VLIFORNIA IS DECREASED
San Francisco, Cal., Nov. 20. Tabu
lation of the state vote for Roosevelt
and Wilson, including the corrections
announced thus far by secretary of
state Jordan, on the oficial canvass
bv counties, shows a Roosevelt lead of
104 A change of 16 in the San Fran
cisco returns has been announced,
which will reduce the Roosevelt lead
to 8S when officially recorded.
Corrections at Sacramento of the of
ficial canvass from counties not yet
reported there may increase or over
turn this plurality.
WINob Visits Bermuda Governor.
Hamilton. Bermuda. Nov. 20. President-elect
Wilson has paid an official
visit to the governor general, Lieut.
Gen. sir George M. Bullock. Mr. Wil
son contemplates occupying much of
his time in walking and bicycling and
preparing for future legislation.
SI E SPRBCKELS FOR S119.0S0.8S
FOR DUTIES OX SUGAR
New York. N V., Nov. 20 United
States marshal Henckel today served
Claus A. Spreckels with papers in the
government suit to recover the sum of
119,080.98 as back duties alleged to be
:ue on importations of raw sugar, said
to have been fraudulently under
weighed TWO E POSTMASTERS ARE
GIVEX COMMISSIONS.
Washington, D. C, Nov. 20. Harry
C Butler has been commissioned
.ostmaster at Anson, Texas, and Lil
lis F. Beete at Kelvin, Arizona.
MISUSE Of
MAILS IS
CHARGED
Arrests for Illegal Medical
Practice and Sale of Un
lawful Drugs.
PACIFIC COAST
IS A' HOTBED
Washington, D. C, Nov. 26. Postof
fice inspectors and United States mar
shals in 72 leading cities of the country
began today simultaneous raids for the
arrests of the 173 persons charged with
criminal medical practice or the sale
of drugs and instruments used for crim
inal purposes.
Two arrests were- scheduled each In
Houston and San Antonio, Tex.
All of the arrests are made lor al-
l leged violation of section 21, of the
penal code ot tne united states, wnicn
bars from the mails any vile 'or ob
scene matter, whether sealed or un
sealed; any advertisement, letter or cir
cular suggesting criminal -practices; or
any packet containing any substance,
drug or thing intended to be used for
immoral or unlawful purposes.
Chief inspector Kobert Sharp, of the
postoffice department, and many of his
force of 390 inspectors have .been work
ing upon the cases for mny months.
It is said by the postoffice inspectors
that a hotbed of this sort of criminality
exists in the Pacific coast states.
In San -Francisco -a fictitious name
was used by several well known phy
sicians, who employed a. woman to do
the necessary advertising and clerical
work. Cases were solicited by corre
spondence and by printed circulars sent
through the mails. Scores of complaints
have been received by the department
from respectable women, complaining
of the receipt of this class of matter.
Mostly "Pill Doctors."
Approximately 20 percent of those
arrested today are socalled "pill doc
tors" men who advertise their prac
tice by correspondence or otherwise
and send to their women patients, eith
er by mail or express, various com
oonnds in the form of Dills or powders.
Careful analysis of the compounds by j
the government authorities is said to
have disclosed that some of them are I
wholly inocuous, while others are dan- j
gerous poisons. Under another section
ex tne penal coae, xne senains ot poi
sons through the mails is expressly
forbidden.
One of the men accused Is said to
have been the secretary of the board
of health in the city of his residence.
He responded on letterheads of the city
board of health, it was said, answer
ing a decoy letter sent to him by the
inspectors.
Interviews of the inspectors with
many of these practitioners indicated
clearly that they knew they were vio
lating the law and were treidinij upon
dangerous ground.
A Clever Insficetec.
In Chicago, an inspector called upon
a physician after having received from
him a response by mall. Tne doctor
was cautious and the inspector was
asked to show the letter he had re
ceived. It was in the physician's own
handwriting. The doctor snatfched it,
from the inspector's hand and tore it
up. He threw it into the waste bas
ket, and subsequently the inspector re
turned to the office in the temporary
absence of the doctor, secured the strips
from the basket ana pasted them to
gether. The letter constitutes an im
portant link in the chain of evidence
on which the doctor was indicted.
A Vigorous Campaign.
It is the expressed determination of
the postal authorities to put an end
to the promotion by mail of criminal
practices and of the traffic in drugs
and instruments upon which a ban is
placed by the law. Postmaster general
Hitchcock said today that every case
agaipst an alleged violator of the law
would be pressed vigorously.
Many Coast Arrests.
San Francisco. Cal., Nov. 20. Numer
ous arrests in connection with the cam
paign of the postal authorities against
medical practioners charged -with mis
use, of the mails had been reported from.
Pacific coast cities by- noon today.
Contrary to their previously announced
intention, the San Francisco postal in
spectors began their -work before that
hour and nine doctors, druggists and
others were taken into custody.
None of those thus far arrested is of
particular prominence.
Arrests In St. LohIs.
St Louis, Mo., Nov. 20. Mrs. Hulda
Koch, proprietor of a maternity home,
was arrested in St. Louis today. It
was charged that the mails were mis
used. A warrant was issued against
Gustave F. Jacobs, manager of a drug
company but deputy marshals did not
find him. Another indictment was
I returned against a woman who died
before the warrant couia oe servea.
DYING PRISONER SURRENDERS
WHEN ESCAPE IS HOPELESS.
San Francisco, Calif.. Nov. 26.
Thomas Franey and Michael Mullin.
military prisoners who sawed their j
wav out of cells in the army prison .
on Alcatraz Island and were supposed i
to have escaped on a raft Saturday I
night, were found on the island earl j
today. i
The men had burrowed a cave be- i
neath a pile of drift wood on the
narrow beach, where they lay four
days, half covered with slime and I
without a morsel of food or a drop of
water. !
Realizing that Franey was , dying.
Mullin crawled forth last night to get !
water. A sentry caught sight of him
and gave the alarm. Obeying Mul
lln's weak voiced directions, the I
guards soon dug Franey from the
cave. His condition was desperate and
Mullin also needed medical attention
i
CONVICTED CUXM3X WILL BE i
SENTENCED TO DEATH OX NOV. 26 ,
New York, N. Y Nov. 26. Sentence j
of death on the four gunmen. 'X3yp the '
Blood," "Leftv Louie," Whitey" Lewis
and Dago Frank," convicted yesterday
of murdering' Herman, Rosenthal, will
be pronounced by iustice Goff on Nov.
26, he announced today when the pris- ,
oners were arraigned before him.
Joseph A. Shay, attorney for Chas.
Reeker. filed with district attorney
Whitman today notice of appeal from
I ., .31.... .1... 4.. .. nrkl.h .mn vfjaf. a,1
his client of procuring the murder of
Herman Rosenthal. The notice acts as
I a stay of execution.
i WOMAN AVHO CONFESSED TO
1 MURDER IS HELD FOR TRIAL
I Sedalia, Mo., Nov. 20. Mrs. Pansy
Ellen Lesh. brought from Los Angeles
last Sunday, after confessing tnat sne
murdered two Missouri women, was ar- '
raigned today before justice Leaning ,
on a charge of murder Sn the first de
gree. She was held to the criminal
court without bond and immediately
returned to jaiL
PETITION IN BANKRUPTCY SAYS
MOTOR COMPANY OAVES $12,860,660
Trenton, N. J., Nov. 26. An involun
tary petition in bankruptcy was filed
today in tbe federal court here against ,
the Lnited States Motor company, Hav
ing offices in Jersey City. In the peti
tion it is alleged that the concern owes
more than $12,000,000 and has assets
that will not exceed J9.060.000.
PLOT FORMED
B! UNION
OFFICIALS
Witness Says 11 Officers of
Ironwokers Discussed the
Plans For Explosions.
McNAMARA URGED
ALL TO BE CAREFUL
Indianapolis, Ind., Nov. 20. Eleven
officials of the International Association
ot Bridge and Structural Iron Workers
were accused by Patrick J. Dugan, at
the "dynamite conspiracy" trial today,
of having been present when the blow
ing up of non-union Jobs was dis
cussed. Dugan, former president of a local
union, testified that shortly after a
building in Detroit was dynamited in
June, 1607, the union officials held a
caucus over the election of officers.
At that time, the witness said, Herbert
S. Hockin . announced that he had lost
his position on account of having in
duced. Ortie E. McManigal to blow up
the Detroit job.
"Hockin said because of this he
ought to be given a place on the ex
ecutive board," said Dugan. "He said
he was going to make his campaign for
office bn the strength of the Detroit
job."
Dugan said president Frank M. Ryan
and 19 other officers were, present
Local Union Received 525.
Dugan testified that an Indianapolis
union had destroyed a non-union job
for $26, and -when it -was -learned that
the international union was paying (200
for each job blown up, complaint was
made to J. J. McNamara.
"McNamara replied that people were
learning too much about explosions,"
said Dugan, "He said district attorney
Jerome; in New. York, had learned that
the. Iron Workers' union was behind
the" dynamiting jobs' in the east and
they wdtild have to b ecarefuL5'
While J. J. McNamara was in jail in
Los Angeles and before he pleaded
guilty an ' effort was made by iron
workers in Indianapolis to buy certain
papers, testified Mrs. Mary E. Carroll.
Mrs. Carroll said Fred Sherman, an Iron
workers' business agent, offered her
1106 to procure & receipt in the posses- j
sion or Dugan. JLragan naa s&ia ine
receipt was for $25 paid for destroying
a non-union job.
Mrs. Carroll said on the promise of
getting $166 for the paper, she went t
Dugan's home and attempted to indues
Mrs. Dugan to give it up, but Mrs. Du
gan refused.
Talked of DynaraitlHg Cathedral.
That Eugene A. Clancy, of San Fran
cisco, and John J. McNamara talked
about "blowing up a cathedral in con-
struction in Indianapolis, was testified
by Patrick J. Dugan, a former iron
workers' business agent.
Dugan said he accompanied McNa
mara and Clancy when, they went out
to look at the cathedral, and after Mc
Namara had pointed out a place M But
the explosive, Clancy tneasurwi olt
with his feet to learn whether a wall
would fall on a nearby residence, but
the' explosion did not occur.
Testimony was given that Edward
Smythe attempted to conceal evidence
in 'connection with an explosion at
Peoria On Sept. 4. 1910. McManigal had
lesiiiieu inai omyuie iiku assi&Ltru unu
In carrying nitroglycerin to the job.
When the government examined the
hotel register, where McManigal had
stopped' under the name of "J. W. Mc
Graw," the page containing the regis
tration had been taken out.
Judge Murphy, the hotel keeper, tes
tified that shortly after the explosion
Smythe called at the hotel and asked
to see the register, explaining that Mc
Graw had been an administrator of an
estate and absconded with money. The
hotel man said he permitted Smythe to
have the register and later he found
the page was torn out.
POLICE RECEIVE WORD THAT
IIILDRETII IS SENTENCED TO JiA.IL.
J. W. HUdreth, who was arrested
here some time ago by the police and
taken to Pottsvllle, Pa., to stand trial
on a charge of embezzlement, was
sentenced to serve four months in jail,
according to a letter received by po
lice chief L N. Davis from F. G. Hale,
the detective who came after HUdreth,
and a clipping from the Pottsvllle
paper. At the time HUdreth was ar
rested here he was in the employ of
a local dry goods company and- a
moving picture house.
HUdreth was alleged to have se
cured $406 from the Prudential Insur
ance company when he was its agent.
In addition to the jail sentence It was
stated he would have to return the
money and pay a fine of $16.
SCENE OF
This map distinctly illustrates the situation around Constantinople, where, behind the foi ts at Tchatalja the
Turks are fighting hacd to save the city from the Bulger army sweeping south. Two lines of fortifications have
to be captured Part of the firt has already fallen Redosto. a port at the head of the Sea of Marmora, is now the
scene of continuous fighting between the Turks and Servians,
II
WAVEWiPESQUT
HURRICANE KILLS FOR TY- TWO PEOPLE
TWOTOWIftlGA
Kingston, Jamaica. A'ov. 20. A great tidal wave Is reported to have prae
tteally rrlped oat the town of Savanna In Mar, on the southwest coast, and
Lucea, on the northwest coast of Jamaica.
Forty-two people were killed by the hurricane In Mentego Bay, accord
ing to a report brought -by a fruit vessel whicb arrived at Pert Antonio to
day. Confirmation has been received of the great destruction .caused .by the
hHrrleane In the western end of the Island. Floods, whfeh accompanied the
storm, caused Immense-damage,-a hundred houses being blown down. Tel
egraphic communication Is suspended.
MANY HOMELESS AND DESTITUTE.
The governor of Jamaica has .left on a special train accompanied by a
deiaehraent of artillery, who live taCen with them 360 tents and foodstuffs,
as in certain sections the people arc homeless and destitute.
The gale besrii on Novrninrr IS and continued in inereaslag fury fur sev
eral days. Vessels arriving la port repcrfed that the wind nas blowing over
160 miles an hon'.
Lucea is a town of 2600 inhabitants on an inlet on the nerthwet coast of
Jamaica, while Savanna la Mar Is a seaport with about the same popultlon on
the southwest coast, almost directly across the Island.
RECALL STIRS UP
PECK OF TROUBLE
Sixteen Men Ask for Constable's Recall,
Are Sued by Officer and 13 of
Them Recall Petition.
Tombstone, Aria, Nov. 20. The first
recall in the county of Cochise has
been recalled. Sixteen signers to a
petition filed with the board 'Of super
visors asked for the. recall .of con
stable J. A. Jenkins, of- the judicial
precinct of Cochise, and the board was
preparing to call the. ejection as the
law demands, but today It received a
petition bearing the names of 13 of the
original 16, calling, on the board to'
recall the first petition."
This latter petition was instigated
right after Mr. Jenkins filed a damage
suit in the superior court here claim
ing $25,004 damages from Uie IS men
who signed the recall petition.
Leading lawyers' here say that' ' the
filing of the petition recalling the first
petition is paramount to a confession
that Jenkins Is right.
At best, .it is a neighborhood row
that has simply been transferred from
the postmastership to the constable
ship. TUCSON WELCOMES
THE SOUTHWESTERN
Tucson. Ariz., Nov. 26. Fully 3500
people met the first train over the X.
P. & S. W. when it arrived here at 11:15
a. m.
Tucson has a holiday appearance with
flags and bunting hanging from every
business place and on the-cross wires
supporting the trolley wires on both
congress street ana scone, avejrae.
The welcome
were-Tnaae oy
John B. Wright
W. Chafln.
Officials of
the;
kweetern present
were H. J.
Florian.
fua luwMifct , .
tendapt oP the
I arreh. Ken- I
manager
weatenMrvfBi
era! agent and E. G Mustain, traveling
ireignt ana passenger agent.
The railroad officials were, banquet
ed at the Old Dominion club.
EXPENSES OF STATE
GREATLY INCREASED
Austin, Tex, Nov. 28. It will take
$12,9S2,321 to run the state government
for the next two fiscal years, exclusive
of any appropriations that may be made
for the state penitentiaries, .according
to estimates furnished' the' controlers
department by the various departments
and institutions of the state, announced
today. This is an increase of $3,377,710
OTer the amount appropriated by the
last legislature for the past two fiscal
years, when the total appropriations
were only $9,604,711. The estimate is
nearly $2,000,060 in excess of what had
been expected.
; v v ; v v ;. v v ; v v v
KILLS WIFE AND BABY;
CHLOROFORMS IIIMSBLF.
Worcester, Mass., Nov. 20.
John Wood, a grocer's clerk,
killed his wife, his four months
old baby and himself -with chlo
roform during the night. A
note found by a" 13 year old
daughter when she awoke to
day told of the crime.
. .?.
... ... .-. .;.
: :
SUFFRAGETS SENTENCED.
London, England, Nov. 20. For win
dow smashing, Isabella Irving was sent
up for six months and Ethel Slade for
four months. Both are suffragets.
TURKS' LAST STAND
.McMATH BUYS ALTA
VISTA PROPERTY
Pcrry-Kirkpatrlck Company Prepares
to Build Five Bangalows on THla-
rosa Street, to Cost 915,006.
Jay F. Knox has sold to A. T. Mc
Math tbe three-room brick residence at
the corner of Bisbee and Luna streets,
in Alta Vista, for $1356. He has also
sold to W. L. Wood three lots on the
corner of Cotton avenue and Arizona
street, with a frontage of 145 feet- on
Arizona street, fpr $3000.
The -Perry-Kirkpatrick ' company Is
mfeking preparations to commence con
struction of five bungalows on Tula
roaa street, in Alta Vista, to cost about
$15,000.
ORNER TRIAL AT
PECOS NEXT WEEK
Mrs. Agnes Orner, indicted here for
murder of her child by polsoninc. will
face a jury for the third time on that j
charge at Pecos, Tex. The trial of the
. case has been set for November 25, and
subpenas for the El Paso witnesses in
the case were delivered into the
sheriffs hands Tuesday.
Mrs. Orner was first tried on the
indictment in the 34th district court
and sentenced to serve a life term in
the state penitentiary. Because the
verdict did not specify the degree of
mnrder of which she was found
guilty, the court of criminal appeals
reversed the case. Her second trial
took plaee at Marfa, where the jury
was unable to agree.
TO ASK FOR ROAD
BOND ELECTION SOON
ab m& rput- ui &a euttBinimiuc week-
ing hjtaUncesday nigiit to tbe office of
tne Newilfiaf Invest menT oMnpany en
San Afltoalo street, the voter of El Paso
may have the opportunity of casting ate
vote on the proposition of Issuing $X50,.
tw worm ox Donas ior tne purpose ox
repairing present county roads ead
building others,
Following the meeting it was stated
that petitions would be circulated to be
signed, and when enough signatures
have been obtained, the petition -will
then be presented to the commissioners
court which will be asked to call an
election. .
GENERAL RAIN FALLS IN THE
TBCOS VALLEY COUNTRY
Artesia, N. M , Nov. 20. A general
rain fell in the Pecos valley that did
r great deal of good to the pastures
and range and benefitted the orchards.
There 'was about an inch of precipita
tion at this place.
RAIN AT MARFA.
Marfa, Texas, Nov. 20. A fine, soak
ing rain fell here for two days. A few
flakes of. snow fell, but with no result,
except mud. It is quite cold.
WIFE ON TRIAL FOR MURDER
THROUGH A JEALOUS RAGE
Augusta, Me., Nov. 20. The taking of
testimony in the case of Mrs. Elsie
Hobbs Raymond, charged with the
murder, in 1905, of Miss Mattie Hack
ett, was begun in the state supreme
court today. The motive of the si
eged murder was a wife's jealousy.
TAFT PREPARES MESSAGE.
Washington. D. C. Nov. 26. Presi
dent TaTt will begin tomorrow the
dictation of his annual message to
congress to be sent in the opening of
session next month.
ELS HOLD
Rural Guards Aboard Repel
Them Revolution Grow
ing in Durango.
ALSO GETTING
WORSE IN SOUTH
Mexico City. Mex., Nov. 26. A fight
yesterday between rurales and rebels
for the control of a railroad train
cost the lives of a lieutenant and
three rural guards and two civilian
passengers in the vicinity of Penjamo,
state of Guanajuato.
The train, traveling along the Guad
alajara branch of tbe Mexican Central
railroad, ran into a bridge from which
tbe rails had been removed and the
engine and two cars fell through.
A large force of rebels then ran
confidently down the hillside toward
the wreck, not knowing of the pres
ence of 24 rural guards in one of the
cars, on the way to the capital from
Manzanillo.
The rural guards took upjPoaiOons
and held the rebels off. The fight
around the wrecked train lasted about
an hour, when the rebels retreated to
the hills.
Besides the four soldiers and two
passengers killed, several others were
slightly injured. It is not known
how many casualties were sustained
by the rebels.
The presence of the rural guards, no
doubt prevented the robbery of the
train and possibly the slaughter of
the passengers.
Eight small encounters in various
parts of the republic were reported
today and in each case the government
troops claimed the victory.
The rebels are showing increased ac
tivity in northern Durango, while the
Zapatista movement in the south con
tinues unchanged.
COL. orozccTto have
HABEAS CORPUS TRIAL
CoL Pascual Oroxco, sr., has been
granted a plea for a habeas corpus by
judge T. S. Maxey in the federal court
at Waco, Tex. The writ is returnable
on Nov. 29 at Austin before judge
Maxey. This information was received
by A. H. Goldstein from his partner,
W. E. Miller, who is CoL OroJtcos
attorney and who is now at Waco
representing the rebel leader.
At the session of the Waco cowrt
Wednesday, morning at which the plea
was made, district attorney Charles A.
Boynton stated, according to Mr. Gold
stein, that in case CoL Orosce was re
leased on the habeas corpus proceeding,
he would be rearrested oa the state
extradition warrant on the charge
TOfcbery in the etate of Chihuahua.
MAYBE IT WAS ANOTHER
FORTILLO 'WHO WAS KILLED.
1-f kH ,kAl ImjIo. ThrfnnA Pnr-
1 tnio. was in El Paso Sunday, as is re
ported reliably, it would have been
next to impossible for him to have
-t aa.th Monday at Colonia Chui-
chupa, Chih., where it is definitely
reported that John Brooks killed a
rebel named Portillo and was killed
himself. However, the official report
of the shooting received by Gen. Trucy
Aubert at Juarez from the federal
commander in the district, stated
that it was Enrique PortiUo who was
killed and that two of his men were
wounded before Brooks died of wounds
received in the fight The federal
captain reported that he had seen
both the bodies of Brooks and Portillo.
Yet, there are many Americans and
Mexicans here who declare that they
have seen Portillo in El Paso during
the last few days. It Is believed
probable by these that another rebel
named Portillo, and not the former
mayor of Casas Grandes, was slain by
the fighting American.
GEN TERRAZAS ,TO SPEND
THE "WINTER IN THIS CITY
Gen. Luis Terrazas is now in Los An
geles, having passed through El Paso
last week on his way from San Antonio.
Gen. Terrazas has rented a suite of
five rooms in the new hotel Paso Del
Norte and will make his home in El
Paso during the winter. He wUl be ac
companied by a number of his immedi
ate family and a retinue of servants
and mozos.
CONCRETE BRIDGE AT
YUMA IS ASSURED
Yuma, Aria, Nov. 26. At a meeting
of the ruma county board of super
visors, which was attended by governor
Hunt, it was decided to build a con
crete bridge across the Gila, probably
at WeUton. to make possible a cross
ing of the river at any season of the
year.
The bridge will be part of the ocean
to ocean highway as well as of the
borderland route.
Engineers will be put in the field at
once to determine the most feasible
crossing and to map the road from
I Yuma to the point at which the bridge
I -arlll Ko hilt
Will be built.
SNEED DEFENCE HAS EVIDENCE
IN nRST TRIAL RECORDED
Fort Worth. Tex.. Nov. 20 In the
trial of John Beal Sneed, charged with
the murder of Capt. A. G. Boyce, the
defence today caused to be read into
the records the testimony given in the
first trial by Sneed s, who since has
been killed bv an employe.
The elder Sneed had testified that
he informed his son of young Mra
Sneed's relations of with Al Bojce, jr.,
and that he ad-i ised his son to secure
a rlivorce.
The statement declared Capt. Boyce i
had said he thought Mrs. feneed ana
young Bovce both were guilty and ex
pressed the opinion that it was best
that Beal give up his wife and pay her
alimony.
STOLDMWS BOD IS
DECLARED FORFEITED.
John Stoldmcn, arrested by the po
lice Mondaj on a chaice of sellinsr
liquor on Sdndaj. failed to appear
j Tuesday afternoon for his trial in th
J corporation court, and the bon 1 of $J3
which he furnished for his release,
w as declared forfeited Stoldman is
allesred to ov n an irterett in a saloon
in the 200 bloCK on Broadway v.-here
the police s,-.y un'awful sales of
liquor weie made
BEtE S VLOO-5 ROBBED.
Belen, N. M . Nov. 20 Santa Fe pay
aay ias attenaea d tne attempted sate
blowing and
robbery in the saloon j
l) Wk-J1? ch reSZ
owned by George
ist r had been left unlocked, although
it contained a few dollars, and the reg
istt r was rot damaged at all in secur
ing the mo-iev from its till After
rifli--r t.'o i Leister, the robbers turned
then- attrition to the afe and suc
ceeded in knocking off the hinges and
combination lock, when thev abandoned
REB
UN;
FESTED
Dl
! the job.
ARMIES STOP
UTTL TO
TALKP0GE
Maxim Pasha, Leader For
Turkey, Wfll meet Gen.
Savoff, of Bulgaria.
ORDER IS RESTORED
AT TURKISH CAPITAL
fr- REPORT MASSACRES OF
CHRISTIANS IN PALESTIHB
Athens, Greece. Nov. 26.
p- Reports of massacres of
Christians in Jaffa. Palestine.
- caused the commander of the
t- Russian cruiser Oleg to
p- weigh anchor and depart hur-
riedly for that district today.
p- There "are supposed to be
about 16,606 Christians among
the inhabitants, the total be-t-
ing estimated at about 40,00.
p- There are eight Christian,
churches and four Jewish syn-
agogs. There is an English
hospital and a French bos-
jitaL
London. Eng., Nov. 20. Fighting has
ceased for the moment between the
Turks and Bulgarian armies struggling
for possession of tbe key to the gates
of Constantinople, and the opposing
commandersinchlef are engaged in ar
ranging the terms of an armistice. If
the negotiations prove successful, titer
will be preparatory to a, meeting of
plenipotentiaries who will discuss coo-
dltions of peace.
In accordance with the suggestiaooi
contained in the Bulgarian note than
the allied Balkan nations are preparedt
to meet the Turkish conunanderin-t
chief wit ha view of arranging ant
armistice, the Ottoman government has
appointed Nazlm Pasba to confer wfthr
Gen. Savoff, the Bulgarian leader.
Meanwhile, the two armies bold theft'
respective poettlons. How long thi
armed truce wfil be maintained, how
ever, will depend on the terms of peace
offered by tbe league of the Baikarf
nations and en whether the hitherto
futile attacks by the Bulgarians out
the Tchatalja lines have Inspired the
Turks with hopes that the fortunes oC
war may yet turn in their favor.
Courtsmartial at Constantinople are
busUy engaged in sentencing members
of tbe Young Turk party to terms of
imprisonment. Nineteen were sen
tenced yesterday. Deputy Cazasso, of
Saloniki. has bean arrested.
A private letter received by a busi
ness firm from Constantinople dated
November 15 says that under martial
law order is being better kept than
ever before in that city. It concludes:
Ton can take this from an old busi
ness firm that Constantinople will aI-
ways be left to Turkey and that trou
ble win never occur in the way people
abroad imagine."
BULGARIAN COMMANDER TO
lACT AS PEACE ENVOY.
Ofcelera Epidemic Results In CleabHC
All Seheels at Censtanttaeple; -Greek
and Bulgarian Treeps Fight.
Constantinople, Turkey. Nov. 20.
Bulgaria has nominated the comman
der in chief of the army at Tchafcalja
to negotiate tbe armistice. Tbe ne
gotiations will be conducted at Ha
demkeui. where Turkey will send her
delegates.
Because of tbe cholera the govern
ment has ordered the closing of tb
state and private schools until futher
notice.
According to reliable lnformation.
tbe Greek troops are behaving badly
at SalonakL Under the pretext of?
searching for arms they are making:
house to house visitations, it is said
and stealing everything removable.
It appears from these reports thaeS
the Greek and Bulgarian troops hava
failed to fraternize as cordially as had;
been hoped for. A quarrel occarreoE
between the soldiers respecting tbe oc-i
cupation of certain barracks in Sal-t
onikL A free fight followed in which?
knives were used and several killed.
The position at the Tchatatja lines;
was described by Nasim Pasha, the
Turkish commanderinchiefL in a tele-
L gram to the Turkish war office ttmedl
12:15 p. m. today as follows:
'-Reports received at this moment
state that the enemy facing our left
wing withdrew completely last night
In the direction of the slopes Papex
Burgas. Our reconnoitering parties
counted 500 dead Bulgarians on the:
slope in the environs of Tchatalja.
From their epaulets it was estabBsbedl
that tbe dead soldiers belonged to tbe
first infantry regiment of Sofia. Aj
number of rifles, caps, aad officers"!
swords were brought by our troops.
"According to statements made by
Bulgarian prisoners, the enemy has
been without food for three days and;
is retreating."
Heavy gun firing was audible at
oclock this afternoon from tbe direc
tion of Biyuk Cbekmedye at tbe seai
of Marmora, and of the Tchatalja forti
fications. It Is believed that a Tar'
,"
f lans-
kish warship is firing at the Bulgar-
AMERICAN ARMY OFFICERS MAY
INSPECT BALKAN BATTLEPIEUDS'
Wasington, D. C, Nov. 20. The
United States has asked the Balkan
allies and Turkey to permit a party
of American army officers to join
their forces and go over the fields on
which some of the greatest battles
j of modern time have been fousrht.
within the last few weeks.
If permission is giver members ot
the special .cavalry board now tour
ing Europe and the available. military
attaches at London and Paris will be
ordered to the scene at once.
Even after the forces hae been
withdrawn it is said observers may
study with profit tbe methods em
ploved to handle the wounded, the dis
integration of the armies and the ef
fect upon fortifications and trenched
of the tremendous artillery fire which
was the principal feature of this
short and fierce war.
j Tl'RKS LOSE ie,00 MSN
I ' IN BATTXE AT MONASTIR
Belgrade. Servia. Nov. 20. The Turk
I ish casualties during the three days"
I fighting prior to the fall of Monastlr
before the attack of the Servian troops,
are reported to have reached 10.066.
Great quantities of modern field
?uns, rifles and supplies fell into the
hands of the Servians.
Kir? Peter, of Servia. will make a
triumphantentry into Monast:r In a
1 few da;, s. The decoration of the streets
to w o'c ime him has begun
Monastir. the Turkish garrison did "not
surrender, but fled in al! directions.
leaving a large amount of war naterlal
behind.
MEMBER OF TURKISH LEG 4TIOS
TRANSFFHREO TO LONDON
Washington. P. C. Nov 20 R. P.aif
Bey. ccunselor ana secretary of tha
tContinued on next Pze).

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