OCR Interpretation


El Paso herald. (El Paso, Tex.) 1901-1931, February 18, 1913, Image 8

Image and text provided by University of North Texas; Denton, TX

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88084272/1913-02-18/ed-1/seq-8/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 8

EL PASO HERAT
D
8 Tuesdav, February 18, 1913
Chief Meyers
Thorpe Will Sleep In the
Tepee at
Marlin
and Jim
Same
Big Chief Meyers Lauds Jim Thorpe
Indian Player With the Giants Will Don Same War Paint, Bank Together in
the Same Tepee at Marlin and Be Brothers During Baseball Season.
By SAM CHANB.
MARLIN. TEX-. Feb. 18. Wnen
John Tortes Meyers and James
Thorpe meet here in the Giants'
ti aining- camp there may .be a clash be
tween the tribe as to which will be
entitled to the name and rank of chief
of the clan of two. but I do not antici
pate any scalp dance that is always
preliminary to the digging: up of the
tomahawk. On the contrary, I think
that both indians will bunk under the
same tepee while here and be insepar
able roommates when under the roofs
of the unite man's skyscraping hotels.
That Chief Meyers will be called
' Chief as long- as he is a Giant, and
that probably means as Ions as he
nlays baseball for a stipend, goes
without saving. I believe that Bender,
of the Athletics, is also called "Chief"
bv his fellow players, bat still his
title te the name does not appear to
rne to be as distinctive when applied
to the Chippewa as to Meyers of" the
Mission Indian tribe of southern Cali
fornia. And Thorpe, the Sac and Fox.
will go down in athletic as well as
baseball history as platn "Jim," al
though his fame is world wide, while
his fellow Indian's reputation has the
narrower scope of being simply na
tional. Yes, Meyers will never lose the title
of "Chief," but possibly that may be
enlarged to "Big Chief."
But Meyers and Thorpe are now
warriors of the same tribe the
Glante and there will be need far
them to smoke the pipe of peace. They
will wear the same war paint; they
will be brothers.
This I know to be so because "Big
Chief" Tortes emerged from his win
ter's hibernation in Redlands, Southern
California, long enough to write a
Schoolmaster Joins the Yankee Crew
Say Fisher, the Big Pitcher Who Claimed He Was Not Given Enough Work to
Get the Best Eesalts, Will Be Given Another Trial by Chance.
By W. J. MAC BETH.
" T W YORK, Feb. 18. Ray Fisher,
IJ ! Vermont schoolmaster who
makes mathematical calculations
on the moist side of a five ounce, leath
er sphere during the holidays, has qual
ified for further experimenting under
professor Chance. The spitball tosser
nf the New York Americans mailed in
his signed contract and is thereby
elisible to sail for Bermuda with Lient.
Chase's marines.
A letter, accompanying the contract.
Informed admiral Chance that the
Vermont product had high hope of be
coming an able seaman in every sense
of the word. Fisher is anxious to go
to the island camp as early as possi
ble in order to get his arm into shape
for a real campaign. He reports that
he is in pretty good condition, so far
.is his legs and wind are concerned.
He has been playing basketball and
doing road wrfk for several weeks.
Fisher was a disappointment last
Tear He did not report until late in
June, because he had been given per
mission to finish his college course.
When he showed up he was in very
poor condition and Wolverton seemed
afraid to work him. The result was
that the big fellow who needs to
work about three games a week never
did come around. In 1911 Fisher
pitched a number of sensational games,
though he always claimed he was never
worked often enough. Chance says
1 inrs
opnng 1
ime
Don't delay another day ordering that Spring
Suit. Our line of new Spring Suitings is now
complete. OVER 1000 ALL WOOL PAT-
SUIT TO ORDER
WAQNIMRI The famous "Dundee"
nnnninu. System is widely Imitated.
We have bo connection vrlth any other
store In this city and therefore urge
job to come to the right place.
Dundee Woolen Mill
319 San Antonio Street
I
(Opposite
Us Boys
OliurV CUAllCO t tlffflt
JTrr cnri.iy v view
exivjvMJ TV fie AOAnvtfx
A6AW BUT GOSH HAN&j
11, EI'MUl
MTVBtOM
won i
LET rVE
PtAt WITH
HIM. feKte
SMS SHE
UJR.U
mi. a,
no iP I
eusJtry
TVSTAUt
TOHr0
MTfc
HWibH
Rtfflft
i. mm
r ydl fS5fr
Ul in GfclUNY HQU APPVA?U until keep QUIET AWO
"" -..-.. , . ..
letter in which, among other things
(and the chief is a prolific as well as a
very interesting writer) said he was
more than pleased that Jim Thorpe
"my friend of a long time" is to be one
of us.
"I have always." wrote the Chief,
"been a great admirer of Jim and shall
do my best to assist him to become cs
great a ballplayer as he is an athlete,
and that means pre-eminent. I shall
take an immense amount of pride as
one of his race in seeing him mount to
the top in the baseball profession, and
I think he wilL In fact he cannot help
it with John McGraw as his manager.
Gives 3CcGraiv Credit.
When I joined the Giants I had little
else than my ambition, a big bat and
my catcher's mitt. What success I
have attained since, is entirely due to
manager McGraw and Christy Mathew
son. I give them the entire credit. Jim
Thorpe will Join the Giants a perfect
athlete, champion of the whole world,
as an all round man. He knows some
thing of baseball, probably as much as
I did when I first reported in Marlin,
but more than that Jim loves the game
of baseball even more than he does
football, and that is half the battle.
"With the natural athletic ability
Jim has and bis aptitude in rasping
new ideas, his anxiety to learn, and
willingness to take coaching instruc
tions, makes me Tery confident that
McGraw can develop him into a great
player. I should much rather he earns
his refutation as a ball player than to
be dependent as a mere drawing card
on the fame he has gained in the past
as a -world's champion athlete."
The "Chief" also wrote that he might
arrive in Marlin about the time the
first squad gets here, "so as to make
Thorpe feel more at home."
there will be no kick on this score the
coming season.
?
Manager Frank Chance, business
manager Arthur Irwin, groundkeeper
Phil Schenk, and able seaman Roy
Hartzell, as well as the official "galley
chef," embarked for Bermuda on the
good ship Arcadia. In another week
Hal Chase will head for the Gulf stream
with pitchers Ford, McConnell. Fisher,
Warhop and Keating; catchers Sweeney
and Sterrett. and ship surgeon "Bone
setter" (Doc) Barrett. The residue will
sail on Saturday. March 1.
it
Secretary John B. Foster, of the
Giants has announced that he has re
ceived the signed contract of Otis
CrandalL The demon doctor, or res
cuer extraordinary, has spent a very
pleasant winter on his Indiana farm.
KINSBLI.A TO SCOOT FOR GIANTS-.
Springfield. TIL, Feb. 18. Richard F.
Kinsella has signed a contract to act
as scout for the New York National
league club. Kinsella acted as scout
for the St. Louis Nationals last season.
I'reviousiy ne was owner 01 tae opnii
field baseball club.
HORSE BACK AT MARATHON
Alpine, Tex.. Feb. 18. The race at
Marathon between the Nance mare and
the Walker grey was largely atended.
The mare won the race easily.
TERNS FROM
W H I OH T O
CHOOSE. New
shades of gray, tan,
brown and the ever
popular blue serges.
Come in and let us take
your measure before
the Easter rush is on. x
Stanton.)
u ..( ;"- JTT.. -nirsM ADIMUlfN
-" C DO NT TOO Uc: iuuv rwww-
Is Here !
' f cri ) ( HERE COMES EMICU i
Cards Think Fifth Place Is Worst for Them
Schuyler P. Britton Promises Followers of His ife's. Baseball Club Better
Baseball This Season.
By CLARENCE F. LLOYD
N
EW YORK. S. Y Feb. 17.
Schuyler P. Britton, president of
the Cardinals, made a noiselike a
second Charles Webb Murphy, of the
Cubs, only his tones lingered much
more dulcetly on the ears of fans.
Besides promising St. Louis fans im
provements in the bleachers, free score
cards and -other novelties for a mag
nate of a St. Louis club Mr. Britton
declared that his club would be built
up to finish in the first division this
season. How Mr. Britton would not
say, but nothing lower than fifth pla?e
can be possible, he declared, prior to
bis departure for Cleveland with his
wife.
While Mr. Brltton's noise listens wl!,
it is difficult to absorb, not knowing
any of his sub rosa deals to strengthen
the club and make it possible for the
disorganized outfit to pass Cincinnati.
Philadelphia, Chicago, Pittsburg and
New York.
Mr. Britton made a hit with the
club owners here, who think that his
election to the presidency has solved
all Cardinal ills.
The National league meeting was
really of the American league stripe.
There was no noise following the gath
ering. It was truly a peaceable mect-
aiunt Pay iur "Umps."
Because Garry Herrmann deprived
the league of a perfectly good umpire
when he signed Hank O'Day as his 1913
manager, the club owners decided that
in the future if a club picks an umpire
for a manager or some other position.
Gossip About
MANAGER Bill Dahlen of the
Brooklyn Dodgers has left for
Atlanta, Georgia, where he jvlll
prepare the training camp.
Manager George Stalling, of the
Boston Braves, has completed training
camp arrangements for his team, and
has left for his home In Georgia, where
he will shortly -be Joined by a squad
of battery candidates.
Promoter Tom Carey, of the Vernon
arena, is waiting for a reply from Joe
Mandot, whether he would like to meet
Bud Anderson, the Vancouver light
weight an March 8. or not. If he does
not receive a reply from Mandot shortly
he will try to secure Ad Wolgast or
Knockout Brown for the match.
Joe Rivers ranks a 16 to 8 favorite
over Knockout Brown in their coming
26 round bout at Los Angeles on Feb.
22. Both boxers are training hard for
the bout.
it -3fr -5G-
Charlie White, of Chicago, has been
matched with Johnny Dundee, the New
York featherweight, for a 10 round
bout in New York on Feb. 28. Dundee
fas now hailed as a top-notch fighter
and should White defeat him he will
probably get a match with Kilbane.
Ad Wolgast is now down to hard
training for his bout with Tommy
Murphy. He and his manager, Tom
Jones, met at the office of James
Coffroth, the San Francisco promoter,
and selected Jim Griffin, who referred
the Wolgast-Ritchie match to be the
third man In the ring.
Bill Torrey, the Giant pitcher was
reinstated by the National commission
along with Jeff Overall. Torrey. while
delirious from typhoid, jumped from a
WINDERS OK Y. M. C. A. ATHLETIC
HONORS WILL HAVE BANQUET
Under the direction of the official
at the Y. M. C. A an award supper will
be held Tuesday night in honor of four
different groups and classes at the Y.
M. C A. Members composing the five
following groups were invited: The five
boys winning the 1912 class attendance
medals; the Y. M. C. A. basketball quin
tet, which won the championship of the
City league: the leaders of the Regular
and Bovs clubs who assist the physi
cal director, and the physical depart
ment committee and association offi
cers. The Invited members of the
groups will meet at the Y. M. C. A. at 6
oclock and will then proceed to the
supper. H. L. Mitchell will be master
of ceremonies.
CONLEY SCHEDULED TO FIGHT
KRANKIE BURNS AT NEW ORLEANS
After spending several weeks in El
Paso, Frankie Conley, ex-bantamwelght
champion has gone to New Orleans,
where he will be seen in action against
Frankie Burns. a veteran rival biffer,
when Conley was fighting his way to
the bantamweight championship. Burns
is a crack little boxer and as both boys
have met Johnny Coalon the match
should be a hot one. especially because
of the popularity of the two bruisers.
Conley will be manased by Pete Por
retto, who handled him in his fights
with Coulon and Burns.
"WHITE SOX SPBCLVL WILL
LEAVE CHICAGO THURSDAY
Chicago, 111.. Feb. 18. Members of
Chicago American league baseball club
will findl a supply of tennis rackets
and medicine balls awaiting them when
they arrive in raso Eobles. Cal., next
Manager Callahan helieves these two
exercises will prove beneficial in lim
bering up the muscles of his athletes.
The special train will leave here Thurs
day night. No exhibition games will ne
played until the players have been in
camp 10 days.
i
NQUUTCO LITTLE SCrSMt DON'T YOU
'"EVEK SFEAK To SWNNY OfclU- CfiU. A POLlCEMWJ
i'aj AjaT tlfiVrif. TVS HAVJP Wmv Dl &VH.1-. Auv r-
Jvitr TMirtlt U UIU Tin urV ...J..
lwvr i iv- y niMiiiw- nss ujsu.
k IO tK5
GmSfr& W
kOF himself;
"tQU STAi R16HT THERE TrU
TO SHRIMP - AiOU) D0NT YOU
I COME BACKl c r
the club will be required to reimburse
the league to the amount that it coats
to replace the drafted indicator hand
ler. The staff may be raised to 19 mem
bers. If Hank O'Day accepts president
Lynch's offer to return to the game in
that capacity.
Paul Krichell, the former Brownie
catcher and proprietor of a cafe in the
Bronx here, bobbed up at the Hotel Mc
Alpin with the announcement that he
was a holdout. Not exactly that, but
Krichell dislikes his transfer to the
Kansas City (American association)
team. Like all New Yorkers, Krichell
wants to be able to "make" this town
a few times each season. For that rea
son he is making an effort to be trans
ferred td some International league
team. Krichell threatens to be a cafe
manager 12 months of the season un
less he is shifted to this section of the
country.
Manager Huggins has been unable to
filch a pitcher from a certain Interna
tional league owner. He has made a
couple of propositions to aforesaid
owner, but has been turned down. Now
Hug believes he'll have to stand pat en
the players he has on his roster. The
transfer of Beals Becker, outfielder.
from the New York to the Cincinnati
club, is the lone big deal. Huggins held
up Becker when McGraw first asked
waivers on the fly-chaser, but was un
able to take him. He says he doesn't
regret that the Reds obtained the
utility Giant.
Sport Stars
window and seriously injured himself a
year ago and has not played ball since.
Danny Murphy, the Athletics veteran
outfielder, is again in splendid health,
and may get back in the game now
and then next season. When Murphy
injured his leg last year it was thought
he was through for good as a player.
-It-Connie
Mack says Jimmy Walsh, the
new outfielder he secured from the
Oriole, is a finished ball player de
spite his short time in the big league,
and wilt be a big help to the Athletics
In the next campaign.
Charlie Murphy says he lias made no
offer to the Montreal club for the ser
vices of pitcher Mattern, the former
Boston southpaw.
Kddie Onslow, the youngster the
Tigers grabbed from Lansing last sea
son and turned over to Providence,
has been shorn of hls ambition to be
come a free agent. Onslow did not
remember having signed a contract
with Detroit, although he played first
base for them until shipped to the
Grays. The national commission con
vinced him that he signed a contract
and nyist live up to it.
Connie Mack declares Eddie Plank
is really In earnest when he says he
-will retire from the game. Plank made
up him mind to quit the game last sea
son, and it is unlikely that a raise In
salary -will tempt him to change his
mind.
,.
Already the merry clink of the ham
mer and anvil chorus floats out on the
brefzss in Cincinnati. Theyre after
Joe Tinker. They say Tinker ought
to sign young players instead of load
ing up with Cub cast-offs like Brown
ana idling.
WESTERN LEAGUE TEAMS "WILL
PLAY' FIRST G2YME ON APRIL IS
Lincoln. Neb., Feb. 18. The club
owners of the Western league, after
working for three days and a large
share of as many nights, by a unani
mous vote adopted a schedule for the
1913 season. It provides for 168 games
to be played in four trips around the
circuit by each team.
The principal dates announced by
president Norris O'Neill are as follows.
Opening day April 18, Lincoln at
Wichita, Denver at Topeka, Des' Moines
at St. Joseph Sioux City at oraaha.
Opening day April 25. Wichita at
Lincoln. Topeka at Denver. St. Joseph
at Des Moines, Omaha at Sioux City.
TtmrtRK
: 1". .Jtf. C. A. WINS
CHAMPIONSHIP OF A
ARIZONA
Bisbee. Ariz.. Feb. IS. In a fast
game of basketball the Bisbee Y. M. C
A. team defeated the University of
Arizona team in the second game played
here and gained the championship
Of the state. The end of the first half
left the score 15 to 18 In BIsbee's favor
and. by superior team work, the local
bovs ran the score up to 48 to 21 for
the final. Both the Bisbee and the
University teams left here Tuesday for
Kl Paso to enter the Southwestern
championship tournament.
MOIIA DEFEATS THOMPSON;
CLAIMS COMMISSION TITLE
Milwaukee, Wis., Feb. 18. Bob Moha,
of Milwaukee, defeated "Cyclone'
Thompson, of Sycamore. II!- in every
round of their 16 round fight here last
night Moha now claims the title for
the new 175 pound "commission
weight.
UTAH PROHIBITS HOOKMAKING;
"WAGERS ON RACES MADE FELONY
Salt Lake City, Utah. Feb. 18. The
anti-bookmaklng and pool selling bill
has been signed by Gov. Spry. The
measure makes it a felony to place any
wager of any description on a horse
race and provides punishment by a fine
up to $2000 or one year imprisonment.
Skinny Gets a Little of Dr. Shrimp's Treatment
Tteiristered United States Patent Office.
DARE TO
.... .
CTiuUbrl
CARE
- 1 ATTEND I
TaS
AU) THIS AJNT
MODE TlLC
rUcO FK DCHX
r jtzzsm.
1 SWIFTS BREAK EVEN
WITH EL TORO TEAM
Point Are Dlilded In BovrliiiK Match
'In the Industrial League IS. P. it
S. W. Han Chance for First Plncc
After losing the first two periods the
Swift five came back in the last game
with a suficient margin, to break even
with the 1 Toro quintet Monday night i
at the Cactus alleys. Weak totals were J
rolled by both teams. Anderson
rolled high game and Vaughn high
total with a run of 477. Strikeouts
were credited to Mesiel and Presley. '
Two points were won by each club, if I
the js. r. s. w. quintet is able to
win its match this week, it will go
ahead of the Swiff team and climb into
first place in the Industrial league.
The scheduled match between the
Calisher and Tuttle fives in the Cactus
league was postponed until next week.
Wednesday night the three high men
in the ball and bag contest will roll a
three game match and the winner will !
De awarded the ball and bag.
The following scores were made
Industrial League
Swift & Co.
! Vaughn 149
1S1 1C? 477
1S8 145 4S9
121 165 . j
110 ISO 441
11 1S1 445
711 768 2212
184 179 469
112 187 422
175 93 433
146 116 444
123 168 434
Presley ice
Edmonds 114
Mcisel 1S1
Paschal 123
733
Cement Plant:
Hanson 126
1 Anderson 123
Henry ,..165-
Tjfylor i..l7g
Blnford 143
735 726 743 2198
Points won. Swift. 2; Cement Plant,
High game, Anderson. 187.
Tllch tA.l Vanvk. J??
I Strike out! Meisel. Presley.
I
BASKETBALL TEAMS
READY FOS GAMES
Arizona. m Mexico and West Texas to
Compete With EI 1'a.io for Cham
pionship of the Soutkivc-it.
Four of the five outside teams en
tered in the Southwestern Basketball
federation have sent in the names con
stituting their lineups, which will be
used in the meet to the federation of
ficials at the V. M. C. A. Alamogordo
High school, is the only team which
has not bfcen heard from, but the lineup
Is expected chori! The Agricultural
J college at Mesilla l'ark. has withdrawn
irvin inc jurcu auiu iia pim-v nw vwii
taken by the Bisbee. Ari., Y. M. C. A.
Following are the lineups of the teams
entered up to date: Bisbee Y. M. C. A..
B. Struthers. J. L. Benton. B. Thomas.
J. Champion, J as. Maffio. C. Beyers, H.
Hodgson. L. C. Daniels. E. Yoakum
and R. Verfuth. The lineup of the Bis
bee team Is nearly the same as the
quintet which participated in and won
the championship of the federation in
this city three years ago.
The Silver City Normal, at Silver
Ira ' Williams. Raymond Coffey. J.
Penneovall. F. Rosefield, Otto Provost, i
M. Xorcup. F. Tippets.
Big Springs Y. M. C. A.. Big tprins.
Tex.. Vivian Nichols. Charlie McPheir
son. Louis Conway. H. B. Robb. Jack
Williamson. Yuill Robb. T. H. Tipton.
Frank Carlston and Harry Williamson.
New Mexico Normal, at Las Vegaa. N
M. Carl Eller. Clare Kooger. Harold
Stewart. Solomon Gallegos. J. C. Baker,
Frank Carron. Prentiss Wulte. Octa
viano Larrasola.
The various sqnads will arrive on dif
ferent trains Thursday morning and
afternoon. The extra service bleacher
seats in the balcony of the Y. M. C A.
gymnasium have been put up in the
expectation of the large crowds at the
games.
GREAT WESTERN CIRCUIT
FIXES DATES FO'
RACES
Meeting nt Dalian Will He Held From
October SO to Nov. -2 and
At Phoenix Nov 3-S.
Chicago, 111., Feb. IS. At the annual
meeting of the Great Western circuit
of trotting and racing meetings, the
following cities and dates were as
signed for this years' racing:
Decatur. 111., August. 5-8: Peoria, III,
August 12-16: Galesburg. Ill, August
19-23; Des Moines. Iowa, August 25-29;
Hamline, Minn.. September 1-5; Mil
waukee, Wis, September S-12; Detroit.
Mich., Sept. 15-19; Peoria. I1L. Sept.
22-27; Sedalia. Mo, Sept 39-Oetober 3;
Springfield. Ill, Oct 6-11. Open dates
October 13-18: no application; Dallas,
Texas. Oct 20-Nov. 2; Phoenix. Ariz,
Nor. 3-8.
CUBS ARRIVE IN CAMP AT
TAMPA; WILL PLAY IIAVAN A j
Tampa, Fla, Feb. 18. The Chicago
National league baseball club. 36
strong, has arrived here for 30 days'
training. Summerlike weather prevails
and the team will start active work
at once. The first exhibition game of
a series of 11 will be plajed next Mon
day with the Havana, Cuba. team.
INTERNATIONAL
Gives your Boy & start.
Phone 1 147. J. P. MulBa. Pre.
Dentists
All Work Guaranteed.
We give gas for extraction.
DR'o. BYERS
203 Trust Bldg. Phone 537.
avu shuckues, let shrikp flay curm
I'M ALL RIGHT ij
AS MUCH
GOSrUUHSH 5HE
UXXJLD LET SHWMP .
PLAY VUKHME'.r
ir DC"
i
JH8I Jv - WEYootJ
1
Battle With Cox Gave McCarty Start
-,ss5 ss ar sfts Ert-B"toz
By THOS. S.
, , tll. al fishts that . l:ke a dnb once ana tnen wmi c "
. M3 of the real Shts tnai . againdt
J started Luther McCarty on his ; Battns Nelson. Joe Gans and others
- road to the heavyweight ehaui- 1 Tommy Burns once appeared like a
plonship was with Joe Cox at Spring- enVanf &
field. Mo., back in December of 1911. 1 WOrld's champion Ad V. olgnt
At that time McCarty was nothing but J fOMlt a- poorly down east that ine
a green kid with the frame of a young 1 eritica claimed Knockout Bron And
giant. It was by accident that he got I others would beat him sure, but the
the match. This man Cox had been cmac wildcat turned around ind
quite a fighter in the eyes of the local gc the best kind of wins oer go- d
sporting men around Springfield and j Hghiweights. Eddie McGoorty put 1 p
it was the aim of several of them to j poor fights at times, but he turned.
have him whipped in royal style. Con- . aroun(i a year ago and scored some of
sequently they were looking around for j the best wns 0f his career.
a man to turn the trick. ji, Fjtzsimmons came near being
Walter Monahan, who had been a t t to the Dad by peter Maher or.ce
sparring partner of Jack Johnson when I and maje to look easy, but he came
the latter was training at Reno, .was j Dacfc and turned the tables so .f
the man selected to beat Cox. He was I fectively that Peter was never the same
considered as a fairly good man and class afterwards. The same can be
one who could surely defeat the coun- said ot most high class fighters they
try champion This was after Larry I show a big reversal of form at times
Goetz, a Chicago heavyweight had and no mistake
citement when the supposed Walter
Monahan arrived in Springfield. One
of the men there who take a great in
terest in sports, T. B. Sackett. became
convinced that tne man wno naa ar
rived there was not Walter Monahan
and later, in conversation with the
fighter, he discovered that instead cf
Monahan It was a young, husky fellow
named Luther McCarty.
During this discussion Billy McCar
ne, manager of McCarty. was arrang
ing matters with the club. Sackett b
came convinced, however, through Mc
Cartj's talk that he was really the man
to beat Co and he went to"the man
agement of the club and made known
his anxiety to bet $25 that McCarty
would stop Cox in eight of 10 rounds.
This was done to test the club match
maker, as be was warering about let
ting the match go on after he dis
covered that it was not Monahan who
was to meet Cox. He quickly grabbed
the $25 bet and decided to go through
with the match. They met as agreed
and Cox took a beautiful trimming in
the sixth round. McCarty sent him to
dreamland where he remained for ?1
minutes. That was the starting of Lu
ther McCart s fame as a boxer in Hie
little town of Springfield and he male
good in all his fights following in that
burg. Waenever he goes into battle
now there is always plenty of Spring
field money to back him.
It is a hard matter to account for the
reversal of form shown by boxers at
times. Boxers are a great deal like
race horses; at times they are in tip
top form and fight like champions, and
again they appear like novices. Dare
Smith, the Australian champion middle
weight before Jimmy Clabby defeated
him. was considered a world beater at
home and he put up some splendid
battles, but when he got away, and
finally landed in New York he was put
to sleep in one round by Eddie Mc
Goorty. It may have been a "fluke"
at that but just the same McGoorty
got the credit of a rapid fire knock
out Later on Smith put up a credit
able fight in Boston and also in Phila
delphia, but the damage had been
done and he returned to Australia
-without having a chance to wipe out
the McGoorty stain.
Ercole DeBalzac, the French mid
dleweight who has been in Australia
for some time, recently put up a great
fight against Ernie Zanders and also
against others, but -when he faoed
Smith he seemed to go to pieces and
was whipped in three rounds. It
helped to bring Dave back to notice.
bat was an awful reversal for the
Frenchman.
It was the same with Jaek Read over
there. He put up a miserable fight
-with a couple of mediocre fighters and
then turned around and whipped Jean
Poesy and Grorer Hays in good style.
Jimmy Clabby fought so well-in Aus
tralia during his first trip there that
he could command all kinds of back
ing to meet any man of his weight
in the world, but when he landed in
England and was put against a second
class man Harry Duncan he put up
such a poor fight that Hugh Mcintosh
wanted to cancel his contract at once.
Then again, Jimmy came to Milwaukee
and fought poorly against Mike Gib
bons, but went to Buffalo and fought
like a champion. It was a big rever
sal of form and no mistake.
Rudie Unholz fought in Milwaukee
Automobile &
reer's Elect tie Garage
508 N. KANSAS Electric Carn?0,aIpBpfIeS."ttcrie8- aBd
STUDEBAKER
me )
L
AJ0, LET HER MIL A
rtAO i..iilT ... t llof
.Wr, gSJHRi WU K lfrc
RLL0 SWNNtf, EMILY IS.
F0UERIN, ME AROUWO TOEJ
BLOCK.-UlftU nJK.wg.;
Vs,
( AOO, LET HER ?AU-A ,
ANDREWS
. ., A. U.
Do not be surprised if boxing bouts
are intorduced as part of select parlor
games for the "400" ir various cities
about the country. The fad has started
in London and now Pa -is has taken it
up, so why not the United States' It
has been the custom ft r several years
past to stage short round bouts at
stags and entertainments where nvn
were the only participa its, but now die
women threaten to enter the field.
Only a short time ago Miss Claudia
Lascll surprised her friends in London
by giving them a genuine boxing ma". a
as an after dinner entertainment in
stead of the usual vau leville perform
ance with the Salome dancers. She
had the ring arranged in one of tSe
large rooms and the bottle holders and
towel swingers were there in all th-:r
glory. The young woman acted as
master of ceremonies and she did vey
nicely indeed. She appeared to enjoy
the sensation of being in the ring and
the wymen present certainly enjo , .1
the contest as much as the men. judg
ing from the way they applauded, 't
was a sure enough scrap between tw,
well known welterweights and thfia
was a real knockout.
This brings to mind a request I hal
some months ago from a woman who
thought she would like to give ier
friends a treat of the same kind, but I
I talked her out of it at the time, stating
k. f wmtlil hardlv ho taken in the
right spirit by many of the people.
However, if the society people cf
Europe can stand for it why surely the
liberal minded Americans can.
And while talking about women m
joying the manly sport it might be wl!
to remark that when Sam McVey and
Sam Langford fought in Paris uea-ly
two years ago I attended at the Cirque
de Paris and saw fully 500 women
present occupyjng- the boxes and best
seats in the house, many of them in
evening dress. The women, main ..?
them, were prominent in i society an i
they seemed to en jo, the sport Iri
mensely. Since then women in Paris
have been rgular attendants at soir--of
the boxing shows and the 5p
nothing wrong in it Probably it was
this fact that promoted the London
women to get up the boxing show for
the entertainment of her guests, Wuii
the women Interested there is hope fr
the boxing game in the future. Thv
patronize baseball, football and auto
races, so why not boxing?
Go to Europe by the North-German
Lloyd Galveston-Bremen
SS "Brandnburg" Feb. 15
SS "Breslatt" March 8
SSfiCaseeF April 5
SS fWMfcadBdr May 3
SSfKoelrf M.y 24
SSCasseP June 14
SS "Breslan" Julv 5
SS "Koeln" July 26
Large comfortable steamers.
FARES: Cabin, $$7.56 and $80.00;
Steerage,' $3S.ft
Apply- to Local Agents, or to
ALFRED HOLT, General Agent,
Galveston, Texas.
Accessories
DIRECTORY
AUTOMOBILES.
Richardson Motor Car
Co., Distributors.
42 San Antonio St. Phone 953.
By Tom McNamara
SjklNMY SHAME R'S
GOOGLY DGPARXM&Mr
SHRIMP FCVMkj,
Ewe. PRO TEM'.
WELL, U3c FO0M& OOT
TrlAT UMEW -WE STAMD
UP OUR LAP Z0ES TO
THE SAME-PLACE THAT
0OR. FIST GOES WKEAJ
WE GPE& O0R. HANO.
DIDNTWE A0U).
AU- iuE'vxe GoT To do
IS FN0 OOT U5HERE THAT
14 C0McOJ FC3CKS.
UjHERE is that puce?
VJW? DID THE" FLY FLY"?
BECAUSE THE SPIDER
SPIED'ER
AINT THAT COTE?
WJ82&D to-dw&
FP.OM
,BU- STARK.
Jersey cjtx amerjca.
WHff'S TH OtFFBiE
f
BTtuM AM OLD PWS
COLLAR BILL AND A MEUJ

xml | txt