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El Paso herald. (El Paso, Tex.) 1901-1931, March 05, 1913, Sport and Society Section, Image 9

Image and text provided by University of North Texas; Denton, TX

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88084272/1913-03-05/ed-1/seq-9/

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BALD
Sport and Society Section
Sobrt and Society Section
Experts Figure McFarland
ver Britton In Defensive Won
EL
PASO
HE
Has Shade 0
Fans Eager For McFarland-Britton Bout
Bntton May Have Shade Over the Cfaicagoan on Hitting Ability, But McFar
laad's General Defence Is Better.
NEW YORK, March 5. Some of
i he plains of pugilism will be
o-i display t&U week for the box-
i ins.
rn.- McFarland-Britton engagement
v 11 attract the greatest attention, be-
i"- of the prominence of the prin-
pa --
rt-' two years of haggling, mud
5' Hsing- and backbiting these boys.
umittPdlv the greatest 135 pound
! chtw eights In the world, will' get to
cithT in a 10 round renewal of their
i r-i. nt quarrel in Xew Tortc Friday
l uht
Ti bout will be staged by the Gar-
i - Vthletit- club. The weight will be
" pounds at 8 o'clock. In order to
su" the presence of the principals
t-. the battle date the Garden club
''ic.dls demanded a $1000 forfeit from
j-ti man for both weight and appear-
Tii- conttst between McFarland and
I i.uon has been anxiously awaited by
iim f?ns ever since their memorable
rv etn at Memphis, Tenn., on January
!!)11 when Bntton. then compara-
1 unknown took the pritft of the
si -ikarc's otr an eight reund route
.l p ice that forced McFarland to his
i moot At t conclusion it was the
i .r-al v Out that a draw was the
i -nil t decision
Britton Harps on One A'leterj-.
I'.i-u performances give little dope
' m w men to pick a. muun. .v
i is on fight on which Britton
ia is .!: showing he is the better pu- 1
a l--f than McTarland. The victim I
- d for the comparison is Eddie Mur- t
T- . -rAn1jx. ..iwt... liMMlltV f
j, - H 0USltll rdlivcj avibu- ...- .7
i(. and -won shades on each occas-
v ii 0 rounds Britton fought Mur-
i ce at-o knocked him out In 11
n,K He claims superiority-because
st.,., ied Muiphr while Packey failed
stop tin Boston fighter in two
Packey Bo en -Defence.
nmi'aring McFarland and Britton
is aa.d to see where Jack has any-
on Packey with possibly one
i mn, and that Is hitting- ability.
rcr; other angle of the game
Lucky!
1e. you are gyUiuclj lucky if you
yet one of these area's suite we are
selling for , -
Tliey are values up as high as Thirty
dollars, and we guarantee every one
absolutely. Any suit in our store,
pe lal
Mills Building
Us Boys
BE iMD6RW&" UiHArDOYoo
1 se ,,.,,, r.. -,7 - -
1
I 5U
iiwmh wt itufci;
X00
Fm?
iET'S SEE THERE ODGHf TO Rf
A BETTER. WAY TO KAlflcK HM
&? HIS 805MUHEAJ HE l MAtoi'
. sZSZSi vUIC eeseir-,T
-BKa i' rccv.n
. ......
.51 "5 555,
now.lets
Packey seems to have the margin.
Britton is a clever miller, but not as
clever as his rival. lie is not the ring ;
general that McFarland is. and when
it comes to defensive fighting Packey
must be credited with beinjr the better
man On the offensive it comes closer
to being an even thing.
Britton's one best bet is a right
hand body or heart punch. Jack has
this blow down to perfection. Britton
sends it on a left hand lead, and when
he lands it it creates a smothering I
Sensation, around the heart. A man
Who has received a punch of this kind
will drop his hands, just like a person
who is going to faint. The minute
Jack sees the hands drop after deliver
ing this blow out goes his right fist
as hard as he can drive. Down goes
his victim, generally for the ten count.
McFarland is the scientific boxer. He
has the style, the dash, the great clev
erness that shows up so well in all
his battles. Packey's is not the type
of cleverness that made Frank Erne,
Joe Gans or Griffo famous. McFarland
is the dancing master, who dazslee an
opponent by the nimbleness of his feet.
"Pfcv alnf-Kn't blok or counter a
punch like Britton. The stock yarder I
depends en nis toot worK. to get mm
out of danger of a blow. McFarland
feints with his feet rather than his
hands. He cuffs and mauls an oppon
ent more than Britton.
AVOLGAST AXD MURPHY
1HI.L IIGKT AGAIX IX APRIL.
San Francisco, Calif., March 5. For
mer lightweight champion Ad Wolgast
and "Harlem" Tommy Murphy of New
York, who fought 20 rounds to a draw
here February 22, will meet again in
a 29 round contest either April 12 or
IS. An agreement for The fight lias
been concluded here by their managers.
Murphy had agreed to the match be-.
fore his departure for New York.
DICK BAYUSSS. OP VERXOX CLUB,
VISITS FAXS IX Els PASO.
Dick Bayless. crack outfielder of the
Vernon Pacific coast leasrue elub left
Wednesday- morning for Los Angeles,
after visiting old friends among the
El Paso fans and baseball players.
Bayless hit over .300 last season and
is Considered to be one of the best
outfielders on the coast.
Twirlers Join Superbas In . Georgia
Manager BUI Dahlen Expects Great Work This Season from Nap Rncker,
Pat Sagas, and Frank Allen.
A UGUSTA, GA, March 5. Hap
. ZA Rucker, Pat Ragan and Frank
J - Allen, three of the star flingers
: of the Brooklyn Nationals are due here
i today from Hot Springs, Ark., where
1 they were ordered on February 17 by
! manager Dahlen to take the baths,
i Dahlen believes there is nothing
more beneficial for a twirler than the
baths at Hot Springs, and. as he is
anxious to get off to a good .start, he
took this step to put his twirlers
through a few -weeks of extra work.
Rucker complained last year that
liis arm was never right during the en
tire season.
"Lefty" Allen, who cost president
Kbbets considerable money and trpuble,
Puffs From the
JAMES COFFRQTH. the San Fran
cisco promoter, is making over
tures to Tom Jones, manager of
Wolgast, and Jim Buckley, manager of
Tommy Murphy. for a return match
between the two fighters. Coffroth's
offer for a fight late in March or early
in April is satisfactory to both box
ers, it is said.
William Joh has been selected to
referee two important 19 round boats
in the near future at New York. Joh
' will referee the fight between Packey
McFarland and Jack iJritton on jaarcn
7. and will also preside at the Gun-
1 boat Smith-Bombardier Wells battle on
March 14.
Bud Anderson, the Vancouver light
weight, has started training for his 29
,-niind Iwmfwith "Knockout" Brown at
j Los Angeles on March 15. Brown will
not begin training until me last pars
of this week. It is predicted Brown
will be a slight favorite.
The promoters of the Olympic Ath- 1
letic club, at urana iapias, jiicn., are
endeavoring to stage a 10 round bout
between Bob Moha and Howard Mor
row, to take pace on March 13. Morrow
is willing if Moha will make the middle
weight limit.
Ray Chapman, an infielder from the
Toledo American association club, has
m,.u1 tkA Pinralanil Vgne in tVMkiT enmn
1 JUI11CU .U rf ... .,.. ... ...w.. -...,
at Pensacola, Fla. The players have not
started real workouts yet and are tak
insr nn their time mostly with associa
tion football, medicine ball, and other
limbering up exercises-
Second baseman Morris Rath, of the
Chicago white Sox, met with a severe
accident on the first day of training
at Paso Robles. OaL The keystone
euard drove into the swimming pool
4 which contained only about two feet of
water, and was painfully injured. His
head was cut open and he was forced
YOD GO HWE AND DOPEQUFA
SPEECH TO MAKE AT TOE GAN.
WHEN YOO GET -MAU6RATED: I
- ..
GET EVERY-
THWfe FIVE?
HEY SHRIMP,
ALL RIGHT IP I
SOlMfc INSTEAD
A SPE- I MEAU
BirwrcKWfc -Ltufcg .ggK. fier gycpY- -
(,,? 1 HEY SHRIMP, WILL IT BE T
HUH 5 ALL RIGHT IP I MAKE A J
- SOlMfc INSTEAD OF SING, IMG
SBjl A SPE- I .MEAIJ '
TUTTLE'S BOWLERS
WON BY 107 PINS
Sukerman of the Courthouse Quintet
Rolls High Game and High
Total.
Sukerman was back in his old form
Tuesday night at the Cactus alleys but
even with a high total of CIS was not
able to stave off the victory of the
Tuttle quintet. The Tuttles won from
the Courthouse five by a margin of
107 pins. Consistent games by several
rollers featured the match. Three of
the four points were won by the Tut
tle quintet. Sukerman rolled high
game. Strikeouts were credited to
Ford and Briesh.
The Industrial league matchs as
postponed.
The following scores were made:
Cactus Iicagne.
Tuttle Team Total
II. M. Tuttle 14 146 15S 46S
I. Z. Avina 14 164 138 413
G. G Abbott 1S 201 203 SOS
H. Briesh, 163 200 200 563
Dummy 18S 172 122 482
Total '.. S54 883 821 255S
Courthouse Total
It- Sukerman 22S 193 198 618
W.- I. Watson 156 US 141 413
J. P. McCue 127 117 105 349
Is. J. Ford 179 211 195 585
W. Grandover 213 1SS 137 488
Ta11 tsfts? T7S 771! ?41
Points won: Tuttle. 3; Courthouse, 1.
High game: Sukerman, 225.
High total: Sukerman. 61S.
Strikeouts: Ford, Briesh.
COIIIT RU1.ES AGAIXST BOXERS
IX TEST CASE AT MIIVVAUKEE
Milwaukee. "Wis., March 5. District
judge Xeele B. Keelen decided against
the boxing promoters in the test case
involving Joe Welling, of Chicago, and
Jack Redmond, of Milwaukee, who en
gaged in a 10 round bout here on Jan
uary 17. The men were bound over for
trial to the municipal court.
The court held that the fact that the
announcer said that some other boxer
was" ready to meet the winner made
the event a prize fight.
RESIDEXT COACHES FOR SEASOV.
New Haven. Conn.. xMarch 5. Capt.
Ketcham. of the Yale football team, has
announced the appointment as resident
coaches to assist head coach Howard
Jones next fall, of Capt. Jesse Sapid inp
of last year's eleven, and Douglas
Bomeisler. star end for several yean?,
both of whom graduate in June.
is due to recover his 1911 form this
year. He worked about five complete
srames in 1912. althoueh he aDDeared in
20, heing credited with three wins and !
nine losses. He certainly has the
"Stuff." It is also believed that the
boiling out will put him on edge at the
start. Last year he went through the
training trip performing great won
ders, but when he reached Washington
on the homeward trip, it was a raw
cold day and he cut loose just as if
it -was in the mik8e of August. He
succeeded in trimming the Senators,
but it did not do his arm any good.
Ragan will have to do some hard
-work to take off flesh, and Dahlen
believes if Pat is in condition he will
hold the opposing teams safe.
Fan's Hop Pipe
into the care of Doc Buckner, who says
Rath escaped death by only a few
inches.
Harry Wolter, of the Tankees, is back
on the job and ready for the sail to
Bermuda to join his mates in practice.
Harry, who before he cracked his leg
last spring, was one of the fastest
men along the towpaths, says he has
fully recovered the use of that Injured
member and will be able to show up
well for his new boss in right garden.
Dixie Walker, pitcher for the Wash
ington Americans last season, has been
secured by manager Friel, of the St.
Paul American association club.
The Brooklyn baseball club has re
leased pitcher Claude Williams to the
Nashville club of the Southern associa
tion and signed pitcher B. Hall, of the
Ridgewood (W. Va.) club.
Charlie White, who meets Pal Moore
at Kenosha, Wis., on March 10. has of
ed to post a forfeit oi rjlBW , to secure
a match -with the winner of the Leach
Cross-Joe Rivers bout in New York, on
April L He specifies 133 pounds ring
side. Jim Thorpe is showing up so well in
the training camp of the Giants at
Marlin, Texas, that John McGraw be
lieves the Indian is going to make a
good hitter, star base runner and a first
class fielder in the garden or on first.
They are -willing to wager in Mil
waukee and Minneapolis that when the
American association schedule opens
April 16 there will be from four inches
to a foot- of snow on the ground.
Jack Graney, outfielder, bad the hon
or of breaking the first bat among the
taps in training at Pensacola, Fla..
wnen ne cracked a liner to deep cen-
ter.' breakine the slick in tirn Venn I
Gregg, star southpaw, has joined the i
squad. 1
LLV
I WAS
WILL IT BE
MAKE A
OF SlNClMG
.
II YONOER. WHAT K(MD 0FA
, .. ...... -ww... iwpui
H
"LET BOB DO IT AFTER THIS"
Tales Told At the Ringside
By W. A. Phelon
JIM HcCORMICK, champion of Texas, was a fine specimen of manhood, and he
could go some in the ring. He downed sundry second raters, he batted Sandy
Ferguson all around the ring, and he gave Gus Ruhlin all the trouble he wanted
before the Texas cowboy could be overcome. McCormick gave Jack Johnson three
fine battles, and might have risen to great eminence in his class but for one thing
he started too late in the game. The Texan was 29 or so before he took up the
professional gloves, and a man who starts at that age has but a few short years
to go. Before McCormick was really educated as a fighter he was approaching
middle age, with common sense quite equal to his valor, he laid down the gloves.
McCormick was shrewd and crafty, but the wisest of us pull a bonehead now
and then and so it chanced that the champion of Texas pulled one that was a!
royal pippin. Bob Fftzsimmons, in the zenith of his glory, was touring thecoun
tryjjmd besides his boxing'wofi;, was performing sundry tricks that kept him ably
advertised. One of these stunts was playing with a pet lion. This attracted the
attention of McCormick, likewise looking for publicity, but he passed it up. "Not
because it was dangerous.' explained the Texan, "but because it was too blamed
expensive. Fitzsimmons, being a champion, has lions given to him, free of charge.
Me, being only a beginner, would have to buy my own lions, and the darn things,
cost $1200, C. 0. D.!"
Another of Ruby Robert's games was the forging of horseshoes and the shoe
ing of horses. That was. great -stuff, and made him solid with the hornyhanded
sons of toil. Furthermore, it was not at all expensive, and so the emulous McCor
mick decided that here was his chance to shine. He would in public, shoe a horse,
show that he was just as clever at the game as the red Australian, and dim Bob's!
press agent with long columns, of his own. The chance came sooner than Jim ex-,
pected came, in fact, before "he had even an opportunity to take private lessons
from a blacksmith. Fitzsimmons andhis company appeared at Pueblo, Colo., and
Ruby Robert announced that he would shoe a horse that very day at Gannon's.
McCormick, who was to fight the following week at Pueblo, saw his chance and
announced that he would be there--that he would watch Fitzsimmons shoe his
animal, and would then show his-own skill -by shoeing another. There was great)
delight in Pueblo, and a vast gathering in and round the smithy on the appointed
hour. Fitzsimmons received an introduction to McCormick with an amiable, much
freckled grin. Robert then hammered a shoe into shape, seized the near hind leg
of a waiting steed, and, in a iiffy set the shoe in place, amid loud applause.
McCormick advanced, picked "up a shoe, and dropped it, as it happened to be
hot. The grinning Fitzsimmons handed him a cool one, and McCormick laid eager
hand upon the gambrel of an adjacent horse. The horse cocked bis ears, looked
round inquiringly, and then straightened out both, hind legs.
They picked up McCormick over by the smithy wall, and poured cold water on
him. He rose, somewhat wobbly and grasped the sympathetic hand of Fitzsimmons.
"As to this horseshoe game," growled McCormick thickly, "let Bob do it after
this. If I want press-work, I'll ge.t it by wallopin' someone, and I'm willin toJ
start in on the first guy that dares say horseshoe' to me at any time hereafter!"
Cardinal Recruits Make Good Showing
Ed Koney and Other Holdouts of the St.. Louis Nationals Are Now in Training
Camp and Ready to Sign Contracts To Get on Payroll.
By W. J. O'CONNOR. ;
CLUMBUS. Ga., March 5. Miller
Huggins's managerial debut,
launched without fanfare of
trumpets, was a notable success. The
onlookers were unable, with the naked
eye, to discern any material difference
between Hoggins the manager and
Huggins the player, as the "Rabbit"
was the least conspicuous man on the
field.
He turned his Ditchers over to Heine
Peitz and demeaned himself like any of
the other hired hands, a noticeable con
trast to tHfe Clustering way of ram
ps t Roger Bresnahan.
Huggins seems destined to prosper
with his players, who support him to a
man. That much one can learn after a
er short stay in camp. Whether
Huggins is a manager, though, is a
question for thne'only to answer. But
as- to his popularity, there seems no
doubt. He's one of the boys, even
though he does wear the managerial
toga
Huggins has a collection of recruits
who appears io be, of major league tal
ent. Not one of them may deliver, but
at this date one can state, with reason
able assurance, that few teams have
ever gone south -with a finer looking
lot, of athletes. There isn't a misfit in
the lot Last year Bresnahan had a
prize lot of jokers, nearly all under
sized, and not one worthy of serious
consideration. This year Huggins has
many fine specimens of athletes, who at
least look like ball players.
Credit for this may indirectly be
given to Bresnahan. It was Roger who
hired Dick Kinsella and Bill Armour
at J 5000 each, and it was Kinsella and
Armour who dug up the kiddoes now
under Hug's command.
HoldontH Will Sign.
The colony of balkers "now includes
Koney, Wingo, Magee, Evans. Oakes
and Geyer, but none of these will prove
really troublesome.
They are all willing to sign even
Koney. who has reported here. The
'Big Train" admits that he will be in
the game -when the Tiell rings for the
first bout against the Browns. Evans
and Oakes say they will sign. Wingo
may prove a bit troublesome, but the
new manager won't lose any sleep over
Ivy's case, because the fiery-headed one
likes to play too well. Indeed, one
might as well dismiss the holdout stuff
right here, as none of the players will
forfeit any of their salary by failure
to sign a contract. They want the coin
and will get it on the first payday,
June 1-
Barring the recruits there are very
few single men on the Cardinal team
this season. Since Jakie Geyer joined
the benedicts, the only bachelors left
are Magee, Wingo, Harmon, Sallee and
Steels. And rumor has it that two of
these stalwarts will desert the ranks
coon.
With the exception of Ed Koney. Dan
Griner is the biggest man in camp, Gri
ner has a pair of shoulders that would
look well on the man who is destined
to whip Luther McCarty. And Dan has
wwwwwwwwwwwww ww lrwV
Just One Thing After Another
Registered Vn ted States Patent Office.
HE? EMILY, WHAT I S"AIAU GRATED"? SHRIMP
IS COIN' TO MAKE ME BE ONE JUST 'CAU5E
LECTED PRESIDENT
6EE.HERE I ARE
.j
vr sL( KNOW XWL
It jfk UNLESS. ITS Wt
tjL-f !)'S0METHNfe L1&P
-UKE A .Si JT
lA0!j (ohi;
ME DARN JSIS !T 6ET PEEUIUSH;
POOL . i.sSI
speed and a good curve ball, but he's
what the ballplayers call a "groove
ball' 'pitcher. He hasn't the knack of
cutting the corners, preferring to put
the ball squarely over the hear.t of the
pan. The result is the opposing swat
ters collect too many base knocks. Con
trol Is a f&Ujt, when it comes this way.
SWIMACns MAKE FAST TIME
IN RACKS AT V. M. C A. POOL.
F. Scotten won the 30 jard speed,
race in the swimming contest of the
older boys' division of the Employed
Boys' class Tuesday night at the Y. M.
C A. Scotten made the dash in 20 3-5
seconds. R. Lorens was second with
a time of 21- 2-5. C. Thompson won
In the younger boys' class, making the
two laps in 20 3-5 seconds. K. Oden
was second with a dash of 25 2-5. Scot
ten made the best time in the prelim
inary heat with a time pf 19.4. but
was unable to keep it up. Fourteen
boys were in competition in the races
Tuesday night.
The running high kick in the young
er boys' class was won by S. Broaddus,
in the weekly event. Broaddus made
a high kick of seven feet. In the
older boys' division D. Crockett won
the kick with a lift of seven feet and
four inches. F. Kimball won in the
employed boys' class wfth a kick of
seven feet two inches. C. Cuttler won
in the regulars class, toeing the plate
at eight feet and two Inches. The event
next week will be the standing high
jump.
Indoor baseball is now being played
and several games have been scheduled.
LEIjAXD GIANTS WILL XOT
PLAY GAMIW IX EL PASO.
Owing to the Inability to secure a
strong negro team to meet the Leland
Giants, of Chicago, it has been decided
by local sporting men that negotiations
to match that club with a team in this
city will be dropped. The Giants
wanted dates for two games, on March
28 and 30.
A call will soon be issued for local
players by manager Tommy Smith, of
the El Paso team, and workouts -will
be begun at Washington Park for the
game with the Chicago White "Sox on
April 1.
WITH REDS, IJCT CANNOT PLAY.
- Kansas City, Mo.. March 6.-John
Kling, baseball catcher, today mailed a
letter to president Herrmann, of the
Cincinnati National league baseball
club explaining his denial of Mr. Herr
mann's statement that Kling had signed
a contract to play with Cincinnati the
coming season.
Kling in the letter, admitted he signed
a contract, but insisted he did it with
a distinct understanding that the con
tract would not be binding unless
Kling's local business partner agreed
to bis leaving here. This, Kling- stated,
his partner refused to do and thus the
contract never became effective.
Burnetised ..osts cheaper and better
than cedar. Lander Lumber Co.
60SH HANG IT IT WAS BAD ENOUGH TO
BE 'IECTED 8UTtuHEMA6DYHASTER8
Al AU6RATED' Am MAKE A SPEECH
BESIDES IT'S T0U6H-f
IUABBYIM' mv un crA
7
oh iGuESsnrUK-tE
SWBLV-KMGZAJloii'Cmy
ALL RIGHT TO- Fl tW
BO S0J. Hf LL PALL
:
I JUUNl Ofcl rXtVUrsH
Yankees Roster For Season Complete
Pitcher Ray Caldwell and Catcher Bob Williams Sigm New Contracts With
New York Americans and Are OS to Bermuda Traiaiag Caap.
By W. J. MAC BETH. '
NEW YORK, March 5. Pitcher
Ray Caldwell and catcher Bob
Williams signed with the Yan
kees for another year before sailing
for Bermuda, where Chance will condi
tion his athletes. President Frank Far
rell brought to the reported holdouts
with a nod and a handshake. More
was accomplished in a minute's chat
than in half a dozen letters which
had passed between the respective par
ties. With the signing of Williams and
Caldwell the New York American club
roster was officially completed. The
17 "chances" who sailed on the Ar
cadian, as well as all at Bermuda, are
now under contract. With the excep
tion of Caldwell, the last squad was a
most hale and hearty aggregation
though a trifle apprehensive of a rough
passage. Caldwell is several pounds
under weight. He has suffered a great
jeal from tonsilitis lately.
The Highlanders interpreted as a
gcod omen the fact that they traveled
in a vessel that was loaded to ca
pacity. At the last moment a number
of friends of the club tried in vain to
secure accommodations. The disap
pointed ones were hopeful to the last
that some player might miss the boat
in order that they might "horn in."
AND
dit r
DlJLJLs
E-O
a " b! tt ft
automobile & Acce
HUDSON
HUP MO
Chalmers Motor Company f El Paso
Cor. W. San Antonio and Santa Fe Sts.
f,k Dkl:i.(iss)
El Paso Rubber &
Winton Six
Rm ,
eiBV MagnetOS
&
321-323 Texas Street. Bell Phone 3370.
fWrlsmil fare
J Ci JldllU VUl
Auto Insurance
Greer's Electric Garage
508 N. KANSAS EIectric Carnfi?aS"B7,"alteries- aad
1TUDE
E. P.
AGLNCY Phone 5105
BAKER
By Tom McNamara
AU3 I'M (jOIN' TO ASK SHRIMP-
KIM I SIN6 A SONk INSTEAD
OP fAKIM A SPEECH
(GoSH.TNUJsree
GREArNQTTOeEl
A PRESIDENT Ir-
HKmxjn
But little "Birdie" Cree. who caused
some worry, finally arrived with j.
few hours to spare on the milk train
from Snnbury. Pa He was stored in
the last reservation.
The squad was composed of outfit li!
ers Cree, Wolters and Daniels; infield
ers Priest, Stump, Derrick, Martin, Mid
kiff. "Barry and Harbison, pitchc-s
Caldwell Hoff. McConneil, Scnulz and
catcher Williams.
Arrow
7&k COLLAR
15 cents. 3 KB- ag cents
ssones
DIRECTORY
SOTTHWESTEEH AUTO
SALES COMPANY.
Comer Hyxtle ani Kansas St.
Automobile-., Trucks, Passenger Cars and
Supplie Distributors for the South-
"Hrt NEFF-STILES CO.
400 Block, No. Santa Fe.
Automobiles
-ss' Auto Supply Co.
LongwelTs Auto Truck &
Sales Co.
Jos. Tays, 31 gr.
128-22 San Francisco St.
El Paso Auto Sales Co.
Office 713 H. Ocioa St.
Phone 3585.
J. K. JOHNSON, JR, MGE.
Service Station
Ignition and Lighting
WISBMA2 ft ANDERSON.
Service Station
WISBMAN & ANDERSON,
ignition specialists.
Geo-L-istributor.
Salesrooms Southwestern Ball ding.
Phoae 1S8.
P. O. Box 77.
DOUGLAS C. CROWELL Agency
208 Mills BWg. ' Phoae 578.
All Kinds.
Anto Supplies.
AUTOMOBILES.
Richardson Motor Car
Co., Distributors.
422 San Antonio SU Phone 953.
& S. W. BtJILDING
C P. HENRY, Manager.
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