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El Paso herald. (El Paso, Tex.) 1901-1931, April 03, 1916, HOME EDITION, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of North Texas; Denton, TX

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88084272/1916-04-03/ed-1/seq-1/

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HOME EDITION
TODAY'S PRICES
v I'ink jut.. (itit hill) 9&lo
M '! j' , 4.'i Narlonals bill
4 rrnnxa furrcn( y !$ Bar sller
Mm A Harmon quotations SIN
r f .. oi : oo (;Eir. higher
r k Mtid Stocks sluffCtah.
WEATHER FOItKC T.
EI I'mo Bnil irnt Texas, iinieltled: New
Mexico, niln or snow, Arizona, rains
outli, snow north.
FOURTEEN PAGES TODAY.
LATEST NEWS BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
SINGLE COPT FIVD CENTS.
EL PASO. TEXAS. MONDAY EVENING. APRIL 3. 1916
DELIVERED ANYWHERE SO CENTS A MONTH.
U. S. TROOPS AND CANO FIGHT BANDITS
HERALD
Hides
San
Andres
in
w 'far I I Ban Bill tarn mm
Gen. Cavazos, Who Fought
Villa At Guerrero, Says
Bandits Demoralized.
U.S. TROOPS AT
SAN ANTONIO NOW
Three Villisla Bands Raided
Guerrcro-Minaca District,
Is Report on Border.
ADVICES received by local min
ing men confirm Carranza ad-
lcea that American troops ar
. ! at San Antonio, ten miles north
! i'um, Friday at noon and that Villa
) nl Rone south and was wounded In
On knee The news that Villa 1
wounded wu brought into "Cusl" by
wood gatherers who supply the mine
plants
nother new fact that the telegraph
li--pntrhes dlacloae la that Gen. Jose
i avaios reached Cuaihulrlachlc on
'I i. sday following the battle at Guer
ii io ,md that he had with him some
men. The dispatches state that
i' jioi carae into Cuslhuiriachlo on
Hi run and that the information that
ilU has at any time been near Cusi
huitia'hir is in error. The fact that
HMiroR esiaped from Guerrero with
" uirn confirms Carraasa claims that
iIIh only killed a few Carrancistas
hn he captured Guerrero, -whose
edi-riso only totaled between SO ami
70 men, according: to' Gen. Gartrs, ot
lnar z
The management of the. Cos! Mlp
nir comnan state that UTe is little
probability that any ot the foreigners
w hoe names liave been cited as killed
I t Villa, have escaped, with the pos
sible exception of Ilelmple.
GK.V LUIS GUTIERREZ, commander
of the Constitutional forces in
nihuahua. in a message to Gen.
',.iur of the Juarez garrison Monday,
unfirmed the reports reaching the bor
der from many sources that Villa was
.Miumlrri in an engagement with the
irrunra troops at Guerrero on Mon
il.iv. March 27. He states In his mes
suKt to Gen. Gavira that his advices
rrnm Gen Jose Ovazoe. who survived
'n sudden Vllllsta attack, led him to
i.t lit that Villa has been conveyed
to sei ret caverns and ravines of the
i Andre mountains, and that he will
It- found there eventually.
Mlllstna Demoralized.
'I lo message from Gen. Gutferree also
v .lies that the Villisla troops in the
.in rrero district arc badly demoralized.
in.w i;n Cavasos escaped, or the num-
lu i of his loss, was not learned. G,eru
, i i-a scouted the idea that there were
i, iv thing like 172 Carranza soldiers at
i in rrcro when it was attacked by Villa
h lore dawn on last Monday, and said
iii.it theie could not have been more
I'm ii ;0 to 70 men at the most.
iji n Gavira was also given an op
ionunit to ezpi ess himself upon.tho
itMinuous rumors current in the
i n Hi ! states as to the defection of
i.iii i.uis Herrera and Col. Cano, and
he denied vigorously that there had
Win anv defection, or that there was
iv iirobabillty of tbe American troops
lining attacked a column under Cano
. i Wednesday at Guerrero Instead of a
hind of, Villistas.
Villa Is Wounded.
"Prom very source comes the af;
firmation." he said, "that Villa has
been engaged In the Guerrero district
-mhI that he was Wounded. The trou-
hli with lots of the newspaper corre-j
.(ondents in Kl I aso is thatuhey are
smoking marihuana, and Just because
i number of them were mistaken at
first about Gen. Herrera, they seek
. v erv chance to place that general In
a I. .id llxbt "
lien Gavtra acknowledged that the
telegraphic communication between
himself and southern Chihuahua is
onmderably hampered by defective
irM Ann broken lines, and that he
univ secures a limited report on hap
penings In the zone where the Villa,
'arraiiza and American troops are now
operating
Americans nt Son Antonio,
report received by an El Paso
leencv for one of the mines of south
. i n Chihuahua Monday. stated that
meriian troops arrived Saturday at
.sMn Antonio, the junction point that
. oniieuts Chihuahua city and Cuslhul
i mi hie and not more than ten miles
north of Cusihulriachli.
Un things point to the theory that
Villi has three or more bands all
-working in different directions at the
..inie time The attacks upon Mlnaca
and Guerrero are supposedly the work
of two distinct bands and the pres
i m e of bandits near Cuslhuiriachlo on
the da following the engagement of
the Seenth cavalry with the Villiatas
it Guerrero suggests that this is a
third band.
Repeated rumors from Chihuahua
that a raid by Vlllistas is anticipated
led many Interested persons on the
binder today to believe that the same
band that visited Cusihuiriachic. aug
lomted by new recruits from the
Giiericrn and Mlnaca massacre, are now
luit a short distance west of Chlhua
hti.i Humors Ahont Ilerrera.
n unusual rumor which is going
t: iinniK among the mining men ex
led in 1:1 Paso Is that Gen. Luis
Hi i ii i.i nas In Cusi on Friday and
ll olttlnued on pure T. Cot. 4.1
Official Figures Show
HUGE GUNS MAY BLOW UP VERDUN
BJK GUTU
S"
!
House Judiciary Subcom
mittee Hears Arguments
for and Against Packers.
Washington, D. C April 3. Hearings
upon representative Borland's resolu
tion to have the federal trade com
mission investigate whether the meat
packers are violating the antl trust
laws were begun today before the house
judiciary subcommittee.
Arthur Meeker, vice president of Ar
mour and company; It. C. MeManus,
representing Swift and company, and
several cattle raisers opposed the res
olution. Former Gov. Stubbs of Kan
sas; Walter 1 Fisher, former secretary
of the Interior, and Edward L Burke
of Omaha, and the market committee
of the American livestock association,
supported It
Representative Borland opened for
the resolution by reading letters from
farmers In several states who com-
Elalned chiefly of alleged price fixing
y packers. He insisted that the
packers' buyers not only fix prices
In the markets, but follow cattle from
tbe country to the yards to see that
certain fixed prices are maintained
on thern.
Would Dlrtnte Terms.
"There Is a power which actually
exists In five packing companies In
this country not only to control the
price of products but also to dictate
terms under which business shall be
done." he said.
No Certainty About Prices.
Representative Doolittle of Kansas,
Insisted that the packers made greater
profits than ever during the last year
wnue Dreeuers tailed in large num
bers. Just now. Mr. Doolittle said.
cattle raisers have no objection to
prices, but there is no .certainty as to
how long these conditions will obtain.
Representative Kent of California,
declared "the existence of this com
bination Is so well known that they
never had the nerve to deny It to me."
Favors Government Regulation.
Representative Steele of Iowa, a com
mission man, declared that the packers
fixed prices through a working agree
merit, but He opposed the resolution
because It would "bring no benefits to
the farmers. Former inquiries, he In
sisted, resulted in less money for the
raisers. Government regulation by one
body over all stockyards was the solu
tion of the packing problem, he main
tained. Representatives Borland and Doolittle
insisted on the Introduction of the res
olution. They said a general demand
for an investigation this year had
caused markets to rise In the face of
increased receipts.
Mr. Meeker, vice president of Armour
and company, surrounded by attorneys
and cattle raisers, questioned the wit
ness and it was said the packers are
willing to submit their books to the
government to prove that they have not
been making an nnfair profit.
SENATE VOTES FOR MILITIA
OFFICERS IN GENERAL STAFF
Washington, D. C. April 3. Senator
Cummins's amendment to the senate
array bill to create a national guard
section of five state officers in the
general staff was adopted by the
senate today by a vote of 35 to 30.
The vote was a defeat for senator
Chamberlain and the military com
mittee which had rejected the pro
posal on the ground that it would be
unsafe to place national guard officers
in such positions of high trust The
vote was the first In the senate on
the army bill and many Democrats
supported the amendment Senator
Chamberlain and his colleagues did
not attempt to conceal their disap
pointment CITY OF CHANG CHOW FU
REPUDIATES YUAN SHI KAI
Amoy,' China, April 3. Chang Chow
Fu, a city of 900,000 population in Fo
Kien province, lias declared its independ
ence of the government of Yuan Shi Kai.
Officials at Amoy have sent a request
to the American consul, asking tiiat an
American warship be Bent to this port
to am in preserving oruer.
CHANGES TO BE MADE IN
DISTRICTS BY EXAMINERS
Austin. Tex.. April 3. The quarterly
conference of the state bank examiners
began here today, with all but ono of
the examiners present The conference
will be on for three days and It is ex
pected, as a result, that changes wilt
be made In some of the districts.
IIUARTnUOKB.V. DOCTOR
SACKS K.NDS HIS MPE.
Chicago, III.. April 3. Theodore 11.
Sacks, a well known physician and un
til recently head bf the board of
directors of the Chicago Municipal Tu
berculosis sanitarium died Sunday of
self administered poisoning. Friends
said charges of mismanagement in
connection with the sanitarium broke
his heart He left a note saying be
would not dignify the controversy: tnat
he was "simply weary."
JAPAN COLOXIXRO GEIWfA
ISLANDS IN SOUTH SHS
San Francisco, Calif.. April 1. That
Japan Is colonizing and apparently In
tends to retain the South Sea Islands
captured during the present war from
the Germans was the statement made
here by Frederick Starr, professor of
anthropology, University of Chicago,
who was enroute to Chicago today
from the Orient after six months' re
search work In Japan and Korea.
IIULGEK MUST DIE IV WEKIv
OF MAY 11. COURT IJKCIDES
Denver. Colo., April 3. James C
Rubzer. soldier of fortune, convicted
of killing Lloyd F. Nicodemus. must
die the week beginning May 11, ac
cording to a decision of tbe state su
preme court today.
m
ZEPPELINS ID
ON THREE MOTS
Sunday Night Raid Extends
as Far as Scotland; Latest
Casualties 10 Killed.
London, Eng., April 3. For three
successive nights the British isles have
been subjected to zeppelin bombard
ments, the last of which, Sunday night,
extended to Scotland. In 'the raids of
Friday and Saturday nights it was of
ficially announced that S3 were Killed
and 119 wounded. Anti-aircraft batteries
on each occasion shelled the raiders
violently.
Details of Sunday night's raid over
eastern Scotland and the northeastern
and eastern counties of England have
not been given out officially, but from
such reports as have been received It is
evident the zeppellns covered a wider
area than during the visitations of the
two previous nights. Trains and street
cars were held up and lights were
dimmed for several hours. The zeppe
llns were about from 9 p. m. until after
la.ni
Ten persons were killed and 11 In
jured in Scotland In Sunday night's
raid. It was officially announced this
afternoon. There were no casualties
In England.
The zeppellns which visited Scotland
Sunday hung over the district for 45
minutes, during which tlmo 20 bombs
were dropped. No mrther details from
that district have yet been announced.
A zeppelin which appeared over a
northeastern county remained about an
hour and a half but, as far as at pres
ent ascertained, dropped only 20 bombs
over a considerable area, largely agri
cultural. Grrman Officer RxDlalna Italds
"I do not think you would find an of
ficer of the German navy or army who'
would willingly participate in the kill
ing of women and children.''
Lieut Com! Brelthaupt. commander of
tha zeppelin L-16 whleh was hit by
shell fire in the raid Friday night on
English towns and later sank In the
Thames estuary, thus responded to an
Associated Press correspondent when
requested to explain the psychology of
oeraun air raids on defenceless cities
and the killing of harmless civilians.
Killing Noncombntants Is Incidental.
-"I am very well satisfied with the
treatment here," he said, "but naturally
feel the loss of my freedom. As to air
raids, we have a much more important
object in view than the killing of wom
en and children; namely, the destroying
of the enemy's armed positions, war
ships and factories. Women and chil
dren become the victims of our opera
tions, but not because we kill them in
tentionally. It Is war."
The Iron cross with which he was
decorated bore the date of the air raid
of October, 1915, and ho Informed the
interviewer that he nad been in the
zeppelin since the outbreak of hostili
ties. Asked whether he knew the lo--cation
of the airship during raids dur
ing darkness and whether he would dis
tinguish buildings and other objects
at nleht, he asserted that he could tell
almost exactly but could not say wheth
er the bombs fell where they were In
tended to fall, except In some Instances.
Ready to Take Chances.
Commander Brelthaupt who was a
regular naval officer before the war,
served In Australasian waters and also
In South America. He said he was ac
quainted with number of British naval
men and did not feel any hatred for
them, but was doing his part in fight
ing the enemies of Germany. Asked
whether he participated gladly In air
raids, be replied, "Yes, I do my duty
as an officer, gladly. As to the risk
in air fighting, we know the chances
we run and are prepared to take them.
Our aircraft was hit three times by
shrapnel and we camo down very
rapidly Into the water."
Wnr Plants Destroyed.
Berlin, Germany, April 3. (By wire
lees to Sayvllle, L. I.) The official
German account of Saturday night's
zeppelin raid over Engl nad, follows:
"During the night of Anrll 1-2. naval
airships renewed the attack on the east
coast of England. For a period of one
and one-half hours explosive and In
cendiary bombs were thrown on blast
furnaces, largo Iron works and Indus
trial establishments on the south bank
of the Tees and on the ports of Middles
borough and Sunderlsnd. Trcm ex
plosions, fires and demolitions were
caused and the successful effects of the
attack were clearly noticeable.
"Notwithstanding heavy shelling of
our airships they suffered neither
losses nor damages."
VON DER GOLTZ'S PLOT
PAPERS ARE SEIZED
Washington. I. C, April 3. Corre
spondence belonging to Hurst von de
Goltz, the alleged German spy, who has
said he was directing plans to blow
up tho Wetland canal, has been seized
by Scotland Yard detectives, and will
be made public by the British foreign
office, according to an announcement
today by department of justice offi
cials. It Is understood the correspondence
contains details of plans to blow up
the Welland canal and to jnvade Can
ada from the United States. Tt was
this correspondence, it was said, that
enabled the British authorities to ob
tain a full statement from von der
Goltz as to his activities in the United
States.
GERMANY PROMISES PROMPT
ANSWER IN SUSSEX CASE
Washington, D. C April S. American
ambassador Gerard at Berlin cabled to
day that the German government had
promised him a prompt reply to his in
quiry regarding destruction of the Bnt
(Conilnued on rKe 5. Col. 4.)
El Paso
GEIANS RESQY
FOB NEW B
IT UPS
French Armies Brace lo Re
ceive New Violent Attack
Now in Preparation.
15,000 COMPLETE
CONQUEST OF VAUX
French Believe the Loss Of
Ground Is Compensated by
Germans Slaughtered.
PARIS, France, April 3. A new
phase of the battle of Verdun -has
begun and the belief prevails that
the violence of Uio latest attacks fore
shadows another attempt by the Ger
mans to rush tho fortress with vast
forces. New batteries of large caliber
havo been moved up closer to tho
French front to wreck the fortress, and
tho German Infantry has been rested
and reorganized. Sunday's fighting, on
the whole, was not unfavorable to the
French. It Is authoritatively stated.
The object of the Germans was to
clear the approaches to Fort Douau
mont and 15,000 men were thrown for
ward on the mile and half line be
tween Douaumont fort and village of
Vauz. Tho attacking force succeeded
in crossing- & little ravine which hither
to had stopped, them and In entering
tho Uaiilette. -
Fmici Driven vl-.Vom Vnui.
Further east they dislodged the
French from the last ruined houses of
tha village of Vaux, but the French
positions were so placed as to make it
practically Impossible for the Germans
to debouch from the village. Vigorous
French counter attacks drove them
back to the upper fringe of Calllette
wood.
Germana Gain 500 Yard.
The total result of tho very forrnld
able effort they put forth was a gain
for the Germans of about GOO yards of
terrain, more than offset, it is affirmed,
by the very heavy losses they had en
dured. On tho west of tha river the
Germans attacked tho Avocourt block
house in a no less determined man
ner, but again met with complete
failure, tho observers declare.
Dunkirk In llombed.
The text of the French communica
tion today follows:
A zeppelin Sunday night threw
down eight bombs on Dunkirk. fTbe
material damage was not great, but
two persons were killed and four
wounded.
"West of the Meuse, the bombard
ment has continued at the villages ot
Haucourt and Esnes. but without any
action of infantry.
French Gain nt Calllette.
"East of the Meuse' the fighting which
went on Sunday night In the region of
Douaumont and Vaux was favorable to
us. We gained ground In the wood of
Calllette. Our line rests on the right
or tbe Pond of Vaux, then crossess the
Calllette wood, the northern corner ot
which is occupied by the enemy and I
alntno - nnlt Innn mmi . nA nne nV
rejoins our positions south and west of
the village of Douaumont
Germans Attack In Waves.
"It has been confirmed that the at
tacks of the enemy Sunday were ex
tended over a front of three kilome
ters. They came forward In successive
waves, followed by small columns. The
activity of our artillery and the fire of
our Infantry caused heavy losses.
"In the Woevre district the night
passed quietly.
"In Lorraine the fire of our artillery
caused flames to break out at Lea
Remabols, west of Lelntrey, and In the
region of Ancervlller.
"The reconnalsance of the enemy
which was attempting to reach our po
sitions, was repulsed by our fire near
Moyen.
"A German airplane has fallen within
our lines. The aviators were taken
prisoner."
ITALIAN AIRMEN DROP
BOMBS ON AUSTRIAN TOWN
Berlin. Germany. April 3. (By wire
less to Savvllle, L. I.) The Austrian
war office has given out, under date of
April 2, the following statement In re
gard to the progress of the campaign
on the Italian front:
"The situation in the Italian war the
ater Is unchanged This morning enemy
aviators threw bombs on Adelsbuerg,
fin Carinola. 22 miles northeast of
Tnest) killing two and wounding sev
eral HOLLAND WONTTiGHT
UNLESS RAIDED BY ARMIES
The Hague. Holland, April 3. The
Associated Press IS ag- !n authorita
tively informed that all apprehensions
regarding any impending embroilment
of Holland with any foreign power
are wholly unfounded, but a consider
able section of the public persists In
believing that the expected offensive
by the allies, supposedly planned at
the Paris conference, holds tho pos
sibility of danger to Holland's neu
trality. FOKTS AT SMVIt.NA ARK
DESTROY11U IIY WAIIMIII'
London. Kng., April 3. A dispatch
from Salonlki states two forts and
other .defences at Smyrna were de
stroyed Friday in a three hours' com
bardment by a British warship. Turks
did not reply to the fire.
Leading
liEllfifH ON HEELS
OF THE FLEEING
By GEO. H. CLEMENTS.
FIELD Headquarters United States Army, near Kamiquipa, by wireless io
Columbus, N. M, April 3. A close search of the field of Col. Dodd's fight
with the Villistas near Guerrero Wednesday found 60 dead. There is no
report as to the wounded. Col. Dodd had four men wounded.
The Americans are now operating over a front 75 miles long and not a
foot of that distance is uncovered. They are now operating in six columns com
manded by Col. Dodd, who lias under him a squadron of the Tenth (negro)
cavalry under Col. Brown, another equadion of the Tenth under 3Iaj. Evans, and
a squadron of the Seventh cavalry under C6L Erwin.
It was Erwin's squadron which engaged Villa at Guerrero and routed him.
Other commands in the field after Villa are: Jlaj. Tompkins with two troops
each from the Tenth and 13th; Maj. Lindsley's squadron of the 13th, and 3Iaj.
Howzo with a picked squadron from tho Seventh a total of 2500 men.
Col. Kefugio Davila, commander of the Carranza garrison at Nueva Casas
Grandes, and members of his staff were guests of the American geenral staff
at dinner Sunday, another evidence of the amity existing between the two
governments.
From private sources, reasonably credited, though not officially, it was
learned today that tho American forces are vigorously pursuing the remnants
of the band of Villistas cut to pieces by Col. Erwin's command at Guerrero
Wednesday, giving him no opportunity to recuperate.
CARRANCISTAS FRIENDLY.
Villa's remnants are being pursued with vigor.
There is no report as to his whereabouts.
Headquarters hero was out of communication with the front all day
Sunday.
The natives generally are surpised at the mobility of the American troops
and the staying qualities of the big American cavalry horses, which they had
supposed would not be able to negotiate the extremely rough country over
which the operations are now being conducted.
The men and animals are standing the strain wonderfully well. Reports
say no men are sick and there has been no call for remounts.
GMBLOWSlTIIfEH
IIP: h INJURED ILDiSBUR!
Buffalo, N. T April 3. Twenty-five
men were injured, several probably fa
tally. In an explosion at the plant of the
Otis Elevator company here today. The
accident was attributed to the explo
sion of a gas tank in the foundry.
QUILLIN TRIAL IS STARTED;
MOTION TO QUASH OVERRULED
Austin, Tex., April 3. The case
against C. C. Qulllln. former chief
bookkeeper In the controler's depart
ment was called today in the criminal
district court A motion of the defence
to quash the indictment was overruled.
T3.l. l.3Aa ,V,an ,tinAI1TIIMl fMlllT for
the trial and the court adjourned until
tomorrow morning to complete tne
panel of jurors.
Qulllln is to be tried on the chargo
of being an accomplice to the offence
alleged to have been committed by tax
collector Druesedow. of Harris county,
that Is, the failure to pay Into the state
treasury at the time prescribed by law,
state money to the amount of ap
proximately $29,000.
BODY OF YOUNG DDXTON
RECOVERED FROM RIVER
Pueblo. Colo.. Anril 3. Tho body of
William B. Denton, 27 years old, who
had been missing two weeks, was late
Sunday recovered from the Arkansas
river about is miles east or. nere.
The youth was tho son of Gilbert H.
Denton, president of the Vulcan Iron
Work nomnanv nf Dwitrer and had
held a position as draughtsman at tho
ri .. -m ts 1
Mlnncaqua plant of the Colorado Fuel
ana iron company here for tne past
five months.
On March 19, Denton left his room
ing house, evidently for a walk in tha
country and no one has been fuond who
saw him after that The father be
lieves his son, while Investigating the
work of beavers In the river, fell In the
water and was drowned.
PLACES DLAMB FOR WRECK
UPON KILLED ENGINEER
Washington, D. C. April 3. The In
terstate Commerce commission report
on the New Haven wreck near MUford,
Conn., February 22, when ten were
killed and many Injured in a rearend
collision of passenger trains, placed tha
blame on the killed engineer of the
local train which struck a stalled ox
press, because, the report says, he
failed to regard block signals. The
report adds that the wreck again em
phasizes the need for automatic train
stops.
CHARTER OF NATIONAL
SALES COMPANY FILED
Austin, Texas, April 3. The charter
of the National Sales company, of El
Paso, was filed today In the state de
partment. The capital stock is 310.004
and the Incorporators are A. C. Van
Pelt, P. E. Van Pelt and Frank H
Green.
THE DAY IN CONGRESS.
Senate.
Resumed debate on the army
bill.
Judiciary oomraittee postponed
until Tuesday consideration of
the Brandeis nomination.
House.
Miscellaneous bills requiring
unanimous consent were consid
ered. Secretary Daniel again dis
cussed national defence before
the naval committee.
Brig. Gen. Crozler. chief of
ordnance, testified before the
military committee.
Representatives Borland, Mis
souri, and Doolittle, Kansas,
urged investigation of packing
houses before judiciary commit
tee. All Texas
HITS OF VILLA
New Tork, April S. A serious lire
broke out In the downtown section of
the city this afternoon. At 2 oclock It
had destroyed two five story buildings
on Beekman street
Shortly afterward all tenants -were,
ordered out of the 20 story skyscraper
known as the Nassau-Beekman build
ing and occupied by the New xoris
Sun.
Fire department officials announced
at 2:30 oclock that the fire was under
control and would be confined to tho
two destroyed buildings with some
damage to a 16 story building at
Nassau and Beekman streets. Most of
the tenants in the Sun building stayed
In their offices in spite or tne danger.
It was roughly estimated that tha
damage would amount to 2200,000.
LIQUOR LICENSE TRANSFERS
TO BE FOUGHT BY THE STATE
Austin. Texas, April 3. The question
as to whether or not a saloonkeeper
has the right to have his liquor license
transferred from one precinct or po
litical subdivision to another, is to
be finally determined by the state su
preme court announced controler Ter
rell. The controler contends that this
cannot be done.
This saloon man applied to the county
judge for a transfer of his license from
the city of Galveston to another pre
cinct in the same county. The county
judge refused to grant the transfer;
tbe saloon man then filed a. petition
for a mandamus In the district court
at Galveston presided over by judge
Clay Briggs. The latter granted thi
mandamus to the county judge com
pelling him to grant the application. R.
H. Humphrey, chief liquor permit clerk.
wno reprsented tlie controler, gave no- nlnd villa yesterday, entering the vll
appeals. and in the event that tribunal iage of (deleted) shortly after he had
decides against the controler, then the , ncd from iu lt wa8 suspected that
maner win oc appeaiea to tne stale su-
preme court
INQUIRY INTO SOARING "GAS"
PRICES NEARS COMPLETION
Washington, D. C, April 3. Finishing
touches were today being put on the
preliminary report of the federal gov
ernment's inquiry into tbe rise in the
price of gasoline. It will be placed
before congress this week.
The federal trade commission has had
every available field agent at work
on the Investigation and the department
of justice has forwarded to the com
mission all complaints received for lt
The essential facts gathered have been
given to the department of justice, I
wnicn win conBtaer tne evidence with a
view to deciding whether prosecutions
are warranted under the antl trust
law.
BOY AT FT. HUACHUCA
KICKED BY MULE, DIES
Tombstone, Ariz., April 3. Jimrale
McClane, the young son of , Mr. and
Mrs. George McClane, was kicked on
the head by a mule, while he was visit
ing at Ft. Huachuca, according to In
formation received by his parents here.
Jlmmle was playing with other chil
dren when the 'accident occurred. The
parents left at once for Ft Huachuca.
NET REVENIE OF SMI BIG
ROADS GROWS 50 PKRCENT.
Washington, D. C, April S. Pros
perity of railroads throughout the coun
try continues without abatement, ac
cording to preliminary reports for Feb
ruary made public today by the Inter
state Commerce commission. Returns
from 98 large roads show their net
revenue increased from 325.000.000 In
Februaj-y. 1915. to $38,000,000 for Feb
ruary, 1916, more than 50 percent
CHIYO MARU AHANIIOXISD.
Hong Kong, China, April 3. The
Japanese steamer Chio Maru, which
stranded in a storm off Loma islands.
30 miles south pf Hong Kong, has been
abandoned. The 229 passengers of the;
steamer were taken oft! b a British
cruiser shortly after the vessel
stranded.
Cities In
Brush Between Carranza
Troops and Bandit Gang
Reported By Funslon.
AMERICANS AND
VILLISTAS FIGHT
Skirmishes Are Numerous
Troops Close to Villa; In
janiry To Aid Chase,
WASHINGTON. D. C, April 3.
A fight between one of the
smaller groups of Villa and
Carranza forees, tho latter under com
mand of CoL Cano, on March 29, was
reported to the war department this
afternoon, by MaJ. Gen. Frederick
Funston. Emmanuel Boco, a Villa
leader, was killed.
AN ANTONIO. Tex., April 3. The
detachment of Villa's forces de
feated, at Guerrero by American
troops We4aetay was loeated' Sn&Bay
near Baehlhlba, aortheast ot Guerrera.
according to Brig. Gen. Pershing, who
reported today U Gen. Funston.
Tho remainder of the dispersed force.
he said, waa scattered through the
region northeast ot Guerrero and
American troops are continuing their
pursuit
Sen. Pershing said Villa himself had
not been located. He added that his
intelligence department had been given
much, misleading information and that
securing reliable guides was becoming
mbre difficult Grazing for the ani
mals was scarce, he reported, but some
grain had been found.
1 "tAMP of Gen. J. J. Pershing at tho
, Front. April S. (By Ailrplana to
Colonla Dublan and br Radio to
Columbus. N. M.. April 3.) American
cavalrymen encountered a fleeing forco
Of Villistas near (deleted) early todav
and sounds of firing have been heard
from that direction. No report of the
outcome of the engagement has yet
been made to headquarters.
Infantry to .Aid Search.
Gen. Pershing announced today that
troops of the Infantry arm are to be
used for mountain climbing in tha
search and are to cooperate with tha
cavalrymen, who have borne the brunt
of the five day pursuit of Villistas.
The infantrymen have been going
through hardening preparation In hilt
climbing marches for about two weeks
and their officers say they are in ex
cellent physical trim.
Troops on Villa's Heel.
in, imHran triwinl war, hIiuaIv ia
: mi,,ht bo hMii.ii in m.f it. ,,
and every precaution was taken to
effect tho capture. Two squadrons of
cavalry entered the Tillage from oppo
site sides simultaneously. Every prep
aration had been made for the engage
ment which failed to develop.
Minor Skirmishes Fought.
There have been a number of minor
skirmishes in tho vicinity of the vil
lage, two scouts reporting today that
they encountered two Villistas on its
outskirts yesterday and fought for five
minutes without casualties.
American air scouts are now flying
over the entire Villa territory and are
carrying dispatches from the front to
the field base and field headquarters
Motor trucks also have been able- to
pentrate the mountain waste almost as
far as the territory occupied by the
cavalry under CoL George A. Dodd.
Prepare to Intern Bandits.
Columbus, N. M-. April 3. Much
speculation was expressed among mili
tary authorities here as to the disposi
tion of the Mexican prisoners, prepara
tions for the internment of which were
progressing rapidly.
It is generally believed that most of
them finally will be turned over to the
civil authorities for trial for murder,
burglary and arson. Military men here
point out that since a state of war does
not exist the prisoners cannot be tried
by a military court
The Mexicans, it is said, have the
same status in court as persons who are
charged .with anv felony except that
thev have been pursued by the mili
tary. May Giie Villa to Carranxa.
While no orders have been recen e.l
at military headquarters here indicat
ing the plans of the war department for
the disposition of the bandit leader
himself, should he be captured, it has
been suggested that he might be turned
over to the de facto government
On the other hand, lt is said that tha
bandit chieftain and all of his follow
ers may be taken to the county seat at
Demmg. for trial as were the Villistas
captured on tha morning of the raid
upon Columbus These were indicted
several dayaRfto for murder and are
now being held for trial.
Building
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