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The Tacoma times. (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, March 28, 1911, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085187/1911-03-28/ed-1/seq-1/

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t Th* I mntl-trfmtlmm I law I dora ■<»* prorMe I ««»!•.«« I
.tii* treat wklch will be given next Tncadar to the <
iTh* ■nll-lrrnrluK law ■■ favKßt every■ nteaaar*
the treat nklrk will be Kltru nnl I uenilay to the
iTltnir Kraft Rung: that aaa fooarht n«. mraran
la In. onir, which the »ablle voted fur. Those who ■
are now •adravurlaa; to aarau Mayor Faweett -at
evrrr (urn In coaaectloa with the nnll-treiitliiH
!ow will have semethlaar new to reflect upon when
Ihe ballots are collated. < :■ "•
VOL. VIII. NO. 84.
EX-MAYOR WRIGHT TELLS OF GAS DEAL
MR. SEYMOUR GIVES PUBLIC HIS IDEA OF MUNICIPAL OWNERSHIP
FAVORS LEASING PUBLIC UTILITY
TO PRIVATE INTERESTS
INTERFSTING FACT CHOPS OUT AT MKKTING BEFORK
TWELFTH AVENUE IMPItt VEMEXT OLUB.
• SEYMOUR ON MUNICIPAL, OWNERSHIP •
• "I would favor the purchase of public utility corporations •
• If the prices at which they were offered were right. lam par- •
• ticularly impressed with the Chicago plan of handling public •
• utilities, that of public ownership of the plants and their lease •
• to companies to manage them."—W. W. Seymour, before the •
• Twelfth Avenue Improvement club last night. 9
W. W. Seymour, candidate for
mayor, would turn back the pub
lic service utilities owned by Ta
coma to private companies to ex
ploit. The volley of questions
flred at him in his meetings
brought the truth last night and
shows the deep scheme by which
the interests would hope to regain
what they have lost.
For years the people of Tacoma
have fought the public utility cor
porations. They battled with the
power trust and it was a fight to
the finish. Today the drills are
plowing through the solid rock at
Legrande and the contractors are
busy building for this city the
finest power plant in the world.
There is nothing to compare with
It in the whole country. The peo
ple voted for it. They are paying
for it. They wanted it for them
selves and their children.
AVaterfront Monopoly.
The city suffered from the time
it was held up by the waterfront
monopoly. Time and again citi
zens have arisen to demand relief
but the waterfront combine was
too strong and crushed them until
finally A. V. Fawcett, by dint or
personal aggressiveness, backed
by the people and the Times,
fought the combined powers of
the waterfront monopoly and sub
sidized press and won for the city
the inunicl'pal dock.
And now W. "W. Seymour wants
to be mayor and to turn this
great asset of the people back to
the private dock companies to
manage and put the city right
back to the position from whence
It came.
Mr. Seymour says he would not
urge the i)lan for the water plant
Ibut on all other public utilities he
stands for leasing them to private
companies.
The Times has known that the
effort to place Mr. Seymour In
power is an effort of the special
Interests to come back into con
trol. He is backed by the special
privilege class and their mouth
pieces. And they never stand for
anything unless there is some
thing in it for them.
But the method .by which they
hoped 'to undermine the present
advancement of the city toward
the goal of complete municlpaliza
tlon of all public service utilities
In Tacoma remained to be divulg
ed by Seymour himself.
Tacoma tried tne plan of leas-
Ing her dock at Fifteenth street
to the private dock companies.
And the situation was that the
■waterfront monopoly still retained
the grip on the people. Now the
people have thrown off the bur
den, have gone into-the dock busi
ness and Tacoma is coming into
her own.
Already more boats want to
come to the city dock than can be
accommodated and plans are go-
Ing ahead as fast as possible to
complete the erection of the new
dock buildings.
Already new boats that never
have visited Tacoma are planning
tr come and dock at the wharf.
City's Waterfront.
And now the private dock Inter
ests see their grip slipping. They
see the day ahead when the city
will have the whole waterfront
from Fifteenth street to the Flyer
dock and so they want a man Tor
mayor who will take the city out
of the dock business and lease the
plant back to the private company
to operate.
Tacoma is spending $2,000,000
for the big power plant because
she wanted to be free from the
machinations of the >power trust.
But Seymour wants to turn this
plant back to the trust to manage
and operate.
With agents of the power trust
In charge how long would It take
to wreck the city's property and
business and produce a situation
that would put the city In worse
slavery to the trust than ever he
fore?
Are the people igolng to stand
for this game?
Have they fought the battles of
the past and won the victories
, over the special Interests to build
Creat municipal utilities to now
The Tacoma Times
The llnlr Inflepe mlrn t
Newspaper la Tacoma.
turn them back to the old enemies
and lose all they havo fought for
all these years?
Seymour's Conviction.
Mr. Seymour elaborated hie
idea of the Chicago plan last night
and insisted that experience had
shown the scheme to lease the
publicly owned utilities to private
companies was "the best." There
is no doubt of his opinion. He
stated it clearly and the matter is
a settled conviction with him.
And it is a settled conviction of
the interests backing him that
they are going to kill off the mu
nicipal ownership program in Ta
coina If there is any way to do it.
This is tho entering wedge.
With the plants leased to private
companies and the city out of the
active business it would be but a
short step then to juggle the busi
ness so that the city would be
brought to the point of parting
with the plants entirely.
It Is time for the citizens or Ta
coma to get their eyes open to the
real significance of the present
campaign.
THE INTERESTS ARE TRY
ING TO COME BACK IN TA
■ COMA.
TAFT TO TELL
CONGRESS ALL
HIS REASONS
(By United Press Teased Wire.)
SAN ANTONIO, Tex., March 28.
—Reports are current here today
that President Diaz of Mexico has
resigned, ibut so far no confirma
tion has 'been received.
Army officers expressed today
their opinion that there is no
chance of intervention in Mexico
until congress meets wlfen Presi
dent Taft is expected to make a
complete report of the situation
and to explain in full the reasons
which led to the army and nary
of the United States being mobil
ized.
Woman Against
Booker Washington
Snapshot photograph of Mrs.
Albert Ulrlch, the white woman
whose husband beat up Booker
Washington, tne famous negro
educator. Mrs. Ulrlch claims
that when she went into the ball
of the apartment house In which
■he lives, she saw Washington
peeplag into the keyholes and she
•ays that when he saw her He
said: "Hello, sweetheart."
Roys Now In
'First' Place
The recall petitions with plentr
of names added were refiled with
the city clerk this morning against
Roys and Woods. The Roys pe
tition had 750 new names added
in addition to all those that were
validated. This will put the Roys
petition at the top of the list for
signatures now and It will have
plenty of names.
The Woods .petition had 719
new names in addition to those
that were validated on the old
ones. He will have several hun
dred to spare.
There was a rumor started
around this morning that an at
tempt would Tje made to contest
the Woods petition to save him.
A story was started a day or two
ago that some of the friends of
Roys would start action in court
to try to save him.
Any such attempt, however, to
prevent the recall on technicalities
will probaibly arouse the people to
such an extent that it would make
the cases of Roys and Woods
hopeless in an election.
PEACE IN
30 DAYS
(By United Tress Incased Wire.)
SAN ANTONIO, Tex., March 28.
—Peace for Mexico, within thirty
days, and possibly within ten days,
was predicted here today by Fran
cisco Madero, sr., father of the
provisional president who is lead-
Ing the revolt against Diaz.
Senor Madero told tho United
Press that the Mexican govern
ment had agreed to peace terms.
Notwithstanding the Madero
declaration, the prospects that
hostilities will continue is seen
here today in an order from the
war department to the adjutant
general of the division here that
every regiment must be immedi
ately recruited to its full war
strength and be prepared for au in
definite stay in the field.
CAMPAIGN PilH
How comes it that a few North
End women seem to be imbued
with the idea that the South End
sisters are so in need of being told
how they should vote?
Why Is it that some of our fair
speakers are falling to mention
the fact in the South End that
the whole recall situation revolved
About Commissioner Roys, who
permitted things that womanhood
would not stand for? Probably
chis may be explained when we
remember the fact that the
.vculthlest ward in town voted
igainst the anti-treating law.
Every vote against Mr. Fawc«u
s a vote favoring Roys 1 sentiment.
3very woman knows that .Roys
vas the "open town" man under
.vhom the dives flourished. Why
a this fact not brought out by
those directing the feminine poli
tical machine which has sprung
up?
An eastern paper in printing
facts about the recent anti-treat
ing election in Tacoma used the
words "A shameful combination"
'n referring to the fact that the
aristocratic ward and the ward
where the dives thrived were the
only oneß to oppose the anti-treat
ing. law
ANTI- ARRESTS
Gus W. Kiesel, proprietor of
the State saloon, was arrested yes
terday for violation of the antl
treatlng law. The saloon is sit
uated in a building partly owned
by Mayor Fawcett.
A warrant was also Issued for
the arrest of Joseph Plschofberten
of the Milwaukee Beer Hall.
A warrant was Issued for an
arrest at the Olympic ealoon, in
the name of George Shreeder, pro
prietor. Shreeder is in California
at the present time and the war
rant could not be served.
Despite accusations that he
would not enforce the antl-treat
-Ins law -violations are receiving
police attention with discourag
ing frequency for those wno are
telling the public that the ordi
nance would not to enforced.
TACOMA, WASHINGTON, TUESDAY, MARCH 28, 1911.
Holy Smoksky, Anna Was Mad!
Ufc-huh! You just wait until
Dmitri Smirnoff gets back to St.
Petersburg. He'B going to hustle
right straight from the depotyky to
the czar's palace, nud after he gets
Nick's ear we shall see what we
shall see. Somebody's going to be
in trouble, after Dmitri gets
through. It's about Anna Pavlowa.
In some mysterious way some
favorite at the palace—oh, a lady,
of course, and a jealous one—got
word to America that Anna, who
has been dancing over here, had
received a big share of the small
fortune which a certain M. Dandre
is accused of having looted from
the Russian treasury.
When she beard the story—gee-
whizzskyvitch! —she wouldn't
dance. For three nights she kept
to her hotel while audiences at the
Metropolitan opera house in New
York waited patiently. She
Gigantic Coal
Trust Alleged
(By United Press Lieased Wire.)
WASHINGTON, D. C, Mar. 28.
—As the result of long Investiga
tion into what agents of the de
partment of justice declare is the
biggest trust in the world, an
nouncement wias made here today
that criminal prosecution of half a
dozen of the most powerful finan
ciers in the United States is to be
begun In the near future by the
federal government.
THINK VESSEL AND
138 PEOPLE LOST
(By United Press leased Wire.)
BRISBANE, Australia, March £B.—Bits of cargo from the
steamer Yongala, which washed ashore here today have caused
almost a certainty that the vessel, vrHh her crew of 7O men
and 08 passengers, is lost. It la believed the Yongala foundered
at sea with all on board.
Race Question
Gets Serious
(By - United * Press leased i Wire.)
i-. ITHACA, ; : N. V., March 28.—
The race question, which has been
simmering t for | several weeks,.' to
day took i definite i form when 200
co-eds ! of. the university I protested
formally to the faculty against the
admission of two negro women stu
dents to i the ! dormitories lin } Sage
hall. President §j Schurman fa will
present I the protest Ito 1 the full
board of trustees at Its next meet
lac'-'.-' ! ; •■■'"■? ■. ~; vv .-■'.■' ■•■.■'-";.
ANNA PAVIOWA.
wouldn't listen to argument.
Thpn Smirnoff came to town.
Pavlowa's managers appealed to
him. Well, ho fixed It. Ho asHiired
Anna that it wasn't the fault of
American people that such a story
had spread. They all knew where
her mouey came from. Hadn't
they given It to her themselveH,
by the tons, during the past win
ter, a,l! over the place? "You go
ah'jai' and dance," he advised.
"I'm-Cgoing to Russia to sing and
aB B<|<m as I get to St. Petersburg
I'll tell the wfcole thing to the lit
tle father. And he'll" find out who
started the story."
AH" Delight! That was enough
for Ajtna. Revenge! She danced
that' night wildly. And when
Dmitri sailed the next morning she
wa|( down at the pier to tell him
whit to tell the czar.
"It was some Jealous old cat,"
she said, "who started the story."
-. Agents of the department, have
reported their find, \of evidence
showing that a billion dollar com
bine exists, fathered by the Penn
sylvania railroad, and which -was
organized to control the output of
anthracite coal - throughout ( the
whole of the United States. '.:. .'
The government asserts that
the Standard Oil and the Tobacco
trusts, enormous as they are, are
dwarfed by the j combination ' Just
exposed. „ .r. ."■ ■ ; v->.-.j';l.^' i"«w||
Another Arrest
John T. Schmidt was arrested
by Detectives Recob and Brown
last evening charged with Violat
ing the anti-trtatlng ordinance in
his saloon at 2301 Pacific avenue.
George Johnson swore to the com
plaint. He was released on $50
bail and will have a hearing in the
police court this afternoon.
WEATHER FORECAST.
Fair tonight and Wednesday.
Light westerly winds.
ALCOHOL CAUSE
OF WOMAN'S
DEATH
Evidence produced at tlio In
■ quest over the body of Mrs. Frank
jHolliday, known as Miss Mary
Kelly, this morning, conllnned the
jfheory held by the officers tnat
'death wag produced by acute h!
jcohollain or heurt disease. Medl
ral testimony indicated a criminal
jattack, but doctorb lestlfled this
could have had nothing to do with
death.
Neither Cole, the druggist, Mike
Kelly, the brother, nor Cool, who
admits he spent the evening with
the woman, were on the stand this
morning, but It is expected they
will make a clean breast of all
that happened, this afternoon.
Mm. Holllday was married to
Frank Holiday, a Centralla farm
er, seven years ago, but was di
vorced shortly after.
Rebels Win and
Shoot Federal
Commander
(Hy Viilte«l Tress leased Wire.)
EL, PASO, March 2 B.—News of
a battle between federals under
('apt. Duran and a large body of
insurgents at Azu Frera ranch. In
Ooahuila, reached here today. Tho
rebel force, which was entrench
ed In a mountain pass, was attack
ed by the federals. After several
hours of fierce fighting the insur
gents were victorious, driving the
government force back and cap
turing Ca;>t. Duran, who had been
wounded. The commander was led
to a mountain retreat and shot to
death.
When his body was discovered
by friends It was seen that he had
been shot down from behind.
CAMORRIST OFFERED
JOB ON THE SIAGE
(By United Press liPHHCd Wire.)
VITERBO, Italy, March 2 8. —A
salary of $1,0.00 a woek was offer
ed In a letter received today by Ab
betemago, the Camorrist Informer,
from an American theatrical man
ager. The manager wants Abbete
mago to appear in vaudeville and
relate his experiences as a mur
derer, kidnaper and thief.
HEROLD CASE
WITH JURY
The case of H. O. Herold, ac
cused of attempting to kidnap the
child given to the custody of his
wife l>y the court, was given to
the Jury at noon today. The clos-
Injt arguments were made by As
nl*t«nt Prosecuting Attorney Bur
melster and Attorney Kred Nolte
for Herold.
PACKERS GET NO
IMMUNITY BATHS
FROM THIS JUDGE
.;; JUDGE tQ. ; A.' ; CARPENTER. £:
1 This ] is; the federal Judge who
spilled the ink into 1 the immunity
bath • scheme of i the i indicted: meat
trust heads, and set the date for a
hear! ur."--':.';:-'-"^ <■:;.,"..-,,.*>•. ;-;.^rt'^
I 1\
Already <■• S»y bmi foroca ar* keccla|r *•» • «S
lt-«-«» from I ho., who hay* !>*•■ <rlilu «l» «11, id
hard (art! ■!■«•• (h«- re II ■Itnnllon 4»»»l«»e* l» X
Tnromn. • ■ Kurt* ori> «UI count ■owadajr* M« th» 3K!
victory or Mr. Kawoctt Mil I 'ruraday ' will ' pvoir* • ■
irrrlflr Mow to Ihr pump Mian aabtertaco >«!■»• la- Si.
•Inlcrd la by ■«■•• of Mr. - Sfr"«"'« ■ Wit •_ *r+*mt %i
■ uppurtrrK. -. _„..■-. .- -;, :'.'",■- .'■-■.-'- •*'■''} '«" ■;, ?3V?S^ *
The Only Independent
KtniptpM la Taroaia.
How Seymour Came to
Give $10,000
GIFT OmfllNATF.l) WTOf Mil. HKVMODR BUCCKKDED IN
"STAVINtI OFF" WUUIiIMIK OI'I'ONKNTS.
How did W. W. Seymour come to give that $10,000 to th«
city for the Seymour conservatory?
In a public statement he bhl U recently that ho did ft after h«
had retired from the gas company here, and that It waa In recog
nition of the services of Mayor Wright In Raving him when outsiders
were dickering for his plant and trying to get a franchise at the
same time to start a competing plunt.
This statement of Seymour's started a big controversy as to
whether or not the city after all was not bumped hard on the deal.
There has been talk around for
sereral days that through tho ac
tion of the city officials at that
time In saving Soymour that he
was able to boost his prlco about
$100,000, and that In reality the
peoplo are paying interest on this
In the shape of dividends to the
aew company now and will for all
time.
Ex-Mayor Wrlsht was asked
this morning just how the thing
stood. He said:
"When this matter came up
Seymour whs up against It. lie
was having to borrow money to
put Into the gas plant. Ho was
getting $ I.fio a thousand for gas
«nd the people were clamoring for
dollar gas, and then Hardsloy and
McLean came along and asked for
a franchise for starting a compet
ing plant. Seymour came to mo
and told his troubles day after
day. Ho was dickering with the
eastern men for the sale of the
plant, but they would not come to
his terms, it seems. He was right
up against it, and finally he Hsked
me what he should do. I told him
if I had it I would go to Bardsley
and McLean and offer them the
plant. He slapped his leg and
said, "Golly, that's lust the
thing."
"I saw them for him and sug
ges'f I that they could buy him out
and^hat h« offered to give them
the plant so they could clear six
per cent on the Investment.
They began dickering with Sey
mour, and went Into the books
find it took roiiHlderable time. Sey
mour had told me If he could
stave the thing off for six months
ho could make the deal In the east
and come out all right.
"While Uardsley and McLean
were dickering with him they did
not push the franchise matter and
that just laid there. Finally Sey
mour got word from the east that
they were ready to close, and h«
jumped on the train and went east
and sold to the eastern men
Bardsley and McLean then
dropped the .whole proposition, at
they had lost their enthusiasm.
"Seymour was very grateful foi
Late Bulletins
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
I/ONDON, March 28.—1. kin dispatches to the Time* say today
that China has granted every Russian demand, except the eatab*
lisiiini-iii of a Kussian consulate at Kobdo.
m DUIiUXII, Minn., March —It is persistently rumored in finan
cial circles today that a company . to compete with the United States
Steel corporation is being formed here by the merger of steel, ship* ,
ping and iron ore companies. \ '?,'■ ■ "..:-y-"i
'ST. I/OTJIS, March 28.—Mexican Minister of Foreign Affairs*
de la Kami, who was ambasador to the ' IT. ■ 6.",' \ today declared ■ jho I
knew nothing of peace negotiation with the Madcroa. ,; .;-,'-?
VICTORIA, B. C, March 28 The first victim of the steamer
Sci-hi'ii which went down off Williams Head last Saturday after*
noon was found late yesterday afternoon.
Eli PASO, March 28.—The report that President IDlas of Mexl.
00 has resigned was pronounced ridiculous today by General Na
varro- J
CONSTANT! NOPIiE, March 28—Mutinous Albanian Midlers,
drilling under .Lieutenant Yon Sc filleting, a German instructor, this
afternoon slmt the Uentenant dead.
BBIiLiTXGHAM, March 28 Fire started at 1:15 o'clock this
morning partly destroyed a building at the corner of Bay and Holly
streets. Damage, 98,000.
ANTI-TREAT LAW
GROWS IN FAVOR
In an effort to harass Mayor
Fawcett and at the same time In
sult those who saw fit to vote for
the antl-treatlng law some friends
of the Royal Arch are doing their
best to throw cold water on the
recent enactment.
Had Mr. Fawcett desired to
curry favor from those who visit
cafes and from the cafe men he
might have embodied some such
construction In his ordinance. The
facts are that Fawcett's Intent
waa to hit at what Is commonly
known as the barroom evil. Had
he .been endeavoring to play poli
tics an Insertion in the ordinance
■giving cafes a right to allow treat
ing would manifestly have Been
the diplomatic move.
The city attorney's opinion to
30 CENTS A MONTH.
what I hnd done and wanted to
give me $10,000 and for me to
give It to tho city. I said. No, I
would not do it; if he wmnted to
give It be could, but that I would
not let It come from me. So he
gave the f 10,000 and I appoint
ed a committee to decide what to
do with it and the committee de
cided on the conservatory, which
was built."
Peace Talk
(lly United Press Leased Wire.)'
PARIS, March 28. — French
newspapers complacently »lew the
reorganization of the British,
army, now in progress declaring
that England's activity foreshad
ows the development of increased
peaceful relations between Franca
aud Great Britain. The entente
cordlale already existing Is ex
pected to merge Into a defensive
alliance of the French and KtiK
lish navies and later mar be fol
lowed by a similar convention re
garding their armies.
King Will Train
Like An Athlete
(By I nif.il Pros* Teased VHre.Y,
LONDON, March 2 B.—Prepar
ing (or his coronation like an
athlete for a record-breaking test.
King O«orge today has gone Into
training under a skilled Instruc
tor. Warned .l>y his physicians
that the strain of the great <publlo
functions in June might sap his
strength,-the king, besides a strict
course of dieting, is devoting sev
r-ral hours dally to physical cul
ture exercises
BANK CLEARINGS
('Wrings $6*3,710.93
Balances 82,676.67,
that tinder the present liquor li
cense law antl-treatlng Is to be
observed in cafes. The mayor ot
course abides by his opinion, aa
would any other citizen.
Attempts of his opponents to
throw cold water on the law are
received with open amusement on
the street. Efforts will be made
to evade the law. Not every per
son In Tacoma voted for it and
much discussion as to how toe or
dinance can be "«ot around" is
a necessary aftermath.
There Is every reason to believe 1
that the an tl-treatin law, Is dally
growing in favor and ' that despite
the attempt to ?$ make sport at
those who voted for it, «i«: meas
ure will ultimately meet with ap
proval of many who voted Kga!n ß t'
it

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