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The Tacoma times. (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, April 23, 1912, Image 1

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SIXTEEN PERTINENT POINTS DEVELOPED BY INVESTIGATION OF SENATE STJB-COIffInTTEE INTO TITANIC DISASTER .. v ,« v TJJ
What J. Bruce Ismay, managing director of the White Star line did not see as he left the Titanic witii women and children: "I saw no passengers in sight when I entered toe lifeboats. I did not see what
happened to the lifeboats" I did not look to see if there was a panic. I know of no explosion. I saw no struggle, no confusion. I saw no women waiting when I entered the lifeboat.
What P. A. S. Franklin, vice president of the White Star company, did not know about the Titanic disaster, as told to the investigators: "1 did not know on Monday morning that the Titanic hadlmot
with serious disaster. I did not know until 6:27 Monday evening that the Titanic had gone down and that hundreds of lives were lost. I did not know that a reassuring telegram had been sent from the White
Star offices to Representative Hughes of West Virginia, saving that 'The passengers are all safe and would land either in New York or Halifax on Wednesday.' Ido not know whether the Titanic carried any
searchlights. Ido not know the speed the Titanic was making at the time of the collision." . -_^ ...
What P. A. S. Franklin did know: "I know that J. Bruce Ismay, managing director of the White' Star line, sent three messages asking that the liner Oedric be held so that he and surviving members or tne
Titanic's crew could return immediately to England and that I wired that it would be impossible to do this under existing circumstances."
What Fourth Officer Boxhall of the Titanic, did not know: "I do not know where the iceberg strAck the Titanic. I did not see Mr. Ismay with Captain Smith on the bridge or in the wneettouse. Ido not
know whether Mr. Ismay and Captain Smith dined together on the night of the disaster or whether much wine was consumed. Ido not know where the captain was when the Titanic struck the iceberg.
HOME EDITION
''r ' "liA*X>liliErTE, THE MAN"— 5 J
Pag* 8. ■■:-> '^Sf.
"HOW* TO TEST, YOUR OWN
FOOD' BY DR. WIL.BY, Pa«© 4.
. -■'•«.»,•". ..(»j™».~-."*. ••.j.'<t.-v.■-;•."*■•»..-'«■ «K.
VOL. IX. NO. 106.
TITANIC OFFICER SWEARS WRECK DUE TO COMPANY'S NEGLECT
VIVID STORIES
TOLD OF HOW
GREAT SHIP
SUNK
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
: WASHINGTON, D. C, April 23
—Sworn testimony that neglect
on the part of the White Star
■ company to .' provide marine
glasses for the lookout on the
Titanic was responsible for the
greatest- sea disaster of modern
times was the sensation this af
ternoon, of the inestigation. ":■
. Frederick Fleet, who was look
•■ out in the.crow's nest of the Tl
_, tanlc _ wfien ' the giant - % liner
> smashed into ' the iceberg, -made
oath that not a single lookout on
the Titanic' was provided „ with
. marine glasses-and declared that
i had his request for such - glasses
In Southampton not been refused
the' Titanic might yet be afloat.
"I could easily , have sighted
the iceberg with marine glasses
In plenty of time to have the yes
• eel steered out of the way." said
m Fleet, and gave In detail the re
** quest he made in Southampton
for them. -*'-'. \ v
Although .- all - other :. liners are
bo provided, Fleet' swore, bis re
quest was flatly refused and he
was told there were no ', glasses
for him. .
Third Officer Plttman admit
ted that - the > Titanic had been
warned that ice bergs were preva
lent but said iie did not see any
on the Sunday of the disaster. He
declared that in his 14 years' ex
perience he had seen only one
iceberg before. '
Pittman started his testimony
In a laconic and brusque manner.
Comments on his stolidness were
audible in every part .of the
room. Then the committee be
gan questioning him on the scenes
on the Titanic ' when It was
- found that there was no hope of
saving the vessel.. -
Officer Beaks Down
Pittman's demeanor underwent
' a complete change, and In a chok
ing voice he begged the com
mittee not to press him regard
ing the death cries of the trapped
victims. ;•
"The prayers and moans of the
passengers arose In a mighty
chorus of woe wlien they learned
that hope had vanished," I'ni
■ limn said. "It was a continual
moan for an hour, and it died
away gradually. I wish you had
not referred to tills."
Women spectators wept, and
conimltteemen shaded their eyes.
J. Bruce Ismay. Pittgnian said,
was standing near a lifeboat and
he heard him ask about a boat
loaded with women. Captain
Smith, Plttman said, followed out
. Ismay's suggestions in issuing
orders.
Pittsman declared that his
boat saved 40 passengers and six
members of the crew. Ht heard
four explosions, he said, and 1 then
the Titanic sank.
OFFICER ADMITTED THAT
IF EVERY LIFEBOAT HAD
111 :i :\ CROWDED THEY WOULD
HAVE ACCOMMODATED ONLY
1.200 PERHONS. HE ASSERT
ED THAT HE TRANSFERRED
TWO MEN, A WOMAN AND A
BABY FROM HIS BOAT TO
LIFKHOAT NO. 7 AT THEIR RE
QUEST.
Pittman said that when he re
tried at 10 p. m., the vessel was
making about 21 1-2 knots.
"The collision awakened me,"
he said. "It sounded as if the
ship was coming to anchor. I
was half asleep and wondered
-why. I rushed to the deck un
dressed, saw nothing and return
ed to my bunk in the belief that
I had a nightmare.
"Then Fourth Officer Boxhall
came to my room and said the
Titanic had struck an Iceberg.
"When I got to the deck I
found that the lifeboats were be
ing lowered. I saw the firemen
coming up from the engine
Jroomi.
"Women were crawling over
the hatch and I rushed out to
*kelp load the lifeboats. I helped
to lower boat No. 5, which was
■•signed to rap.
A man In « dressing gown
PHOTOGRAPH BY MISS IIKHXK'K PAIiMBB, A PASSENGER ABOARD THE CARPATHIA—
"THIS 18 A PH«>TOGHAPH," SAVM MIHH PAI.MKK, "SHOWING A GROUP OF WOMKN SI'RVIV
oiiN. MI. THESE WOMEN ARE DREHBEU IN UK ACS GIVKN THEM BY PASSENGERS OF THE
CARPATHIA.
aaid: "You had better get those
women and children over there
and load them In that boat.' I
learned later that his was Mr.
Ismay. I got the boat almost
tilled' and shouted:
"Are there any more women?
"There did not seem to be, so
I let some men get on.
"First Officer Murdock shook
hands with me, saying:
" 'Good bye, old man, and
good luck.'
"I never saw Murdock after
that. I believed that only two
or three of the compartments had
filled and never haft the faintest
idea that the Titanic would gink.
All the passengers In my boat be
haved admirably.
Women Didn't Row.
"Women in my boat were not
permitted to row, although some
of them wanted to do so that
they could keep warm. It was
about 3 degrees above zero and
very chilly."
"If the Impart h«d been bow
on," . continued Plttman, "the
Titanic would be afloat now. If
two or three steamers had col
lided with her, she would not
have sunk. It would have re
quired about six steamer to sink
Jier by collision."
The officer stated that he left
J. Bruce Ismay on the Titanic and
did not Bee htm again until they
were both on the Carpathla.
Might Have Saved More.
"I know that my boat might
have held more," glad Pittman,
"and I told my men to try to
pick up passengers from among
those who were struggling in the
waters. Many of my passengers
begged me not to do this, fear
ing that the lHtat would capsize.
I turned the boat around to go
in the direction of criea which I
heard. When I saw that the pas
sengers thought the swlmmem
would swamp up, I did not go
back to the spot where the Ti
tanic sank. We took in our oars
and drifted for an hour. Oradu
ully the cries grew fewer and
finally ceased."
When the members of the com
mittee insisted on pressing him
for details ag to his efforts to
rescue the swimmers from the
waters, Pittmans voice choked
and he replied with feeling:
"I had rather y«>n had left that
oat. That was all the effort I
made to rescue people from the
water.'
"We sighted the Carpathia at
3:30, when she seemed about 5
miles away," continued Pittman.
"This was at daybreak, and all
cries and stopped long before."
The officer stated that he saw
no bodies floating in the water.
At 1:30 o'clock he said he saw a
white light on the borlzon tout
was unable to tell whether it was
from a lifeboat or a steamer.
DO YOU KNOW—
That lemons may be kept for
some time by wrapping each In
tissue paper and putting In a
tightly covered jar or pall.
The Tacoma Times
THE ONLY INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER IN TACOMA
WOMEN FIGHT FOR
PLACE AT HEARING
(Rr United Press Leased Wire.)
WASHINGTON, D. C, April 23.
Because of confusion at yester
day's session of the senatorial
sub-oomniittee which is investi
gating the Titanic disaster,' the
scene of the committee's Inquiry
was shifted today from the com
modious caucus room in the sen
ate office building to a smaller
room.
Here 500 furbelowed, frilled
women, many carrying lunches,
fought for admittance. Less than
100 of their number passed the
doors. Only diplomats, senators
with their wives or other rela
tives and reporters were admit
ted.
Mrs. Lucien Smith, daughter
of Congressman Hughes of West
Virginia, a bride of a few months
SAYS LOOKOUT ASLEEP
AND CREW DRUNK
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
CLEVELAND, 0., April 23.—
Charging that the lookout on the
liner Titanic was asleep when the
vessel struck the iceberg which
cost more than a thousand lives,
and that members of the crew
were drunk at the time from
champagne given them by the
stewards from the late banquet
served to the first-cabin passen
gers, Lewis Klein, a Hunguarian
who claims t.o be a member of the
Titanic's crew, was placed under
arrest here yesterday.
He was detained on a technical
charge of mutiny, pending the ar
rival of a subpoena from the sen-
Munich Police Raid Nude Dancing School
(Ry United Press Leased Wire.)
MUNICH, April 23.—A flourishing, school for the new art of
nude dancing, termed "reform aancing" has been railed by the
Munich police and Albert Hlet>er, who called himself "academic
director," is under arrest. Hieber established the reformed danc
ing academy some time ago and advertised for talented young
girls, agreeing to train them for the chorus, ballet and specialty
dances. He Is alleged to have represented that hereafter the
ballets in all European operas would have to dance without
tights. He insisted upon a very careful examination of each
applicant.
Male "Kissing Bag" Tries Portland Girls
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
PORTLAND, Ore., April 23.—Ab a consequence of an alleged
Insatiate appetite for osculation with Portland's fairest maidens and
prettiest matrons, C. E. Colber of Cleveland, Ohio, 1b in jail here to
day. Rushing through the business section, Colber greeted every at
tractive woman with the salutation:
"Well, girls, going to the ball tonight?" at the same time
throwing his arm around the charmer's neck and Implanting a kiss
on her lipa.
A chorus of feminine shrieks brought the police and caused his
arrest.
TACOMA, WASHINGTON, TUESDAY, APRIL 23,1912.
and a Titanic widow, was among
the first to toe examined. Mayor
Peuchen, a Canadian army officer,
arrived today to testify.
The survivors of the Titanlc's
crew who are awaiting summons
to the sub-committee's hearing
are putting in their time on
sight-seeing expeditions about
Washington.
Mrs. AHtor Is 111.
The condition of Mrs. John Ja
cob Astor is such as to necessl
tate a postponement of her testi
mony. Physicians sent a note
saying that J. lioxliu.ll, fourth offi
cer of the Titanic, was unable to
appear today.
Herbert Pittman, third officer
of the Titanic, recited the final
trials of the liner at Belfast Loch
before her fatal trip.
ate Investigating committee.
The arrest was ordered by
Senator W. A. Smith, chairman of
the committee. Klein does • not
f peak English and his peculiar
story wfts interpreted by the Aus
trian vice consul.
PLAN NAVAL BASE
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
ROME, April 88.—Italian
troops have landed on the island
of Astropnthla in theiAegan Sea.
The Italians are planning a naval
base there and at Rhodes or
Crete.
I'M- PHOTOORAPH RV MISS DERNICE . PAIiMER, A PASBIMWJER' ABOAKO XHK CAHPATHIA—
""THE WOMAN ON THE HIOHT," HAYS MIHB FAT.MXX, "IS A BUBVIVOK THR TITANIC, ■
Tt;|<MN« TJIJ3 STOHV OP. tIKII I I Itltlllll ■: KXI'KBKN<'EB TO CAUPAfHIA I'ASHENOKRS.: ALIi
TDK WAV FitoM iin ICE i ii ii> To m- \v vniiK SCENES i,iiu ihi AIIOVK WEltB mi i,\r
ON Ol'tl SHIP." .-'. -V-iul-v ■ ■ «—■■♦-.-■ r - ■\r:t,'• J .-v.-«j „/,V;v .■v.;. -■;.... ■;-•■■', .\-,,- ;',. ." j.
540EATH TOLL
(By United I'ivks eljagod Wire.)
CrI}CAOO, April 28. —Fifty-
four persona killed, 200 seriously
Injured, some fatally, and $500,
--000 property damage, Is the total
work of destruction by the cy
clone which swept over Indiana
and Illinois Sunday its authenti
cally reported, here today. Sev
enteen others- are reported killed
at Marlon, 111., which town Is lso
latfd as a result of the tearing
down of wires and other commu
nicamtion done by the storm.
The towns of Bush and Willis
ville, 111., and Morocco, Ind.,
wore almost completely destroy
ed. The known dead are:
At Bush, 18; Wllllsvllle, 3;
Campus, 3; Murphysboro, 3;
Freeman, 3; 'Lowell,' Ind., 3;
Sheldon, 111., 2; Hamilton coun
ty, 1; Kankakee, 1; West Frank
fort, 8; Morocco, Ind., 9; Marion
(unconfirmed), 17.
RAILROAD MEN
10 MEDIATE
NEW YORK, April 23.—1t Is
Considered certain today that the
railroad managers will accept an
offer of federal mediation and
prevent the impending strike of
locomotive engineers. One offi
cial said: i
"There will be no strike. We
will accept this offer, and event
ually there will be an amicable
agreement."
The managers promised to
make definite answer to Labor
Commissioner Charles Nelll and
Presiding Judge Martin A.
Knapp of the commerce court
this afternoon.
Th« railroad managers are in
nesaioa today at their headquar
ter* The engineers accepted
the mediation offer of Nell and
Knapp through a general desire
to avert the strike.
The railroads prefer the strike,
believing that they can convince
the Interstate commerce commis
sion they should be permitted to
Increase freight rates.
IS KIIiI.KI> BY CYCJLONE
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
ATLANTIC, Qa., April 22.—
About one dosen persons are re
ported killed today as a result of
a cyclone which yesterday swept
Adamsville, Plnckney City, Jug
low, P.rooksdale and oth«r di»
tricta of Alabama.
First Day On Job New
Foreman Breaks Neck
Owen Woods says P. B. Egbert, was too "offensively partisan," sc
be- dismissed him from the job of foreman at the sluicing on Bakei
bill and sent 13: K. Worley down yesterday to take the job.
In a few hours Wi.i l<-> was dead with a broken neck, from a
blow on the forehead by the flying nozzle.
Worley went into the pit to take hold of the nozzle and was
nuahed over by the force of the stream through the nozzle. Instead
if lying still until the Water was shut off, he attempted to rise and
the whirling nozzle hit him in the forehead, breaking his neck. He
lied en route to the hospital.
A. I. McDonald, superintendent of water, was on the job at the
time and carried the Injured man out. •
Worley was 69 years of.age, and leaves a widow and two chll
ircn. Dean Worley, formerly manager of the Empress theater, and
Miss Tracy Worley, bookkeeper at the Oypsum works.
The family will be protected by the state Industrial Insurance
md will receive probably the full $3,000 allowance. *
Joe Fisher Best Husband; Wife
Says So; Concynski Dismissed
Joe Fisher of Rigney Hill Is the b«st husband in the world.
His wife says so.
She paid so very emphatically yesterday when the attorney foi
young Andrew Concynski, on trial for attacking her on the street
two months ago, tried to Insinuate that maybe It was Mr. Fisher who
did it.
"Doesn't your husband ever object to your going to lodges?"
the lawyer asked.
"No sir, he only says sometimes, maybe I could get home
aarller."
The case against Concynskl was weak and he was dismissed.
New Dock Plans
The city engineer has made a
new set of plans for the munici
pal dock building which it is be
lieved can be carried out with
the funds at hand. It is now
contemplated to erect a three
story mill-construction building
Instead of the fireproof structure
as originally planned.
BUY A
HOME
SITE
$10.00 CASH
$5.00 MONTHLY
for two lota In Hoimer'a addi
tion, on graded street. Only
|120 for the two. Taxes and
assessments paid.
caijVin phujps 00.
211 California Bldg.
HOME EDITiON
To Indict
Pankhurst
LONDON, April 23. —Recom-
mendations of indictments against
Mrs. Bmaline Pankhurst - and
Lawrence Pathrlck and wife, suf
fragette leaders, charging "con
spiracy to violate the property
act and malicious injury to prop
erty," were made by the grand
Jury investigating the window
smashing outbreak.
Heard "C.D.Q." 100 Miles Away
* (By United Pre>m leased Wire.)
„ " ROTTRRHAM, f April *JKJ.— • captain; of ; the Illrinn, a Russlar,.;i<
liner plyiiiK between New. York and I.;iii<l«ii, admitted today that hi*-"*
vessel was -100 'miles: distant*from ■ the Titanic ■ when 'she struck •: th« ».'•'
Iceberg, bat claims lie was unable to go to the rescue because ' of tlx ;
lee field.
The captain said he attempted to circle the Ice bergs In an effort
to reach the Titanic, but that ax he was en route the Htrma's wtreleat
operator picked, up the ' Carpathian message that the liner had gonr
down.:-..,, ;..,^,.:- *?&??'^ l ' -' i-^^
Deaf Mates Stage Merchant V. of Venice
(Bjr United Press leased Wire.)
# , VANCOUVER, Wash., April * 23.—Eighteen $M actors; gi all g deaf
mutes, pupils at' the state school i or ] the, deaf, Saturday evening will
stage. JiTbß:Metcha%t"ot,Venic^M^Mr^moi^M^m^^^^^M
The mute actors will move to music they cannot hear provided
iby musicians • who f cannot view the atag* or j actors. The orchestra
is composed of pnptln at th« -tiwo! (01 the blind,
WRATH KR FORKCAHT.
For Tacoma and vicinity —
Shower* tonight and Wednesday.
30 CENTS A MONTH.
GRAFT CHARGES
UNDER PROBE
BY GRAND
JURY
Sitting enbanc, the judges of
the superior court lait evening
decided to call a grand jury to
Investigate charges of graft that
have been made against at least
two deptjr proßecutora at th«
court houae.
Action was taken following a
reading of the report of Attor
ney H. P. Burdlck, detailed to
look Into the Crashulei and oth
er matters and nee whether th«
situation warranted a grand Jury.
The court refused to give out
the report of Mr. Burdlck.
The Investigation started be
cause of the statement that had
been made by a party Interested
that Prosecutor Murnietster had
received half of the $500 taken
from Mrs. Mike Craahules of Wil
keßon as the price of her free
dom from jail. McMurray says
another case ho has heard of M
one where Nolte Is charged wttbi
having demanded $200 from a
man represented by Attorney J.
M. Glasgow of Seattle.
-In this case, the story goes,
that the prisoner wag brought
from Port Townsend on a statu
tory charge; that Burraelster sad
Nolte went to htm, found he had
money In a Seattle bank and de
manded that he turn It over and
they would let him go.
Later In the day Attorney
Glasgow came over and the pris
oner made the statement to him
that Nolte and Biirmeister wanted
to let him go if he would pay
them. Glasgow confronted Nolle
and Burmeister with the prisoner,
whom. It Is said, repeated the
accusation.
The prisoner was released that
same day.
It is hinted that other similar
charges will be presented to tho
grand jury from other sources
and Burdlck will prabably be ap
pointed by the court as special
prosecutor to appear before the
grand jury In the matter.
Well Known Names.
Forty-two names were drawn
for the grand Jury this morning
and given to the sheriff's offlc»
to serve. Some well known Ta
comans are on the lint, including
Stephen Appleby, cashier Pacific
National bank; Thos. Caratenß,
president of Carstens Parking
Co.; Peter David, lawyer and ex-
Btate representative; Anna Ebert,
grocer's wife; E. J. Felt, rallroart
contractor; L. O. Fenton, U. 8.
customs officer, and Sarah Mc-
Alevy, wife of the fire chief.
CONFESSES
ROBBERY
LOS ANGELES, Chi., April 23.
—Merrill P. Level, former teller
of the All Night and Day bante,
jointly charged with his brother,
Ellis E. Level, with embezzle
ment of $6,000 of the bank's
funds, has made a complete con
fession, according to the police
here, and exorenated his younger
brother, Ellis.
They were arrested by their
half-brother, John Level, a Los.
Angeles policeman, and are held
In default of $2,000 ball.

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