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The Tacoma times. (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, October 02, 1912, Image 1

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BILLIE BURKE, ONE OF THE MOST POPULAR ACTRESSES ON THE AMERICAN STAGE TODAY, IS WRITING FOR THE TIMES. HER ARTICLES APPEAR TRI WEEKLY.
The man who Is sitting at the j TheTaconia Tiroes The Times will give the public
The man who „«,„, «t the JL A '~MZ%J- ~Mm ";%«^ii.^^^^it * A JS- -». J*. AM. 9**T bulletins after each inning of the \
''■' '-'blmnMt'lahnr tri«i': in m^,^ • ' *■"■• ' '•' ---- ■■ "-•i* -.'.-n.^..i«.. .-v.■.-■;..-'«"..»£; r v: Dullcunn after each inninc of the : i;
,/ sLtT lJuS^rs I , : THE ONLY INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER IN TACOMA || saaggat«igajS::-;-||;
VOL. IX. NO. 251.
CONVICTS LYNCH NEGRO FOR ASSAULT
REBELS
KILL A
CONSUL
VICE CONSUL AMiKX M'CAUG
HAN AND ANOTHEK AMKK.
ICAN MURDERED, IS KE
POHT.
'- (BULLETIN.)
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
: , WASHINGTON, D. C, Oct. 2.
'—Advices from Mexico City to
day reported that American Vice
Consul Allen McCaughan of. Du
rango has been murdered by Mex
ican ■ rebels. The report states
that Herbert L. Russell and a Mr.
Cliff, also Americans, were killed
at the San Juan Tavlehe ranch.
McCaughan had held his office
but a month.
MEXICO CITY, Oct. 2. —Am-
erican Ambassador Wilson was
notified here today that Mexican
rebels Sunday night murdered
' American Vice Consul Allen Mc-
Caughan, stationed at Durango,
and two other Americana.
'Z i i The report ■ was received from
. Consul General Hamma at Du
rango, who telegraphed that reb
els headed by Louis Caro, raided
a ranch owned by an American
named Cliff and killed Cliff, Mo
I Caughan and Herbert Russell, an
other American, manager of the
ranch.
No details were included in the
telegram except that federal
troops were pursuing the rebels.
WASHINGTON, D. C, Oct. —
Up to an early hour this after
noon no official report of the re
' ported assassination .of Allen Mc-
Caughan, Mr. Cliff and Herbert
Russell, all Americans, by Mexi
can revolutionists, had been re
ceived.
GAVE MUCH TO
ROOSEVELT
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
. WASHINGTON, D. C, Oct. 2.—
Verification of John D. Archbold's
testimony that the Standard OH
company contributed $100,000 to
ward Theodore Roosevelt's 1904
campaign-was given the senate
campaign contribution investigat
ing committee here this afternoon
by George Sheldon, who was treas-
I urer of the republican national
committee in 1908. The contribu
j tion, Sheldon said, was made un-
I der Archbold's name. Other con
tributors, Sheldon said, was J.
Plerpont Morgan, Henry Prick
end George Gould, j Each of the
last three named, he said, contrib
uted $100,000. ;;
GILLIES GUILTY
Three months in the county
Jail or a fine of $300, la the sen
tence imposed upon A. P. Gillies,
promoter of sundry million dol
lar enterprises, by Justice DeWitt
M. Evans, for enticing Edith Tay
lor, aged IS years, to his room.
Gillies served appeal notice and
was placed under 9500 bonds. He
spent the night searching for
bondsmen.
VOLIVA COMING
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
SEATTLE, Oct. 2. — Merely
traveling for pleasure, Wilbur
.Glenn Voliva, head of the Chris
tian Catholic church at Zion City,
Illinois, will arrive in Seattle
Monday afternoon in a special car
attached to a Canadian Pacific
train. He will leave Tuesday noon
for Portland.
A Few Specials
For Rent
6th ay., 6-r., bath, hot water
heat .' $22.50
•th ay., 7-r., bath, pore.
plumbing $20.00
Alnaworth ay., 6-r.. mod.. .$22.60
80. 9th St., 7-r., furnace. .$25.00
No. Cheyenne, 8-r., furnace $22.50
Tacoma ay., 6-r., batb ....$16.00
So. O St., 7-r., bath $16.00
It will be to your Interest to
■cc us regarding the above.
Calvin Philips & Co.
211 California Bide.
Dfl YOU WANT THIS CITY
1 TO SPEND MORE MONEY
" IN 1913?
Franklin Fogg says firemen in Taconiu should get more
Fogg Is willing; to pay additional taxes to see them get a
salary boost.
Kverybody would like to sec tiie firemen aud policemen
get large salaries. It ia up to Uie people U> decide whether they
should get more money. There is no question about the desir
ability of the big salaries.
Tracticolly all of the letters received by the Times from
tax|Mtyers have been opposed to boosting salaries and have home
a tone indicating that they want the commission to get down to
business and run the city just as they would a private business
on a strict basis of efficiency and economy. Tills was what Hie
I»eople thought they were going to get when they adopted the
commission plan of government.
The Times wants to give everybody a chance to hove a say.
I If you think the firemen and policemen should have more pay
even if taxes are raised write and Kay so. Tills is a free and
open discussion and alt sides will get equal treatment.
The council will settle taxes for next yeur Monday.
1 If you want fieni raised or lowered speak now.
September 30.
Editor Times: 1 note In
your valuable paper that you
ask taxpayers and those who
are interested in the city to
express themselves through
your paper. 1 have wanted
io do so for some time, but I
was afraid I might use too
strong language. A stranger
coming here to find a place
to settle will ask you how
much taxes he has to pay
and when you tell him it is
the small sum of 3 1-2 per
cent he holds up hia hands
In horror and says, "In De
trolt, Cleveland, or most any
other city in the country he
says we only paid 1 1-2 per
cent, where I came from.
Why that would not leave
me any profit." I would be
doing business entirely for
the city. I think I will try
some other place. And srtlll
our city commissioners pile
on more by increasing the
number of city employes to
pay for their support in the
last, election.
A TAXPAYER.
Editor Times: In answer
to your query. Shall the
city spend more money in
1913? Regarding salaries
I believe that when the city
shall have difficulty to fill
positions at the present rate
then It will be time enough
to spend more.
A READER
Editor Times: In regard
to the question about raising
the salaries of the city em
ployes my opinion is that
they should be lowered in
stead of raised The city em
ployes work 8 hours a day
and have higher wages than
most men can get and it they
are not satisfied with the
wages that they are getting
at the present time, let them
find work at other places
and see how they like It. In
raising taxes they have rais
ed nearly twice the valuation
of what it should be. This
will make the taxes twice as
high as they are now.
Taxation will scare most
people from buying property
here. I wish some of the
citizens of this city would
take a walk around town and
notice the empty houses and
see the reason why.
A COMMON TAXPAYER.
Editor Times: I am a
reader of the Times and
noting your request for ex
pressions on the proposed
1913 proposed taxes will say
that I am a pioneer of this
city and a railroad employe,
a union man, and believe to
get good men you must pay
good wages and as I am a
heavy taxpayer I will vote to
Increase the salaries that we
may get good competent men
who will give us value for
the salaries they receive.
There are a lot of men In
the different departments of
the city that could not work
for a private corporation but
they passed the civil service
examinations and have got a
pull.
W. C. MC—.
5647 1-2 Unian Aye.
October 1.
Editor Times: As a tax
payer in this city, I object
to the useless expenditure of
|4 0,000 for the purchase of
a city public market site, for
the following reasons:
We have a public market
already established on South
Mnln 22
D street between Eleventh
and Thirteenth streets, as
convenient a site as could be
obtained in Tacoma.
Forty thousand dollars
would not purchase to ex
ceed four unimproved 25
--foot lots in a corresponding
location as convenient as the
present one.
The market we now have
occupies about 500 feet
frontage with plenty of un
improved property to take
care of its future growth.
What will $40,000 give
us? Nothing.
It would take many times
this amount to establish a
municipality owned public
market. Why go down into
our pockets for something
we already have? At least
spend our money to the best
advantage.
Such an ftem as this could
be sensibly cut out of the
budget. Yours truly,
R. S. HUDSON.
GUESTS IN FREE-FOR-ALL 1
FIGHT AT WEDDING; 5 DIE
IiISHON, Oct. 2.Five persons were killed and 20 injured.. .
in a fracas that broke out in connection with the wedding fes
tivities of Don Juan I'erca, a wealthy cattle breeder at Melgaco, '
according to advices received here today.
After liberal {rotations of champagne, discussion of poll
tics during the wedding dinner started and soon became heated.'
Itlows followed, and then the guests resorted to - automatic
pistols and stilettoes. The military were called in to quell the
fight. The lawn, where the guests had been dancing, | was
drenched with blood.
DOVES SETTLE QUARRELL BETWEEN
LAWYERS IN CARD'S COURTROOM
Two pigeons fluttering in
through the open window of Su
perior Judge E. M. Card's court
today saved the court from what
might have been a very trying
and delicate situation.
Attorney Lefebvre, representing
E. P. Masterson In his claim for
$60,000 damages against the
First National Life Assurance so
ciety, had just directed a remark
WHY THEY SHIVER
TACOMA, WASHINGTON,WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1912.
THE TIMES WILL TELL SCHOOL BOYS
HOW TO PLAY FOOTBALL
ADAMS TOO POOR
TO HJRE COUNSEL
(Hy I'nUed Tress Leased Wire..
SEATTLE, Oct. 2. —George
Adams, paroled on a charge of
embezzling from the government
assay office and later entangled
himself with the law in an al
leged conspiracy with John C.
Webber, to manufacture coun
terfeit money, says that as soon
as the grand jury acts on his case,
he will ask the court for coun
sel for he Is too poor to pay coun
sel.
THIS IS THK TIMKS
FOOTUALI, KID
11l 1.1.1 \<.s SETTLKS IT. ■"
Late Oubernaiorlai Candidate
Orville Billings has come through
and settled the lawsuit of Mrs.
Bruce Rogers, socialist, for the
typewritten copy of his speech
against the socialists at Moose
hall. Just as the case was to go
to trial he rushed in, paid the $5
and $G court costs and quit.
of biting sarcasm towards Attor
ney Langhorn for the defense.
The latter was in the act of re
plying sharply and Judge Card
had already begun to interfere
when the two birds made their
appearance,
Instantly the attention of every
one in the court room was divert
ed and the Incident was forgotten.
The birds remained in the room
several minutes.
Hey, kids! Here's the goods. The Times will leach you IIII'J
footliall. Our expert has written four stories explaining (l"* details
of the game. The first will be published tomorrow. Watch for it.
The stories arc:
l_Ki;i-KS ANI> PRACTICE.
2 —(IIAIUJ ING.
;I— BLOCKING A\l> TACKMXG.
4— HANDLING THE HAL,!,.
(Hj Tnltod Press leased Wire.)
ISKKLIN, Oct. 2.—Frustrated I nun attempt to commit
suicide with a knife, a workman named Heinricli Tollp, in Fot
tiiiKeii prison, iii.il to bite himself to death. lie hod bitten
open mi artery of his left hand and had gnawed huge rhunks
of flesh from I>■ — upper arm when the, wardens found him
' lying exausted in his hlood-drcnrhed celL He Is now reported
- dying in the prison hospital.
PUYALLUP FAIR OPENS UP;
BIG THRONGS ATTEND TODAY
Thronging the grounds of the
Vallty Fair association, elbowing
and!jostling each other at the hog
and; sheep pens; nudging each
other and exclaiming "oh's" and
"ah's" in the vegetable and fruit
exhibit, smiling and happy, watch-
Ing ; the fattened cattle and uleek
ioryws. poultry, ducks and pheas
ants, and shouting themselves
hoarse over the horse races, one
of the largest crowds in the his
tory of the valley fair attended
.fee "opening today.
From the tim« the gates were
thrown open at 10 o'clock to a
large waiting crowd, until they
closed at night, the happy visi
tors fairly made the whole valley
ring with their unending chorus
of approval.
It is estimated that fully 8.
--000 or 10.000 persons passed
through the wickets during the
day.
Today wag Fraternal day, G. A.
R. and W. R. C. day. Children's
day, Old Settlers' and Bay Island
day. The fraternal organizations
turned out Btron^ and made an
excellent showing in their parade
through Puyallup to the fair
grounds at 1 o'clock, led by a
brass band.
HOW TO GET TO
PUYALLUP FAIR
Puyallup Short Line Trol
ley:
Ijohvps Interurban depot
every hour from 0:10 to 11
a. m. and every half hour
from 11:40 a. in. to 5 p. in.
Nortliet.4 Pacific passen
ger train:
Trains leave Union depot
at 1, 2, 8, 4 and 8 o'clock
every afternoon. Tr/lns re
turn from l'u,v«lli«i> at 1:HO,
2:80, 8:80, 4:SO, 6 and O:1O j
P. m,
Puyallap Old U»e:
Hourly from Inter- j
urban depot. :
MEN TAKE LAW INTO
THEIR OWN HANDS
(lly United Tress Leased Wire.)
CIIEYENE, Wyo. Oct. 2. —
Frank Wigfall, a negro who as
saulted Mrs. Julia Higglns, 7C,
at Rawlings Monday night, was
lynched by convicts la the state
peni:entlary at Rawlins today.
Wigfall was captured last night
and placed in the county jail here.
A mob surrounded the build-
Ing threatening to lynch the ne
gro but was finally dispersed.
A rope, secured by convict* in
the state penitentiary at Rawiina
ended Wlgfall's career.
Wigfall chopped down the
door of the Higgins home, over
powered the aged woman and as
saulted her. A posse took up his
trail and pursued the negro Into
the hills, where he was captured
last night and later lodged in the
Rawiina county jail.
Mobs led by the raos! promi
nent citizens and armed with
TURKS PREPARE FOR
IMPENDING TROUBLE
(Hy I'nitrd Tress I.cn«c<] Wire.)
CONSTANTINOPLE. Oct. 2. —
Hfl'iising on Servia's demand to
surrender Servian munitions of
war, detained in transport, the
Turkish cabinet today appointed
Abdullah Pasha commander in
chief of the Ottoman forces in the
Balkans and began a hurried prep
aration for the war which now
seeniH inevitable.
BUDA NtT, Oct. 2. —A dis
patck received here from Sofia
stales that Turkish aeroplanes
were sighted today, ■OOUtIBJ
along the Bulgarian frontier.
LONDON, Oct. 2.—Reports re
ceived here today state that light
ing is in progress along the Turk
ish, Montenegrin and Bulgarian
borders. It has been impossible
to verify the rumors which are
generally discredited in diplo
matic circles.
PARIS, Oct. 2. —Acting in con
cert with the other powers France
today is continuing its official ef
forts to promote peace In the Bal
kans. Of all concerned Russia is
tho only nation which sincerity Is
suspected, for it iR doubted in of
ficial circles If either Bulgaria or
Servia would have gone bo far if
they had not been assured that
Russia would back them against
any Austrial or German aggres
sion in the event of a general con
flict.
CONSTANTINOPLE, Oct. 2.—
All indications here today point
to immediate war in the Balkans.
Although the sultnn has protest
ed to the powers against the mo
bilization to a war footing of the
armies of Servia, Bulgaria, Mon
tenegro and Greece, simultaneous
orders were issued for the mo
bilization of the Turkish troops.
Reports received here today say
that Greek ships cruising about
in Turkish waters have been seiz
ed as transports by Turkish war
ships and this fact is expected to
haten a declaration of war.
SOFIA, Bulgaria, Oct. 2.—Of
ficial- announcement was made
here today that depulicate notes
have been handed to the repre
sentatives of the powers in Cit
tinjo, Delgrade, Soda, appealing
to the powers to let the Balkan
allies settle their Turkish trou
bles without interference.
The note declares that the al
lies do not want Turkish terri
tory but do want to force the sul
tan to grant autonomy to Mace
donia.
ASKS MORE PAY
FOR FIREMEN
• Franklin Fogg this morn- •
• ing tent a letter to the •
• council urging that the i>:iy •
• of firemen should be increas- •
• cd. Fogg thought that the 9
• job is a bard one and <!<■ •
• serves good pay. The coun- •
• cil filed hjg letter. •
• •
WEATHKR FORECAST.
Fair tonight with light frost;
Thursday fair and warmer.
30 CENTS A MONTH.
shotguns and railroad iron, gath»
• i. (1 about the jail as Wlgfall was
transferred to the state peniten
tiary at Rawlins. Three hundred
convicts In the state penitentiary
heard the negro being brought la
at. 8 o'clock in the morning.
While on the way to the broom i
fnctory the convicts overpowered
(he guards and turnkey, released
the negro and after fastening a
io|.<- around bis neck, tied tn«
other end to the railing fifty feet
above the main floor. Wlgfall,
screaming in protest, was hurled
over the side and fell 25 f«et be
fore his neck snapped. The con
victs made no effort to escape but j
quietly reformed their lines ready ;
to coutinue their inarch to the
broom factory. Guards returned
them to their cells.
Wlgfall wa ß an ex-convlcf who
recently finished a long term in
the Rawliris penitentiary for crim
inal assault.
KING OMMH OF GRKBCE.
KODAK FROM
AN AEROPLANE
(By Vnlt.d Press Leased Wire.)
—With Drivers De Palma,
llugheß, Mulford, Nelson, Clarke
and Tetzlaff starting off in the
order named, the Vanderbllt cup
races began here at 11 this
morning. ,
Farnum Fish, aviator,
aeroplaned over the \ arse, car
rying Fred Wagner, a'uewspaper
correspondent. The Associated
Photo*, .ipher officials were very
much incensed over Fish's ac-
tton, as they had purchased ex
clusive picture rights of th*
meet for $10,000.
Teddy Tetzlaff wag forced to
drop out of the race, shortly aft
er the start, owing to trouble
with his engine.
Again Today
Fortune
Knocks at
Your Door!
, * , *.- - ,~: "" "* " -i * ' *'\ "' !**
w ; Maybe you * didn't .-i hear
her —listen and you will —
'. tomorrow or soon. ;' 'K^Jp-^M
, Every day holds It oppci
"' ■ t 1 tics for tfie men or wom
fan who grasps : them.tir^v^
i}.. Tour opportunity may; be
at hand nowt'',."--,''j-tji^
rl?«lr Read and use Times Want
Ads which have been the
„. means of putting so many
Tacoma people iii touch with
their grea'c*.-. opportunities.

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