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The Tacoma times. (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, October 03, 1912, Image 2

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085187/1912-10-03/ed-1/seq-2/

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PAGE TWO.
Osgar
Cheerfully
Pitches
Bed-Hot
Rivets if
Adolf Is
Willing to
Catch Them.
Words by Bchaef
Music by < on do.
HAS PLAN TO
PICK STATE
CHAMP
A plan to decide definitely the
football championship of the state
of Washington has been submit
ted by Wedell Fobs, a former Ta
coma High school man. Foss sug
gests that the state be divided
Into districts and that the teams
be matched until the winning
pair of teams are decided by elim
ination of the others. lie has it
all doped out that when elimina
tions have been made in all the
districts (Southwest, Fast, Sound,
etc), that the winning two will l>o
ready to definitely settle the
championship title by Thanksgiv
ing or soon after.
STRAND BEATS
SEATTLE CHAMPS
(By I'm it'll Press J.oiiNpd Wire.)
SEATTLE, Oct. 3.—The Seat
tle champs were defeated here
yesterday In the first of the post
season games with Spokane, score
Sto 0. Strand pitched great ball
for the Indiana.
ARTHUR FIiETCHKIt, CLKVER SHORTSTOP,
MAY si vi; IX WOMjD'B KKItIKK OAMHB
ARTHUR FLETCHER.
Johnny McGraw . once went
upon record to the effect that
Arthur Fletcher wag one of the
greatest ball players In the busi
ness. Whether he has reversed
this decision only the leader of
ta Giants know*. And he Isn't
•Via*. - t '■ --.;.■■:,■,;•■.-:-,.
- Fletcher Joined the Giants In
1909 after a great ear with Dal-
BOSTON PUTS FAITH IN
BIMT-H\I,r.KR»
FOOTBALL TIPS FOR THE BOYS
(This is the first of the Times
stories intended to instruct the.
boys of Tiicomu in the fundamen
tals of football.. The stories are
written by a member of tlio
linn-, si.ill', who has had a great
deal of experience as coach of
youthful football teams.—
tor.)
THE CAPTAIN SEES THAT THE PLAYERS PRACTICE CONSCIENTIOUSLY.
Value of Practice Often Underes
timated; Knowledge of Game's
Details Makes <>reut I'layers.
Thrump! Yes, thnt was a
football. College teams have
been at work, hard, and schools
and athletic clubs are planning
schedules and getting out playing
material.
The "more and ninro" will
come from the public schools and
las. He went to short when
Bridwell slowed up. He did won
derful work In the Giant-High
lander series, but didn't cut much
figure last year against the Ath
letics. He hns what ball players
call "wonderful hands" and is a
pretty fielder, hut his position in
the batting order, down at the
bottom, speaks eloquently of his
lack of hitting ability.
athletic clubs. From experience
as coach and official with such
teams, the writer has concluded
that the ONE reason why football
has not long since become popu
lar is that boys in grade schools
and clubs do not KNOW the
game, either in spirit or letter.
The part of football written up
In the papers, as a rule, is the
roughness and the strategy, yet
the REAL game lies in little de
tails of the work of ther'^ndivid
ual players- Wj * •
The VERY FIRST thing the
youthful football player MUST
do, Is to master the rules;* every
player should be able to answer
any question pertaining to the
game without hesitation. 1' F, H.
Yost, the Michigan coach, has
said that much of his past success
was due to the "quiz classes"
held frequently when training.
These are merely interrogations
by Yost, upon the rules, and ev
ery varcity man at Michigan
MUST be letter perfect.
The rules this year are about
the same as in 1911, with a few
minor changes to simplify them,
and a little study and discussion
with other players -will get the
rudiments into every boy's head.
A quiz class and study will do the
rest.
When Sam White smashed
through the Harvard line at
Princeton last fall and grabbed
a fumbled ball, he didn't pause
and ask himself what to do next
He had that ball in his arms and
was off for the Red goal before
he had time to think of anything.
He acted mechanically, because
he had been trained for weeks to
do just as he did.
Harvard said it was a fluke,
that their team was bigger,
stronger and better than Prince
ton, but Harvard failed in a fun
damental when a back fumbled
and White was there to take ad
vantage of the situation — which
is football and sport.
So, boys, learn the fundamen
tals. Become so familiar with
the little things—HANDLING
THE BALL, CHARGING, BLOCK
ING AND TACKLING—that you
will do it instinctively when the
time comes. AND DO IT PROP
ERLY. ,
(The next story will deal with
the work of the linesman.—Edi
tor.) -; .; .".;.?
• American League : «
' American League |
Standing of the Club*. •,.
.<;:•, woo. Lo«t Pet
Boston .......103- 46 .691
Washington ... 89 60 .597
Philadelphia ..89 60 .597
Chicago ...... 74 77 .490
Cleveland..... 73 77 .487
Detroit ....... 69 81 .460
St. Louis ...... 52 99 .844
New York .... 60 99 .336
R H B
Detroit 5 12 1
Chicago 8 14 3
Jenien. Bonier and Onelow;
Kocher, Cicotte, Walsh and Sul
livan.
R H E
St. Loula 2 8 2
Cleveland 4 7 g
Hamilton. Allison and Alexan
der; Blinding and O'Nell.
j Pacific Coaat League "T
jSjjffi Standing or the Tumi. ;:r
v-'--^-- ,■■•':■-..-'. Wot.>Loit Pel
Oakland ...... .105 72 ; .692
Los Angelas .. .101 75 • .67*
Vernon .;..:;; ; 98 77'^ .561
Portland IT;'.T.*.j7B V U 86 « .465 .
San Francisco '.",:, 78 3' 101 .427
Sacramento ... 68g 108 .358
THE TAfiOMA TIMES.
• Whether player orUpic- •
• tator, keep your temper. •
• Learn the rules —lafcd •
© stick to them. ■ 9
C If you ago a player: •
• Learn to charge, block, •
• handle the ball, and lastly, •
• learn signals and forma- •
• tions. •
• If you do not maßter the •
• first four ,the others irtlj'jbe •
© useless. ■ 9
• Don't "slug." The RaUK •
• is rough enough within-Ske •
• rules. Slugging in footMll •
• is like spiking in baseball. •
• If j'ou are a spectator: •
• Keep off the playing field. •
• Give officials the benefit •
9of doubt for honesty and •
• skill-—their Jobs are hard •
• enough. 9
• And again—players, spec- •
• tators and officials, learn •
• the rules and stick to them. •
DE PALMA WINS
INDIVIDUAL RAGE
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
MILWAUKEE, Wls. — Ralph
De Palnia won the individual cup
race here yesterday. There
were eight entries in tbe race.
Teddy Tetzlaff of Los Angeles
was the favorite in the betting Be
fore the races started.
Mulford withdrew early in the
race because of megneto trouble.
At the fifteenth lap TeUlaff was
a lap ahead, having covered 118
miles in 95 minutes. Shortly
after this Tetstlaff's engine went
bad and he was forced to retire.
DePalma's time was 4 hours
and 31 minutes, averaging 69
miles an hour for the whole dis
tance.
RIVERS FINED
FOR SPEEDING
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
LOS ANGELES, Cai. —"Never
again," in the way Joe Rivera,
Mexican lightweight, puts it to
day. Rivers was arrested for
burning up the roads with big big
touring car. This Is Joe's third
offense and Police Judge Cham
bers threatened him with thirty
days in jail for his next offense.
M'CAREYVERY I
BUSY AGAFN
LOS ANGELES, Cal.—Thurs
day night Is the date set hgJPto
raoter Tom McCarey for the re
opening of his night fights at the
Vernon arena. McCarey planned
to commence the "semi-pro" cqn
tests last night, but a B li«l|lMz
£le caused a change of plans.,
GOLF PLAYERS
OPEN SEASON
Tbe women members of the
Tacoma Country and Golf club
started the fall season yesterday.
Women's handicap foursomes will
be featured, the play for the W.
K. Hacker and J. L. Carman tro
phies la this event continuing un
til Wednesday, November 13.
Players of all classes will take
part in the play, pairs being cnog
en by contract, a high handicap
{Mired with a low one.
"100 TO 0", SAYS PERKINS
AND PINS FAITH TO T.H.S.
"If you fellows don't beat
Aberdeen 100 to 0 ."
Coach Perkins of the High
school did not flniah his condi
tion, but the players knew what
he meant. The coach of the blue
and gold hardly could expect a
score like that when Aberdeen
has been training so long espe
tialy for this game, but his re
mark just goes to show the spirit
of the squad, coaches and root
ers. Just to show how they re
membered the game in Aberdeen
two years ago Tacoma High is
going into the game for all there
is In them.
Coach Perkins had his men
practicing warding off the at«
tack when Coblentz was punting.
Part of the squad proceeded to
ward off the attack of another
part of the men.
Harry Deegan sprained his an
kle in the bucking yesterday and
he will probably not 'be used
for a week or so. "Chlng"
Johnson had his nose injured in
Tuesday's signal prjjctice and was
not in school yesterday. He is
expected to be able to play by
Saturday.
There was a whale of a squad
out for practice last night, seven
teams and subs enough to mako
two toanis more. Outside of the
first team and the eleven subs
there was the second team and
subs, the Midget team, and the
four class teams. The class
teams are Rolng at it in Btyle and
especially the Freshmen and Jun
iors who will attempt to kick the
tar out of one another tomorrow
after school.
| National League \
Standing ot trie Clubs.
Won. Lort. Pet
Xew York 101 47 .882
Pittsburg 92 58 .613
Chicago 90 59 .604
Cinrlnnatl .... 74 77 .490
Philadelphia ..72 77 .484
St. Louis 03 88 .417
Brooklyn 57 93 .380
Boston 50 100 .333
R H E
Brooklyn 2 5 1
Boston 3 9 1
Allen, Stack and Miller; Tyler
and Raridan.
s a i
New York 1 6 0
Philadelphia 2 6 1
Ames, Wletze and Hartley;
Seaton and Killifer.
• H 1
Chicago 6 11 0
Pittsburg 5 12 2
Lavender, Smith and Archerj
Cotter, Camnitz, Robinson and
Gibson.
Boston won the second game of
a double-header.
IS HK BED SOX WEAK POINT
BTEVE YERKES, BOSTON
SECOND BASEMAN.
HAKItY DBHOAW.
DOUGHERTY AT
OUTS WITH AD
(By United Tress leased Wire.)
SAN FRANCISCO. Oct. 3. —
Following a quarrel with Light
weight Champion Ad Wolgast
Hobo Dougherty, who has train
ed the little Dutchman for all his
fights since his "pork and beans,"
is on his way east today to join
forces with Joe Mandot, against
Wolgast. Wolgast and Dougherty
have been on the most Intimate
terms for years, on one occasion
the little champion setting the
Hobo up in the chicken business.
Local sports consider the deflec
tion of Dougherty a serious hand
icap to Wolgast. Dougherty will
be in Mandot's corner when he
meets the champion.
Pigskin Prattle
Coach Perkins now thinks that
the Aberdeen game will not bo
such a hard one. Just the same
there is going to be some little
spirit shown.
"Dub" Coblentz is reported re
covered from his illness and will
be in the game Saturday. That
brlngg forth several sighs of re
lief.
The inter-class games begin
Friday. The first one will be be
tween the Freshmen and Juniors.
There will be some terrifying
games in the series.
Al Rushmer will be back In the
fold Saturday.
Olympia is expected to put up
a good right this season. The cap
ital city boys had a good team
last year and with "Puss" Col
bert to coach them this year there
should be a good game when they
play Tacoma in the stadium one
week from Saturday.
The IT. P. S. is showing more
interest in football than usual and
Coach Pltchford is predicting a
mighty successful season. Pltcn
ford was well pleased with the
beating his charges gave Sumner
Saturday.
Coach Ghormley of Whltworth
Is still running his men hard.
Ghormley is saying very little but
it Is thought he will have some
thing in store when his team
makes the first appearance.
Jacquot and Sutton, the IT. of
W. men who have been out of
the game lately, are coming
around and will be into the fray
soon.
The IT. of W. rooters are plan
ning a big special train to Port
land for the big game with O.
A. O.
A GOOD BUNCH
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
LOS ANGELES, Cal.—Aiming
to shake np and put the Sacra
mento baseball club into the
Coast league pending the pen
nant race in earnest next season.
Jack Atkin, owner of the Capital
city franchise, is on his way east
today to resruit new players.
Important News
For Boys f
BOYS' DOUBLE-BREASTED AND NOR
FOLK STYLE SUITS WITH EXTRA
PAIR OP KNICKERS—
All reinforced and stayed at every weak point.
Both pairs of Knickers have taped seams.
Beautiful fall patterns of fancy mixed cassi
meres and cheviots, ages 7 to 17 yrs'., guaran
teed all wool; 2 pairs pants, $5.00.
Young Men's Suits £
Some very smart models with new distinctive
features, perfect clothes for the young fellow —
$12.50, $15.00 and $18.00
James H. Dege Co.
1110-12-14-16 Pacific ay.
The Good Clothes Store for Men and Boys.
MEN!
Do You Know the
"United Clothes"
From Maker to You, Saving
the Middleman's Profit
Suits, Overcoats and Raincoats. ' -
Pants $1.75, $2.50, $3.50 and $5.00. ■■>.
Buy direct from factory store and save $5 or $10
on your suits. ■ . .';,;
We are here to stay. Every garment guaran
teed to give satisfaction or a new garment free
, of charge. . \ -4
A-. .^a .-. ■■'.. .. .... :• ■-: -^-' •■tttA'*
VnVniJP 74 Stores—74 Cities TSuTfSSTS/
JfiRM UNITED CLOTHES SHOPjft^L,
KIkVI &« 9 Pacific Are. Kg
£^ From Maker to Ton B^Pr
':.'.'-_-.. ;■;- ■■■■■■'; ""-r'-*- '/
>■<„/;■;■■;-> .„-.- ■ ..- ■■/';■. ■-„ „;>: - ;/■; :, /J.^'^^A v>^.:
-'' - tr-- '■' /■>-■■ "v.- ■■• ■■;„-..., .. j, -, ..-'.■ -.*-, -..-'v '■«;-;■■ ">*■■* l. wV- "^'^# -'Vt.'
Turn to the HB^* Want Ads
Thursday, Oct. 3,1912.

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