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The Tacoma times. (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, October 07, 1912, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085187/1912-10-07/ed-1/seq-1/

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-y ijijLJJpM?^^ Watch For Airship Pictures of Vanderbilt Grand Prix Races Exclusively In the Tacoma ' Times— Photographs Left2^B«LL—-.^EZZs/
&B^^^^^^*' Milwaukee At 1:10 a. m. Sunday October 6th, and Are Coming to Tacoma As Fast As the Mails Can Bring Them.^^^^^^vSSlS
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|^ /|r . edltion- you >; • . ; v THE ONLY INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER IN TACOMA S^S»?=Ssl.
VOL. IX. NO. 254.
CITY TAX LEVY TO BE 12 MILLS IN 1913
"ITS THE CHILDREN THAT
CAUSE MOST TROUBLE 111
DECIDING DIVORCES"
jl l>«. I CLIFFORD DECI^AHKS DIVORCE IAW IN THIS STATE
IS TOO IjOOSE—"MAUIUA(iK A JOKE.
The time: One year after their wedding day.
The place: Superior court.
Enter John and Mary.
Mary—Your honor, I cannot live with this man any longer.
John—Your honor, I cannot live with this woman any longer.
Htzzoner —Divorce granted.
Exit John and Mary.
As Superior Judge M. L. Clif
ford aptly put it today, "this
state needs an amendment to its
divorce statute that will place the
requirements necessary for un
hitohing strontg enough to make
John and Mary cautious in hltcli-
Ing up."
Judge Clifford would not grant
a divorce on the incompatibility
argument. Where such conditions
exist he would suggest that the
husband desert, after which di-
Toroe nrtight be secured in a year.
The incompatibility farce is a dan
gerous thing to the community,
he says.
"It is the community that suf
fers from divorce," declares the
Judge. Children make the most
trouble. Where there are no
«/!hil(lren it makes little difference
to the community whether John
end Mary are sympathetic souls or
not —but the kids —the public is
Interested deeply in their welfare.
"The law In this state is too
loose and Indefinite. It needs a
change setting down the exact
causes for. granting a divorce.
Just because a man and woman
declare they can no longer live
together is altogether too thin an
excuse. Too many take advant
age of it, and marriage is made
a joke."
DECLARES HE
IS GUILTY
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind., Oct. 7.
—Edward Clark of Cincinnati,
former business agent in that city
for the International Association
of Bridge and Structural Iron
Workers, and one of the 48 mem
bers of that organization on trial
here for illegally, transporting
dynamite, today changed his plea
of not guilty to one of guilty at
this morning's session
When United States District At-
torney Miller. reached the court
room he quietly announced to
Judge Anderson that Clark had
. decided to change his plea to one
of guilty. Clark tWen took the
witness stand, admitted that he
was guilty .'is charged, and was
ready for sentence. "Killer asked
that sentence be deferred, and
Clark joined Ortle McManlgal
in Marshal Schmidt's office. Al
though the other defendants were
greatly surprised at Clark's ac
tion they expressed the belief that
It resulted from Miller's denuncia
tion of Clark Saturday. Miller
charged that Clark had supervised
twelve ilynamitings in and near
Cleveland.
The body of the man who com
mitted suicide by shooting him
self in South Tacoma park Satur
day still lies unidentified at the
Piper undertaking parlors. Al
though Undertaker George Piper
says there have been as many as
BO or 60 people in to view the
remains not the slightest, trace as
to his Identity has been found.
CHEAP
MONEY
We offer the lowest rates
obtainable. in Tucoma for
money on real estate mort
gages. No delay in closing.
Low expenses.
Calvin Philips & Co.
n California Bids. Main 23
NATIONS MAY
STOP WAR
(Ily United Press Leased Wire.)
LONDON, Oct. 7. —With Eng
land falling in line today with
the other European powers in a
joint note to Turkey and the Bal
kan states, urging immediate set
tlement of difficulties, the outlook
for an amicable adjustment of
the main points at issue without
war is greatly Improved.
The outstanding features of the
note: Turkey is advised to give
Macedonia and Albania more lati
tude in the way of self-govern
ment.
The Balkan states are warned
Hint the powers will not permit
them to seize any territory even
if war with Turkey comes.
Government officials today re
sent the report that Great Brit
ain's procrastination nearly block
ed the plan of the other powers
to prevent warfare.
PROGRESSIVE
MEETINGS
« _ —•
• Senator J. A. Falconer of •
• Everett and E. G. Mills of •
• ' Seattle, candidate. for attor- •
• ney general on the proems- •
• sive ticket, will speak here •
• tonight. •
• " ' Mills will speak at Jeffer- •
• son Square Improvement •
• club. North 19th and Mason. •
• ' Falconer will speak at the •
• Norwegian-American pro- •
• gresslve league meeting in •
• Valhalla hall. , •
• Both will speak tomorrow •
• night at South Tacoma hall. •
••••••••••••••a
BIG CROPS
Records are being smashed
right and left in the crop returns
for the Northwest for 1912. The
wheat output for Washington,
Oregon and Idaho this year Is
78,530,000 bushels, while oats for
the same three states total 31,
--360,000 bushels and 14,800,000
bushels of barley. It was esti
mated two weeks ago that the
wheat output would total 74,
--000,000 bushels.
REAL ESTATE MEN
TO ORGANIZE
For the purpose of getting
measures before the state legisla
ture as to licensing of realty
brokers and a law regulating alien
ownership, real estate men of the
state, have been summoned to
gather In Seattle Thursday to
form an organization called the
Washington State Real Estate
Dealers' association.
RUNS AMUCK
WITH'REVOLVER
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
CAIXJARY, Alberta, Oct. 7.—
Driven suddenly Insane, John C.
Davis, a wealthy real estate deal
er formerly of Spokane, Wash.,
entered the apartments of Ml«s
Mildred Dixpn. a friend of his
wife here today, shot Mrs. Davis
dead and fired three bullets into
Miss Dlxon'a body. After the
shooting Davis killed himself.
Miss Dixon i« confined in the
hospital In a critical condition.
Mrs. Davis had refused to re
tun, to aim.
LONELY CELL FOR MAN
WHO OVERWORKED
It was a withered hand that gripped the edge of
Superior Judge Chapman's bench today, and it
steadied a thin, worn body, the body of a man pre
maturely aged. His face had lost the gleam of hope
fulness, for he was going back to the "pen," with
its cold steel cells and its gloom.
"I'm guilty," he said.
There were only a few in the court room who
knew the man's stoiy.
Years, ago, back in Ohio, this same man, E. J.
Hofford, graduated from a medical school at the
head of his class. He loved the work, and he suc
ceeded. People trusted his ability and his practice
pushed him to the utmost of his capabilities. One
all-night case Avould be scarcely finished when he
would be called to another as serious.
He noticed a trembling of his hand, at last, a slight
nervousness, that might mean death to a patient in
a delicate operation. Morphine steadies the nerves,
temporarily, and so it was that in ministering to the
sick and the maimed, Hofford became a drug fiend,
Today no one wants him for a physician. He
knows this, and why, but he still craves to touch the
delicate instruments with which he was once so adept.
Last May he was released from the penitentiary,
where he had gone because he could not resist the
fascination of a microscope. He stole the instru r
meat.
And the love of the old life, the impulse to be back
again at his chosen life work, a momentary weak
ness, drove him to the office of Dr. C. H. DeWitt in
the Fidelity building, when his release came, and
there he committed a second theft, the one which he
pleaded guilty today.
They cali it "kleptomania," and they sentenced
him to from one to 15 years back in the cell he left
last May.
Attorney O. A. Burmeister knows the story of Hof
ford and has sent word to the prison board that if
Hofford's people back in Ohio will consent to take
care of their relative, the prosecutors' office and the
court here will recommend his release at the end of
the first year.
"»vor prison sentences are not a cure for a man like
Hofford," says Burmeister. "He can't help it. Yet,
if someone cares for him and watches him closely,
he will not do these things."
WILL BODIES
(By United Press Leucd Wire.)
NEW YORK, Oct. 7.—With the
pvlmary Idea of making people
understand that autopsies are In
the interest of medical science,
200 physicians of Brooklyn and
Long Island are pledged today to
will their bodies to the dissecting
table.
Love's a Great Thing But There Are Times When-
TACOMA, WASHINGTON.MONDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1912.
THREE IN ONE BLOCK
(fly United Premi l.iu-,.,1 wire.)
LOS ANGELES, Cal., Oct. 7.—
Three robberies in one block Is
the record of two holdup men as
reported b the police today. The
men operated unmasked and held
up three citizens In a single city
square during the night, securing
a total of $4 5. No arrests have
been made.
Wonderful Airship Photos of.
Great Auto Races-Daring Feat
Performed for Tacoma Times
FISH (ON RIGHT) AND WAGN KR, ALL READY FOR A PHOTO-
GRAPHIC FLIGHT.
.MILWAUKEE, Wie., Oct. 7. —
The greatest combined feat of
aviation, auto racing and photo
graphy in all history was per
formed here Saturday afternoon
wli^n Farnum Fish, aviator, and
Fred Wagner, photographer, snap
ped from the air the speed de
mons of the world's most spec
tacular auto races.
This daring and successful at
tempt at aerial photography was
made expressly for the Times.
The photographs secured were
Immediately dispatched to the
Time*. They are now rushing to
Taconia as fast as the speediest
mail trains and special delivery
may carry them.
Tills Is the first time that the
famous auto classics, the Grand
Prix and the Vanderbilt cup
ra<vs have ever been photograph-
Ed from the air. A number of
brilliant photographs were secur
ed as the aviators skimmed the
air waves, following the flashing
autos.
The result, in the remarkable
pictures thus secured for the
Times will make historic record
of this great achievement In pio
neer aerial photography perform
ed by Fish and Wagner.
Farnum Thayer Fish Is the son
of a prominent physician of Los
Angeles, Cal.
A year ago Fish qualified for
his license from the Aero club of
America, and became the world's
youngest aviator. He holds the
record for the longest flight over
water—from Los Angeles to San
Diego, 130 miles.
He has made many flights, re
paid the cost of his airship, ana
is not yet 16.
Fred H. Wagner, the photog
rapher, ts a memher of the firm
of Wagner & Durborough, aerial
photographers. For a dozen years
he has been noted among the
newspaper photographers of
America. The difficulties find
perils of aerial photography sim
ply whet his appetite for more.
TACOMA GREEKS
ARE READY
Two hundred Taconia Greeks
served in the army before they
came to this country and there
are 600 more in the.city, and all
declare they will go back and fight
for their native land if war comes
and they are wanted. 1 « • iji
-■--i-; • ■ •*■ - - ,■ _■.
• Congressman Start >n War- •
• burton «has received a tele- •
• gram from the commissioner 9
• of light houses at Washing- •
• ton, D.'C, that a fog signal •
• will be established .in " the •
• Tacoma harbor Dec. ; 1. The •
• signal will be located at the •
• entrance to the city chan- •
• nel. '&&%£. \ «fes;3&acs*ssfej •
-i'-i ■-■:-...■- ' \ "-;-. :--■.
Commissioner Mills today ap
pointed xW. P. Payne,*»' a ' railway
man, ' as * license j inspector ' to take
the ' place ■ of •'. Oscar • McCall:•.-';«>;.
.'. McCall was also a railway man
and 'he ' got -a'; chance 'to 'go j back
on the : lino -as conductor on "■ the
run between Tacoma and Port
land. " The salary as conductor
was 165 a month and the license
Inspector only 9100, he quit.
Payne went ito work * today.
DECISION REACHED
AT A BIG COUNCIL
MEETING TODAY
The city tax levy for next year will be 12 mills. '
This means an increased tax on the homes of the
people of $48,00 C.
The levy -will be the "same as last year, but the
assessed valuation has been raised on the homes of
the people about $4,000,000, so 12 mills will bring in,
according to the figures of Controller Meads, $879,
--000 instead of $831,000, raised this year by the same
levy.
It took a room full of citizens
all forenoon to beat Commission
ers Mills, Woods aii'i Lawson out
of a 12 1-2 mill lev.v, Mills was
determined to carry out his pledge
to raise the salaries of police and
firemen. Woods and l,a\vs<m
stood by him. The mayor and
Freeland tried to put through a
12 mill levy but the His Three
voted them down. Then the peo
ple took a hand. It was finally
snown that Mills wanted $33,000
additional for salaries for his
men, hut that the 12 mill levy will
brjn# $43,000 more in taxes than
this year. Mills then agree dto a
12 mill levy and he said he would
cut out everything In the way of
improvements to give his men the
pay they ask.
The council adjourned until 1
o'clock to reconvene and Btart
pruning the budget to the 12
mill levy.
A. E. Gntfton and C. E' Podge
protested against stopping prog
ress simply ' for more salary.
Preston Redmond, Lou Stone, B.
R. Rogers, S. A. Glbbs and other
citizens protested against high
taxes.
Commissioner Mills was willing
to sacrifice anything to ke*\> his
pledge to raise salaries. He said
the firemen worked 24 hours a
day.
Mayor Seymour wanted to know
whether McAlevy had said they
were going Into politics.
McAlevy admitted he said it,
partly joking.
When the people finally won
their contention for a 12 mill levy
it wag too late to end the matter
before noon and adjournment wag
taken until 1 o'clock.
Then will come the clash.
Mills is determined to booßt
salaries and said he was willing
to cut out everything else neces
sary to get it.
TAKES LIFE
WITH FIRE
(By Tnil^d Press L«ns<>il Wire.)
SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 7. —
Choosing death by fire as the sur
est means of ending her troubled
life, Mrs. R. M. Hluin, an aged
wife of a local mariner, sprayed
her clothing with gasoline In her
apartments here today and ap
plied a match. In a flash the
old woman was converted into a
living torch and soon lay a
charred mass In her blazing home
.Members of the fire department
found the corpse after they had
extinguished the fire with a single
line from the chemical.
Tell The Telephone! .i§f I
Lost? Found? " Help? Work? For ', Rent?- ~.Voi'us'- ||
• Sale? House Wanted? Business Opportunity? An V* II
Auto? A Horse? ■.-.**,■" "T- ".^ :,".-rS jl
Tell The Telephone! I
Every phone in Tacoma connects in an Instant with II
The Times WANT AD PHONE. «v; -- t 1 ' "" II
I'HONK vi \i\ ia JI
11; Tell The Telephone! f1 ||
Ml C } lit _ \-_jwlbk- _ • t
30 CENTS A MONTH.
BECKER BEGINS
FIGHT FOR
LIFE
TRIAL OK POUCH UKI'TM.
AXT ON IN NEW VOltli TO-
DAT.
(My I nit«<l EMM l/cawd Wire.)
NEW YORK, Oct. 7.—With *
■pedal panel of 250 Jurors on
hand and with the court room
crowded almost to suffocation, the
trial of Police Lieutenant Becker
opened before Justice John W.
Qoff this mornin*. District At
torney Whitman is conducting the
prosecution in person. Former
Assistant District Attorney John
F. Mrlutyre was in charge of the
defense.
Daokw, the magnet for all eyes
when lie entered the court room,
held his head high and the confi
dent look he wears continually
seemed heightened.
Many of those In the court
room at the opening of the trial
were former gangsters and gun
men, whose Imslneee has been cur
tailed somewhat of late by the
activity of the district attorney' 4
office.
Due to the tragic death of Jac*
Zellg, alleged to he a silent ao
complloa of Becker's, Interest la
the trlsl was greatly intensified
throughout the city, and thou
sands clamored for admittance
long before the beginning of.
court proceedings this morning.
NAMES BIGGEST
CONTRIBUTORS
(lly I'iiitod Pros* leased Wire.)
WASHINGTON', D. C, Oct. 7.—
When the senate contributions In
vestigating committee resumed
its probe here today. Colonel Han
nan, private secretary to Senator
Robert M. LaFollette, said among
the largest contributors were Ru
dolph Spreckels of San Francisco
and Congressman William Kent
of California.
The largest individual donor,
Mann an said, waa Charlea R.
Crane of Chicago, who contribut
ed $20,000. Congressman Kent,
Oifford Pinchot and Amoa Pln
chot, the witnoss said, contribute
id $10,000 each.

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