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The Tacoma times. (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, October 14, 1912, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085187/1912-10-14/ed-1/seq-1/

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F any further argument were
needed ngainst the billboards,
the fact that Tuft is advertising
himself on them should furn
ish it.
VOL IX NO. 260.
GIANTS FIGHT DESPERATELY AND WIN
STRAW VOTE SHOWS
WILSON AND T. R.
RUNNING CLOSE
I BY GILKON GARDNER.
- WASHINGTON, D. 0., Oct. 14.
That Roosevelt Is at present
Baediiig both of the other can
ididntes in Indiana and Pennsyl
vania and that he is running he
liiiiil both Wilson and Tuft in
New York state, is the showing
of 11 postal card straw vote mode
by your correspondent. *
The figures are:
Indiana —Roosevelt, 106; Wil
son, 74; Taft, 35; Debts, 25;
Chafin, 4; Reiner (Socialist-La
bor), 1.
Pennsylvania— 72;
Wilson, 54; Taft, 51; Debts, 21;
Reiner, 1.
NEW YORK— 91;
Taft, 64; Roosevelt, 48; Debs,
12; Chafin, 8; undecided, 2. ,
It is not claimed that this poll
is conclusive nor that it is at all
complete as to the states. It Is
simply a straw in the wind, ac
curate so far as it affects the
lacalitles where the poll was
taken.
These three states were chosen
because they are regarded as piv
otal. Whatever happens in the
other parts of the country, the
hi6tory-making vote will be that
cast in the three states.
It looks now as if Roosevelt
would have a "Solid West," to
match Woodrow Wilson's "Solid
South," and that the battle will
turn on what happens in the
states of the Middle West and
the East. These are sample
states in these sections.
It is significant that in both In
diana and Pennsylvania Taft is
running a rather poor third. This
bears out other polls and corrob
orates the statements made by
Hiram Johnson and Senator Dixon
that throughout the West at least
Taft is a negligible quantity, and
it would Indicate that in parts of
the East he is equally negligible.
CHILD VICTIM
FAMILY
I That little Joe T>lnsky, the B
rear-oltl sun of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob
llliisky, 1218 JCiist 24th Ms., who
died in convulsions Saturday aft
ernoon after eating from a box of
chocolates which ho had picked
up while playing In the yard, was
the victim of enemies who have
been hounding the father for a
number of years, is the theory
upon which the police detectives
•re working today.
Chemical examination of the
itomachs of two geese which
dropped dead in the yard at the
tame time as the death of the
child. will be complete late this
afternoon, and City Chemist C. S.
Wilson stated this morning that,
although he was not positive at
that time, every Indication pointed
to strychnine poisoning as. the
cause of death.
In support of their theory, the
police discovered today that three
years ago the home in which the
Dinsky family lived was fired by
incendiaries.
Captain John Fitzgerald of the
detectives would give out no In
formation today, the workings of
his men being kept a secret. . V
Owing to the fact that the
frantic mother destroyed the box
of candy when the child first be
came ill, the city chemist's office
has been somewhat hampered in
determining (.he character of the
poison. ! The two dead geese and
a dog which died Saturday after
noon afford the only means of
solving the mystery as the parents
of the dead babe have forbidden
the coroner holding an autopsy,
and a/c grieving over their child's
body,. which they refuse to < allow
being taken ;out of ■ the home. -. Ii
.. The fatal box of sweets . was
CHEAP
MONEY
Wo offer the lowest rates
obtainable In Tacoma for
money on real estate mort
gages. No delay in closing.
Low expenses.
Calvin Philips &Co.
Sll California Bid* Main 2i
TheTacoflia Times
THE ONLY INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER IN TACOMA
though in New York he still has
some strength. He Is second man
there, and Roosevelt third.
Wilson leads in New York. .
It is equally significant that
Wilson has a long lead on Taft in
New York state. It should be re
membered, however, that no cam
paign has as yet been made in
New York state. The state tick
ets have only just been nominat
ed, and all the conditions of the
poll were as unfavorable as pos
sible for Roosevelt. After he has
campaigned the East, and particu
larly in New York, and after the
democratic nominations have been
looked over by the voters and the
latter have had a chance to take
stock, the results may he very
much changed. This poll also
leaves out of account Greater
New York, which always is a
large factor in national election-*
but generally on the side of the
democratic candidate.
Must Carry New York
Unless Rooaevelt can break the
Solid South, it is necessary for
him to carry New York in order
to have enough votes to win.
Even should he carry Pennsyl
vania and Indiana, with the oth
er states of similar political com
plexion, should he lose New York,
he would lack the votes necessary
to win. Probably as never before,
therefore, New York is the pivot
al state on which this election
turns.
Another interesting feature of
this poll is the strong showing of
Debs, the socialist candidate. In
Indiana, Debs polls 25 to Taft's
35. In Pennsylvania, he has 21
to Taft's 61; nnd in New York,
12 to Roosevelt's 48. This would
seem to indicate that the socialist
vote will not be materially af
fected by Roosevelt's candidacy,
but that Roosevelt will draw his
strength from the two old parties
in the main.
OF
FUED
found by the child lying close up
against the fence near the back
gate. It was only partially filled.
It Is believed the two dead birds
and the dog ate from the box be
fore the child found it, or that he
divided with them as he played
in the yard.
Both parents of the dead child
speak bu tbrokenly, and it was
with difficulty that they explain
ed the child's death to the police.
Today th epolice found that
when the Dinsky family moved to
their present home • three years
ago thei rold house was burned
to the ground, the fire being set
by someone unknown.
The father believes he is be
ing hounded by enemies, and* the
police are straining every point
to determine the identity of the
person who placed the candy by
the gate. They think this person
will prove to be the one who fired
the Dinsky home three yearß ago.
MAY BE AN
ESCAPED CONVICT
John Murray, now at the coun
ty hospital with gunshot wounds
in both legs as the result of an
encounter with Patrolman Strick
land last week, Is believed to be
a Montana convict who escaped
from a road gang at Deer Lod^ge
last winter.
A letter from Deer Lodge re
ceived here today state* that the
wounded man is probably the es
caped convict, and says that $100
reward Is offered for the return
of the convict to the penitentiary.
The city today received pay
ment la full from the American
Bonding company for the Bring
olf shortage when a check reach
ed the city hall for $15,669.46.
PROGRESSIVE MEETING
Progressives are coming from all over the county
for the big rally here Friday night, when Bob Hodge,
Senator Poindexter and W. H. Paulhamus will be at
the armory.
The meeting will be the one big political event of
this campaign, and it is expected the armory will be
filled.
Paulhamus is taking off his coat and getting
right into the campaign and Senator Poindexter is
doing likewise. It has been a long time since three
such good fighters have been on one platform in this
city.
TIMES SCORES AGAIN WITH ACTION PICTURES OF GAMES
(1) HERZOG SLIDING INTO THIRD ON HIS
THE SECOND INNING.
SOCIETY LAD
IS IN BAD
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
VANCOUVER, B. C, Oct. 14. —
Harold A. McNaughton, promin
ent in Vancouver society, is being
held here today for the alleged
slaying of Ernest Spinard, a
young steel worker, in an alter
cation over the 15-year-old wife
of the latter. Spinard. is dead
after being unconscious for sever
al days as the result of a blow
from a heavy umbrella handle, al
leged to have been struck by Mc-
Naughton after he had been found
with Spinard's wife.
The affray was the culmina
tion of a number of excursions
taken by Mrs. Spinard with other
youths of the neighborhood, it is
said.
Finding his wife absent from
home recently he sought her out
and found her walking with Mc-
Naughton. A fight followed, and
it is alleged McNaughton brought
it to a sudden stop with a smash
ing blow from his umbrella.
Spinard never regained conscious
ness.
SPEECH KILLED
BY A BULLET
(Uy ITnited Press Leased Wire.)
SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 14. —
Lying in. the hospital with her
tongue severed by one of four bul
lets fired at her in the court
yard of her home, Mrs. Omily
Pietz is unable to tell the police
here today the perpetrator of the
shooting.
PEACE AT LAST
(By United'Premt Leased Wire.)
LONDON, Oct. 14.—Dispatches
received here today by the Berlin
Exchange Telegraph declare that
Turkey and Italy have signed
terms of peace.
Hunter Accidentally
Slain by Seattle Man
NORTH YAKIMA, Oct. 14.—
Henry R. Cole, a rancher of Sun-
nyside, died yeeterday morning
of a wovind oaußed when he re
ceived accidentally a charge of
bird shot from a igun carried by
George Kane, 5010 Orcaa street,
Seattle.
TACOMA, WASHINGTON,MONDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1912.
FLITTY O'FLARA
ALMOST NABBED
THK WAY I'F.OI'LK AUK si AUCHIS., FOR FLIT, IT LOOKS AS
IF SHK'LL HAVK AS MlH'tff OF A SHOW KLUDINO TACO.MA
PEOPLE AS A TKNDKKFOOT WOl'Ll) HAVK IJIDIM. A
IHCO.VCO CAYI'SK.
Miss Flitty O'Flara still elude* rapture.
The (Jig Harbor peach yet roams the streets with a carelessness
that is nothing it' not exas|H-ratiiiK to tho ilumi'.iiikl- who arc strain
ing every nerve and bruin imriirle to lay hunds upon her. And
the $ 100,000,000,000,000.80 in gold Offered as a reward still occu
pies the Times' sock.
She has had some narrow escapes. Oh yes! She has been
followed constantly by thousands of. eager, ravenous, would-be
sleuths, each with 4,000 latest copies ofi the Times in his pockets,
and laden with the required toi) of coal; SUO gallons of soda pop
and cake of ice, all of whom are eager to cop the dough.
Miss Flitty describes a scene at the coiner of Pacific avenue
and South 9i)th street for the benefit of those who doubt her ex
istence.
"There was seven guys and a couple of skirts standing on the
corner," says the elusive and dainty Flitty in her most elegant
rhetoric. "One gink was talktngiabout mull. I felt so nervous. One
of the girls was chewing gum. She had a bad eye. I thought she
knew me, for she asked the direction to the nearest coal mine. I
was afraid she was going after the ton of coal and I legged It down
the alley. 'Nix on being ketched,' says I."
This most fascinating young woouut will visit some well known
hotel today. To aid her pursuers, the Times will at this time say
that Flllty is a small woman, someS !'■ ■>■». 10 inches, in her stocking
feet. She weighs in the neighborhood of --■> pounds and wears a
most disconcerting smile. AH the boys in C>ig Harbor ure wild about
Flitty's beauty and coy mannerima.
LAWSON NIPPED
IN THE BUD
The scheme to hnnd Judge W.
P. Reynolds a fee of from #5,000
to $0,500 for helping the city at
torneys try the lawsuits with the
Ohm river contractors slipped a
cog in the council this morning.
l.i-.-t week a l< li< r was sprung
in the council from Judge Stiles
asking tliat Ki-ynolils be secured.
The council concurred. Then R*jr
uolds asked »5,000 for the Me-
Hugh can and wanted more for
the others.
The mayor and Freeland saw
him, tried to Ret him down but
I lie best he would do was $5,000
for McHugh and Fowler cases,
win or lose, w4th extra pay up to
$1,500 for the Wright case If he
sues.
Seymour, Mills, Preeland and
Woods thought the price too high.
Mills wanted to know whether
Stiles really wanted help. Stiles
was called In. He said the case
waa Just like any other, the more
lawyers the better, possibly, but
he was not alarmed.
"But you asked for help," said
the mayor.
"But you know how I came to
do it," retorted Stiles.
"I thought It would come out,"
said Mills.
Then Niick Lawson got excited.
He Insisted thai there should tbe
outside help and that the council
should hire Reynolds willy nilly.
The rest of the council could not
see it.
They finally agreed to leave the
whole thing to Judge Stiles and If
he wants help he can get it not
HIT IN THE FIRST HALF OF
to exceed $5,000 in cost, for all
the cases.
. It developed that Lawson had
started the scheme to get Rey
noldt^in on the Green river money
and Judge Stiles was asked to
ask for help.
Frank Baker told the council
that ptiles did not need help on
toe rase, that it was a law case,
would not lie tried by a jury and
thai no man in town knows the
law as Stiles does.
TEACH SOLDIERS
MUSICAL CUSSING
(lly Vnitrd I»rcB8 Leased Wire.)
VANCOUVER, B. C, Oot. 14. —
Prim' Vaneover does not like the
racuqus manner In which the sol
dier boys "cuss" their mules. The
tcoopers therefore are to be given
vocal Ichsomk iii order that in the
event they have to cuss out loud
itJiey may do so with cadence and
imelody.
STOOD IT 50 YRS.
► HUNTINGTON. W, Va., Oct.
14. —Asserting that for more
than 50 years he has stood the
fttgging and curtain lectures of
his spouse, Isaac Jackson, aged
70, ig today seeking legal separa
tion. Jackson declares that when
he was younger the nagging did
not affect him as It does now and
he wants a divoroe.
The Times Saturday print- i
ed the first pictures of the <
world series' games. To- 4
day more excellent pictures 4
are printed. Pictures today «
are primed on pages one, <
two The Times (
gets the news and the pie- <
tureß first.
WEBBER TELLS
OF PLOTTING
MURDER
(By United Press Loused Wire.)
NEW YOKK, Oct. —Full
corrohorntion of the story told
Saturday by "Bald Jack" lloso
that Police Lieut. Charles Bock
<r wanted Gambler Herman Hi>s
cntlial "killed, dynamited or
croaked' was given today In
"Ui-idney" Webber when the trial
of Becker oh a charge of having
Instituted the murder of Ilosen
thal was resumed.
"If the man Kosenthal," Wel>
ber swore Becker said to him,
"ever sees Whitman it's all off.
Why don't you L*ors have him
croaked? I'll take care of you
fellows after the jot) is done."
Webber, who is alleged to have
been in charge of the gangsters
who killed Rosenthal, testified
that he told Becker he would
"pull off" the job in a few days.
But Becker, he said, kept after
him to hurry up.
Webber then described the
meeting of the gunmen on July
IS, when arrangements were com
pleted for slaying Rosenthal.
Webber testified that he locat
ed Rosenthal at the Hotel Metro
pole on the night of the murder.
He told the gunmen, who left Im
mediately for the scene. The wit
ness said he went to the Metro
pole at 2:10 o'clock In the morn
ing and saw Rosenthal's body ly
ing on the sidewalk. At 5 o'clock
Webber said he met Becker and
Rose. Becker, he said, was smii
ing and said to him after shak
ing hands: "Well, Brldgle, you
did a good job. Don't worry. I
told you I would see you through.
The only thing necessary now Is
for you boys to lay low for a few
days." Then Webber swore Rose
gave him $1,000 to distribute
among the gunmen.
OH! YOU NAVY
(Ity Vnlted Press Leaned Wire.)
NEW YORK, Oct. 14. — With
the saluting of guns at 9 o'clock
this morning, the greatest Amer
ican naval review opened hero,
comprising 127 vessels of all
types from drcainaught to col
lier.
President Taft, aboard the
yacht- Mayflower, waited outside
the harbor to participate in the
review.
ETTOR TRIAL ON
(By United Press I/eased W»ro.)
» SALEM, Mass., Oct. 14. —The
irial of Joseph Ettor, Arturo Glo
vannittl and Antonio Caru9o,
charged with the murder of Anna
Lopizza, a woman striker, Wiled
In a street gathering of Lawrence
textile workers last winter, was
resumed here today. A second
venire of 350, from which a jury
l« to be selected, was on hand.
The talesmen were questioned by
Justice Quinn.
THE utandpat crowd faring defeat
are now resorting to slander to
fool the people who are flock
ing l<> Bol) Hodge. Bat the
pc-oplo won't be fooled thla
time.
KNOCK OUT STAHL'S
MACHINE IN 1 ROUND
SCORE BY INNINGS
123456789 R. H. E
Boston 020000000 2 72
Giants 50000000 x 5 10 1
By (Iruiidmul lUce. '
KKW YOKK, Oct. 14. — Driven
to bay, the Gittnts led a last riiKli
iiiK, cles|Mi iinmiull nonius! the
Kcd Sox machine today and ton- it
apart «itliin oik- round. >lnr<|uai<l
pitched In- pals to a roinpiiiK. cake
walk victory by the count of .*• to
2. The Unix-, as ill Mi first start,
broke the lloston attack at every
turn, and after one rickety round
—the —stopped Stalil's
sliLsliinj,' sliifSKc-rx with .1 thud.
ToniKht the i.iiiiif- move back
to Boston for another name stand,
where Jeff Tesreau and Jot' Wood
hook up for their third clash*
The first round today settled
the battle. Stahl stuck In Buck
O'Brien and the Giants were
ready. Knowing they had their
backs against the wall, they rush
ed the Red Sox spltballlst with
such savage ferocity that he was
on the ropes in a twinkling, when
he was slammed for six hits and
five runs before Stahl could get
another pitcher warmed up and
into the fray.
The appearance of Rube Mar
quard, striding across the battle
field with his accustomed grace
and nonchalance was the signal
for a roar of applause from the
Giant fans.
Wood, Collins and O'Brien
warmed up on the Boston side
lines.
FIKST IXMXO.
Boston: Hooper singled be
hind second base. Hooper caught
Fletcher. Yerkes filed to Snod
grass. Speaker walked. Speaker
stole second. Lewis filed to De
vore. No runs.
New York: Devore out, Gard
ner to Stahl. Doyle beat out a
Blow grounder to Yerkes. Doyle
stole second. Snodgrass fanned.
Murray safe on an Infield single
to Wagner, Doyle taking- third.
Doyle scored when O'Brien made
a balk, Murray taking second.
Merkle doubled to right, scoring
Murray. Hprzog doubled to left,
scoring Merkle. Meyers singled
to left, Herzog reaching third.
Herzog scored on a double steal,
Yerkes throw to the plate being
wild, Meyers taking third. Fletch
er bunted safely, Meyers scoring.
Fletcher out, O'Brien to Stahl.
Five runs.
SKCOND INXINO.
Boston: Gardner reached first
on Marquard's error. Stahl sin
gled, Gardner ■ taking second.
Wegner fanned. duly fouled out
to Meyers. Kngle batting for
O'nrien, doubled, scoring Gard
ner and Stahl. Hooper out to
Meyers. Two rung.
New York: Collins now pitch
ing for Boston. Marqu-ard filed
out to Stahl. Devore fanned.
Doyle filed to Speaker. No runs.
THIRD IXXI.VG.
Boston: Yerkes singled over
gecond. Speaker flied to Snod
grass. Lewie fouled to Devore.
Gardner filed to Murray. No
runs.
New York: Snodgrass flied to
Yerkes. Murray singled to right
and was out trying to stretch it,
Hooper to Yerkes. Mcrkle beat
out an infield hit. Morklo out
stealing, Cady to Wagner. No
runs.
FOURTH INNING.
Boston: Stahl beat out an in
field single to Herzog. Wagnor
filed to Snodgrasa. Cady singled
to right, Stahl taking third. Col
lins hit Into a double play, Eletch
er to Doyle to Merkle. No runs.
New York: Herzog filed to
Speaker. Meyerß tripled to cen
ter. Fletcher filed to Speaker,
Meyers being held at third. Mar
quard out, Yerkes to Stahl. No
runs.
FIFTH INNING.
Boston: Hooper filed to Mur
ray. Yerkea filed to Murray.
Speaker flied to Herzog. No
runs.
New York: Devore.singled to
left. Doyle popped to Wagner,
Snod^rass filed to Hooper, and
Devore was doubled at first. Hoop
er to Stahl. No runs.
SIXTH INNING.
Boston: Lewis fouled to Mey
era. Gardner and Stahl fanned.
No runs.
New York: Murray filed to
Hooper; Merkle popped to Stahl;
Herco* filed to YerUes. No runs.
In the sixth Cady was given an
error for the muff of • foul at
lierzog's bau
30 CENTS A MONTH.
TODAY'S LINKUP
GlantH—
Devore, If.
Doyle, 2b.
SnodKrass, cf.
Murray, rf.
Morkle, lb.
Herzog, 3b.
Meyers, c.
Fletcher, 88.
Marquard, p
Itcd Sox—
Hooper, rf.
Yerkcs, 2b.
Speaker, cf.
Lewis, If.
Gardner, 3b.
Stahl. lb.
Wagner, ss.
Cady, c.
O'Brien, p
Umpires—O'lyouj?hlin, be
hind thy bat; Ktgler on
bases; Klcm in left field and
Erana in right field.
SEVENTH INNING.
Boston: Wagner out, Mar
quard to Merkle. Cady flied to
Snodgrass. Collins filed to Mur
ray. No runs.
New York: Meyers out, Col
lins to tSahl. Fletcher filed to
Speaker. Marquard filed to
Speaker. No runs.
I li.II Ili INNING.
Boston: Hooper filed to Snod
grass. Yerkea single! over sec
ond base. Speaker filed to Mur
ray. Lewis filed to Murray. No
runs.
New York: Ilevoro out. Colling
to Stahl. Doyle fouled to Cady.
BnodffraM beat out an infield bit.
BnodgTUi out stealing, Cady to
Wagner. No runs.
NINTH INXINO.
Bottom Gardner flied to Snod
griiKs. Stahl filed to Murray.
Warner out. No runs.
ROBBBURO, Ore., Oct. 14. —i
Df. Roy P. Smiek, prominently
connected here, in dead today fol
lowing a fishing excursion to the
IJmpqua river. Smirk wae troll
ing in the river and fell over
board.
AUTO THIEFESS
(Uy United Press I .•■»->■<} Wire.)
SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 14. —
Determined effort is being made
by the police hpre today to locate
the stylishly dressed woman who
calmly cranked up a five passen
ger machine belonging to H. W.
Roland in front of the Savoy the
ater and made off with It.
• 0
• LOS ANGELES. Cal., Oct. •
• 14. —When City Prosecutor •
• ICddie Guy Eddie appeared •
• In court today another war- •
• rant charging him with the •
• delinquency of Alma Jones, •
• a minor, was served on him. •
• Eddie fainted. " •
C-. \ ■■!'
»O>t»M ••••••••
Who Has
the Time I
to walk from house to
house looking for the
houßes which bare the
"rooms for rent" sign on
them when he needs a
roomT
Everybody
Has the Time
to read The Tlraea
"room for rent" Ads. It's
tho modern way of rent
ing rooms.
You can fill your rooms
by using Times Want Ads.
Telephone Main 12.

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