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The Tacoma times. (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, November 01, 1912, Image 1

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WHEN THE SHEPHERD DOG MEETS THE WOLF-THEN ONE MUST DIE
BY FRED L. BOALT
The grass that grows on a certain pasture known to the geogra
phers as Washington, is tall and lush and abundant. The Sheep that
roam thiß paßtUTe were fatter than most Sheep, until—
At the time of which the tale tells there came to the pasture
a Wolf in Sheep's clothing, whose name was Dirty Dollars, and who
was minded to dwell in this pleasant, smiling land. Dirty Dollars
was as greedy as he was cunning and as cowardly as he was cruel.
There came under the influence of Dirty Dollar* a Sheep who
aspired to be tlic Itell Bheep of the Flock. If you do not know what
a Bell Sheep is, think of a governor. This Mheep w«« vain 1 weak
and selfish und by nature a snob. He was known to the Flock as
"Putty."
To "Putty" Dirty Dollars made known the fact that he was a
Wolf. Whereupon "Putty" fawned and cringed, after the manner
of snobs, and paid him compliments.
"Bell Sheep, eh?" Bald Dirty Dollars. "Why?"
"It is, sire," said "Putty," "an office of much dignity and Im
portance. "And," he added, "there are perquisites?"
"Humph!" grunted Dirty Dollars, showing his yellow fangs in
a leering grin. "What are these perquisites?"
"The Bell Sheep," "Putty" explained, "leads the Flock and so
comes first to the tallest, sweetest grass."
"If I make you the Bell Sheep of the Flock, what then?"
growled Dirty Dollars.
"I would serve you loyally and faithfully," said "Puttty"—"l
and all my friends. If at any time you should want anything done,
you would have but to command us."
"Good!" said Dirty Dollars. "You shall be the Bell Sheep.
But tell your gang that I shall stand for no monkey business."
And so "Putty," through the influence of Dirty Dollars, became
the Bell Sheep, and, though the grass grew as abundantly as before,
there was never anything left for the Flock when the Bell Sheep
and his gang had eaten their fill. The Bell Sheep and his gang grew
fat and sleek, but the Flock went hungry, so that the flesh wasted on
their bones and they scarcely had strength to graze.
In the night, when the Flock was sleeping. Dirty Dollars would
X TODAY STANDS FOR EXTRAS,
which the Times will publish next
Tuesday night just as fast as re
turns come in from the whole
country on the Times' own Unit
ed Press leased wire; be at Times
Square to see the returns flashed
on tbc sheet.
VOL. IX. NO. 276.
LOVE COMEDY
ON HER PORCH
The Storle front porch must
have been one of the real show
places in town in the summer of
1910, according to the testimony
of witnesses In the $100,000
breach of promise case of Nellie
Storle against Fred C. Horgan.
The Storle home sits down and
the neighbors' houses all have a
fine view of that front porch and
testimony was universal that the
little love drama thereon enact
ed was always worth the looking.
Mrs. Mary J. Cass, across tne
street, said she "couldn't help but
see it" and that Hogan was cer
tainly an affectionate lover. She
had seen him repeatedly come out
on the porch where Nellie was,
put his arms around her and hu,g
her affectionately and when he
came In the evening he always
greeted her with a resounding
smack.
Mrs. Delia Hill, too, had seen
the front porch dramas, and her
impression likewise was that Ho
gan was a ti*ue enough lover. "He
was very attentive," said Mrs.
Hill.
Other witnesses vouchsafed
other MMMa from thp romance,
one lady tolling that Uogan had
reached the. Htate of familiarity
that he was resting with his head
in Nellie's lup and his arm en
tvtined around her neck with oth
er uii-ihlhts of the family and
# (By United Press Leased Wire. 4>
«- BOSTON, Nov. I.—Mrs. Mary Baker G. Eddy, founder of <S>
<§> the Christian Science church, had In Massachusetts at the time ■*
<$■ of her death $82,843.75 in personal property and real estate <$>
<?> valued at $155,000, according to the report of the appraisers. <!•
<S> All the personal property goes to the Christian Science <S>
<?> church under the direction of the supreme court of New 3>
«> Hampshire, which sustained the will of Mrs. Eddy. The en- <$■
<?> tire amount which the New Hampshire administrator will turn <$>
<S> over to the church is about $2,000,000. ♦
LONG, LONG, TIME
(By I'lilted l'rcss Leased Wire.)
WASHINGTON, D. C, Nov. 1.
—With the seven year army en
listment law effective today army
officers are watching with inter
• est to see whether it will result
In an increase or decrease in en
listments.
<$> (United Press Leased Wire.) <J>
<S> TOPEKA, Kans., Nov. 1. <$>
. <§> —This section is under four <•>
& Inches of snow; This condl- <S>
S> tlon is reported to be gen- <?>
t> eral over Kansas. <$>
Tacoma Aye.
$900
Each
Buys lots on the west side of
the avenue between 18 th and
19 th. Paving paid. Lots above
grade. Only four blocks from
Union depot.
Calvin Philips &Co.
til California Bids.
herself right in the same room.
The court room in federal court
this morning was crowded, the
public beginning to take an In
terest in the romance of the Can
adian millionaire and the pretty
Taconia girl.
FIGHTING
MOOSER
COMING
Ole Hanson, the fighting Bull
Moose campaigner, will be In Ta
conia tomorrow and will speak
not at Valhalla hall, but at the
Temple of Music.
Hanson's ire has been aroused
by statements that he has desert
ed Bob Hodge, and one of tlie
most fiery deliveries of his career
is expected tomorrow evening.
Although the Temple of Music
will be entirely Inadequate to ac
commodate the crowd that will
flock to hear the heavy-hitting
orator, it was considered the best
place In the city owing to its cen
tral location.
$26 MADE
ON RACES
That those who had charge of
the gates and ticket selling at
the automobile races last summer
are not only not guilty of having
caused a $12,000 shortage, but
in fact have shown $26 over-bal
ance, is the finding of the Pink
erton detective agency, which was
assisted by the police and sheriff
in a complete investigation of the
case.
In a report to the guarantors
of the racing association the Pink
ertons say the cry of fraud raised
against these men is "ridiculous
and preposterous," and wholly
uncalled for.
Those who employed the detec
tives are Arthur G. Prlchard and
George B. Burke, trustees of the
auto racing fund, and A. B. Howe,
president of the Carnival associa
tion.
DEFENSE ALL IN
(By United .Press Leased Wire.)
SALEM, Mass., Nov. 1. —When
District Attorney At will conclud
ed the reading of a pamphlet on
the "History Of the I. W. W." !n
the trial of Joseph Ettor who,
with Arturo Olovannlttl and An-'
tonio Caruso, is charged with
murder growing out of the Law
rence textile strike, the state
rested its case today.
Mala M
slip off his Sheep's coat and fall upon the Sheep and slay them. At
first he slew because he was hungry. Later he slew In the lust of
power. He robbed Ewes or their Lambs and Lambs of their moth
ers. With one savage fling of his head, one snap of his powerful
jaws, he would rip the throat wide open and thrust his yellow fangs
deep Into the gaping wound to drink tlie warm blood and devour the
still quivering flesh.
At such iiiin-s the Bell Sheep kept very atill. lest his bell should
ring and waken the Flock. For Dirty Dollars had said he would
"stand for no monkey business."
The Flock complained bitterly.
"Why is it," the Sheep asked one another, "that, though thU to
a fertile pasture, there is nothing for us but stubble?"
"How many times must I tell you," said the Shepherd D<^g, who
overheard their mutUrlngs, "that there is a Wolf in Sheep's clothing
among you? And 'Putty,' whom you have chosen to lead you, is *
traitor. He serves, not you, but the Wolf."
BUT IT 18 THE NATURE OF THE SHEEP TO BE PATIENT
AND LONG-SUFFERING.
"We know of no Wolf," said the Flock, and went on nibbling
at the stubble, while the Bell Sheep and the gang fattened on lush
grass.
"I know there is a Wolf," said the Shepherd Dog, "because I
have come upon the mangled carcass of inorf> than one Sheep."
So the Shepherd Dog searched the Flock for the enemy, and
Dirty Dollars, scenting trouble, called the Bell Sheep to him and said:
"The Shepherd Dog threatens to make trouble. He is a danger
ous demagogue and is inciting the Flock to discontent. AYe must
settle this presumptuous fellow."
The Bell Sheep and his satellites—sycophants all—taking their
orders from Dirty Dollars, spread false nnd vile rumors throughout
the Flock.
"They do say," babbled the scandal-mongers—and there are,
alas! many such in every Flock—"they do say that tlie Lamb who
was killed last night filled the belly, not of a Wolf, as tlie Shepherd
Dog would have us believe, but of the Shepherd Dog himself."
"They do say," wliittpered the Kcandal-iiiongers, "ili.il lie is lazy
TheTacoma Times
THE ONLY INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER IN TACOMA
CITY TO WAR ON LOAN SHARKS
Three Beautiful Women In Today's News
ALICE LOXGWOKTH.
(Ily United Press Leased Wire.)
CINCINNATI, Nov. I.—Forty
women neighbors of Mrs. Alice
Roosevelt Longworth began a
strenuous campaign today in be
half of the Bull Moose ticket and
they have adopted the name of
the "Princess Alice Circle" in
honor of Col. Roosevelt's daugh
ter. A house-to-house canvass is
beiag made throughout the city.
Loan Shark Preyed
On R. R. Employees
Not only do the "professional" loan sharks, those who frankly
admit that they gouge the wage-earner, ply their unspeakable
traffic in dirty dollars in Taconia, but there are probably a score
or more of saloonkeepers and boarding house and cheap hotel
proprietors, who take wage-earners' notes and assignments of sal
ary for paltry loans, charging usurious rates of interest.
In Justice Evans' court yesterday, John P. Hernison admitted
that he charged 120 I'Klt CENT A YEAR INTEREST on loans
that he had made to 1 '■■ It. Brooks, an employe of the Chicago, Mil
waukee and Puget Sound railroad.
Hermson conducts his shark game on the side, as it were; he
also runs the Raymond .saloon at 2323 Pacific avenue.
This "amateur" loan shark brazenly testified yesterday that
he loaned $45 to Brooks on the ' O. K." of one Gleason who was
employed by the railroad as a timekeeper. Hermson said that It
was understood that Gleaaon would deduct $40.50 from Brooks'
wages. Officials of the company heard of this transaction and
Gleason fount! himself unable to collect the money for his friend
Hermson. Incidentally, Gleason lost his job as timekeeper.
Yesterday Hermson brought suit to recover $45, which repre
sented the principal. It seems.
In giving ilu- judgment for $86, Justice Evans called attention
to the state usury law, which provides that If any one either di
rectly or indirectly attempts to obtain a higher rate of Interest
than I - per cent per annum he can only recover the principal, less
the amount of interest he attempted to obtain, and shall also be
compelled to pay the costs of the action.
In the meantime, don't overlook the fact that the "profes
sional" loan sharks are Btlll on the job, meaning,
I). H. TOLiMAN, notorious usurer, local office in the Provi
dent building.
I>. D. DRAKE, another of the "big concerns" that in nnscru
pnlous and avaricious; local office in National Realty building.
"STATE SECURITY OO." (Glen E; Dickens, manager), a lo
cal concern that specializes on salary loans, offi.e in California
building.
*><£><«><s><s><«><S><s><S><S><s><£><S><s><S> •s><s><s><& <&<s><§><s>■s <$<$><$■<$>$> <$>$,
* i '.-- r v - -„ • " / ■ -x ": '.♦
<> , FRANKLIN, Pa., Nov. —To give birth to «Ix children «>'
* in a little more than 13 months Is the record of Mrs. Stephen ♦
<$■ Nageotto of French town, Crawford county, who today is nurs- <?>
<£ ing the latest —three boys. ■:'" .. ■ ■,-.?♦
* •
■> ♦ 4> 4><J> ♦ <B><S> 4> ♦ ♦ 4> ♦ ♦ -S> <J"s> <^ <$>■$> <S> ♦ «><fr <t> 4>s <&■ ♦ ♦"*«
TACOMA, WASHINGTON.FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1912.
FRITZI SCHEFF.
NEW YORK, Nov. 1. —Friends
of John Fox, jr., the novelist, to
day confirmed the rumor that his
break with his wife, Fritzi Scheff,
the light opera star, is without
any hope of reconciliation. Action
will be filed in the divorce courts
but whether Fox intends to in
stitute the suit is not made pub
lic.
PASS RKBOLUTIONS.
Negro republicans held a meet
ing at Odd Fellows' hall last
night ,adopted resolutions deplor
ing the death of Vice President
Sherman and listened to addresses
by T. J. Bell, J. Chandler and R.
M. Watts.
Mid gourds the Flock but poorly; that be la treacherous and a false
Mend."
, Dirty Dollars chuckled as these rumors spread.
I They came to the ears of the faithful Shepherd Dog, who was
more than ever determined to find the Wolf, and also bring the
Flock to a realization of the cause of its danger. He went among
the,' Sheep and said:
"You are hungry because you let the Bell Sheep and his gang
go before you. They eat the grass and leave you the stubble. If
they were less greedy, there would be enough, and more than enough
grass for all. Time and again I have warned you against the Bell
Sheep and his master, the Wolf. But you have not listened."
At this the Bell Sheep and all his followers pretended a great
Indignation, as Dirty Dollars had told them to do.
"It is an ancient wheeze," said Dirty Dollars, "but It always
works."
"How dare you," cried the Bell Sheep and his gang, "Bmlrch
our fair pasture? Are we not prosperous? Are we not the envy of
all other flocks? Where in all the world will you find grass so
sweet and abundant as here? What will the other Flocks think of
us when they learn that you, our Shepherd Dog, have maligned us
BO?"
But a murmur ran through the Flock. "It is true," the Sheep
said, "that the grass is sweet and abundant, but we do not get a
chance to eat it. And it may be true, as the Shepherd Dog Bays,
that there Is a Wo.lt in Sheep's clothing among us, for many of our
number have been destroyed."
There came a day when the Shepherd Dog and Dirty Dollars
met face to face, and the Shepherd Dog liked not the fit of Dirty
Dollars' coat.
"What kind of a Sheep are you?" demanded the Shepherd Dog.
"A perfectly respectable Sheep," Dirty Dollars replied. "I am
a member of the Chamber of Commerce, I move in the best circles,
and I go to church ©very Sunday."
"You are a liar!" said the Shepherd Dog. "You are a Wolf,
anfl your name is Dirty Dollars."
Tln-re ensued then a battle so desperate and so grim, the out-
MADELINE FORCE ASTOR.
NEW YORK, Nov. 1. —Declar-
ing'that society and the code of
Gotham's "4 00" bores her to ex
tremes. Madeline Force Astor, the
beautiful young widow of Col.
John Jacob Astor, who was lost
on the Titanic, has decided to re
main throughout the winter at
her country home. The $2,000,
--000 Astor palace on Fifth avenue
is closed.
"RATTLED ME"
SAYS WILSON
NEW YORK, Nov. 1. —Greatly
pleased at the reception accorded
him here at Madison Square Gar
den, Governor Woodrow Wilßon,
democratic nominee for president,
left today for Rochester. Wilson
confessed that for the first time
in his life be waß "rattled" last
night. The 62 minutee of cheer
ing bo affected hini that he for
got hfs prepared speech and de
livered another one. Governor
Wilson will return here tomor
row to review the democratic
parade scheduled for the after
noon.
BURNS TO DEATH
SPRINGDALE, Wash., Nov. 1.
—To have his home destroyed by
fir* and a baby daughter burned
to death while he was driving to
town to bring back a casket for a
deceased uncle, was the experl
ence'Of Frank Hill, who today Is
mourning the shocking death of
his little child.
MEAT IS CLIMBING
LOS ANGELES, Cal., Nov. 1.
—Another increase of 1-2 cent a
pound in tbe price of meat by the
local dealers today is effective No
vember 9. Dealers declare that
■tin another rise will come before
January 1.
MISS BTKKII TO IM,AY.
Miss Olga Steeb, the young and
distinguished pianlrte, will .give a
recital in the Christian church,
6th are. and North X streets,
thli evening.
The city of Tacoma has a loan
shark problem of its own and It
may start a city bank to get away
from it. If not, the city employes
who insist on patroni/.i ng the
loan sharks are likely to be drop
ped from the payroll.
The city has been bothered for
years by a large number of city
employes selling their time to
speculators outside who take out
about three per cent a month,
which amounts to 30 per cent a
year.
One loan man comes up every
month with from 20 to 50 as
signments.
This practice Is a nuisance and
the subject was referred to Com
missioner Freeland. Today the
mayor, aroused by the Times on
the loan shark proposition, asked
Freeland for a report. Freeland
said it was a difficult problem to
handle, that while most of the
men who disposed of their time
deserved no consideration, occa
sionally a man wag forced by ad
versity to do It.
He suggested that the city
might take care of such cases by
borrowing money from the banks
and loaning it to employes in
such cases, each case to be passed
on by a board before it was done.
The mayor was inclined to fa
vor the Idea. If this plan is at
tempted probably the mayor, com
missioner of finance and city clerk
win comprise the board on loans.
There are sonic men, even
clerks in the water and li^lit of
fice, it is said. Him have not
drawn their own pay for four
years.
CRUISER
IS SUNK
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
ATHENS, Nov. 1. —The Turk
ish cruiser Zthefidelund was sent
to the bottom of the Gulf of Salo
nika last night by a Greek tor
pedo boat, according to advices
Just received here from the com
mander of the Greek vessel. The
cruiser carried a crew of 22 0 men.
"WE'VE WON"
SAYS T. R.
NEW YORK, Nov. l.~"We
have already won. Whatever Is
the balloting next Tuesday, the
progressive party has been found
ed and put on a lasting basis."
This was the statement here to
day of Colonpl Roosevelt, the pro
gressive nominee for president,
who is in New York to attend the
progressive rally at Madison
Square Garden tonight at which
Oecar Strauß, progressive nominee
for governor of New York, will
be the principal speaker.
News Items From
the Hicktown Bee
Nice plcklod beets will bo
Riven away free with all sun.
pers at the Palace Hotel after
tliiß, Lute Pratt, the genial
prop., says.
Tin- Ladles' Voting Coterie
met In Libry hall last eve and
voted to give their ballots to
W. "fit ■ t because he's got a
Dice niudtaihe.
The 2J2 train got In on time
today. The cause of the acci
dent couldn't be found out by
our scribe.
It's all right to go into so
ciety once in a while, Lafe
Watertower says, but he's go
ing to draw the line at shaving
dish suppers after this.
come of which was so vital to the Flock, that the date of It la worth
recording. It was Tueaday, November •"•. 1012.
Between Dirty Dollars and the Shepherd Dog there waa this
difference: The Shepherd Dog never fought, save for hie own honor
and the safety of the Flock, while Dirty Dollars was at heart • thief
and a murderer, who would fight only when cornered and then
would not fight fair.
Also Wolf Dirty Dollars -was much larger and ' stronger thau
the Shepherd Dog, and he had a cunning which the Shepherd Dog
might have matched if he had been less honest.
liut the Shepherd Itog hud thix, at li-.i-l. In his favor, that ha
was fighting a good fight, and a Dog In iiiwuys braver than a Wolf,
just ax an Honest man is always braver than a Thief.
The Shepherd Dog knew he could expect no mercy from Dirty
Dollars. He would get no quarter, bo he would give none. It was
inevitable that this should be a battle to the death.. Either th«
Wolf or the Dog must die.
Once, twice, the Shepherd Dog leapt upon the Wolf, who
evaded the rush, and struik savagely, vicious, ripping the Dog's
shoulder. A little higher, and he would have reached the throat.
Next time !
The Dog turned and rushed again, before the Wolf had quite
recovered. They came to grips, and the shock of the Impact of
heavy bodies threw tumbling, writhing, upon the ground, the Wolf
above, the Dog below.
Hut the Dog's te«'th were buried in the Wolf's throat, and he
Ik 111 on grimly, blindly, knowing that (In- was the only thing left
for him to il"— to hold on while life l;isi<il.
And the Wolf in his coward heart knew he must kill or be
killed. He must fight as he never had to fight before. He must rip
and gash and tear until the vise-like grip of those Jaws on his throat
is relaxed. In a rage Insensate now he used every murderous trick
that it Is the instinct of the Wolf to employ. Ha must kill or be
killed. • * * He must slash and rend the flesh and crunch
the bones until these Jaws are loosed • • • until the brave
heart of hlB enemy Is still. He must kill or be killed.
ONK Ml ST IMK.
X STANDS I OK $10, which In these
flays is quite a bunch of money
to have nil at one time. The
Times will give $1 toward the X
for the lir-i inotlier-in-law joke
sent in by tomorrow morning.
I tend about it on page four of the
Times today.
HOME EDITION
HODGE GIVEN
BIG OVATION
Public and popular refutation
of the lies of the slanderbund
against Hob Hodge was given at
Seattle last night when the great
est political meeting in the his
tory of the city was held In the
Collsseum. Over 4,000 people
jammed Into the hall and at least
1,000 were turned away limply
unable to wedge Into the building
at all.
There were 100 from Blftet
Diamond on the stage, a dramatic
protest against the slanders ut
tered against their old neighbor,
ISob Hodge.
When Ho&ga and his four boys
walked on the stage a tornado of
enthusiasm broke loose, the like
of which had never been seen be
fore at a political gathering here.
The meeting was opened by Ole
Hanson in a ringing denial of the
stories that he had turned Bob
Hodge down. He showed up the
RACER IS KILLED
(I'nileil Press loosed Wire.)
I'HOKMX, Ariz.., Nov. 1.
—(ivy Itoniiiinc, .i motor
cycle racer, In dciul here to
il.m as a result of injuries he
received when his mu< lime
crashed into a (BUDS on the
exhibition race truck yester
ila.v. Koinnine Mils killed l>e
fore <lie eyes of 10.000 hor
ror-stricken spectators.
LOOK, VICTIMS
The state law prohibits ANYBODY from charg
ing ANYBODY more than TWELVE PER CENT
a year on any kind of a loan!
If Tolman, or Drake, or the "State Security Co."
or any other loan shark has attempted to collect
MORE THAN ONE PER CENT A MONTH from
you under any pretext whatever, come to the Times
office and state your case.
You need not pay one cent of interest if such an
attempt at extortion has been made.
No matter what the sharks tell you; if they try
to annoy you at your home or place of business,
swear out a warrant for them.
But above all, REFUSE TO PAY THE INTER
EST IP IT IS MORE THAN TWELVE PER CENT
A YEAR. ,
THAT'S THE LAWI ':'£s
About Everybody Reads the Times
, going home and In the home—-that's why Times advertising brings
the best results. "■ \\ .'-. ';■■<■- : ■■•--. ■•.:.■■:--_•>"-t*jV;:;~C: •-;-•'
\ For world news, store news, want news the people of Tacoraa
turn to The Times.';/ ■';" ;f/-.'.i. •■' '• :.'''-'■" .'-'■' "*V:: ■«/?■'
'_..- They ' buy and sell . houses, ■ farms, , horses, '. business enterprises;
and merchandise quickly through Times .Want Ads;,?3Fi''^3^£3gl^f
Employers looking; for help and help looking (or employment
use and read.Times Wants to their mutual advantage.
;, V , "Times > Wants Will Make and Save lfo« Money.;i; ■•":.:,",
B0 CKNTB A MONTH.
lying liny sheets who have been
telling of his flcKertion. When
Ole got throuffb there was a
grease spot left of the Hob Hodge
lnali.micrs and everybody under
stood that the whole program of
the Hay sang is to try to deceive
tho people.
When Hodge got up to speak
the audience went wild. The
crowd stood up on chairs at tfee
big bull moose stood before them
waiting to begin his speech.
At the conclusion of the meet-
Ing hundreds of women flocked
to the stage to shake hands with
Hodge, and with tears in their
eyes pledged their support to th»
man who had been lied against
by the slanderbund. Cheering
crowds accompanied Bob through
the streets to progressive head
quarters.
It was the j?re.itoßt political
gathering of the campaign.
SAVED HER BABE
(lly United Press leased Wire.)
LOS AKOBLJSS, Cal., Nov. I.—
Run down by an automobile Mrs.
Yetta llaiser saved b.er four
months' old baby from Instant
death by throwing the infant to
a friend. Mrs. Baitser was struck
by a machine driven by R. A.
Yates of San Fernando while
crossing First street here.

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