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The Tacoma times. (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, November 22, 1912, Image 1

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EXCLUSIVE STORIES WITH EXCLUSIVE PICTURES 6*. VtEREST TO ALL THE PEOPLE ARE SOME REASONS WHY MOST EVERYBODY IN TACOMA READS THE TACOMA TIMES.
v AFE WATKRTOWKR says:."lt's -
U all right for a gel to want to
LAKE WATERTOWKK says: "It's
all 1 i^hl for ,i gel to uant to
know about Hie latest si.vl.-s
■_. from Paree, but".what has be
■"■ , come 'of Uic darter who made
~." it a point to be sure the but- ,
■ ton-holos on dad's Sun. shirt
, hadn't pullout out?"
VOL. IX. NO. 294.
WOMEN AND CHILD SLAVES AND FILTHY CONDITIONS
FOUND IN AMERICA'S GREAT FOOD CANNING INDUSTRY
The Times today begins a story of American Industry
that has never been told. It is the stoiy of the ennneries.
And you will probably agree that it is us big "nil startling as
the story of the puckiiiK houses told a few years ago by Upton
Kinclafr.
This, however, is no romance. It is grim human fact.
It tells of n "Jmijtlc" of real people, where women and chil
dren are the prey, giving names, dates und places; of a jun
gle whence flows v stream of social pollution and disease.
The story is not pleasant. Hut you will want to read it,
for it ...... .-i ii- YOU and YOUR FOOD and the FUTURE OF
YOUR COUNTRY.
This is the era of rnnncd food. li\ • hij. in cities, herding
Folks Who Have Plenty of Money, Stow Away a Few Tons of Coal
Coal 1b seven dollars a ton, or
thereabouts.
Folks who have got plenty of
money usually buy four or five
tons 'long about this time of the
year and stow It away; no need
of having all the fuss and dirt of
the coul-man's visit but once a
year, is there?
Then there aro others who
haven't quite got the price of a
winter's supply a'l at one time, so
they buy a ton at a time—-and put
up with the fuss and dirt.
Then some folks Ufa in flats
and apartments whore the grateful
warmth radiates from the steam
pipes and they don't bother about
RENO AND TACOMA
COMPETITORS FOR
DIVORCE HONORS
IMYOKCKS.
Reno, Nev., transolent divorces allowed 730 a year
Tacoma, one year's residence required 3Joayear
Kalis fur Avoiding Divorces.
Don't marry too young.
Don't marry too old. .
Absolute sure-fire rule: Don't marry.
II divorces could lx> granted In office. He has oined only six
Tnoonm courts with »he same couples together in the saim-^ pc
, , riod. Giving the other three
ruthlessness that is allowed l»y jlu , ges the game rate with the ex _
Ihw In Reno, the little Nevada cel ,tion of Judge Chapuian, who
mecca for injured love would l>e probably handles only h.'ilf as
forced to lock its gato am! throw many, this would bring the Ta
atvny the key, in the belief of coma divorce factory's annual
Judge Kasterday. output up to 1,400 in four years.
The divorce market here would In other words, 2,800 unmated
bulge to the point that half a soults have found solace in soil
dozen more judges would be re- tude through the present udges'
quired to keep it down if It were term of office,
not for the fact that one must Judge Easterday says:
live in Pierce county a year Be- "There are two reasons for di
fore one may breathe the free air vorce. First, the lack of a home
of blessed singleness after one where the couple can live apart
has been married. from others second, the lack of
Judge Easterday said toaay
that he had ground out 00 abso
PAULINE FIRED
(By United Press Ix>ase<l Wire.)
MILWAUKEE, Nov. 22. —Will-
iam Galloway of Waterloo, lowa,
a breeder of Ayreshire cattle, who
was in Milwaukee today, has de
cided to give President Wilson a
cow to take the place of Pauline
Wayne, the Wisconsin cow given
President Taft by Senator Steph
euaon.
HE WON'T OBEY
Attorney G. G. Williamson has
Informed Judge Easterday he will
not obey any order of the court
to turn over a copy of steno-
graphic notes taken in the case of
Lena Griffith against Daniel Grif-
filh for divorce. These were asK
ed for when notice of an appeal
was given. Williamson says the
notes were taken at his- expense.
$400
CASH
For two lots on South
Trafton; convenient to
Sixth aye. ear line;
street graded, cement
walks. Easy terms.
i
Calvin Philips &Co.
11l California Bids. Mala 11
TheTacoma Times
THE ONLY INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER IN TACOMA
the dust and soot of the coal-bin
and the parlor stove.
The shabby delivery wagon of
the coal-man drove up in front of
a tumbled-down cottage just about
dusk last night. A crazy chimney
that threatened to collapse with
every fitful blast of the wind,
showed no signs of smoke and
there was an air of genera! delapi
tation and forloiness about the
cottage that would have depressed
the coal-man had he been of a
tempermental disposition, which
he was not.
Glancing at the dingy slip of
paper which he had stowed away
in his cap for safety, the coal-
children. Too youthful marriages
are bad; too old, worse."'
TALK OF It
BONO ISSUE
The city commissioners are
right now being hammered by
philanthropic citizens on account
of the condition of the city Jail.
"I got a scorching letter this
morning," said the mayor. Milis
admits he is getting scorched all
the time.
But the trouble is the old Jail
in the city hall cannot be fixed
so it will be either sanitary or
decent.
"We must have that municipal
farm," said Mills and Woods In
unison this morning. So all com
missoiners agreed.
That brought up the bond ts
suo.
And Mills asked that all com
missioners bring in a report next
Wednesday as to what they want
to submit to the people for a Hond
vote this year.
WEATHER FORECAST.
Rain tonight and Saturday.
SOCIETY WOMEN ARE NOW
WEARING DIAMOND GARTERS
<S> NEW YORK, Nov. 22.— ew York society women today
«■■ are expected to fall in Inle with the innovation in garter dec- <£
4 orations set at the horse show here by Mrs. Herman Oelrich's. <>
<S> As Mrs. Oelrichg started to mount the broad startcase at •&
•• Madison Square Garden, she daintily lifted her skirt and a •■
♦ diamond tassel, scintillating urilliantly, stood'out in strong <?■
<i> relief against a black silk stocking. The cluster of gems was -?■
<£ suspended from a point a little below the knee and Mrs. 9
■•> Oelrichs raised her skirt so all could see. She also wore a <3>
■i> diamond dog collar ajbout her neck. <s>
in flats, we lack gardens, poultry yards and preserving ket
tles. The can ojwner is the symbol of modern cooking. Meat,
i mt'iiililrs, ii-.li, fruit, jelly, everything comes out of cans.
The caunery replaces in a largo part the individual kitchen.
And for kitchen helpers the housewife lias thousands of name
less, viewless workers in hundreds of unknown factories.
We used to know every step of the process by which food
renched our tables. But what do we know of these factories?
The can we open to prepare supper—where wan it made?
Who gathered the material? Who prepared It? Under what
condtlons? We do not know.
Did tilth or poison enter the can from factory floor, ma
chine, vat or atmosphere?
man drew up his sad-looking old
steed and jumped from his seat.
There was no door-hell on the
cottage so ho banged lustily on
the frail and dusty door.
The door opened a few Inches
and the pale face of a woman
peered out.
"Coal, ma'am?" enquired the
coal man.
"Yes, put it on the porch," aji
bwered the woman and slio held
out a quartei-of-a-dollar.
"It's thirty-five a sack now,
missus," said the coal man.
"Why, I—-I only want 25 cents
worth," faltered the woman. "I
haven't got it in the house just
now—and I need the coal. The
TACOMA TREES THRIVE ON
CITY'S SUPPLY OF JUICE
Being a city lineman is not all otiy line force a lot of trouble,
joy. In many places the trees on trie
"Why a woman came out on parking have grown up until they
the front porch the other day run the city wires,
with a ehotgun and threatened 10 The loss of electric juice
blow the heads off the men if through those wet trees Is im
they did not set out of her trees mense and is worth n lot of
and quit cutting them," said As- money. The trees thus el«ctri
slstant City Electrician Gundev- tied seem to thrive more than
son this morning. others, which indk-ate a n«'w
This wet weather has &lven the scheme for horticulture.
SWITCH ENGINE
KILLS IN
MAM STKI'S IN FRONT OF L,O
<OM OTIV X —FATA IjL VH I* ItT
—DIES AT X. P, HOSIMTAIj.
Stepping directly in front of a
switch engine in the half-moon
freight yards of the X. Y. rail
road about C o'clock this morn
ing, Charles Dabler, a switchman,
aged about 25 years, was so se
verely injured that he died a few
hours later at the County hos
pital.
Although no one has called at
the undertaking parlors of Xoska-
Buckley-King to identify the re
mains as yet, it is said the dead
man has an aunt, brother and
sister in the city.
WHEN IS A POUND BOX OF
CANDY A POUND OF CANDY?
Mayor Seymour is being kept
■busy today by candy merchants
and manufacturers over the no
lice given by the mayor and
weights and measures Inspector
that a pound box of candy must
have a pound of candy and not
two or three ounces of box to
make up the pound.
C. M. Hotchkiss of the Tacoma
Candy and Bißecuit company was
COOK COMES BACK
(Ujr United Press leased Wire.)
SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 2 2.—
Dr. Frederick A. Cook of North
Pole fame, will lecture here De
cember 1, according to announce
ment today. Dr. Cook recently
completed a lecture season ni Ch:
cngo. He is now touring the
Northwest.
TACOMA, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1912.
baby—"
"Well, we don't sell less'n a
sack —and its thirty-five and has
been and you know it," added th«
coal man.
He glared indignantly at the
woman and stamped off.
The woman held the door ajar
till the sound of the rattley old
deliveiy wagon's wheels had died
away and then shut it dejectedly.
• • •
Folks who have got plenty of
money buy four or five tons 'long
about this time of the year and
stow it away; no need of having
all the fuss and dirt of the coal
man's visit but once a year, is
there?
CUPID'S DARTS
ARE THWARTED
UPCOAST CHASE WITH RRIDB
TO-ltK Kl>H RADLY FOX
PORTO RICAN — FATHER
MAM HIM.
SEATTLE, Wash., Nov. 22.—
Higo Custidio, Porto Rican, who
eloped from San Francisco with
Taka Muraoka, has been caught
here and is being hekl pending
the arrival of police officers from
San Francisco on the charge of
abduction, and the iglrl Is now on
the way home with her father.
F. Muraoka, the father, who
arrived here last night, at an
early hour located Custldio .Af
ter a sweating by the police he
disclosed the whereabout of the
girl. % . \:
The trio returned to San Fran-'
Cisco today.
right after the mayor early th:s
morning. He said a box of candy
wa« a box and not a pound.
"The trouble in people do not
know the difference. Candy Is
sold by the pound box, the two
pound or five pound and the pur
chaser thinks he is getting that
amount."
The dealers have been given
until December I to get a pound j
of candy into their boxes.
538 DIFFERENT
MENUS IN TAG.
Miss Annie Post, domestic
science teacher at the high school,
and Miss Marie Webber of ttfft Y.
W. C. A. are today submerged il\
a tidal wave of hanksglving
menus. They are udglnc, which
of the 538 different kind of tur
key dinners suggested by Tacoma
housewives is the best.
If all the different proposed
Thanksgiving dinners were spread
upon a single ta<ble, that table
would of necessity be large
enough to seat 2,090 • persons.
And each would find himself sur
ficiently filled.
Tomorrow the best Thanksgiv
ing menu will appear In Tne
Times with the approval of Mlc«
Post and Miss Webber.
Were the workers who handled the food clean themselves
nml free from offensive disease?
I'i.l they have light, air and elementary tilings of comfort
inn! sanitation?
Were their living qnarters decent, permitting moral and
physical cleanliness?
Did they get enough pay to keep well and decent?
AVero tehy helpless women and children?
Did they toil long hours at exhaustive tasks?
Have human l.l\ is and human sol is gone into those
enns?
All these questions Mary lt.nl, ■ O'llellly will answer in a
of remarkable reports written for the Times.
Mary Boyle O'Reilly—The
Story of a Woman Who Does
Things—Great Big Things
MARY BOYLIO OKEILLY.
Tf you were to ask any intelli
gent man or woman in Massa
chusetts, "Who's Mary Boyle
Olieilly?" you would be set
down as pitifully ignorant.
Her name is the best known
Irish name in New England. It
opens official locks for her in
NVw York and Washington. It
ie famous in Ireland. It gives
her entree alike in the exclusive
Bark Bay of Boston, in the offices
of senators and presi
dents, among philanthropists, edi
tors and social workers, in fac
torips and in prisons.
' Tliis brilliant woman is the
dangler of John Boyle O'Reilly,
th< famous Irish patriot and
tyoet, imprisoned and exiled for
his efforts to free Ireland, and
re\ered as one of the great names
Of Huston.
".Miss Boyle OTteilly," as her
hum Me Irish friends in Boston
call her, or "Miss Molly,' as she
is known to many a man and
woman in high station, inherits
her father's genius and passion
for liberty and service. She also
inherits —and has earned It, too
— the personal loyalty and love
of her race.
What has she done? That
wpulil make a long story, for
Miss O'Reilly, still young In
years and in face and heart, is
gray in useful action. Here arc
a few of her achievements in the
roalni of social service:
For seven years she was prison
commissioner of Massachusetts,
giving her time, effort and sym
pathy without pay, reorganizing
aiul humanizing the department,
preaching prison reform and
leaving her imprint on the char
acter ad lives of many thousand
prisoners.
For eight years ahe was trus
tee of the children's Institution
department of Massachusetts —
the official mother of 1,500 chil
dren.
Her best known piece of social
■ervice was her "baby farm 1b-
vesti^ation" of 1010, begun and
carried on by her alone, at her
own expense. She revealed a
horrible and widespread system
of "farming out" babies in New
Hampshire, including starvation
and murder of infants, and suc
ceeded in having a law passed to
stop tho practice.
She has investigated sardine
canneries, cotton factories and
laundries, working on a level
with hopeless toilers, and has
made her work effective in puU
licity and agitation" for corrective
laws.
In the "hot wave" or early
July, mil, when the thermoi.ie
ter stood 104 degrees in the
shade at the seashore, Miss
O'Reilly was operating a bubbler
in a steam laundry in a lioston
basement. She was there to in
vestigate personally the wrongs
of laundry workers.
She has written much for mag
azines and newspapers- her edi
torial articles and "Mrs. Dele
hanty" stories are famous in
Boston—but. she has done more.
Against the protests of rela
tives and friends, and usually at
her own expense, Mlfr O'Reilly
has chosen this hard path to
make it easier for the less for
tunate.
INFANT BORN
WITH GRAY HAIR
*> WHITESBURG, Ky., Nov. <S>
# 22.—Horn with gray •Lair, <?>
v the Infant son of Mr. and ♦
•> Mrs. John I]. Craft, the lat- .«
■$> ter a farmer of Prince «"
• Creek, is the wonder of the #
••> community today. <^
$ The news of the freak «>
<•' spread rapidly and all #
*> through the day.hundreds of ■!
* people beseiged the Craft <$>'
♦ home, hoping to get a <$>
■■•> glimpse of the infant. <s>
Miss O'Reilly, who Is the daughter of John Iloyle O'Kell
-I>. the famous Irish patriot and poet, is eminently Jltied for
the task she assumed. She won distinction as prison conimitH
sloner of Massachusetts, as a free Inure investigator and social
worker In many lields and as a writer for newspapers and
magazines. Her nccouut of the cunning industry is the r<--
Mill of v thorough anil .I.■(ailed investigation extending
through the summer and fall, during which time she person*
ally worked in the factories.
KVKKV BTATKMEXT SIIK MAKIX IS CABEPCIXT
WKIGtIKI), BVKRY PACT SIIIST.\NTIATKI» AXI» IMtOV
ABLE BY DATA IN lOSSKSSION (IK THK TIMES AM) BY
COUKOIIOItATIVK OiVICIAL DATA FlhKI) IX NKW VOKK,
WOMAN UNEARTHS
STARTLING FACTS
IN BIG CANNERIES
BY MARY BOYLE O'REILLY,
Special Commissioner Investigating Hie Cunning Industry for
Hie Times.
I am a working woman unlike my sisters only in this -for
tune has made DM a chronicler of facts.
Xo motive underlies this study save the wi: li to kelp the
helpless, the desire to do for other working women what they can
not do for themselves.
It was to give these mute toilers a voice that I became one
of them, and as Mamie Kiley, a bread-Una worker, Bought for
jobs in the canneries of the fertile QensaMM and Mohawk val
leys in Western New York.
All canneries in the United States aro not bad. Women and
children are not slaves and filth is not the ruin in many Ameri
can factories where fruit and vegetable! ate packed. Bui I found
after an inquiry among government and state officials that there
are noisome canneries in the east, in the south, in a belt across
the middle west and on the Pacilic coast— noisome because of the
slave-driving of women and children and Inn mil of the filth with
which they reek. Noisome- conditions which amount to a nation
|al scandal.
1 chose to study the canneries of Xew York because central
and western .New York is the metropolis of the canning industry of
America—an Industry which employs hundreds of thousands of
people in a season and represents an Investment of more than a
hundred million dollars. „'
As ".Mamie Hllfc.v" I worked in many towns and many factories
and lived in many Cannery settlements where non-resident workers
are housed, beig lltbject to all tlie condition under which these
people live and lahor. sharing their toil, their food, their hours of
relaxation, and their intimate personal Ufa.
I Know how the food of Mm people i.s propared in tbCM can
iiiiiß factories, and I know what tho (Miinciy lolk t'lidnir; and I
know that th« truth about the Wont factories lias never been told,
and that not half of it CAN' be told, in print.
I know tluit women have bad to work 120 hours a week under
incessant strain, resulting in physical and mental exhaustion.
I know that children under lfl have tolled day after day from
17 to IN hours, and that infants oT 6 and C years have labored
for a pittance.
I know that girls obliged to earn ■ liviiiß In can factory towns
are driven to desperation 1-y wages of from .?:; to $5 a week.
I have seen shacks in Which workers imported from the largo
cities are obliged to live, so filthy ;nid lacking In the common con
veniences of life as to make health, cleanliness and moral decency
impossible.
I have seen canned food in course of preparation handled by
teh fingers of unclean and diseased workers; I have seen this" food
which, like us not, you will plaOe on your tabte.thia winter, pass
ing through hands cut. festering and wrXpped in dirty rags, la
malodorous and filthy factories.
The whole story of the canneries can be told only by one
woman to another.
But such things a* a decent reticence may permit in print, I
am goiiif? to tell in detail, so that the people may know, and so
that an aroused public opinion may compel legislation and admin
istration in every cannery district in the land, for the protection
of the people's food and the welfare of the wage workers- who
prepare it.
In my article tomorrow I wtll tell the readers of the Times
the story of "The Women of the Canneries."
'^<s><S"<B><S><s><3><S><s'<*><®><s>s><S><S- .<»•■»■ <S><g.;s><S><S>3>^.s>'s><j>s>s>4><£<|
<!> ' <£
♦ PABBEXGKM QI7ARAXTIXKI>. " " <$>
<S> - • .____ <g>
•> DBVBR, Col., ov. 22.—Eight passengers aboard a Pull- <$>
■$• man car, Including A. G. Stilgebour. Mrs. Stilgebour and ■?>
-> their seven-year-old son of Los Angeles are quarantined to- «>
<«> day at Castle Rock, Col., 30 miles from here. This action was <3>
<?■ ordered by the Denver Doard of health as the result of A. C. <&
♦ Jones, a Pullman conductor of a Santa Fe train, being strick- <$>
♦ en with smallpox ■while earqute hero. ' <s>
<S>*>^)'*><J>^><s>'s>^><s-<J><&^<S><»* <$<$(<$ <$> ■$>•?> ■?>'■* <J> <?>•?) <J> <?><s> <(^ <>
WOULDN'T A PHOTOGRAPH BE THE
THING FOR CHRISTMAS?
At this time of year most everybody is
thinking of Christinas, and those who are
taking time by the forelock and not waiting
till the last moment in getting prepared
arc the ones who won't be worrying the
last few days next month. Perhaps one of
the most popular Christmas presents is the
photo, maybe of your sweetheart, or sister,
or mother. At any rate, there is no gift of
such taste and sense as a photograph.
You will notice in this afternoon's Times on
page H the display ad of Johnson's Studio,
110H Pacific avenue, in which a special offer
is made to the readers of this paper.
Eaciv time you have something to sell
and do not use a Times want ad to sell it
for you you are just losing that much time
and money. Times want ads are famous
for their pulling powers. Try it, Main 12.
ON I -II 111 the ilnn^s you wad In
the iii'»~|iii|h-i> |irnve ilmt
Irutli l. •.n.'iiiui i tliun fiction,
and FT.. ..mi', i-iili kinder li<-f|w
/<>u in |)l«:i-inul:li' until i|iatlon
of finding it's nil a iukr. Now,
, isn't that tlic truth, liiiisf:isla?
30 CENTS A MONTH.

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