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The Tacoma times. (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, January 15, 1913, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085187/1913-01-15/ed-1/seq-1/

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FULL report of the boxing contest'
between Leach Cross and Joe
Rivers, which occurred in New
York last night, on Times sport page
today.
. VOL. X. NO. 21.
TACOMA'S SON IS GOVERNOR TODAY
«><s><s><S><t><S><S><B><S><3><S><s>.s.<S.<3> <$><$> <$>'$><j><s><»s><S><S><S><i><S><J><S><s><e>
* . • ♦
<?> SPEAKER TAYLOR GETS GAY <8>
O _ •■•- ;. ..;; p;.--,; «
<«> (By United Press s Leased Wire.) :.)', <$>
<$> OLYMPIA, Jan. 15.—Speaker Howard Taylor . of the <$>
<§■ house drew a hot call-down at the second session of the legis- <§>
<$> laturc this morning when he attempted to poke fun at Mrs. <$>
<«> Frances C. Axtell, one of the two women members, when she <$>
<S> Introduced a hill regulating morals at the request of the W. <S>
«> C. T .U. - ■« -H <j>
<8> Mrs. Axtell offered three hills which had been submitted •$>
<§> to her by the temperance workers. One intended, to curb <$>
♦ "white slavery," was referred by Taylor to the committee on <?>
3> commerce and manufactures as a joke. <S>
4> Many members of the house took kindly to the intend- #
$> ed humor and a roar of laughter went up. Hut Mrs. Axtell <*>
<$> was angry. Rising from her seat, she waited until the noise <3>
<?> subsided, then demanded in firm tones that the speaker re- <£>
<S> tract Ma action and refer the bill to the committee on morals. <S>
<S> Taylor complied at once. <J>
«> a
«^<£§>'s<S><?><S><S>s><3»3><£3><^4»e.<s>3><£<£<s><s><j>,
COMMON-LAW WIFE WANTS
HER THREE CHILDREN; FATHER
HOLDS THEM IN PORTLAND
'$ Is'<*>>?>3><B><§>'S><s><S><S><s'S><S<S><*
«S> WANTEDA wife. Apply <?>
<£ A. (». Brown. <$■
*><B>'s«s>@'<S'<s>>j>>*>'s><§><§'3><S> <$>*?>
This Is the advertisement
■which appeared in a Seattle
newspaper seven years ago, and
•which Mrs. Etta Rocco of 921
South B street, Tacoma, an
swered at the time.
The result was a common law
marriage between herself and
Brown.
There were several children as
the result of the common law
marriage, two of them being
Amon G. Brown and Ernest
Brown, who are now four and
five years of age.
Brown failed to support the
•woman who had answered his ad
vertisement, and Mrs. Itocco
■washed and scrubbed that she
and her family of little. ones ana
their father might live.
At last, no longer able to en
dure the burden, Mrs. Uocco
asked the juvenile authorities ror
assistance. Brown was driven
from the home and Amon and
Ernest were placed in a home
supported by Pierce county.
Mrs. Rocco's work finally took
her to Seattle.
While she was there, Brown
appeared before Judge Chapman,
and obtained an order giving him
the custody of the little boys
Amon and Ernest. The mother
was not notified of this action
until Brown had spirited the chil
dren out of the state.
Search located the man and
two lads In Portland, and the
mother secured an order for their
return. That was in October
1910.
This order was placed in the
WOULD
RECALL
JUDGE
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 15.
Co-operation with the movement
instituted by San Francisco club
women to secure the recall of
Police Judge Weller for reducing
the bail of a prisoner charged
•with a statutory offense, was
promised here today by Rudolph
Spreckels, San Francisco million
aire. Judge Weller reduced the
accused man's bail from $3,000
to $1,000, which the latter fur
nished and left the state.
HYDE ON TltlAli
(By United Press leased. Wire.)
KANSAS CITY, Mo., Jan. 15.—
The third trial of Dr. B. C. Hyde
. for the alleged murder of Colonel
Thomas Swope, millionaire uncle
of Mrs. Hyde, started here today.
The defense attorneys tried hard
to secure a postponement but
failed. " i . -
i
I SO MANY TACOMA GIRLS WOULD GO ON THE JSTAGE-LET THEM READ THIS I
!< ___ -m
Temperament.
Ambition.
Courage.
Memory.
Health. ,
Energy. ;
Pluck.
Hope.
: ±— —_____ :_—___ #
BY ROBERT MANSFIELD.
All these things you must
have, along with the essence
, ■•" of an unconquerable sense of
humor. . .
I That Is what Miss Florence
Bell, who is leading woman
TheTacoma Times
hands of C. A. Read, who was
then juvenile officer for the
county.
Read never served the papers
and for nearly two and a half
years Mrs. Rocco has been unable
to see her two children who are
with Brown in Portland.
Sheriff R. W. .lamieson looked
up the order for the return of the
Rocco-Brown children, and tooK
it with him to Portland with the
intention of bringing Dack to
their mother the two little boys
who have been the prisoners of
their father for mure than two
years.
Sheriff .Tamieson left for Port
land last night.
MRS. ASTOR 1
TO WED LORD
Mrs. Ava W. Astor.
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
NEW YORK, Jan. 15. —Lorn
Basil Blackwood has arrived here
ou board the steamship Cedrlc.
Dispatches from England say that
he comes to marry Mrs. Ava
Willing Astor, former wife of Col.
John Jacob Astor, who died on
the steamship Titanic.
Lord Blackwood was found on
the upper deck of the Cedric.
"I have found," said his lord
ship, "that reporters are a bore."
With that he moved hastily to
his stateroom and locked the door
from the inside.
Lord Basil Blackwood was con
veyed In an automobile to the
Astor residence.
at the Princess Theater told
me when I ventured to bore
her nearly to death with my
chatter and my questions,
last evening, after the per
formance of "In Mizzoura."
"You would be surpris
ed," began Miss Bell when
we were comfortably settled
—she on a gilt property sofa
and myself on a big trunk in
mid-stage. "You'd be sur
prised to know what a lot of
young girls come to me for
advice. They want to carve
out careers—they are just
dying to act."
As I have suffered the tor
tures of the forever-damned
through several amateur
productions, I could reason
ably believe that there are a
lot of girls, oceans of 'em no
THE ONLY INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER IN TACOMA
GUNDERSON
LIED SAYS
THE MAYOR
ASSISTANT CITY ELECTRIC
IAN BEFORE COUNCIL THIS
MORNING TO EXPLAIN AL
LEGED DUAL POSITION —
CHARGED THAT UK HAD
CONTRACT WITH I'KDKH
SON WHILE WORKING FOR
CITY".
Andy Gunderson, assistant city
electrician, was on the carpet
again before the council tuts
morning. Some time ago he was
up charged with working for the
city while holding a contract on
the transmission line from Hans
Pederson. He said then he had
no contract.
This morning Mayor Seymour
brought the evidence In a law
suit tried in Seattle before tne
council giving the testimony of
Gunderson in court there to the
effect that he had the contract
with Hans Pederson for tne
transmission line.
"I want to say that Gunderson
came before this body before and
lied to us," said the mayor.
Gunderson said nothing.
"And I have it from reliable
authority that as late as last
August, after he was working for
the city, he still held this con
tract and paid off the men with
his own checks," said the mayor.
"If he has been doing that he
has no business working for the
city," sa;o Mills.
And Gunderson went back to
work.
SEEKS LIGHT
' , THROUGH
POETRY
"To see or not to seethat
is the question
That confronts us and we
ask yon to hark,
For If we hump our heads
and get congestion
Or break our limbs, while
walking in the dark,
We'd use hud language
make the atmosphere
Smell sulphuric, and do you
think it nice
To come from church —our
minds on other sphere
Feeling our way and slipping
on the ice?
Forgetting all the preacher
said and cuss?
Would that be right? We
ask you, do your part;
Give us the lights, be kind
and make no fuss;
Be good and have enlarge
ment of the heart."
W. J. Ahrens and 20 other
East Enders want street lights at
4 sth and East F and G streets.
Ahrens took a petition to the city
council this morning with the
foregoing plea in blank verse.
"Are you the man that swore
coming from church?" asked
Mayor Seymour as Ahrens pre
sented himself with pride in his
literary effort.
"Ya," said Ahrenu.
"What brand was you drinking
when you got this up," asked
Woods.
"I'm a Dutchman from the old
Country, but I have not drank a
drop for 2 years," said Ahrens.
And the petition was referred
to Commissioner Lawson.
SEATTLE, Wash., Jan 15.—
Dr. William J. Hanover 'is out
$75 today, paid as a fine, as the
result of prescribing cocaine to
George Downey, an employe of
the state medical board, who told
the doctor that "his general con
dition" was such that he needed
the drug. .■".-, ,
doubt, who are "dying" to
act, and they shouldn't be In
terrupted. We ought to let
them go ahead and expire In
the dear delirium of their
very first appearance.
And I said as much to my
charming vis-~a-vls, which la
my way o f referring back to
Florence BeH.
Somehow that woman puta
high-brow thoughts into
my mind; mayhap it is be
cause she is talented and
pretty and patient.
For she went on to tell
me just wlnt asset a. girl
must have if she would be
successful as an actress.
"Most of the young girls
who enter the profession
have no idea, not a faint
guess," she continued Miss
TACOMa, WASUINGTON, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 1913.
CHICAGO HAS HOTTEST, SPLASHIEST
"CHARITY BALL" HUMANS EVER SAW
Ity Idah MrGlone Gibson.
CHICAGO, Jan. 15. —My eyes
have been dazzled by the most
gorgeous costume ball ever pulled
off in America. Never, I believe,
has American society flaunted Its
wealth in such magnificence. The
chosen sons and daughters of
Chicago were there, and lots of
sons and daughters from other
cities were also there to help swell
the dazzling display of riches.
It was the Charity Ball. All
the priceless jewels and costly
silks and music and lights and
champagne were for the benent
of the poor. ■ ;
I will tell you about the ball,
and what the poor got out of it.
It was an "Abrian Nights'' ball,
and most of the women hailed
the chance of wearing trousers
with delight.
Prom hundreds of luxurious
limousines alighted women en
veloped in the velvets and furs
of the modern western world.
These were quickly doffed to
disclose the opulence and mag
nificence of the Orient as It is
dreamed by the modern Chicago
multi-millionaire.
Under the brilliancy of
hundreds of yellow shaded
electric lights, and caught
here and there in the beams
of FOUR SPOT LIGHTS
which continually circled the i
room, THE SPARKLE OP
JEWELS WAS BLINDING.
Mrs. Joseph E. Coleman, one of
the executives of the affair, wore
a wonderful costume, that looked
as though it were all made of
pearls. The loose fitting tunic
shimmered with them, and she
carried a feather fan set in an
Oriental handle mounted with
pearls. Her head-dress was com
posed of a bird of paradise with
huge i;earl ear muffs and pear
shaped pendants, and about her
neck were three magnificent
ropes of these most costly
jewels.
All the other women were at
tired in the same magnificence,
or as nearly as they could ap
proach it.
And did they dance the Tango?
They certainly did and all the
other ragtime dances that society
ha stolen from the tenderloin,
and adopted with so much zest
MONEY"
KING
FAKES
WASHINGTON, D. C, Jan.
18. — William Rockefeller,
the Standard Oil magnate, Is
not too ill to testify briefly
before the house committee
investigating the money -.fj
trust.
This, at least, is the report
made to the Pujo committee by
Dr. Richardson, the medical ex
pert sent to Miami, Fla., to ex
amine the millionaire.
"A long examination," said Dr.
Richardson, "might endanger
Rockefeller's health, "but a short
examination would have no ef
fect." ;■- V: |
Rockefellers physicians say ex
amination of their patient* would
endanger his life. .. ■>\.,- : ■".'."• 'i-
It is understood ' Chairman
Pujo will order Rockefeller to ap
pear before the probers at once.
The committee for weeks tried
to secure service of a subpoena,
on Rockefeller, but the million
aire eluded House Serge»nt-at-
Arms Riddell and a score o*r de
tectives. .••-••;•>?,. t
Bell, "of all that will beset
them before they can even
consider that they 'belong';
that they are real/ly-and
truly actresses. And X am
sure that there are many,
many of us who doubt very
much if the rewards are real
ly worth the effort.
"A girl must have health,,
and hope and ambition.
Nearly all of us must start '
at the very lower rung of
the ladder. It is almost the
came In this profession as in
any other. The one who
makes a modest beginning
and works carefully, slowly
and painstakingly toward
the top, is the one who has
the happiest success ahead
of her.
"Reputations and lofty po-
Mrs. Joseph K. Coleman, wearing her gorgeous pearls at the
. „-'" / Charity Ball.
«>..,'•■* <»>
♦ THE "CHARITY BALL' AND THE PROFIT TO CHARITY <?>
<$>„-;■_; • . _ #
<?■ Wealth of families represented $500,000,000 <j>
<$• .Cost of jewelry worn ■.. . 10,000,000 ♦
<¥ : Cost of clothing worn , . 1,000, «>
• Cost of fancy costumes unusable after the ball 100,000 <$>
♦ Most costly jewelry worn, Mrs. Harold McCor • <$>
♦ > Micks chain 250,000 $>
<$>-Received from cafe patrons (drinks) 10,000 <$>
<$> Total receipts 43,000 <•>
• Expenses of the ball, rent, lights,' orchestra, <» ,
*. _ etc • 29,000 <$>
<?> WHAT CHARITY GOT 14 000 ♦
»<S>£><t><3><S><s><s><s><;> $><S><s>^<s®<s><^<s>s><s><j.<s><s><s><B >< £>,s<j >^ ]
■ >.■■' .'■■■. ~ ! —— ' —— ~~ ___ i
ANOTHER JOB AT
|THE CITY HALL
■Another job was created by the
city commission this morning on
recommendation of Commissioner
Mtfls, a stenographer being given
thfc- humane officer. Woods ob
jected. '.. •
The salary will be the lowest
paid in the city, being only $33.33
a month. .'^ "_
<{><$> <S><S> <$> <g> $-<?>.,?><£><s> <$, <$>
<&■ . <H>
* ONLY ON CURTAIN DAYS ♦
<?>.:., -^- — »
<$> „ The ordinance prohibiting ♦
■$■ the loading or unloading of <?>
<* powder in the city is a dead- *
<¥■ letter," and Mayor Seymour •$>
* this morning introduced a ♦
» new one to replace it. The <$>
<?> new ordinance, will assign <$>
<$> certain days of the week <$>
•« when it may be unloaded #
•» and it will have to be la- <*>
i* beled in large letters. <J>
* ' <?>
-4 '
I sit ions in the theatrical world
«that are made over-night are
'rarely substantial or last
' Ing.
| "For eons and eons of
i. time," she continued, "many
', people have believed that an
I actress is necessarily frivol
§ ous and vain, and I know
; that all sorts of unkind and "
i j ungenerous things are said
1 about women of the stage.
'• ) " "Did you ever know any
, immoral actress?" she de
, manded sharply. ■ - ,
Since I am.a married man,
I ■ «nd my wife dutifully reads
all my stuff,.l refused to an
swer on the '.grounds—you
know how it is, fellers.
"No," sir, you didn't," an
"•wered Miss Ben for me,
much to my relief. . '.JXi?**.
FREE OLYMPIA
WOMAN, KILLS'
HER HUSBAND
(Ily United I'rpss I.vim.l Wire.) :
OLYMPIA, Wash., Jan. 15.— I
Mrs. Nellie Hinds is free today,
having been acquitted after three I
hours' deliberation by the jury on '
a charge of murdering her hus- 1
band. She shjOt him when lie '
tried to break into their home on
the Skookumchuck river after
they had separated.
APPOINT SPORT EDITOR
(Hy I uit.il Press l.ciis.-.l Wire.) (
NBW YORK, Jan. 15.—John '
B. Foster, sporting editor of a <
New York newspaper, today ac- '
cepted ai>|)ointment as secretary
of the New York Baseball club l
of the National league, i
"Stage women must be
healthful, moral, careful of
their physical and mental
well-being—or where would
they be? They wouldn't
last—and an actress must
have a full, fruitful life to
amount to anything."
So there you are, Tacoma
•—, -^——— : _ : • - •
PITTS BURG, Pa., Jan. * 15.— more |
battles between negroes and whites in Pitts- |
burg—the "Smoky? city— the order sent |
down. today by John M. Morin, director of pub
lic safety. Negroes may box ' among them
selves, but .with white fighters the color line is | I
to be strictly drawn. ; " t'u v^ : ,;
•— — : _^
CHEER UP, Helene! There is
plenty of fun in life. Are you
reading the laugh paragraphs on
the editorial page of the Times?
HOME EDITION 30 CUNTS A MONTH.
ERNEST LISTER
IS INAUGURATED
IN HIS FIRST MESSAGE FAVORS SEVERAL ITelW—llli
PRlMAßY—oi'posks UOXOS FOU good iiOAIIH Tot! 1 '
APPItOI'UIATIQX OF $.->«><), pop y v PANAMA XXI OSlflo"
OLVMIMA, Jan. 15.—With <
dons enthusiasm everywhere, Km
rated governor of the state of W
The oath was administered I
ma citizens held (he posts of hoi
inaugural ceremonies. ' ,
Governor Lister's inaugural
much favorable comment.
Lister's Message.
"We live In an ago of advance
ment mid progress," said Gover
nor Ernest Lister in his inaugural
address. "The spirit of individ
| ual independence in the political,
business and social life of the
people is stronger than ever be
fore. The voters arc less con
cerned with parly names than
with efficency and economy in
the administration of affairs.
"Public opinion as expressed nt
the lust general election clearly
indicated that the public offi
cials then chosen follow progres
sive lines."
Presidential Primary.
Governor Lister said he believed
the officers chosen would be fol
lowing this clearly defined wish
of the people by the enactment of
laws for a presidential primary,
direct election of senators, non
partisan city and county elec
tions, abolition of the straight
ticket circle on ballots, revision
of the election laws to make vot
ing more simple and clear to the
voter, providing for the initiative
and referendum, congressional re
dtltrictlng, abolition of the state
tax commission, state highway
work by state prisoners, abolition
of the board of managers of the
state reformatory, prohibiting the
state boards of dental examiners,
medical examiners, pharmacy,
nurses, optometry, barbers' ex
aminers, einbalmers' examiners
from collecting fees and pocket-
Ing them, abolition of the state
bureau of accounting, abolition of
the offices of state dairy and
food commissioner, state grain in
spector, oil inspector, commis
sioner of horticulture, state veter
inarian and combining all under
one commissioner of agriculture.
Also putting state fruit inspector
under commissioner of agricul
ture.
Opposes llonds for Good Konds
The governor opposed issuing
bonds for good roads at this
time and urged caution in increas
ing tho tax levy for roads, but
urged systematizing the work so
the money on hand and to bo
come available will be wisely ex
pended.
He urge'! increasing the tax on
fisheries to compel them to pay
the cost of maintaining the state
fish commissioner's office, the
appointment of a state architect,
reduction of work and expense of
public printing, the adoption of
a state flag, a committee of three
to redraft bills before the legisla
ture to make them clear.
Opposes Appropriation for Panama
Exposition.
He opposes the $500,000 ap
propriation for the. Panama ex
position, suggesting that $200,000
should be high water limit for
consideration. He suggested that
the state would get more out of
It to appropriate say $150,000 for
the exposition and put the other
$350,000 into logged-off lands
and in clearing the same .to be
sold to settlers on long-time
payments to develop the agricul
tural resources of the state.
SEATTLE, Wash., Jan. 15.—
After being closed for 10 days on
account of snow at Laconla, the
Milwaukee line Is open today ana
the Olympian pulled out on time
followed by a fast freight loaded
with valuable merchandise from
the Orient.
The Great Northern hopes to
resume traffic some time late to
day. :
-— 'I
girls. )
If you want to be an act
reßß, Just collect a generous
measure of temperament,
ambition, and pluck, and
courage, and health, and en
ergy, an<l memory, and hope
And a sense of humor!
t lie city full of people and ticincn
ii est Lister of Tacoma was iuiniii.
k luhlngton today.
l>y Chief Justice Crow, and Taco
n «>r in the procession and at the
address to the legislature evoked
! asco Man Used
Gun As a Cane;
It Killed Him
I'ASCO, Wash., Jan. 15.—.
Albert Trovethj is dead at
Levy, IK miles east of here,
today, as the result of using
his gun, muzzle up, as a
walking stick while trudging
through the snow. When ho
.jammed it against a stick It
was discharged, the bullet
going upward through h: 9
lungs.
POSTAL MAN
TOOK FUNDS
IS CHARGE
E. J. Larson, former manager
of the Postal Telegraph & Cable
company's offices hero, Is today
charged on a warrant with mis
appropriating $I,li'A.i2, October 5,
191 1. the funds of that company,
to his own use.
J. A. Forehand, superintendent
of the Postal in Seattle, swore to
the warrant before Justice Evans
today.
Larson has been working for
the Chicago, Milwaukee & St.
Paul railway In Tacoina.
Forehead says Larson was
given an opportunity to refund
the money, and that he has re
paid in part, but that there are
yet $11 which he has not re
turned.
Larson claims that shortages
found were due to bad bookkeep
ing before he took the position
of superintendent.
CITY SERVED
WITH PAPERS
TODAY
JUDGE! STILUS BELIEVES
FIREMEN' XOT WITHIN
.IUHISDICTION OF THE
EIGHT-HOUII.
Papers were served by Attor
neys Hone & Wright today on the :
city of Tacoma, Commissioner
Mills and Fire Chief McAlevy in
the suit started by them for the
city firemen to enjoin the city
from working firemen longer .
than eight hours a day.
Judge Stiles, the city attorney,
was inclined to make light of the
case. He said the firemen work
on salary by the month and are
not within the scope of the eight
hour law.
The plaintiffs think differently,
however, and are willing to carry
the matter to the supreme court
to see who is right about it.
1-4
OFF
of heavy winter weight 1
Overcoats—
$20 Overcoat ...$15.00 1
$25 Overcoat .. .$18.75 j
$30 Overcoat ... $22.50
Menzies &
Menzies &
Stevens Co.
■ T. J. FI,KETWOOD, Mgr.VS H
„ :■: 913-815 Pacific ay.
Tacoma, Wash. I
' J 5 _•/ -}

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