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The Tacoma times. (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, January 18, 1913, Image 1

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(OTHER WIVES-AND A HUSBAND-ANSWER THAT BIG QUESTION ASKED BY "THE WIFE"-READ THEM ON PAKE FOUR 1
I«T isn't wholesome to take life too seri
|/ ously. Sunshine and smiles are
Jj the leaven of life—realizing this,
--"Ihe Times has a lot of little paragraphs
that have a laugh in them every day.
VOL.X. NO. 25.
ACCUSE LAWYER MURRAY OF PERJURY
URGES $20,000,000 BOND ISSUE
TO BRING SETTLERS TO STATE
PROMINENT ATTORNEY WOULD ASK STATE TO SPEND
BIG SUMS TO CLEAR OFF LOGGED OFF LANDS AND
GIVE THEM TO SETTLERS ON EASY TERMS—WANTS
IMMEDIATE ACTION TAKEN BY THE PEOPLE.
Here's a mighty big Idea!
It's a scheme for the state of Washington to si>eiul twenty millions of dollars to build itself
a backbone. It promises a slate bond issue for that amount to dear our wasted lugged-off lands
and put them in the possession of settlers on a practicable easy-payment plan.
Washington today needs this backbone composed of thousands of small farm owners who by
the state's aid in beginning, can make a living oft' the soil. (ii\cn this substantial backing, this
Male, with its shipping, its lumber, its fishing and its other natural industries, would take the rank
it is entitled.
Frederick Kausmann, prominent Seattle attorney, is the father of the idea. He outlined it
to the editor of the Times today and asked this paper to pass it along to its readers. The plan is to
start action now. To get a bill through the legislature authorizing this bond issue which would
have to be ratified by the people at the next general election.
Here's Mr. llausinan's plan in detail. The Times does not endorse it without reserve, but the
Timi's does believe it to he a great big constructive scheme which if worked out properly and rea
sonably safeguarded will develop into n great, a growing and a lasting benefit to the state and to
the people us a whole:
This -tut.- is at n standstill. Is it to remain so?
Hear the truth. In its most populous county, King, out of
427,500 acres of unimproved (not timbered) lands, only 2,300 were
ill the fiscal year 1011-12 converted to "improved." "Only about
three-quarters of one per cent in a year! Think of it! And "im
proved" means in most instances, alas, only a little fencing, the
pulling' of a few stumps, the erection of a shack, or the tilling of a
garden.
PIKItCK COUNTY
In Chehalis county the "improved" increased about one and
one-half per cent, in Snohomtsh less than one per cent, in Tierce
«bout one per cent, in Skagit about one per cent. The average of
all west of the mountains is under two per cent!
"Dull times in the east have prevented immigration." Non
tense! A million Americans have been transferring themselves to
Canada. They would have preferred to come to our mild climate
under their own flag. Hut we had nothing to offer except the arid
lauds or stump lands. Both require capital, capital and years of
patience.
mOED ItEADY SOIL
Advertise more outside? Absurd! Why advertise? You lack
what merchants call (lie goods to deliver. The immigrants need a
ready soil. You have advertised in vain. Did we not three years
ago in the Seattle exposition, an admirably conducted one, adver
tise to perfection the resources of this state. How much immigra
tion since?
THIS STATE MUST ACT AT ONCE.
Immigrants in great numbers will offer themselves with the
opening of the Panama canal. They will seldom possess $100 to the
family. They will look at our lands, write home discouraging re
ports, and move on.
Now what is to be done?
STATK SHOULD RORROW
Subject to taxation in this state is property assessed at one
thousand millions of dollars. The state owes nothing.
This state should borrow at once twenty millions, only one
fiftieth of its appraised wealth. It should be distributed over East
ern and Western Washington in the development of lands for colo
nization. The state can borrow on twenty-year bonds at not above
four per cent. It should then, first, begin the clearing and sale of
its public lands, and, second (beca use its public lands are not always
in locality, area, or soil, the best for agriculture or economical
clearing) it should purchase logged-off lands from private owners
when advantageously situated, clear them' and sell to settlers on
twenty payments, at a small advance, say five per cent on the cost,
.with interest at about one-half per cent above the rate on its bonds.
Speaking generally, after providing for the clearing and sale
of state lands, a measure which the present legislature should pass,
will provide for the purchase of private lands after written reports
showing the analysis of the soil and the estimated cost of clearing.
The governor of the state should be the official head of this work,
and in his own handwriting approve every purchase. The pur
chased lands should be divided into tracts of 20 or 40 acres, in
each of which the state should clear all or such portion as may be
wise, leaving the rest in instances to be cleared by the settler, who
begins with at least enough cleared by the state to support him.
- The settler would purchase upon conditions of reasonable
residence upon the soil and of forfeiture if he abandons before cer
tain payments have been made (this to prevent speculators) and no
assignment will be perr'"ed without the consent of the state, or
title to be given until' . setter, if a foreigner, has declared his
mention to become a cltLrfn.
THE BIG IDEA IN BRIEF
*• It proposes to give the sta te a backbone. ' <§>
<8> -- Twenty million bond Issue lor the clearing of logged-off •$>
<?> lands and for the establishment of irrigation projects. <S>
$> Prt these lands into hands of settlers in tracts of from <?•
<?■ 20 to 40 acres, having put land in shape to enable thrifty *
<5> settler to make living. ; . <!>
«. Sell these tracts to settlers under certain fair and rea- <»>
*> sonable terms. •■--.. <$>
<?> 1 Use state owned lands then buy other needed lands. <$>
<?> • Tax land which owners refuse to sell at the price offered <?■
<> by the state. £*• :. » <5>
"♦-■ ■ .-..: ' -': »■- '>: - . ■ ; -.. ■ ''■ <8>
• «>♦«-«>♦ <&«>♦ ♦**♦♦♦♦♦««♦♦*♦*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
POINCARE QUITS
FRENCH CABINET
(By United Press Leaser! Wire.)
PARIS, Jan. 18. —M. Raymond
Polncare, president-elect or
France, today tendered his resig
nation as premier to President
Armund Pallieres, whom Poln
care will succeed on February 28.
His resignation from the prime
ministry, Polncare's friends ex
plained, was made necessary by
his victory of yesterday.
;.■-■: U .M.i, \ WALLA, Jail,; —Charged with writing numerous
i<" j: • love letters to different women' of the , city whom ,he bad, never
jj seen, Wllliuui I'm. lit is being held in the city jail awaiting a
1! * hearing in the court, '-. ;, ,' . • '. ';■ . ~* 'l-f-X'-',' ■■
*t '.'".- "Yon fellows think I'm going to steal the flower of your fair
i city," exclaimed Praoht when arrested. " ','. ■/.,■/,. « ; . ■„ 4j
TheTacoma Times
BRANDT TO
BEGIN ANEW
(By Fnited Press Leaned Wire.)
WASHINGTON, D. C, Jan. 18.
—Foulke E. Brandt, Mortimer L.
Schiff'a valet, pardoned yester
day by Governor Sulzer of New
York, Is en route today to Min
nesota there to begin anew.
Brandt is traveling on a ticket
which Senator Knute Nelson of
Minnesota purchased for him.
THE ONLY INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER IN TACOMA
<$-<S><3>3><S>'3><S''s><B><£<£<S>'S><S>s>^
«> «
•> WHY SOMETHING ■$>
•> SHOULD BE DONE <*>
<s> —:— <S>
<» This state needs the back- <?>
•*> ing of a great big thriving ♦
■$> body of small land owners. ♦
•$> The number of livestock Is <«
# not increasing. <?>
<§> The amount of Improved <8>
• lands is increasing but <S>
«■ slowly. ■?>
•*> There are thousands and <?>
♦ thousands "of settlers and <?>
•• there will be more tiiou- <§>
•' sands when the Panama ca- <$•
»'• nal opens who will be eager <§>
♦ to come here to work here <$>
# and to add to the wealth of <§>
£> the state if the state makes <•>
$> it possible for them to do so. <$>
ISLANDS
MAY JOIN
PIERCE CO.
TACOMA BUSINESS MEN ARK
I'LEASEO WITH TENTATIVE
I'IjAN TO BRING MAIKV ANI>
YASHOX ISLANDS INTO THIS
COINTY.
Taconia business men are to
day recommending the feasibility
of annexing Yashon island to
I'ierce county, since it is expected
that the plan for the formation
of a new county from Maury an<l
Yashon islands will be dropped.
While the movement hns al
ready been inaugurated In Olyni
pia for the formation of this new
county, the report from the is
land today is that the project w ill
probably fall through for this
.tear and may uot come up again
at all.
Election Dropped.
The leaders in the project were
contemplating an election today
to get the required per centage
of the voters demanded to comply
the legal requirement, but
the coin was largely spent In sup
porting a lobby at Olympla and
the election was called off.
In the meantime business men
are evincing an interest in the
case and it is likely that with the
coming of spring Tacomans will
again take up the matter of a
ferry across to the island, and at
the same time urge the annexa
tion of Vashon Island to the
county.
Martin on Subject.
Secretary T. Hr Martin of the
Commercial club said today he
was confident the ferry matter
i will not be dropped.
"Sooner or later it is going to
lie put in," said Martin today. "It
would have been done last year
but it would not pay expenses.
Just as soon as the financial end
is worked out the ferry will be
established."
Tacoma has not been asked to
take any part in the political
movement on the island to get
a separate county, but nas been
in sympathy with it and was per
fectly willing the people should
have their own county If they de
sired, although citizens here
would be glad to have the islands
as a part of Pierce county.
The Islanders too would prefer
to be connected to Pierce rattier
than King county and If the sep
arate county movement falls they
may yet take up a project to an
nex to fierce county.
TACOMA, WASHINGTON, SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 1913.
GIRL, 15,
SUES FOR
SLANDER
rX)RE\TK I'AKHOXS, I'RKTTY
MISS OP 18, OKCLAHKS I'AH
KXTS OF HKlt SWNin'HKAKT
TOI.l) VIliE STOKIES —
VOI'TH lUSAIM'KAHS.
Florence Parsons, aged 15
years, through her father, Perry
XV. Parsons, prominent Tacoma
restaurant proprietor, has today
maile sensational charges of slan
der in a suit for $r>o,o(M> tiled
against I'Yeniont Campbell, sec
retary of the Itrthel Investment
company, IS. K. Hennatts, a groc
er, ;{(MH North Mttl street, and
Mrs. lien n a Us.
In accusing Campbell and Mr.
and Mrs. Bennatts of circulating
false, vile statements concerning
her, the girl alleges the stories
were toll for the purpose of pre
venting her marriage to Kobert
B, Bennatts, son of the Bennatls.
Robert E. Bennatts, according
to the young girl's complaint, ta
missing, he having flea rrom Ta
coma when a warrant for hiß ar
rest on a-statutory charge was is
sued by the prosecuting attor
ney's office.
Miss Parsons alleges that
Campbell and Mr. and Mrs. Ben
natts published false storfes
about her about February 0,
1912, in which they stated that
she was familiarly intimate witn
certain youag men of this city.
These alleged false stories.
Miss Parsons asserts, have dam
aged her character to the extent
of 130,000.
PROGRESSIVES
ARE BACK
OF WILSON
I.EADIXO INSURGENTS DE
CLAKN THEY WIMj LEND
AMi AID POSSIBLE TO DEM
OCRATS TO SECURE PRO
(JHESSIVE LEGISLATION BE
FORE CONGRESS.
(Uy I'liitert Press Incased Wire.)
WASHINGTON, D. C, Jan. IS.
—Shoulder to shoulder in the
fight for progressive legislation
will march the democrats and the
republican lirogressiveg—the ror
mer "insurgents." Such was the
ptiil hatic declaration today of
loading progressives of the house.
That they will vote as demo
crats to support most of Presi
dent Wilson's policies and alißn
themselves against the stand
patters" on both sides was as
serted.
Telegrams offering support
have been sent to President-elect
Wilson at Trenton, Representa
tive Lafferty of Oregon said to
day. At informal conferences the
republican progressives have
agreed upon a definite program.
<S> <J><S> <J> <S> <S> <$><?><?> <S><B><B> <$> <3> «-'<»
<$> - ?:«
<$> . I SHOULD WORRY. <S>
<& ■■-. i .■ . .-:-' : ♦
<•> E. J. Hostetter and J. <S>
<?> Gilmore are being held, to- <$>
<" day by the police on sub- Q>
•$> picion that they may be the <J>
■■?• men who have participated <S>
■i- in two holdups here during <s>
■*■ the last two nights. They <$>
<$> were arrested by Patrolman V
<•'' Ellingson as they were *"■
<$> entering a vacant house at.. #••
A 2109 A street early this <?>
<$> morning. They could not ,<£
♦ give a good account of <^
<ft themselves. ■ ■ . "V..^
CHICAGO
SUICIDE
(By United Press T.ra«< <I Wire.)
CHICAGO, 111., Jan. 18.—A
well dressed man, believed to be
Joseph Tosney of San Francisco,
shot himself in the right temple
this morning while standing In
the Illinois Central station. He
was taken to a hospital In a dying
condition. He was about 30
years old. In his pockets were
round letters bearing the name
given and the address number 53
Third street, San Francisco, and
a ticket from New York to Port
land, Ore. He carried travelers'
checks amounting to $800.
FRENCH ACTRESS COMING
TO COAST "LOVE SCHOOL"
: MMiK. meant BADET.
French Pantoniiinist who Its coming. to the l'a< illc roast to estab
lish her "Life for Eternal lA>ve" school.
PARIS, Jan. 18. —Mile. Regina
Badet today resigned her lofty
md well-paid position as leading
comedienne of the Oomedie Fran
caia, the leading theater of ail
Frame, aiui told the reporters
that she will sail for America
early in February.
"I am going to California to
establish my school for young
people," she said.
"It will he a school where
there will be no book." and
.no Hunts of the world's face.
There will be no figuring and
110 chemist I')'. I' shall have
pupils -of poor people
and lith people. And they
slinll leurn to sing and to
WOMAN WHO KILLED HER
HUSBAND TO WED AGAIN
(Ity I'niled Press I/oasetl Wire.)
LOS ANGELES, al., Jan. IS.—
Mrs. Albert B. Ford, who ended
an unhappy married life by shoot
ing and killing the husband she
declared was the notorious "Bob"
Ford of the Jesse James gang,
Greeks Win
Naval Battle
(BUliLSfllf)
ATHENS, Jan. 18. —The Greek
fleet attacked the Turkish squad
ron outside the Dardenelles to
day and a sharp engagement,
which, is believed to have resulted
In hpavy losses for the Turks, fol
lowed.
The Turkish squadron witti-
Kli-ew in the face of the heavy
Gr«4k att: I; and returned to the
Dardanelles in great disorder.
The casualties on the Turkisfi
flagship are believed to have been
heavy.
♦ ♦'♦♦♦♦*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦«'♦*♦♦♦♦<&♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•
aftv; ' " ' ■ • - ♦
♦' WHAT THE LEGISLATURE DID YESTERDAY. ?
<$> ' SENATE. <$>
<& ' Bills Introduced for five state highways, " for changes In *
<$>'primary election and registration laws, for women's Indus- >?>
-*> trial school and for preventing discrimination in the sale of €>
<& commodities. ' • <$>
•s>! ■ Senator Collins favors appropriation of from $300,000 to «>
<$■ 1350,000 for Panama-Pacific exposition. ' <!>
» \, HOUSE. «>
<?>. Bills Introduced for increasing legislators' salaries to $10 <-•>
I a day. "-' .;/ -. ■ .■ ■.■ .^ry.*/
4>) To hire experts to redraft bills. <>
<$ To provide for a tour by the ■ legislators of the state In- «>
<*> stltutions. -. - - • vr* :■ : . *
<$> To prevent police officials from "'making false arrests. * «>
«> Providing for a bond issue of $20,000,000 for state high- <»
♦1 ways. *■■ -j -'*-■ ■".' - ' ': '■' ;-. ' ':/;-"/'*r:-"' " '•'.*..
•$> Amending the local option law. ", *. ■ / ' ♦
<$> !\ Heating streetcars. .. ■. .. ; - ♦
$> The direct election of United States senators. ♦
■$>.; Providing for an armory at Everett, - ;tS^
*> ,'Both houses adjourned until Monday. ' r~ ' V; v, !,•■■-*?•'■,♦,
♦ ♦♦♦♦♦«,»•«> ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ •♦ ♦ ♦ ♦.♦ ♦♦♦♦,♦,♦♦♦,♦♦,♦:
dance and to lie happj—.mil
to Jic. »•.'
Mile lladet confessed that her
idea if r.ct entirely original, siio
has been devotedly attending
ehtsses in Eugenics at the Circle
Polyelini- and declares that her
school will be modeled along the
lines now generally accepted as
perfect—by enthusiasts of die
eugenic school who hold for mar
riage on scientific principle!.
The actress is 2fi years old anrt
unmarried. She la very lieaull
f«l and has played leading parts
in the pantomimes for three or
four years. Her monthly salary
at the Cojuedie Franeias was
$1,400, the dirertors said today.
admitted today that she will be
come the bride of Dr. W. Tiusley
of Kansas City,
Mrs. Ford killed her husband
April 11, 1911. Her trial, which
created much interest in Califor
nia, resulted in acquittal.
Garment Strikers
Win a Point
(Uy I iiiii-.l Press I-.-um-.I Win-.)
NEW YORK, Jan. 18. —One
division of the great garment
workers' strike was settled ami
cably today when the manufac
turers and employers committees
of the waist and dressmaking
trade came to an agreement un
der which 25,000 workers will
return to the shops Monday. The
strikers were granted their <Je
mands for general increase in
wages on a sliding scale, better
hours and fire protection.
OSGAR und Adolph have a fierce
mix up today; just a little worse
than usual. You'll find these
two popular old chaps making fun for
thousands on page 2 of the Times today.
HOME EDITION 30 CKNTS A MONTH.
UNDER '3D DEGREE'
NEGRO CONFESSES;
DOW TO PROSECUTE
Prosecuting Attorney Dow mill Deputy Askwn are today pre
paring an information against Attorney J. Matthew Murray, ac
cusing him of intnuluiiiii; iillcgeil perjured testimony in the cv.so
of Tom (looden, a MglQ (haul to in-, freed early llii* week, from a
diarjii- of iittemiited murder.
I>lll-111u. a severe "third degree" examination which consumed
mine Ilian three hours thi- inoriiiiiK, Tom (looden nntl mi .illi ucd
e.\-eouvi<t, 1.. .1. (ioi'tlon, broke completely down mid admitted t«»
Captain at Detectives FttMgttnM and Deputy I'rosecr.lor Askren
Iliat their d" tiiniiiiv liad lioeu a lalirirutimi imented for the sole
purpose of lrcciiif; (Wooden.
In their joint COnfaulotl, it Is
said, they implicated Attorney
Murray by MMrtlng that he p*M
a price for Qordon'i testimony.
The entire invention they itttrib
uted to Murray, it is alleged.
Both Gordon and (Soodcn are
beiiiK held on charges of perjury,
information will lie filed direct
in superior court against ttiem
today.
Accused of Shooting.
Gooden was accused of at
tempting to kill A. Hachtner,
proprietor of a Jewish cafe in
Opera alley, on Christmas morn
ing. In hit! defense he named two
characters whom he now admits
were fictitious. They were Al
Forehead and his wife, Mrs. Alice
Forehead.
Both husband and wife, accord
ing to Gooden's and Gordon's
testimony, figured most i roniin
ently in the alleged shooting ar
fair, Gooden declar' <* on the
stand that it was Foi • i ad who
fired the shots Christi.ms nion.
ing instead of himself.
N'ejcro'is Defense.
Oooden went so far ns to rn
troduce a coat showing whf re one
of the bullets had torn his sleeve,
lie explained that Rachtner was
mistaken in belttvlng he was the
man under fire, and that it was
Gooden himself at whom Fore
head was :■ 11.mi m; Mrs. Forn
jhoad, Gooden said, had engaged
him to drive her to a road house
in his automobile
(■oi'doii, it is snid, admit
ted under culmination today
that Mi' hud perjured himself
for money. It is he who im
plicated Attorney Murray in
the case. Gordon, ai'i'iirdiiiK
to records in the police de
partment, is an cx-c on\ let,
who served a two-year term
for burglary in the New
Westminster prison rerently.
Attorney .Murray himself was
but a short time ago under !n
--dictment for grand larceny. There
were a number of separate
charges, all of which were
quashed by Jn4c* Chapman
throuigh a technicality.
FIERCE
FLOODS
IN EAST
(By Vnited Press Leased Wire.)
EVANSVILI.E, Ind., Jan. 18.—
Houses floating down the Ohio
river; Enterprise, Ind., with a
population of 200, abandoned and
probably swept away; Madison
ville, Webster and Tompkins, all
on the Kentucky side, abandoned,
and urgent calis for relief from
a dozen neighboring towns, make
up the flood situation here today.
That the crest was reached was
indicated by the river stage, sta
tionary now 24 hours at 4C.5
feet. The danger will not be
over for several days, however,
as the effect of almost a week's
steady rain will keep the waier
high for some time.
Fatalities were certainly caused
by last nights high wind, said
experienced river men today.
WELL, THIS IS
REAL SAD
(Uy I'nited Preas Leased Wire.)
DEVONPORT, England, Jan.
18.—Queen Mary's dislike for
Americans is given as the reason
why the naval training ship Cum
berland, with Prince Albert
aboard, will not touch at New
York, or any other American port
on the cruise to the West Indies.
The Cumberland sailed today
with the second son of King
George among the cadets on
board.
Blames Ball
Player For
Lost Love
11
lIIiOSSOM SKKI4KV.
(Ily United Press leased Wire.)'
XKW YOUK, Jan. 18.—
. Joseph, (alien, known <>.■ the
Btajaja us Joseph Kane, was
-i -■'<<« ii divorce from Itlos-
Kotn Keeley today' .'Jtube"
.Murqmird, pitcher of the
New York National league
club, was mimed as the
wife's "affinity." The case
was undefended.
TAKES RAP AT
THE LABOR
BUREAUS
"I am going to try to put every
private employment bureau ia
town out of business," said ( ■■111
--iniHsioner A. I. Mills before the
in-c-lrgtslaUvc institute in tbe Y.
M. Q, A. this iiKiiniiiK, and (ho
audience cheered the Ktateinent.
Mills told how the private bu
reau Is a graft largely, and hit*
both the employer and tbe laborer
disastrously.
Mills said It was abaolutely
wrong that anyone should take
money for furnishing employment
to another.
"When the laborer needs a job
is when he is least able to pay to
get one," said Caleb It. Jenkins.
He thought the legislature should
not and society should take steps
that every man should be given an
opportunity for employment and
then every man should be com
pelled to be employed.
Roth Mills and Mayor Seymour
protested against the state substi
tuting a state for the municipal
free employment bureau.
The institute took up legisla
tion for more appropriations for
the state health board. Dr. 18. W.
Janes leading.
Janes said 83 4 died with pul
monary tuberculosis in Washing
ton last year.
Prof. Seligev, TJ. P. 3., figured
the loss to the state from this
disease alone waa $12,000,000 fe
year. He declared the state could
save $15,000,000 a year by build
ing up the health work and stop
ping preventable disease*.

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