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The Tacoma times. (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, January 23, 1913, Image 1

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TRY SENDING THIS KIND OF- PACKAGE BY PARCEL POST I
BILUE BURKE is as clever as
she is pretty. Every other
day there is a special article
by Miss Billie on the Woman's Page
of the Times—are you reading them?
CHARGE PRISONERS STARVE
HARBORS HELD
BY MONOPOLY
SAYS LEGISLATOR
REPRESENTATIVE HOUSER ASKS FOR COMMITTEE OF FIVE
TO INVESTIGATE All l(.Ill CONTROL OF HAItHOIt AREA
BY CORPORATIONS IN SEVERAL CITIES OF THE NORTH
WEST— LEOISLATOR'S BILL AIMS TO KILL MONOPOLY.
By Abe Hurwitz.
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
OLYMPIA, Jan. 23.—Directly
charging what is known as the
McGraw hari>or commission of
1893 v iili having been created for
the purpose of stealing Seattle's
waterfront from the ownership of
the state, and with the consum
mation of the theft, with the ex
istence of a waterfront monopoly
in the state which has unlawfully
mulcted the people of the state
through the Seattle port alone of
9000,000 in the year of 1012,
hhil proportionate amounts in oth
er years, Kepresentative Paul IV.
Houser of King, city attorney of
Kenton, caused the greatest sen
sation of the present session
Wednesday, when he asked for a
committee of five to investigate
Ilia charges.
F.ep. Sims, republican floor
leader, moved his resolution be
printed, and after several speech
es, including a lengthy but - elo
quent argument by Houser
against delay and for immediate
action, the house voted, on a mo
tion by Zednick of King to make
Houser's resolution a special or
der of business at 2:15 today.
Houser reviewed at some de
tail the establishing of the Harbor
lines In Seattle. He told of the
first commission, the Semple com
mission, which reserved all of
Railroad avenue in the reserved
harbor area, which the state, ac
cording to the constitution, was
not permitted to sell. He then
charged that after the courts had
decided with this commission,
MAYOR VERY EXCLUSIVE
<?'«><s> <$><$><?> '<$>■$<$> <$><$><§• •*><§><«> <$><$><?>
HE SNUBS DOCTOR COOK
Mayor Seymour this morning
snubbed Dr. Cook and refused to
sit at the same table with him.
The mayor received an invita
tion to meet Dr. Cook and take
dinner with him at a little ban
quet given for Dr. Cook at the
Commercial club.
Seymour emphatically declined.
"I don't believe in him and
don't want to meet him," said the
mayor. "I am not an expert, but
I am with Dr. Cook just like I am
with the Green river microbes. I
Tree Falls
Over House;
Two Killed
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
WHEELER, Ore., Jan. 23.—L.
M. Dudrey, a trackwalker, and T
Monett, a Japanese, employed toy
the Pacific Railroad & Navigation
company, are dead, and three
others seriously injured as the re
sult of a tree falling across the
house in which they were sleep
ing.
IJV ROBEUT MANSFIELD.
For the past few days, Com
rade Ned Linvllle has been
hearing things; a stray note
of the flfe, or the sharp rat-a
-tp.t-tat of the drum; more
often, the shrill wail of shrap
nel, or the deep boom of can
nonading, off behind the hills
somewhere.
Ned said nothing of these
sounds to his bent and gnarled
comrades who, too, wore the
Union blue, for he wasn't
quite sure.
"Pshaw," he whispered to
himself as he crept into his
narrow cot Tuesday night, "I
the special interests controlled
the second commission appointed
by Gov. McGraw and succeeded in
changing the harbor lines, so as
to leave Railroad avenue free to
purchase. He charged the North
ern Pacific, Great Northern, the
Yesler estate and one or two oth
ers with controlling the whole wa
terfront of Seattle, and that simi
lar conditions existed in other
cities. That all this property be
longs to the state, Houser con
tended, has practically been de
cided by a supreme court deci
sion to the effect that when once
a harbor line is established it can
not be amended except by a con
stitutional amendment, and that
therefore the McGraw commis
sions' action was null and void.
"I suppose this McGraw com
mission," said Houser, "did not
think the railroads and their
dock subsidiary companies needed
any more thau Railroad avenue,
or they would have extended the
unreserved area to the present
deep water line, where the docks
now extend." He then traced the
growth of business which necessi
tated the lengthening of docks
and how the legislature of 1803
l*ermitted the rest of the reserved
area to be leased to the abutting
owners, the waterfront monopoly.
These leases. Houser said, paid a
rental of only one per cent of the
appraised value of that day. To
day, the Northern Pacific pays the
state for four docks approximate
ly $100 per year, Houser cited as
an instance. The Coleman dock
pays $79.
will leave it to the experts, and
they say that Dr. Cook is a monu
mental fakir. 1 think he is mak
ing this great attack on Ashton
and his whole game is one of ad
vertising for the vaudeville
house."
TORONTO HAS
SOME BUILDING
(By United Press leased Wire.)
TORONTO, Jan. 23. —Toronto
is to have a 21-story building,
Canada's highest. The skyscrap
uer is to cost J2,500,000, land
and building. It will nave a
frontage of 11.2 feet.
«><S><B><S><S>3><S.<B><S><ai><j.<i><S><3><s>S>
■§> : <?>
<$> SALEM, Ore., Jan. 23.— 9
<S> Setting a precedent, Mrs. <?>
•$► Blanche Ford Pickering, <$>
<$> pastor of the Friends church : <?•
<8> of Salem, offered, prayer at 4>
♦ the opening of the senate ■$>
<S> session today. ®
<$> -. -.„'-;■,:,-•; ■■-■ ,;U::. y , <$>
»»<l><»<»*>t>-»^><» <S> <S> <J> <f> <»» <».
COMRADE NED UNVILLE OF THE UNION TROOPS IS MUSTERED OUT
mustn't be a-thinking I hear
the old Bounds —it ain't nat
ural that I should. I must be
dreaming, or—or"
He didn't finish what he
thought; .somehow he felt that
the less he thought of WHY
he heard the fife and rattle of
musketry, the better. But he
did enjoy hearing the old
sounds—no doubt of that.
When taps sounded Tuesday
night, Comrade Ned closed his
eyes to welcome Sleep, the
sweet angel that brings peace
to all —sometimes.
Suddenly, he awoke.
He was no longer in the
long, dim dormitory of the
TheTacoma Times
VOL. X. NO. 29.
30c A MONTH.
FRIEDMANN
GIVES CURE
TO WORLD
FEARING DANGER OF LOSING
CREDIT FOR GREAT DIS
COVERY, DECLARES HE
WILL FORMALLY MAKE
CURE PUBLIC TO THE
WORLD.
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
BERLIN, Jan. 23. —Spurred to
action by piracy of his tuberculo
sis cure by German savants who
are investigating it, Dr. Frederick
Franz Friedman announced here
today he will formally submit
some of his turtle serum culture
to government experts for tests.
Friedmann has consented to
public use of his cure as a re
sult of his belief that he is in im
minent danger of losing all credit
for the discovery. Dr. Piorshow
ski, a bacteriologist who formerly
worked with Friedmann, tonight
gave a bottle of what he says Is
Friedmann's serum lo Dr. Held of
Pittsburg, Pa., and two bottles to
H. Prescott Simpson of Cleve
land, 0., to be taken to the United
States for use there.
MUST HAVE
EVIDENCE NOW
(By United Ih-ess I/eased Wire.)
SALEM, Ore., Jan. 23.—The
death penalty could T>e imposed
on persons convicted of murder
in the first degree only'if con
viction is secured through direct
evidence, or if they confessed in
open court, by a bill presented by
Representative Gill in the house.
STREET CAR CO.
MAKES OFFER
Now the street railway company
wants to put something in that
open space at the intersection of
Ninth, C and St. Helens. Vari
ous schemes for monuments have
been suggested for this space but
all have been frowned on by the
city. The street railway company,
however, proposed to put a raised
concrete platforn there for street
car passengers to use getting on
Sixth avenue cars.
GIVES RICHES IN
JUST 1 SENTENCE
(By United Press T-enseil Wire.)
SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 23.—
Consisting of but a sentence, the
will of William B. Bradbury, be
queathing an estate valued at
more than a millipn to his wife,
is on file here Aoday.
BERLIN, Jan. 23.—Revolt of
the Turkish army if Adriauople is
ceded to the Balkan allies is pre
dicted here today by a high Ger
man army officials. The official
declared he had received a letter
from Enver Bey, a Turkish officer
before Tchatalja, asserting that
the Turkish officers have organ
ized and will never allow the porte
to accept the peace terms offered
in London.
Soldiers' Home in Orting; he
was somewhere, away off.
It was Springtime. Com
rade Ned no longer felt the
misery of rheumattz in his
legs; his hands no longer
twitched with helpless palsy,
and his eye no longer clouded
with age and hopeless wait
ing.
Comrade Ned was young.
He was in the ranks once
more with the old 12th Mas
sachusetts. Down the long
dusty road, he and his com
rades, tall, Uthe, brave fel
lows all, were marching to the
lively tune of "Yankee Doo
dle."
THE ONLY INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER IN TACOMA
TACOMA, WASHINGTON, THUHSDAY, JANUARY 23, 1913.
Miller's Defense Is
Dramatic Attack On
Police Third Degree
♦ Court room sketch by Times' artist during trial of Peter
♦ Miller on burglary charge before, Judge Clifford. Miller is ■
♦ faring a jury for the third time, his two former convictions
<*> having been reversed by the supreme court.
«>«><S>«'<J><S>^<B.^<j><S > <B >^^><>#^>«>< j >^<B)( j,^, < j ><><s><><)^<s><> ,
Without stint or objection on
the part of the state's attorneys,
the testimony of Willis Taylor as
to the method in which his sup
posed confession was forced from
him by Captain of Detective^
Tennant of Seattle is today going
to the jury in the Peter Miller
alleged burglary prosecution here.
By his ruling today that all
testimony tending to show thai
'third degree" methods were
used by the Seattle authorities
to force the boy to make incrim
inating statements against him
self and Miller, will be admitted
as evidence in the present trial,'
Judge Chapman has sanctioned
the firing of the defense's most
damaging guns.
Attorney Glasgow's question
leading to the expose of the al
leged inquisition through which
Taylor was put at the hands of
Captain Tennant called forth R
bitter objection on the part of
the state.
Taylor admitted that he had
deliberately perjured himself by
testifying that he had made his
confession to Tennant freely and
willingly, but that he had told
nearly half a score of otner per
sons exactly the opposite.
Taylor said that he was" ,
imprisoned in the Seattle
city jail for 51 weeks with
out a trial.
In Mark Hole.
He swore that he was confined
for a period In the "black hole".
In the Seattle jail, and that h«
was taken before Tennant, where
Miller was forced to ask him to
The starry flag waved In tne
warm southern sunlight, and
beckoned them on—on to
where they'd find flght a-plenty
—and victory.
A startled thrush flew up
from the roadside thicket, ana
Comrade Ned laughed. He
didn't know what lay before,
and he didn't care.
For he and his comrades in
the Union blue were but boys
who were called from school,
to shoulder the heavy musket
and march away to light for
liberty and country.
Then the tune of the tiana
ahead changed.
The band, which had been
relate the entire story of the al
leged burglaries in that city.
On direct examination by At
torney Kills for tlie sia;e, Taylor
related the story of the robbery
of the Fisher home in Seattle.
He said he climbed tnrougn a
window after Miller had smasnec
the lock and that he had admit
ted the accused man tnrougn one
of the rear doors.
A small memorandum book ne
identified as that in which names
and addresses of persons living
in Seattle were kept with a view
to burglarizing their Tiomes.
Some of the things the defense
will attempt to prove oy Taylor
were laid bare by Attorney Glas
gow this morning in arguing that
the boy's testimony regarding the
"third degree" mlgnt go to the
jury.
The defense will attempt to
prove by Taylor that he was held
in custody for nearly a year with
out a criminal charge being
placed against him; tTiat he was
denied the opportunity of con
sulting with an attorney; that
he was not informed by the court
in former hearings that the law
allowed him an attorney; that he
was compelled to lie and swear
falsely under duress and by com
pulsion that he was in the
"Mack hole" only two days when
bit actual confinement there was
a week; and that he is during the
present trial still under duress
and in fear of threats made by
Captain Tennant.
Taylor appeared Immaculately
dreesed. He is barely more than
tfce Attleboro Silver Cornet
band back home, was now tne
12th Mass. Keg. drum corps.
And it struck up the lively lilt
of "The Girl I Left Behind Me,"
apd Comrade Ned's steps quick
ened to the rythm of fife and
drum.
Ah, 'twas great to be a sol
dier.
Then a fleet v cloud passed
over, and Comrade Ned was
coming home again.
No longer was his cap and
coat so jaunty; be was dog
tired.
Four years of death, and
disaster, and marching and
HOME EDITION
20 years old. He held the wit
ness stand the entire morning.
Miller himself cross questioned
one witness Wednesduy ufter
noon, Tlioiiius I>. l'afte, former at
torney, ««s on the stand, and
Miller .mil he bundled hot words
while the court was repeatedly
forced to enll both men back to
the real issue.
After Miller had asked Page's
nationality and the witness had
replied that he is an Indian. Miller
asked, as he bitterly added, "and
you believe In an Indian's re
venge," "What do you think of
the defendant?"
"Meaning yourself?" retorted
Page.
"Yes, sir," said Miller, nettled.
"Then, sir, I will say that I
know you to be a thief and a
murderer," fairly shouted the
witness. "You exposed all your
skillful work to me—told me you
watched the newspapers constant
ly, that you studied your business
carefully, and that that business
was burglary. You said you
studied people and that you
could tell where a man hid his
money by his nationality. You
said you were a burglar—and
you told me yourself that you
killed McMahon."
Miller leaped to his feet and
stood close to the witness, hiss
ing words of wrath. He Is a
powerfully built man; almost a
giant, and his eye is cold gray
and glittering. Page moved un
easily in his chair, trying to
smile and when the court could
make his voice heard he shouted
to Miller, "Stand back there!"
SALEM, Ore., Jan. 23.—A bill
today introduced in the house t>y
Representative Wenterlund pro
videa that all animals to be
slaughtered for sale as food
must first be inspected.
starving had passed.
The fife and drum came back
playing "Yankee Doodle"
though, and the whole town
turned out to welcome home
the boys—that pitiful frag
ment of the gallant Twelfth.
A lot were left sleeping in
unmarked graves under the
southern cross; a lot of them
had gone—no one knew where.
Comrade Ned was home
again—and he doffed the
Union blue, and tried to for
get the scream of shrapnel, tne
deep, ominous roar of cannon,
the howling of the mortar
bombs—and all the rest of it
• • • •
EVERY sane, intelligent word of
praise for Tacoma sent to any
corner of the country is an in
terest-bearing deposit for YOU. Ta
coma is a good place to work and
live in.
BRUTAL NEGLECT OF
COUNTY JAIL INMATES
ADMITTED BY SHERIFF
Ninety prisoners in the Pierce county jail arc near t«» starva
tion today because County Commissioner Heed hasn't (jot the time
or inclination to Me that they linve fit food, so Sheriff Jamicson
declares.
Word lias gone up from the sheriff to the board of county
commissioners that OO county prisoners are suffering from the
want of in.1.1.
Ninety men will tonight be served a supper consisting of a
minutely small piece of meat, a slice of bread and v cup of tea.
This will be their second meal today.
Sheriff .lamieson has warned
the county commissioners that he
will take the matter into his own
hands unless they take immediate
action to alleviate the suffering.
"They are trying to feed these
men for seven cents a day," de
clared .lamieson. "Men can't
live on that amount and while
are my prisoners I'm not
going to stand for it."
For supper tonight the county
cook is preparing 30 pounds of
meat; two-thirds of which is bone
and gristle. Were this all meat
each prisoner would receive but
one-third of a pound. Their al
lowance Is half a pound of meat
per day.
"We have notified Commis
sioner Reed, who lias the feeding
of prisoners In his hands, of these
conditions before," said .laniicson,
"but he lias done nothing.
"It is one flight of stairs from
his office to our's, yet he wrote
us a letter to our last complaint.
We have asked him to come down
here and see what the conditions
are hut he hasn't done it. And
now we're going to see that this
thing is run right ourselves."
Who Wants To
Be Inspector?
(United Press Leased Wire.)
RIVERSIDE, N. .1., Jan.
2f!. — lJccause Mary Szabe
lick was discovered with ten
pairs of hose on when she
quit work recently, and the
firm has lost $20,000 in silk
stockings to date, the 1,600
women and girls employed in
the Taubel Hosiery Mills here
are today ordered to display
their ankles when they leave
each day.
K. It. MAX SHOT
SAN BKRNARDINO, Cal., Jan.
23.—Fred Hellmar, a Santa Fe
section foreman, is seriously
wounded today, while the railroad
police, aided by a dozen deputy
sheriffs, are investigating the
third shooting within five days on
the Santa Fe's mountain division.
This Brought
Him To, O.K.
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
PORTLAND, Ore.. Jan. 23.—
Feigning unconsciousness for 24
hours, during which time he sus
tained pin pricks, tickling and
twisting of muscles without
flinching, John Gorman, a city
prisoner, let out a lusty yell when
the city physician prepared to
open his head to see what was the
matter with him.
A sleeper stirred uneasily
somewhere down the long row
of little cots, and Comrade Ned
Llnvllle awoke.
Awoke, astonished to Una
himself a battered, old husk,
laid aside by his country's
charity to wait til! the Great
Commander summoned him to
Headquarters.
There seemed to be a light
off to the left.
Comrade Ned arose—it was
* o'clock In the morning—and
donned his proud blue coat.
He grasped a heavy army re
volver, where he got it nobody
knows—and passed into an
other room
WHAT IHOD SAYS
Commissioner Reed this
afternoon gave out the state
ment that the county prison
ers were being better fed to
day than under former super
vision and that the present
rules would continue.
"If .lamiebon chooses to
take this attitude lv the mat
ter, he may go as far as he
likes, so far as he has the
power," said Iteed. "The
commissioners are handling
the feeding of prisoners,
however."
NO BUDGET;
NO LIGHTS
THEY SAY
>.MMISSIO\i;i{S INSIST THAT
OOMMIBRIONBH LAWSON
PRODUCE HIS 1918 111 IHJKT
BEFORK GRANTING PETI
TIONS FOU STKKKT JMGHTS.
No more street lights are to b«
granted by the city council until
Commissioner Lawson brings in
his budget'for the year, showing
what the revenues are likely to
be in the light department, what
the estimated light extensions are
and What the state of rinances will
be in the department.
Lawson submitted a Mr bundle
of light applications this morning.
He recommended about $1,700
worth and denied a large num
ber. Freeland suggested that be
fore the eovnctl goes to spending
any more money it ought to know
what the year's work is to be, ha
rest of the commissioners con
curred and Lawsou was told to
bring In his budget.
Joseph Kemp and H. G. Scott,
however, were voted lights by the
council. They asked for six lights
on Alaska street. Lawson had
denied them.
Kemp and Scott said they had
been promised them by Commis
sioner McGregor four yeare ago.
For Tacoma and vi-
cinity: Rain tonight
and ■Friday.
For Washington:
Rain west, rain or
snow east portion to
night and Friday.
There they found him Wed
nesday morning.
There was a smile on his
withered lips, and his faded old
eyes were closed forever.
He had grown tired or wait
ing In the ranks—and at last,
was Mustered Out.
At the State Soldiers' Home
in Orting today they are Hav
ing a military funeral.
Old Glory will enshroud tho
sleeping soldier, and his com
rades will fire the volley over
the grave.
And Comrade Ned Llnvttlo.
12th Mass. Keg. of the Union
troops will Join the Great Ma
jority.

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