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The Tacoma times. (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, February 06, 1913, Image 1

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See the fans—they wear a grin;
And there is a reason.
Tiger players are arrivin'
For the baseball season.
THE STORY OF LITTLE BILL—AND THE SEQUEL
tnY IIOBKUT MANSKIKLI*.
'•- This Is the unpleasant ntory of l.iltlc Bill; it tells how little
Hill h.ip|M n.-cl to be on this queer old planet and — all in all—
Jit's a story I don't like to write. . ."
--%•%• Hut there is a big throbbing reason why it must be written, so
(here goes:
$vi? ~ ' ' - * ' i ■ »■« ■■■■ ■"".
Jfi»* It begnn when The Girl met one of those strange young men who
Didn't Care. ...
♦TBC The Girl was pretty but weak; she loved fine clotlies and she
held finery above nil else because she had never had any. The Girl
]had always been |>oor. ' .>.-'.■>
s,** The Girl was pretty but weak; and when the young man who
-Didn't Cnre came along, she fell quickly and fully.
$$.->- Then tame a month or two of pretty clothes, a cheap bit of
'Jewelry or so, a lot of dances and theaters and so on.
jjys" The Girl was having her good time and paying in the currency
WILL CITY OWN STREET CARS?
EDITOR IS DRAGGED
FROM BED TO JAIL
ON A COURT ORDER
(Ry I'm i.-i I Preßs Loaswl Wire.)
I'HIbADKLPHIA, Feb. «.—
Arre«te«l for criminal libel, Mar
len K. Pew, cilitor of the newly
fhlllfcrd Philadelphia News
-I'ost, was taken from his lied at
• midnight here as a climax to a
I crusade ugainst alleged crooked
police court judKes, and this niom
lii-; ate breakfast in a cell in the
■ auhiirh of Kensington.
■ Pew was arrested on a warrant
-Issued by Magistrate William
Campbell c^ application of for
\;rner Assistant £!«trlct Att—ney
William Gray, acting i.. -■- of
/magistrate James Carey, \.no has
«l)een bitterly attacked by the
liNews-Poßt as a grafter and a men
»< <■ to the decent element of the
ilcity.
®i£ Alleges l.ilx I
<H| Carey alleges that Pew libelled
9|m by printing n confession by
||j," Alexander BoyJ that Carey
"^bribed him to flx juries trying
ifdatnage suits asuinst trie Phlladel-
I phla Rapid Transit company.
||Boyd confessed to Assistant Di-j
rector of Public Safety Murphy
if'who demanded that District At-
Iftorney Roten act. Roten declar
ed that prosecution could not lie
: as it was barred by the statute of
I* limitations.
3 At the time of his arrest last
I night Pew was already under bail
I of $500 on anotner libel charge
fby Carey. • Today Magistrate
I Campbell announced that $G,OOO
.' ball would be require*! under tiie
1 new warrant. "
Carey Barked by (ians.
"The whole political gang Is
behind Carey," said Pew today,
"Imt they cannot gag my paper.
1 will print the truth about them.
The honest people of Philadelphia
are strongly supporting me."
IVw lleleasea.
Pew was released on $6,000
bail at 11 o'clock, Justice Camp
Not a Rj: t
--Just Junger
For E *i-Hur
Did you think that Charley Me
■tee was inciting a rtot at the T» ■
Fcoma theater this morning?
Well, it wasn't a riot or fuss
"of any kind.
Simply several hundred people
I very anxious to buy seats for me
;.- return of "Ben Hur," the big
show that comes to the Tacoma
for the third time next Monday
and Tuesday.
The line of waiting ticket seek
ers formed early this morning
and those who would see the spec
tacular production must nurry
now.
CAPITALIST DIES
LONDON, Feb. 6. —Bradley
Martin, 72, New York and London
capitalist, died at ills home at
Mayfalr, West London, yesterday.
Police Record
Rex Rertfro was arrested today
In North Yakima charged by
Mrs. Hoffmap of 414 East 26th
St., with passing three bad checks.
Renfro oame here recently from
Tennessee and took quarters at
Hoffman home. When he
| paid his board bill he gave Mrs.
'Hoffman the checks. He will be
brought to Tacoma at once.
Detectives Thompson and Mc-
Kay arrested Ed Burns early this
charged with vagrancy.
kHe was trying to sell a watch and
■t razor and his explanation did
not please the officers.
Sam Andrews reported to the
'police that boys had taken a gal
lon of eherbert that he had
planned on entertaining his
friends with. Officer Jurlscli is
investigating.
TheTacoma Times
bell setting the hearing for 4
o'clock this afternoon.
Pew announced today that he »»
just beginning to fight ana even
if he Is arrested a hundred times
will continue to print conditions
just as he finds triem.
The Philadelphia liar associa
tion will hold a special meeting
Monday afternoon to decide
whether to Institute Impeachment
proceedings against Justice Carey.
The Boyd confession and other al
legations against Carey will be
presented At the hearing.
Laura---She
Wants to Be
Real Doctor
LAUItA IIIIMI l< ii.
Manager Richards of the Prin
cess theater has triumphed, but it
was a close call.
And this Is no stodgy press
agent tale, at that.
Miss Laura Hiemlich, the pretty
demure young woman who acts In
the stock company at the Princess,
wanted to quit; she wrote out
her notice, too.
Didn't hanker for higher wage;
wasn't mad with Miss Bell or any
thing like that —but she wanted
to quit to study to be a doctor!
Think of dainty, winsome Laura
coming In to cut out your ap
pendix or pump you full of
drugs!
Manager Richards has persuad
ed her that the M. D. business Is
nix—but it was a close call.
CURE COMES
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
NEW YORK, Feb. 6.—Bring
ing with him the first Prledmann
turtle serum ever brought to tne
United Stat<v, Dr. Austin Held of
Pittsburg arlved here today. He
brought only enough to ireai one
patient in Pittsburg and at once
started for that city.
Dr. Milton Footer of the Ellis
island health service questioned
Dr. Held as to the efficacy of the
Friedinnnn cure. The Pittsburg
physician said he had no doubt
It was an absolute remedy for
tuberculosis.
TRIAL SLOW.
BELLINGHAM, Peb. 6. —The
greater part of the morning was
occupied in instructing the Jury
by Superior Judge Hardln in the
case of the four Seattle bankers
charged with conspiring in the
reception of deposits t>y the de
funct LaConner bank, Knowing it
to be insolvent. Court did not
convene until 10:25 owing to the
inability of the court stenograph
ers to get f?*> instructions out De
fore that time.
VOL. X. NO. 41.
30c A MONTH.
tlmt woman haw given since time began.
Then The Girl's pretty fuce grew strange with that strangeness
of motherhood, and the young man who Didn't Care went away.
He never cume hack.
The Girl paid the price.
And Hi, n cume Little Hill.
A friendly landlady took care of The Girl, who began to be
pretty again, and finally The Girl got 11 job in another town.
For .. few weeks she sent two dollars a week to the friendly
landlady for Little Hill's support, then she too went away.
And she never came back.
The friendly landlady got tired of looking after Little Bill and
she turned him over to some institution or other.
Anil after awhile the institution wont out of business, or it got
overclouded or something, ami Little Kill, now quite v sizeable little
• ■Imp, was farmed out u^ain.
The institution forgot about him by-and-by, and the people who
FOUR CITIES
WILL FIGHT
MONOPOLY
SPOKAXK, SKATTLK, PORT
LAND AM) TACOMA TO DIS
ODW KtAin FOX (JKXKRAL.
POLICY TO UK VOLLOWH)
IN DKAIJNG WITH dklij
PIIONK SYSTEM—MKKTING
IN SEATTLK.
In agree on a general policy
to niainttiiii in their dealings with
the I.i II telephone monopoly, four
of the largest cities in the Xortii
west through their representa
tives have arranged for n meeting
in Seattle next week to arrange
plans for the future.
Hepresentatives from Spokane,
Seattle, Portland and Tacoma will
be present at the meeting, accord
ing to the announcement ot May
or Seymour today.
It may be a great Northwest
scheme of municipal ownership
will be devised with me automatic
telephone to lie used. Sam Hill,
the great independent telephone
man of I'ortland, will be there
_and the whole telephone situation
will be gone into.
The Commercial club here Is
getting into the game. Today
the council got a letter from the
club asking that no franchise be
granted until careful investiga
tion is made as to rates and ad
vantages given to other coast
cities. The club expressed a de
sire to co-operate in investigating
the matter.
Protest Meeting
Edgcwood, Wash.,
■ i . . February 5, 1013.
The Editor of the Times, Ta
roma, Washington:
We, the Edgewood Grange,
No. ii««, in meeting assem
bled do hereby most empha
tically protest against the
present raise in rates on
the Taroma and Seattle In
terui'ban.
I| 'le proposed rates go
'"1 V ' c'(e '( if "'" mean the
col '.c«tlon of a great num
l>e* •.'homes in this vicinity.
Jit ' t hereby, go on record
tfi ill in our power to up-
V/ . the public service coni
-3 lion's decision regarding
' .l.»d raise in rates.
I>. K. M'I'HEKSON,
MABEL L. ANI>EII.SON-,
Committee.
STRUCK BY AUTO
As a result of being struck by
a Bouthbound Point Defiance car
at North 45th and Ferdinand
streets last nißht, W. H. Crowe,
315 North Yakima avenue, sus
tained a broken leg and otner In
juries. He was taken to St. Jos
eph's hospital unconscious and
unable to tell how the accident
occurred.
WIVES AT FIVE
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
CALCUTTA, Feb. 6.—The lat
est census report classifies 302,
--425 Indian girls under five years
of age as wives, and 47,703 as
widows.
MRS. TAPT I I \ ■>■•:■{
OP FASHION
(United Press leased Wire.)
WASHINGTON, D. C, Feb
j 6.—Mrs. William Howard
Taft, wife of the president,
today has popularized the
"One Step 1' by dancing this
old faßhioned waltz at the
Army and Navy reception at
the White House with Lieut.
Commander Timmons. naval
aide on the president's staff.
This menus that the one
step hereafter will be the
"regular dance."
THE ONLY INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER IN TACOMA
TACOMA, WASHINGTON, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1913.
RICH GIRL WEDS CHOICE
♦ $>■'» <8> <§> ® <$><><?> #■$>■$> 3>3>3> ♦ ♦ •
FAMILY GIVES UP FIGHT
ROCKAWAY, N. J., Feb. 0, —jj
Victorious over the bitter opposl-|i
tion of all members of her ram-,
ily, Miss Helen Stickle, daughter
of the late Byron T. Stickle, has
married the man of her choice, a
former coachman for the family.
The bride's fortune Is estimated
CITY PAYS UP
$85,839 IN
SALARIES
The payroll for January was
$85,5:;9, according to the ordi
nance passed today to pay off the
city employes. Commissioner
Freeland explained this was not
as bad as it looks as .< 1 1,11110 of
this is for Green river construc
tion and he said the actual salary
roll of salaried men was only
$4:!,000.
The size of the payroll, how
ever, caused the c.ommlßSloners to
want some excuse bo FreeJand
was asked to get the figures on
the percapity payroll of the mu
nicipalities of Seattle, Spokane,
Portland and other cities where
known extravagance exists to try
to make a good showing for Ta
coma.
BROKE PAROLE
IS CHARGE
Alleged to have broken parole,
R. W. Harton, convicted of
grand larceny in King county,
county, JAie I, 19X2, and sen
tenced to the penitentiary at
Walla Walla for a term of from
six months to 15 years, was ar
rested last night and lodged in
the county jail at Tacoma. He
will probably be taken back to
Walla Walla to serve out his sen
tence. Barton is a plumber by
trade.
THE EASIEST WAY
SEATTLE, Feb. 6.—Despon- I
dent because be had failed to
make good, J. C, Taylor, phar
macist, who left his Home In Dcs
Moines, lowa, two years- ago 10
make his fortune, la dead here
today by his own hand.
MI'MT PAY IM«O TAX
Following the decision of Judge
Chapman that the city ordinance
requiring payment of an annual
tax of $100 by dealers using
trading stamps and other prize
coupon schemes Is legal. McCor
mack Mros. have paid the tax re
lulred.
kept the bahy farm cast Little Hill into the world.
Anil where do you supiHwe they sent him?
Mule Hill is one of fourteen little kids that are being cared for
by Tacoiim'B HIGGIOST institution—The Woolsey Home. There are
other youngsters out there wlio have even sorrier stories than Little
Hill.
When ".Mother" Woolsey takes some little waif in out of the
cold, she doesn't make investigations to know if the waif is worthy;
she doesn't bar a child because it had misfortune in selecting its
parents.
Itace, color and creed are waived. The Woolsey home is the
best thing we've got in Taeoma, and it is nearer ruin'than anything
we Taroinu people know about.
The Woolsey home is up against It; Mrs. Woolsey needs money
to keep her home going and she needs the money hndly.
The Times knows that The Woolsey Home is doing v noble
work; it is a churity that is charity without fuss and tomfoolery.
MRS. HE&BN SHEAR.
at $I^o,ooo, which she inherited
without any restrictions, tliougn
her lather had fought until his
death against her determination
*o marry th© coaenman. The
bridegroom is John Spear, wliose
name was John Pendino when ne
arrived from Italy.
NO FORMAL
I OPENING
The best laid plans of mice and
men ■ = . ■ ■
Laugh over this. ■
It was intended to open the
new 11 th street bridge with all
kinds of formal doings next Sat
urday afternoon.
T. H. Martin of the Commer
cial cluli mapped it all out today
with the city council.
Oov. Lister was to head . the
grand parade and there were to
be motion pictures made.
Hut somebody forgot to tell the
bridgekeeper about it, and the
bridge was opened, and all kinds
of traffic went over.
- So, under the circumstances, we
will have no formal opening.
<J><S>,<J><J><S><S>^<s><i<^<$ ><?;><S><s><i'<$ >
<5> U *
<f> , CAWj THK I»OOTOR. <S>
•$> I . — <!>
<*> iiiii-il Press l.cused Wire.) <••
<» 3 NEW YORK, Feb. C. — <$>
<$ The stock market opened lr- <5>
<S> regular today. . <$>
* j : •, <t>
<&<?>>»>'s>'s><s> <5> <J~ <$> <S> 4y ■§> <$> <S> •$■ <9
i ENTOMB MINERS
(By United Vresk I/oom-cI Wire.J
TOKIO, Feb. 6.—An explosion
of gas occurred In the Fukuoka
colliery today, entombing * 150
miners. It is 4 feared a number ,
of workers met Instant death. .
; ; For Taeoma and vi
cinity :* 'Fair' tonight■
and Friday, colder
/tonight.l -. *: -.
For Washington:
* Fair toniglit and Fri
: day, colder; tonight;'
I cold- wave east por
£-tion with ■ zero ■; tcin
\ peratures continued i
-cold for several days; |
HOME EDITION
BRIDGE OPEN FOR SYSTEM
MONOPOLY IS AFTER !T NOW
Are the people of Tacoma ready to seriously go after a municipal street
car system?
With the completion of the 11th street bridge the tideflats section, al
ready important in manufacturing interests, is open and there must be a tide
flats street car system.
Will Tacoma give the right of entry to this section over the new bridge to
the Stone-Webster interests, or will the people undertake to carry on that
work?
San Francisco has tried the municipal street car plan and it is paying
heavy profits and the service is better than the traction companies afford.
Does Tacoma want the city-owned street cars?
The evident intention of the city to see that street railway facilities are
extended to the tideflats has stirred the street railway company. Judge
Nhackleford recently suggested that the company would be willing to assume
the role of public benefactor to the extent of putting a line to the flats if the
city gives a desirable franchise. Commissioner Woods said today Manager
Bean was willing to build and that the company would be before the council
next Monday to confer over a franchise.
The question now is shall the company be allowed to put in the line or
shall the city utilize this opportunity for driving the entering wedge for
municipal ownership of all lines in the city?
Commissioner Lawson suggests that instead of simply building a sfs}. r),000
line across to the bluff the city put in $250,000 and run the track up the hill
around Brown's Point to Dash Point, thus opening up the east bluff territory.
Judge Stiles said today that the landowners over there would probably
be glad to donate one-fourth of all their land as a subsidy. If they will do this
and assist in selling the bonds necessary to the construction of the road the
city might undertake this enterprise. Mayor Seymour thought some such
plan might be feasible.
COST ABOUT $85,000 FOR LINE.
Citiy Engineer Raleigh estimates it will <-<>st to put in a line and
equip it with cars to operate across the flats.
Shall the city so into it?
A monster petition is now being prepared by WOrkittgmeD in tidoflat
mills asking the city to enforce the construction of a line. They would prefer
the present company to build it so thy would be insured transfers. But it is
possible legislative action might force sn exchange of transfers if the city de
cided to build its own line, Judge Stiles says he doubts whether the legisla
ture could force it but he is not certain.
Seattle has been endeavoring to get a municipal street railway, but has
not been able to market bonds, the electric railway powers in the country ab
solutely forbidding the bond buyers to allow the construction of municipal
lines.
SAN FRANCISCO LINE A SUCCESS
San Francisco has finally gotten around the embargo and put in the first
regular operating line and is making a great hit with it. It is believed the
city might market bonds Tor a tideflat line right in town as the mills and tide
flat owners would undoubtedly sec the securities were purchased if the city
undertakes the project.
It is estimated there are over 5,000 workmen on the tideflats. If
one-half of them rode in a municipal street railway every day at five
cent fare it would mean a daily income of $250. If the city charged only
five cents for a round trip it would be $12") a day even if no transfer agree
ment could be made with the Stone-Webster monopoly, which is noi
probable unless legal compulsion was enforced on the company.
It is believed $100 a day would more than pay all operating expenses
and fixed charges.
MAYOR FAVORS LINE
Mayor Seymour is in favor of building on a small scale at the start, and
as the business grow's and profits come in use them to extend the line. By
this means a general municipal system might in a few years be developed.
"We will not grant any franchise across the bridge to any company," said
Commissioner Woods today. He favors granting a franchise to the company
for tracks on 11th sti-eet beyond the bridge and then charging a royalty on
each car crossing the bridge. A per capita commission on each passenger
would bring the city more revenue, however, it is believed.
If the city gave a franchise east of the bridge and taxed the company
one cent a passenger and 2500 passengers traveled each way daily, the city
would get $50 a day. Considering the cost of the bridge as compared with the
cost of the rest of the line, one cent would be a small part of the fare to go to
the city.
That there will be street car facilities furnished on the tideflats probably
this summer is certain. It is merely a question of who shall do it.
Municipal ownership advocates are determined that the city shall take
up the work and get a hold on the traction business of the city. It has plenty
of power to operate and it is believed it could make a paying proposition of tue
hue.
What do you think about it?
See Helene —she has a smile,
Easter day draws nigh.
Sweet Helene by wish or wile
Easter togs will buy.
There lire no advanced luVjik of Norloiogy or nrientific • Imrily out
tlxrc; Mrs. Woolse} nix<'- a home to boyis and i;i«'N whom nobody
else wants, and wlumi nobody else cures about.
These little waifs ronie from the nluk heu» of our noctety; the
arc outcasts, junt an Little Hill is an outcast.
And we're not :i'iic to let this fine motherly tvoinah see her
home dissolved and tuinttle into ruins now, an- we?
Tin- Woolsey Home needs money to liuy fm-l and food and
clothes and the payments, now loin; overdue, must he paid.
Will you not liel|> ke<-|i a home for Little Kill nnd hin thirteen
companions in The Woolsey Home hy sending v dollar or two out to
Mi>. Woolsey today?
dive I.ml. Itill Hiul the ml of tlum a < liancc!
(The Woolscy Home is lit l.;ns South <i lili street. Money, food
or clothiiiK should be sent direct to Mm. 1,. SI. Woobejr at that ad
dress :unl not The Times.)
THE CITY CAN ACT.

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